FreshRSS

🔒
❌ À propos de FreshRSS
Il y a de nouveaux articles disponibles, cliquez pour rafraîchir la page.
À partir d’avant-hierNAS

QNAP TS-410E : Intel J6412, RAM 8 Go et Dual 2.5GbE

22 août 2022 à 11:00
Par : Fx
QNAP TS 410E 300x225 - QNAP TS-410E : Intel J6412, RAM 8 Go et Dual 2.5GbEQNAP annonce le TS-410E. Il s’agit d’un NAS 4 baies qui ressemble par son format au TS-i410X. En effet, il partage le même design… bien loin de ce que nous avons l’habitude de voir. Cependant, il s’agit bien de produit totalement différent. Découvrons ce nouveau boîtier… QNAP TS-410E Le NAS QNAP TS-410E dispose de 4 emplacements pour les disques. Cependant, ces derniers ne pourront accueillir que des disques durs 2,5 pouces et des SSD. D’ailleurs, ce nouveau modèle est destiné […]

Synology SRM 1.3.1 update 1

24 août 2022 à 23:10
Par : Fx
Synology SRM 131u1 300x225 - Synology SRM 1.3.1 update 1Synology vient de mettre en ligne SRM 1.3.1 update 1. Il s’agit d’une mise à jour importante pour plusieurs raisons. La première, et non des moindres, c’est que SRM 1.3.1 passe en version finale. Précédemment, le système pour les routeurs Synology était en Release Candidate. La seconde, c’est que cette version contient des correctifs importants. Regardons de plus près cette mise à jour… Synology SRM 1.3.1-9346 update 1 SRM 1.3 est tout d’abord arrivé avec le nouveau routeur Synology RT6600ax […]

Samsung 990 Pro SSD – Hardware Information Update!

25 août 2022 à 01:05

The Samsung 990 Pro NVMe SSD FULLY Revealed

For those that have been closely following the world of SSDs in summer 2022, one of the most intriguing leaks of a future product was undoubtedly the reveal on the PCI-SIG pages of a SAMSUNG 990 Pro that was reported to be a PCIe Gen 5 SSD. However, just a week later and now Samsung has put us out of our misery with the official reveal and launch of this new PCIe Gen 4.0 SSD! Now before you say “but wait, the Samsung 980 Pro is PCIe 4 – why should I care about the Samsung 990 Pro?”, it is worth highlighting that this new drive is designed to bolster the existing PCIe4 product family from Samsung and (much like the WD Black SN850X released in July 2022 – Review here) is an upgraded and far superior alternative for 2022, delivering improved speeds and increased power efficiency,  optimized for graphically demanding games and other intensive tasks including 3D rendering, 4K video editing and data analysis. The new Samsung 990 Pro also seemingly benefits from the latest V-NAND and a new proprietary controller, the 990 PRO series offers the highest speed currently available from the PCIe 4.0 interface. The SSD delivers sequential read and write speeds of up to 7,450MB/s and 6,900MB/s, respectively, while 4K random read and write IOPS come in at up to 1.4 Million and 1.5 Million respectively. The result is a 55% improvement in random performance over the 2020 released Samsung 980 PRO (depending on your hardware/storage setup). Samsung claims that the new 990 PRO is particularly well-suited for heavy gaming as well as creative and productivity tasks. Let’s discuss everything we know about this new SSD.

  • SEQUENTIAL READ

    1TB: Up to 7,450 MB/s
    2TB: Up to 7,450 MB/s

  • SEQUENTIAL WRITE

    1TB: Up to 6,900 MB/s
    2TB: Up to 6,900 MB/s

  • RANDOM READ (4KB, QD32)

    1TB: Up to 1,200,000 IOPS
    2TB: Up to 1,400,000 IOPS

  • RANDOM WRITE (4KB, QD32)

    1TB: Up to 1,550,000 IOPS
    2TB: Up to 1,550,000 IOPS

  • RANDOM READ (4KB, QD1)

    1TB: Up to 22,000 IOPS
    2TB: Up to 22,000 IOPS

  • RANDOM WRITE (4KB, QD1)

    1TB: Up to 80,000 IOPS
    2TB: Up to 80,000 IOPS

  • AVERAGE POWER CONSUMPTION
    (SYSTEM LEVEL)3)

    1TB: Average 5.4 W Maximum 7.8 W
    2TB: Average 5.5 W Maximum 8.5 W

  • POWER CONSUMPTION (IDLE)3)

    1TB: Max. 50 mW
    2TB: Max. 55 mW

  • POWER CONSUMPTION (DEVICE SLEEP)

    1TB: Max. 5mW
    2TB: Max. 5mW

  • ALLOWABLE VOLTAGE

    3.3 V ± 5 % Allowable voltage

  • RELIABILITY (MTBF)

    1.5 Million Hours Reliability

  • OPERATING TEMPERATURE

    0 – 70 ℃

  • SHOCK

    1,500 G & 0.5 ms (Half sine)

 

Hardware Specifications of the Samsung 990 Pro SSD

The full hardware specifications that Samsung have provided on the new 990 Pro give you the solid specs, whilst unsurprisingly keeping a little quieter on the proprietary stuff (such as that in-house controller and V-NAND depth/layer count). However, they do highlight that the Samsung 990 Pro will arrive with a new NVMe Controller, as well as running on NVMe 2.0 architecture.  Samsung’s newly designed controller dramatically improves the SSD’s power efficiency by up to 50% compared to the 980 PRO. Alongside this the Samsung 990 PRO employs a nickel coating on the controller and a heat spreader label on the drive for reliable thermal management, something we have seen brands such as Sabrent Rocket 4 Plus and the Viper VP4300 from Patriot employ to great temperature dissipating success. Samsung’s Dynamic Thermal Guard technology further ensures that the drive’s temperature stays in the optimal range.

The Samsung 990 PRO also arrives in a newly designed Heatsink option, that offers an additional layer of thermal control while its RGB lights add more style to the drive. Samsung’s 990 PRO is also an excellent solution for laptop and desktop upgrades as well as for build-your-own PCs, providing a significant performance boost while using less power for increased battery life and thermal management. Right now, the main questions on people’s lips (well – those more versed in SSD tech at least) are:

  • That New Controller! Will this be exclusive to the 980 Pro product line, introduced to new-gen releases and will the older Samsung 980 Pro benefit from it? The answer is almost certainly NO on that last one.
  • That In house 3bit V-NAND – How Many layers?
  • How hot will it get? The Samsung 980 Pro SSD is an excellent drive, even 2 years after its release. But it has always run a little hot and many will wonder if this drive will be the same, better or worse?

And right now, Samsung is being their usual incredibly tight lip self! But below is what we know:

Category Samsung SSD 990 PRO
Interface PCIe Gen 4.0 x4, NVMe 2.0
Form Factor M.2 (2280) Length
Storage Memory Samsung V-NAND 3-bit TLC (Layer Count TBC)
Controller Samsung in-house controller (TBC)
Capacity5 1TB 2TB 4TB (2023)
$179 $309 TBC
DRAM 1GB LPDDR4 2GB LPDDR4 4GB LPDDR4
Sequential Read/Write Speed Up to 7,450 MB/s, Up to 6,900 MB/s
Random Read/Write Speed (QD32) Up to 1,400K IOPS, Up to 1,550K IOPS
Data Encryption AES 256-bit Full Disk Encryption, TCG/Opal V2.0,

Encrypted Drive (IEEE1667)

Total Bytes Written 600TB 1200TB 2400TB
DWPD 0.3 0.3 0.3
Warranty 5 Year Limited Warranty

Interestingly, the new and improved Samsung 990 Pro still maintains the same durability rating as its predecessor the 980 Pro. Now, although a decent amount of the peak 7,450/6900MB/s seq performance and 1.4/1.5M IOPS comes from that new secret SSD controller architecture, there must be improvements in the V-NAND too, so the continued 0.3DWPD rating might have been an area where improvements could have been made, especially when Seagate’s one-year-old Firecuda 530 more than doubles that durability at 0.7DWPD and is comparable in performance.

We CAN make assumptions on that V-NAND though. Around a week ago, there were reports from Samsung that they were expected to release a 236-layer NAND flash product within this year. In addition, it is planning to open a new R&D center this month and the center will be in charge of developing more advanced NAND flash products. Memory chip makers are competing to increase their layer counts. SK Hynix recently completed the development of a 238-layer product and Micron Technology announced that it developed the world’s first 232-layer NAND flash product. Samsung Electronics’ share in the market is 35 percent, the highest in it. Samsung Electronics’ current layer count record is 176. The company is about to increase it by 60 with its production know-how and competitiveness in price and performance. Perhaps these improvements in V-NAND layer count are were we see these further improvements.

 

Why Didn’t Samsung Release a PCIe 5.0 x4 SSD Instead?

It’s a very good question! When the early erroneous leaks appeared a little over 10 days ago via PCI-SIG that this drive was being listed as a PCIe Gen 5 SSD, It made ALOT of sense. Aside from the SSD industry starting to move into the area of commercial PCIe5 SSDs towards the end of 2022, it made sense for Samsung to try to get ahead of everyone else in this new SSD generation after arriving around a year into the PCIe4 generation, a tad sandwiched between a flurry of their competitor’s products. Perhaps Samsung does not have a PCIe 5 Generation Controller ready (outside of enterprise flash developments) leaving that big 3rd party SSD Controller giant Phison with their E26 Controller to start making waves (with several examples from Kingston, Corsair and Gigabyte revealed at everything from CES 2022 to Computex in H1 2022). Right now, if you are looking for a PCIe 5 SSD from Samsung, then the best and closest drive coming is the Samsung PM1743, which is reported to be capable of 14GB/s Sequential read and 2,500K 4K random read IOPS.

When Will the Samsung 990 Pro SSD Be Released?

According to the brand’s own reports/press-releases, the Samsung 990 PRO will be available worldwide starting this October with the manufacturer’s suggested retail prices (MSRP) of $179 for the 1TB model and $309 for the 2TB. A 4TB capacity version will become available in 2023.

 

📧 LET ME KNOW ABOUT NEW POSTS 🔔

Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 1,365 other subscribers


Get an alert every time something gets added to this specific article!


Want to follow specific category? 📧 Subscribe

This description contains links to Amazon. These links will take you to some of the products mentioned in today's content. As an Amazon Associate, I earn from qualifying purchases. Visit the NASCompares Deal Finder to find the best place to buy this device in your region, based on Service, Support and Reputation - Just Search for your NAS Drive in the Box Below

Need Advice on Data Storage from an Expert?

We want to keep the free advice on NASCompares FREE for as long as we can. Since this service started back in Jan '18, We have helped hundreds of users every month solve their storage woes, but we can only continue to do this with your support. So please do choose to buy at Amazon US and Amazon UK on the articles when buying to provide advert revenue support or to donate/support the site below. Finally, for free advice about your setup, just leave a message in the comments below here at NASCompares.com and we will get back to you. Need Help? Where possible (and where appropriate) please provide as much information about your requirements, as then I can arrange the best answer and solution to your needs. Do not worry about your e-mail address being required, it will NOT be used in a mailing list and will NOT be used in any way other than to respond to your enquiry. [contact-form-7]     Terms and Conditions Alternatively, why not ask me on the ASK NASCompares forum, by clicking the button below. This is a community hub that serves as a place that I can answer your question, chew the fat, share new release information and even get corrections posted. I will always get around to answering ALL queries, but as a one-man operation, I cannot promise speed! So by sharing your query in the ASK NASCompares section below, you can get a better range of solutions and suggestions, alongside my own.  

How to Test Your Plex Media Server NAS – 4K, 1080p, HDR, HEVC and UHD Files to Download

26 août 2022 à 01:06

Recommended Files to Test Your Plex Media Server NAS

If you are considering buying/building your own Plex Media server (or even want to test the capabilities of your existing Plex server), then you may have discovered that it is actually a lot harder to bench-test your multimedia system than it should be. Notwithstanding the fact that very, VERY few people are running the exact same server setup (even two people buying the same NAS drive might have different HDDs, SSDs, memory, caching, directories, network traffic and more), but then you need to factor in that the depth, frequency and volume of everyone’s media collection will differ wildly. One user might have a simple Nvidia Shield + external USB drive setup and mostly 1080P, another running a Synology DS920+ NAS and a tonne of 4K, meanwhile, user number 3 is a highly audio-focused user that wants to use pristine, flawless raw audio to their smart home speakers from their Plex library – These are just three setups and each is INCREDIBLY different in it’s hardware requirements! So, when you are in the market for a new server for your Plex system, or simply want to check your current setup does the job), it is recommended to run a benchmark by playing some ranged media that will stress test different areas of multimedia playback on your Plex server. I have been running Plex Media Server tests on NAS drives for a  number of years (a FULL PLEX TEST PLAYLIST can be found HERE on the NASCompares YouTube) and although I include fairly standard multimedia testing using familiar movies and TV shows, I have also used a tremendously thorough range of files known as the ‘JellyFish Files‘. This is an incredible range of files that cover everything from a 2MB sized 480p, low bitrate, H.264, all the way upto an insanely high end 1.4 GIGABYTE 400Mbps 4K UHD HEVC HDR file – ALL of which are the same 30 second media file. These files can be added to your Plex Media Server and playing them, whilst monitoring your system’s hardware and resource utilization will help you understand the limitations of your system and what the system can/cannot play natively, as well as what impact files that need on-the-fly conversion (known predominantly as ‘transcoding’ and we will cover that later). The original source website and author location of the JellyFish files has become vague over the years (with the original repository that I originally found them and credit, being a dead website now in 2022), however, I am often asked if I still have access to the Jellyfish archive and if I can share them. The answer to that first question is YES, but the 2nd question takes a little longer to answer. I tried to backlink/direct users to the repository for a long time, as well as locate the original author (feeling that it is not my work to feely distribute) but hit something of a wall and after my bazillion’th requests, I have decided to create a shared drive for ALL these files. Below are the links to the FULL range of JellyFish files for testing your Plex NAS, but before you proceed, there are a few things you need t keep in mind before you proceed:

Understanding the Jellyfish Files and the File Formats, Quality and Density on a Plex NAS Benchmark Test

Before you start testing your Plex Media Sever and its multimedia capabilities, it is worth taking a moment to understand the terminology and variations of media files. You could have two copies of ‘Marvel’s Avengers Endgame’, both in 4K, but due to variations in their bitrate, their compression technique and their file format/codec and one will play much, MUCH better than another on your system. Although there are many kinds of ways you can clarify your multimedia files, the FOUR most important variables/standards to check are Bitrate, Resolution, Codec and Video Compression Standard. Take a moment to learn about what these are and their impact using the glossary below:

  • Bitrate – Bitrate is the number of bits per second. The symbol is bit/s. It generally determines the size and quality of video and audio files: the higher the bitrate, the better the quality, and the larger the file size because of File size = bitrate (kilobits per second) x duration. In most cases, 1 byte per second (1 B/s) corresponds to 8 bit/s. Video bitrate affects video quality in several ways. First, it is the key measure of any video file size. Secondly, high video bitrate results in high video quality and low bitrates result in poor video quality. However, using an extremely high bitrate is just a waste of bandwidth. In general, a higher bitrate will accommodate higher image quality in the video output, only when comparing the same video with the same resolution. Bitrates should be expected to go up whenever the resolution goes up, as more data is being processed. Therefore, high video bitrate may provide excellent quality, but it can also place a major strain on your hardware which can result in stutters.
  • Resolution – Video resolution determines the amount of detail in your video or how realistic and clear the video appears. It’s measured by the number of pixels contained in the standard aspect ratio of 16:9, the most common aspect ratio for television and computer monitors. A higher number of pixels indicates a higher resolution and a lower number of pixels makes for a low-resolution video. For the common resolutions of 720 and 1080, the naming convention is based on the total number of pixels running in a vertical line down the display area. For 2K, 4K or 8K video, the resolution is named for the number of pixels running in a horizontal line across the frame. Previously, the resolution has been divided between standard definition (SD video) and high definition (HD video). Anything below 720 is considered standard definition. However, as screen resolutions on computer monitors and televisions continue to improve, it’s less likely for anything to be shot in SD.
  • The difference between video resolution and frame rate – Digital videos are made up of thousands of still images played in sequence. While resolution refers to the amount of data in the frame, frame rate refers to how quickly those frames are cycled through, or how many stills are packed into each second. As with video resolution, choose your video’s frame rate based on the type of motion you’re trying to capture and the type of video formats you expect to release to your audience.
  • Codec – Codecs are the oxygen of the streaming media market; no codecs, no streaming media. From shooting video to editing to encoding our streaming media files for delivery, codecs are involved every step of the way. Many video producers also touch the DVD-ROM and Blu-ray markets, as well as broadcast, and codecs play a role there as well. Codecs are compression technologies and have two components, an encoder to compress the files, and a decoder to decompress. There are codecs for data (PKZIP), still images (JPEG, GIF, PNG), audio (MP3, AAC) and video (Cinepak, MPEG-2, H.264, VP8). It’s important to distinguish codecs from container formats, though sometimes they share the same name. Briefly, container formats, or wrappers, are file formats that can contain specific types of data, including audio, video, closed captioning text, and associated metadata. Though there are some general-purpose container formats, like QuickTime, most container formats target one aspect of the production and distribution pipeline, like MXF for file-based capture on a camcorder, and FLV and WebM for streaming Flash and WebM content.
  • HEVC, H.264 and H.265 – H.264 (AVC) and H.265 (HEVC) are both standards for video compression used in recording and distributing digital video. Why would you choose one over the other? The main difference between H.264 and H.265 is how each processes information and the resulting video file size and bandwidth consumption used with each standard. H.264 processes frames of video using macroblocks, while H.265 processes information using coding tree units (CTUs). CTUs process information more efficiently, which results in a smaller file size and less bandwidth used for your streaming video. H.264 (also called AVC, or Advanced Video Coding) is an industry-standard for video compression that allows for the recording, compression, and distribution of digital video content. H.265 is newer and more advanced than H.264 in several ways. H.265 (also called HEVC, or High-Efficiency Video Coding) allows for further reduced file size, and therefore reduced required bandwidth, of your live video streams.

There are several other terms that are more appropriate to Plex that it might be worth getting school’d up on, but these are optional and you can learn about them below in my video on Plex NAS servers for Dummies:

Where to Download the Files to Test Your Plex Media Server NAS

As mentioned, the Jellyfish files comprise a wide range of files that, although all the same 30 secs of jellyfish playing around in the sea, comprise around 56 files of varying degrees of quality and size. You can use the links below to head over to google drive for each specific file (each link opens in a new tab). Then you can use the download option at the top right corner to  download the file to your local machine:

For those looking to bulk-download, I am afraid that due to reasons of bandwidth hogging (when I shared these files with people in the past) and the sheer weight of these files, I have opted to keep these on a Google Drive shared drive. You should be able to add these files and bulk download them from inside your own Google Drive account, or you can message me directly for the full download link by contacting me directly using the contact section at the bottom of the page. Otherwise, here is the full range of Jellyfish files to download and test your Plex Media server NAS server or DIY/ByO system:

Filename
(Click to Download)
Bitrate
(Overall)
Resolution Codec File
Size
jellyfish-3-mbps-hd-h264.mkv Mbps 1920×1080 H.264 11 MB
jellyfish-3-mbps-hd-hevc.mkv Mbps 1920×1080 HEVC 11 MB
jellyfish-3-mbps-hd-hevc-10bit.mkv Mbps 1920×1080 HEVC 11 MB
jellyfish-5-mbps-hd-h264.mkv Mbps 1920×1080 H.264 18 MB
jellyfish-5-mbps-hd-hevc.mkv Mbps 1920×1080 HEVC 18 MB
jellyfish-10-mbps-hd-h264.mkv 10 Mbps 1920×1080 H.264 36 MB
jellyfish-10-mbps-hd-hevc.mkv 10 Mbps 1920×1080 HEVC 36 MB
jellyfish-10-mbps-hd-hevc-10bit.mkv 10 Mbps 1920×1080 HEVC 36 MB
jellyfish-15-mbps-hd-h264.mkv 15 Mbps 1920×1080 H.264 53 MB
jellyfish-15-mbps-hd-hevc.mkv 15 Mbps 1920×1080 HEVC 53 MB
jellyfish-20-mbps-hd-h264.mkv 20 Mbps 1920×1080 H.264 71 MB
jellyfish-20-mbps-hd-hevc.mkv 20 Mbps 1920×1080 HEVC 75 MB
jellyfish-20-mbps-hd-hevc-10bit.mkv 20 Mbps 1920×1080 HEVC 75 MB
jellyfish-25-mbps-hd-h264.mkv 25 Mbps 1920×1080 H.264 89 MB
jellyfish-25-mbps-hd-hevc.mkv 25 Mbps 1920×1080 HEVC 93 MB
jellyfish-30-mbps-hd-h264.mkv 30 Mbps 1920×1080 H.264 106 MB
jellyfish-30-mbps-hd-hevc.mkv 30 Mbps 1920×1080 HEVC 110 MB
jellyfish-35-mbps-hd-h264.mkv 35 Mbps 1920×1080 H.264 126 MB
jellyfish-35-mbps-hd-hevc.mkv 35 Mbps 1920×1080 HEVC 129 MB
jellyfish-40-mbps-hd-h264.mkv 40 Mbps 1920×1080 H.264 142 MB
jellyfish-40-mbps-hd-hevc.mkv 40 Mbps 1920×1080 HEVC 146 MB
jellyfish-40-mbps-hd-hevc-10bit.mkv 40 Mbps 1920×1080 HEVC 146 MB
jellyfish-45-mbps-hd-h264.mkv 45 Mbps 1920×1080 H.264 160 MB
jellyfish-45-mbps-hd-hevc.mkv 45 Mbps 1920×1080 HEVC 166 MB
jellyfish-50-mbps-hd-h264.mkv 50 Mbps 1920×1080 H.264 180 MB
jellyfish-50-mbps-hd-hevc.mkv 50 Mbps 1920×1080 HEVC 182 MB
jellyfish-55-mbps-hd-h264.mkv 55 Mbps 1920×1080 H.264 208 MB
jellyfish-55-mbps-hd-hevc.mkv 55 Mbps 1920×1080 HEVC 199 MB
jellyfish-60-mbps-hd-h264.mkv 60 Mbps 1920×1080 H.264 213 MB
jellyfish-60-mbps-hd-hevc.mkv 60 Mbps 1920×1080 HEVC 220 MB
jellyfish-60-mbps-hd-hevc-10bit.mkv 60 Mbps 1920×1080 HEVC 218 MB
jellyfish-70-mbps-hd-h264.mkv 70 Mbps 1920×1080 H.264 251 MB
jellyfish-70-mbps-hd-hevc.mkv 70 Mbps 1920×1080 HEVC 256 MB
jellyfish-80-mbps-hd-h264.mkv 80 Mbps 1920×1080 H.264 286 MB
jellyfish-80-mbps-hd-hevc.mkv 80 Mbps 1920×1080 HEVC 290 MB
jellyfish-90-mbps-hd-h264.mkv 90 Mbps 1920×1080 H.264 322 MB
jellyfish-90-mbps-hd-hevc.mkv 90 Mbps 1920×1080 HEVC 329 MB
jellyfish-90-mbps-hd-hevc-10bit.mkv 90 Mbps 1920×1080 HEVC 330 MB
jellyfish-100-mbps-hd-h264.mkv 100 Mbps 1920×1080 H.264 358 MB
jellyfish-100-mbps-hd-hevc.mkv 100 Mbps 1920×1080 HEVC 365 MB
jellyfish-110-mbps-hd-h264.mkv 110 Mbps 1920×1080 H.264 394 MB
jellyfish-110-mbps-hd-hevc.mkv 110 Mbps 1920×1080 HEVC 401 MB
jellyfish-120-mbps-4k-uhd-h264.mkv 120 Mbps 3840×2160 H.264 431 MB
jellyfish-120-mbps-4k-uhd-hevc-10bit.mkv 120 Mbps 3840×2160 HEVC 438 MB
jellyfish-140-mbps-4k-uhd-h264.mkv 140 Mbps 3840×2160 H.264 502 MB
jellyfish-140-mbps-4k-uhd-hevc-10bit.mkv  140 Mbps 3840×2160 HEVC 525 MB
jellyfish-160-mbps-4k-uhd-h264.mkv 160 Mbps 3840×2160 H.264 573 MB
jellyfish-160-mbps-4k-uhd-hevc-10bit.mkv 160 Mbps 3840×2160 HEVC 586 MB
jellyfish-180-mbps-4k-uhd-h264.mkv 180 Mbps 3840×2160 H.264 647 MB
jellyfish-180-mbps-4k-uhd-hevc-10bit.mkv 180 Mbps 3840×2160 HEVC 658 MB
jellyfish-200-mbps-4k-uhd-h264.mkv 200 Mbps 3840×2160 H.264 718 MB
jellyfish-200-mbps-4k-uhd-hevc-10bit.mkv 200 Mbps 3840×2160 HEVC 731 MB
jellyfish-250-mbps-4k-uhd-h264.mkv 250 Mbps 3840×2160 H.264 897 MB
jellyfish-250-mbps-4k-uhd-hevc-10bit.mkv 250 Mbps 3840×2160 HEVC 914 MB
jellyfish-300-mbps-4k-uhd-hevc-10bit.mkv 300 Mbps 3840×2160 HEVC 1.0 GB
jellyfish-400-mbps-4k-uhd-hevc-10bit.mkv 400 Mbps 3840×2160 HEVC 1.4 GB

There you have it, those are the Jellyfish files for testing your Plex server. If you are still on the fence about the best plex media server NAS drive you should consider buying, you can use my article below that highlights the drives I would personally recommend and why:

(Click Below to view this article)

 

📧 LET ME KNOW ABOUT NEW POSTS 🔔

Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 1,365 other subscribers


Get an alert every time something gets added to this specific article!


Want to follow specific category? 📧 Subscribe

This description contains links to Amazon. These links will take you to some of the products mentioned in today's content. As an Amazon Associate, I earn from qualifying purchases. Visit the NASCompares Deal Finder to find the best place to buy this device in your region, based on Service, Support and Reputation - Just Search for your NAS Drive in the Box Below

Need Advice on Data Storage from an Expert?

We want to keep the free advice on NASCompares FREE for as long as we can. Since this service started back in Jan '18, We have helped hundreds of users every month solve their storage woes, but we can only continue to do this with your support. So please do choose to buy at Amazon US and Amazon UK on the articles when buying to provide advert revenue support or to donate/support the site below. Finally, for free advice about your setup, just leave a message in the comments below here at NASCompares.com and we will get back to you. Need Help? Where possible (and where appropriate) please provide as much information about your requirements, as then I can arrange the best answer and solution to your needs. Do not worry about your e-mail address being required, it will NOT be used in a mailing list and will NOT be used in any way other than to respond to your enquiry. [contact-form-7]     Terms and Conditions Alternatively, why not ask me on the ASK NASCompares forum, by clicking the button below. This is a community hub that serves as a place that I can answer your question, chew the fat, share new release information and even get corrections posted. I will always get around to answering ALL queries, but as a one-man operation, I cannot promise speed! So by sharing your query in the ASK NASCompares section below, you can get a better range of solutions and suggestions, alongside my own.  

Synology FS3410 : la nouvelle référence full flash ?

29 août 2022 à 07:00
Par : Fx
Lancement du NAS Synology FS3410Synology annonce l’arrivée d’un nouveau serveur : FS3410. Derrière ce nom se cache un NAS rackable (2U) avec 24 baies pour recevoir des SSD au format 2,5 pouces. Il est construit autour d’un processeur Intel Xeon et 16 Go de RAM extensible. Il dispose de plusieurs ports réseau dont certains sont compatibles 10GbE, mais il est possible d’aller au-delà grâce aux emplacements PCIe. Son prix annoncé : 5 700€ HT ! Synology FS3410 Le Synology Flash Station FS3410 n’est pas […]

QNAP lance encore 2 nouveaux NAS : TS-464 et TS-664

30 août 2022 à 07:00
Par : Fx
QNAP TS 464 TS 664 300x225 - QNAP lance encore 2 nouveaux NAS : TS-464 et TS-664QNAP annonce deux nouveaux NAS de la gamme TS-x64 : TS-464 et TS-664 (respectivement 4 et 6 baies). Ils sont animés par un processeur Intel N5105, possèdent des emplacements pour SSD NVMe et des 2 ports réseau 2,5 Gb/s. Cerise sur le gâteau, ils ont également un emplacement PCIe Gen 3 x2… Le prix démarre à partir de 589€ HT. QNAP TS-464 et TS-664 Le fabricant taïwanais a enchaîné les nouveautés cet été… et ce n’est pas fini. Aujourd’hui, QNAP […]

WD Black SN850X vs Seagate Firecuda 530 SSD Comparison

31 août 2022 à 01:16

PCIe 4 NVMe SSD Comparison – WD Black SN850X vs Seagate Firecuda 530

In all my years of covering the subject of storage here on the blog, there are a few brand rivalries that stand out more than any other – and when it comes to HDDs and SSDs it has always been Western Digital vs Seagate! These two brands are grown into the two biggest names in storage, recognizable both inside/outside of the industry as the go-to media makers! In the Hard Drive industry, these two brands dominate more than 2/3 of the industry, but when it comes to SSDs, things get a little more complex. You see, Seagate utilizes long-running partnerships with 3rd Party companies such as Phison, Micron and SK-Hynix, whereas WD develops their SSDs using in-house teams and acquired companies that are part of the Western Digital family, such as Sandisk and HGST. This means that although both brands are targeting the same areas of the solid-state storage industry, their results arrive with very different architecture that ends up prioritizing very different user needs. Today I want to compare the two fastest PCIe4 M.2 NVMe SSDs that either company has ever commercially released (to date). The 2021 released Seagate Firecuda 530 and the Summer 2022 released WD Black SN850X (not to be confused with the 2020 released original WD Black SN850).

Brand/Series Seagate Firecuda 530

500GB – $119.99, 1TB – $159.99, 2TB – $299.99, 4TB – $729.99

WD Black SN850X

1TB – $159, 2TB – $289, 4TB –$699

PCIe Generation PCIe Gen 4 PCIe Gen 4
NVMe Rev NVMe 1.4 NVMe 1.4
NAND 3D TLC Micron B47R 176L BiCS4 114L TLC
Max Capacity 4TB – Double Sided 4TB
Controller Phison E18-PS5018 WD_BLACK G2 NVMe Controller
Warranty 5yr + 3yr Data Recovery (Rescue) 5yr
NASCompares Review
NASComapres YouTube Review
 

I want to look at these two SSDs and compare them on Price, Value, Architecture, Performance and Durability, in order to help you decide which of these two SSDs is best for your PC or PS5 Storage needs. Let’s begin.

WD Black SN850X vs Seagate Firecuda 530 – Price & Capacity

Now, the prices below for the Seagate Firecuda 530 and WD Black SN850X SSD are from Amazon.com / Amazon.co.uk as of August 9th 2022 and do not take into account any promotions/deals. It is worth highlighting that due to a huge range of reasons (hardware shortages locally, cost of living rises affecting buy patterns, post-pandemic supply chain issues and a pain in the bum that was Chia crypto currency in 2021) the price and availability of SSDs have been particularly unstable. Still, even if we JUST look at this snapshot of the pricing of these drives, spread across the available capacities, we can definitely see that the prices for the WD Black SN850X are unusually mixed across the different currencies. Now, the Seagate Firecuda has been in the market much longer now and has had time to spread itself out and have a more balanced pricing structure (much as the original SN850 did a couple of years ago).

Brand/Series Seagate Firecuda 530

WD Black SN850X

500GB Model ZP500GM3A013 N/A
Price in $ and $ $139 / £119 N/A
1TB Model ZP1000GM3A013 WDS100T2X0E
Price in $ and $ $189 / £159 $159 / £159**
2TB Model ZP2000GM3A013 WDS200T2X0E
Price in $ and $ $399 / £359 $289 / £309**
4TB Model ZP4000GM3A013 WDS400T2X0E
Price in $ and $ $799 / £769 $699 / £749**

Nevertheless, there is no avoiding the fact that the Seagate Firecuda 530 is almost always going to be the more expensive choice over the WD Black SN850X, wherever you are in the world. Now, it is worth remembering that Price is not everything, whereas as VALUE is much more significant – AKA what you GET for your money. In this area, it could be argued that the Seagate Firecuda 530 (despite it’s 10-15% higher price tag) gives you a tiny bit more. The higher layer density NAND of 176L, the higher durability (will touch on that later) and the inclusive forensic level data recovery services all add up to (in the eyes of many) justifying that increased spend. Now, it should be highlighted that only a small % of users will likely use/see the benefits in these and once you cost up the budget of your kit, chances are that this small price diff (particularly in bulk/RAID builds) is going to mount up, but it would be remiss to ignore it.

WD Black SN850X SSD = Best Price

Seagate Firecuda 530 = Best Value

*TBC at the time of writing and will be addressed/confirmed later. The video below will break down the definitions and meaning of the terms used throughout this review and the comparison tables

** Pricing for the SN850X is quite varied online at launch and regardless of tax and currency exchange rates, the pricing here (taken from the official WD store and then undated with Amazon pricing) seems a bit uneven. This will hopefully even out soon.


WD Black SN850X vs Seagate Firecuda 530 – Reported Read & Write Speed

Next, we should discuss the traditional sequential performance of the Seagate Firecuda 530 and WD Black SN850X SSD, as this is by far the most common way drives have been compared (despite the rise in importance of IOPS and durability when it comes to SSDs, in the eyes of many the ‘MB/s’ and ‘GB/s’ figure will always reign supreme). As both of these drives are part of the m.2 PCIe 4 x4 NVMe generation of SSDs, that means that each drive has 8,000MB/s of PCIe bandwidth to attempt to saturate and, frankly, they do an incredible job of it! Now, it is important to keep things relative when you see performance stats, as the capacity of the drive plays a HUGE part in hitting higher speeds. The reason for this is because the actual storage on an SSD is the NAND, one or more modules on the PCB that scale in density and frequency depending on the scale of the drive total capacity. So, for example, a 1TB SSD will either be a single block of NAND at 1024GB or two blocks of NAND at 512GB. Two blocks mean that the drive can be read/written to twice as much and tends to increase performance in most cases. This same logic extends to higher capacities (e.g. 2TB = 1x 1TB or 4x 512GB) and depending on the quality of the NAND (e.g MLC vs TLC, or 96L vs 176L) and factors such as power use and heat, different SSD brands tend to pick their physical architecture differently. This is very much the case when it comes to the Seagate Firecuda 530 and WD Black SN850X SSD, meaning that the scaling performance of each drive model as you jump between each capacity tier is quite pronounced. Note that sequential performance refers to big ‘blocks/blobs’ of data when data, not hugely spread across the drive in small chunks (that is more accurately measurable in IOPS, which we will touch on in a bit). Another key point to remember is that these reported speeds are supplied by the brands themselves, in test scenarios running high high end CPU+GPU combos (eg, 12-16 Core Xeon/Ryzen and 64GB Memory) that they represent to maximum performance possible, but domestic and mid-range commercial users are going to hit max performance thresholds a good 10-15% lower. Use the links at the top of the article to see the full testing and benchmarks of the WD Black SN850X and Seagate Firecuda 530 in my 11th gen i5 + 16GB RAM setup.

Brand/Series Seagate Firecuda 530

WD Black SN850X

500GB Model ZP500GM3A013 N/A
Sequential Read (Max, MB/s), 128 KB 7000MB N/A
Sequential Write (Max, MB/s), 128 KB 3000MB N/A
1TB Model ZP1000GM3A013 WDS100T2X0E
Sequential Read (Max, MB/s), 128 KB 7300MB 7300MB
Sequential Write (Max, MB/s), 128 KB 6000MB 6300MB
2TB Model ZP2000GM3A013 WDS200T2X0E
Sequential Read (Max, MB/s), 128 KB 7300MB 7300MB
Sequential Write (Max, MB/s), 128 KB 6900MB 6600MB
4TB Model ZP4000GM3A013 WDS400T2X0E
Sequential Read (Max, MB/s), 128 KB 7300MB 7300MB
Sequential Write (Max, MB/s), 128 KB 6900MB 6600MB

Now, both drives here predominantly hit the reported maximum 7,300MB/s sequential read figure on the bulk Terabyte scale drives, which is very good indeed and largely saturates the maximum potential bandwidth of PCIe4 nicely. The write performance is a fraction different (as write performance typically has a pinch more work to do than read) and on that score, the Seagate Firecuda 530 takes a small lead, at 6900MB over 6600MB on the larger capacities. Alot of this advantage comes down too the NAND on the Seagate, in two very clear ways. 1) the NAND is 176L and of a higher density count and 2) the 2TB on the Seagate is double-sided (4x 512GB modules) and the spread is still better on the 4TB in memory chips and NAND as well. The WD Black SN850X is a tremendous leap in Write (and partially Read) over the WD Black SN850 released almost 2 years previously and the increased range of a 4TB option is great news, but when it comes to traditional transfer sequential performance, the Seagate Firecuda 530 wins on points.

Seagate Firecuda 530 = Best Sequential Performance


WD Black SN850X vs Seagate Firecuda 530 – Reported IOPS

Now, unlike the traditional performance benchmarks of transfer speeds in sequential Read/Write, IOPS has a much more important place in modern SSD use – especially as we start to see the capabilities of CPU, Memory and GPUs to harness the bandwidth of PCIe NVMe (such as Microsoft Direct Storage and modern gen consoles). Because modern high-scale computer processes (databases, loading game sandboxes and AI engines) use incremental loading and in-world loading on the fly, the abilities of an SSD to load vast numbers of smaller assets into the memory (either directly towards the GPU or unpacked by the CPU first) is incredibly important. The IOPS figure presented by SSD manufacturers is presented as a 4K random IOPS operation in Read and Write (4K being an incredibly small packet size and random, meaning constantly accessing data locations across the NAND). Both the Seagate Firecuda 530 and the WD Black SN850X SSD score very, very high in IOPS (once again, based on high-end PC hardware and benchmarks by the brand themselves) and either one will do a fantastic job of loading/recording vast scales of low-volume/high-frequency data – but which one does it better?

Brand/Series Seagate Firecuda 530

WD Black SN850X

500GB Model ZP500GM3A013 N/A
Random Read (Max, IOPS), 4 KB QD32 400,000 N/A
Random Write (Max, IOPS), 4 KB QD32 700,000 N/A
1TB Model ZP1000GM3A013 WDS100T2X0E
Random Read (Max, IOPS), 4 KB QD32 800000 800,000
Random Write (Max, IOPS), 4 KB QD32 1000000 1,100,000
2TB Model ZP2000GM3A013 WDS200T2X0E
Random Read (Max, IOPS), 4 KB QD32 1,000,000 1,200,000
Random Write (Max, IOPS), 4 KB QD32 1,000,000 1,100,000
4TB Model ZP4000GM3A013 WDS400T2X0E
Random Read (Max, IOPS), 4 KB QD32 1,000,000 1,200,000
Random Write (Max, IOPS), 4 KB QD32 1,000,000 1,100,000

The WD Black SN850X has an almost clean sweep of the board here compared with the Seagate Firecuda 530, almost consistently living in the 1.1-1.2 Million IOPS reported mark. This is not a huge surprise and alot of this can be attributed to the in-house development of the hardware on board being much more fixed in its intended use. The Phison/Micron architecture of the Seagate Firecuda 530 is exceptionally good, but these components are used in several other branded SSDs in the market (Sabrent, Gigabyte, Kingston, MSI and PNY just to name a few) and that means they need to be a little more malleable. Much like the SN850 before it, the WD Black SN850X is extremely well geared to high volume and frequency operations and at 1.2 million ops per second is practically the highest in the PCIe4 M.2 NVMe sector right now commercially.

WD Black SN850X SSD = Highest IOPS Rating


WD Black SN850X vs Seagate Firecuda 530 – NASCompares Tests

Now, up to this point, we have been looking at the reported maximum performance of the WD Black SN850X and Seagate Firecuda 530 that was benchmarked by the respective brands. Although these are tremendously useful figures in isolating the max read/write for them both, the systems that they are tested with do not really represent the average user. So, in my reviews and benchmark video/article for each SSD, I use a Windows 10 Pro machine, running on an Intel Core i5 6-Core 11th Gen Processor, 16GB of DDR4 2666Mhz Memory and the M.2 NVMe SSD for the review being accessed as an additional drive (not OS, but still on a PCIe Gen 4×4 m.2 bandwidth slot). These are some of the results of that testing in traditional performance and IOPS:

Seagate Firecuda 530 ATTO 4GB Test R/W WD Black SN850X ATTO 4GB Test R/W

 

Seagate Firecuda 530 Crystal Disk 4GB Test R/W WD Black SN850X Crystal Disk 4GB Test R/W

 

Seagate Firecuda 530 AS SSD 5GB IOPS WD Black SN850X AS SSD 5GB IOPS

 

Seagate Firecuda 530 Temperature During Tests WD Black SN850X Temperature During Tests

Now, as you can see from the testing, there WAS an unfortunate hurdle of the Seagate Firecuda 530 being a 1TB and the WD Black SN850X being a 2TB! This was unfortunately unavailable, as I did not have comparable drives of capacity available from each bran’s SSD at the time, so these results need to have that VERY important piece of context taken into account and the write performance is too different to rely upon, because of how the NAND was distributed). However, in terms of Read performance in transfer rates and IOPS, we can still draw accurate comparisons. In all tests (with the exception of the Crystal Disk 4GB test and early parts of the ATTO tests), the WD Black SN850X was faster than the Seagate Firecuda 530 by a pinch in Seq Read and a noticeable jump higher in IOPS (even if you discount the capacity difference). In contrast, though, the Seagate Firecuda ran much lower in temp throughout all the testing (either though both were using quick large and highly proficient m.2 heatsinks).

WD Black SN850X SSD = Best Overall Performer in a Domestic PC

Seagate Firecuda 530 = Ran Much Lower Temp Throughout


WD Black SN850X vs Seagate Firecuda 530 – Endurance & Durability

Unlike the other points in this comparison of the Seagate Firecuda 530 and WD Black SN850X, the Endurance and Durability of an SSD is an area that is overlooked often enough that I wanted to take a moment to focus a little more on this – you can thank you years from now! The importance of SSD durability and endurance in 2022/2023 is actually pretty massive. Now that the devices we use all feature incredibly powerful processors, often cloud/network hybrid AI processes and graphical handling that will be instantly bottlenecked by traditional hard drives, SSDs are no longer just the ‘boot’ drive for our OS and are now the day to day working drive. This combined with SSD being used as caching and larger SSD capacities allowing suitable substitution for HDDs entirely means that the CONSTANT concern about SSDs lifespan and the durability of those NAND cells is now quite paramount. SSDs wear out – it’s as simple as that. The more you write, the more wear those individual NAND cells suffer – degrading performance over the years and inevitably leading to drive failure. Likewise, the smaller the drive, the greater likelihood that you will be writing, then rewriting, then rewriting, time and time again. The Seagate Firecuda 530 and WD Black SN850X are no exception and alongside massive research and development in better controllers and interfaces to improve performance, the way NAND is improved has led to SSDs lasting lover than ever before. However, SSDs and NAND are not built equally and there is actually quite a large difference in durability between the WD Black SN850X and the Seagate Firecuda 530. The Storage industry typically measures the predicted durability and endurance of an SSD as TBW, DWPD and MTBF. They are:

TBW = Terabytes Written, rated as the total number of terabytes that this SSD can have written to it in its warranty-covered lifespan. So if the TBW was 300TB and the warranty is 5 years of coverage, that would mean that the drive can receive on average (with deleting/overwriting data each repeatedly) 60 Terabytes per year (or 5TB a month). After this point, the manufacturer highlights that durability, endurance and performance will decline. Often highlighted as an alternative to warranty length when gauging the predicted lifespan of a SSD.

DWPD = Drive Writes Per Day / Data Writes Per Day, this is a decimalized figure that represents what proportion of the capacity of an SSD (where 1.0 = 100% capacity) can be filled, erased and/or rewritten on a daily basis. This is provided using the warranty period and TBW figure. So, for example, if a 500GB drive has a 0.3DWPD rating, that is approx 150GB of data per day

MTBF = Mean Time Between Failure, which is the interval between one failure of an SSD and the next. MTBF is expressed in hours and most industrial SSDs are rated in the Millions of Hours. MTBF and MTTF (Mean Time to Failure) have largely become overlooked in recent years in favour of TBW and DWPD in SSDs, but are still stated on most Data Sheets.

So, now you know what those large Terbyte stats, hours and decimal point details are on the average SSD datasheet. So where do the Seagate Firecuda 530 and WD Black SN850X stand on this:

Brand/Series Seagate Firecuda 530

WD Black SN850X

500GB Model ZP500GM3A013 N/A
Total Terabytes Written (TBW) 640TB N/A
Mean Time Between Failures (MTBF, hours) 1,800,000 N/A
DWPD 0.7DWPD N/A
1TB Model ZP1000GM3A013 WDS100T2X0E
Total Terabytes Written (TBW) 1275TB 600TB
Mean Time Between Failures (MTBF, hours) 1,800,000 1,750,000
DWPD 0.7DWPD 0.3DWPD
2TB Model ZP2000GM3A013 WDS200T2X0E
Total Terabytes Written (TBW) 2550TB 1200TB
Mean Time Between Failures (MTBF, hours) 1,800,000 1,750,000
DWPD 0.7DWPD 0.3DWPD
4TB Model ZP4000GM3A013 WDS400T2X0E
Total Terabytes Written (TBW) 5100TB 2400TB
Mean Time Between Failures (MTBF, hours) 1,800,000 1,750,000
DWPD 0.7DWPD 0.3DWPD
Note – Seagate Firecuda 530 includes 3yrs Data Recovery

This is pretty much a solid victory for the Seagate Firecuda 530 over the WD Black SN850X SSD. That higher quality NAND and higher quantity NAND distribution of modules on the PCB (and perhaps the running temperature too, but that is unconfirmed) with everything running for longer on the Seagate drive, as well as the inclusive data recovery services being thrown in too (either as a safety net or a guarantee of the quality – whose to say) means that the Seagate Firecuda 530, despite it’s slightly higher price point in most eShops, definitely being the more durable drive of the two.

WD Black SN850X vs Seagate Firecuda 530 – Conclusion

There is a good reason why the WD Black SN850X and Seagate Firecuda 850X still continue to be two of the most popular PCIe4 M.2 SSDs in the market – they are both such outstanding drives! So comparing them was never going to be easy. The WD Black SN850X is the better drive for mixed-use, PC gamers and post-production, thanks to it’s higher IOPS rating and excellent sustained performance ratings (though keep an eye on the heat in laptop usage). The Seagate Firecuda is the better choice for professional esports gamers, PS5 and use in large-scale databases, where an element of 24×7 use and high data recycle rates come into play. Both are excellent drives and deserve their places at the top of the food chain of consumer SSDs in 2022 and whichever one you choose, you will have an insanely capable SSD in your system for years to come!

Brand/Series Seagate Firecuda 530

WD Black SN850X

Best Performance
Best Endurance/Durability  
Best Price for TB  
Best Extras  
Best Value  
Where To Buy

 

📧 LET ME KNOW ABOUT NEW POSTS 🔔

Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 1,385 other subscribers

Get an alert every time something gets added to this specific article!


Want to follow specific category? 📧 Subscribe

This description contains links to Amazon. These links will take you to some of the products mentioned in today's content. As an Amazon Associate, I earn from qualifying purchases. Visit the NASCompares Deal Finder to find the best place to buy this device in your region, based on Service, Support and Reputation - Just Search for your NAS Drive in the Box Below

Need Advice on Data Storage from an Expert?

We want to keep the free advice on NASCompares FREE for as long as we can. Since this service started back in Jan '18, We have helped hundreds of users every month solve their storage woes, but we can only continue to do this with your support. So please do choose to buy at Amazon US and Amazon UK on the articles when buying to provide advert revenue support or to donate/support the site below. Finally, for free advice about your setup, just leave a message in the comments below here at NASCompares.com and we will get back to you. Need Help? Where possible (and where appropriate) please provide as much information about your requirements, as then I can arrange the best answer and solution to your needs. Do not worry about your e-mail address being required, it will NOT be used in a mailing list and will NOT be used in any way other than to respond to your enquiry. [contact-form-7]     Terms and Conditions Alternatively, why not ask me on the ASK NASCompares forum, by clicking the button below. This is a community hub that serves as a place that I can answer your question, chew the fat, share new release information and even get corrections posted. I will always get around to answering ALL queries, but as a one-man operation, I cannot promise speed! So by sharing your query in the ASK NASCompares section below, you can get a better range of solutions and suggestions, alongside my own.  

Firezone – Serveur VPN et pare-feu open-source performant et léger

31 août 2022 à 07:00
Par : EVOTk
webui 300x212 - Firezone - Serveur VPN et pare-feu open-source performant et légerDécouvert un peu par hasard, Firezone est un moyen simple de créer un serveur VPN WireGuard. Firezone est un projet open source permettant la mise en place d’un serveur VPN, d’un pare-feu ainsi qu’une interface Web de gestion en quelques minutes. Il est très complet et permet en quelques minutes de déployer un serveur Wireguard stable, performant et fonctionnel ! Fonctionnalités de Firezone 🚀 Rapide Le VPN WireGuard permet d’obtenir des performances jusqu’à 6x plus rapide qu’OpenVPN et on profite […]

NAS – Test du Synology DS1522+ (avec carte réseau 10 GbE)

1 septembre 2022 à 09:00
Par : Fx
Test du NAS Synology DS1522+Le Synology DS1522+ est disponible depuis juillet 2022, nous l’avons en test depuis plusieurs semaine et il est temps pour nous de vous en dire plus sur ce nouveau NAS. Pour rappel, ce dernier profite d’une nouvelle architecture basée sur un processeur AMD Ryzen Embedded R1600 avec une mémoire DDR4 ECC. Il possède également plusieurs ports RJ45 Gigabit et il est possible de lui ajouter une mini carte 10 Gb/s. Avec elle, il est possible d’atteindre et de dépasser les […]

QNAP – Une nouvelle attaque DEADBOLT en cours sur les NAS…

3 septembre 2022 à 18:09
Par : Fx
QNAP DEADBOLT 300x225 - QNAP - Une nouvelle attaque DEADBOLT en cours sur les NAS...L’année 2022 est compliquée pour ceux qui disposent d’un NAS. En effet, les attaques se multiplient et aujourd’hui encore… Deadbolt est de retour sur les boîtiers QNAP. Si votre NAS est exposé sur Internet, nous vous recommandons de désactiver son accès et de contrôler qu’il soit bien à jour. [edit]Mises à jour à la fin de l’article Deadbolt et QNAP Après une première attaque en janvier puis une seconde en mai, les NAS QNAP semblent de nouveau la cible de […]

Synology NAS Setup Guide 2022 – Setup, Users, Updates, Remote Access and Security Settings

5 septembre 2022 à 01:10

DSM 7 Installation Guide – Setting Your Synology NAS Up Right – FIRST TIME!

If you have purchased your new Synology NAS (or it is soon to be arriving and you want to be prepared to set it up), then congratulations! You are on your way to enjoying your very own private storage solution that can allow you to access your data in your home, business or remotely anywhere in the world. However, it is worth noting that although a lot of the setup of a Synology NAS is quite straightforward, there are a number of early choices during the initial installation that, if made incorrectly or in haste, cannot be reversed without restoring the system to factory settings. Therefore it is understandable that when setting up your Synology NAS for the first time, that you want to get it right the first time too! So today I want to start my 5 part series here on NASCompares where I will be guiding yoU through setting up your Synology as smoothly as possible. This guide has been made using a number of setup elements from Synology’s own resources, along with my own recommendations on your setup and links to more unique tutorials you may find helpful. In part 1, we will be going through setting the NAS up physically, initializing the DSM 7 software and services, creating a storage area, multiple users, customizing the security settings to your needs and establishing safe remote access to your Synology NAS. The following guide (part one at least) should take you a little under over 30 minutes to do EVERYTHING, with the remaining parts being a little more optional and centred around more user-specific applications and services. If you would prefer to follow the video guide on this, I have released a 9 Part video guide series for Synology NAS in 2022 available below. Otherwise, let’s get started on setting up your Synology NAS.

Here are the 9 Parts of the Synology Video Guide Series

Synology NAS Setup Guide 2021/2022 Part I – 2021/2022 – DSM 7 – RAID – VOLUMES – SHARES – MAPPED DRIVES

Synology NAS Setup Guide 2022 #2 – Snapshots, NAS to NAS/CLOUD/USB, SaaS Backups & Sync

Synology NAS Setup Guide 2022 #3 – Photography, Indexing, Sharing & Moving from Google

Synology NAS Setup Guide 2022 #4 – Music Audio, Indexing, Sharing and Streaming over DLNA

Synology NAS Setup Guide 2022 #5 – Video Station, Stream to Fire TV, DLNA and Indexing TV/Films

Synology NAS Setup Guide 2022 #6 – Setting Up Plex Media Server Right First Time

Synology NAS Setup Guide 2022 #7 – Setting Up Surveillance Station, Cameras, Control and Alert

Synology NAS Setup Guide 2022 #8 – Setting Up an iSCSI Target and a Storage LUN

What you will need when setting up your Synology NAS the first time.

  • A Synology NAS (duh!)
  • An active internet connection and Router/Modem (not essential, but will make initial setup and firmware 10x easier)
  • Access to a Router or Switch that is also accessible with a client computer/mobile device
  • An available mains power outlet

That is all you need for Part 1 of this guide. Let’s begin.

Physical Installation of a Synology NAS

Physical Installation of the hard drives or SSD into the Synology NAS is very, very easy and is completely toolless (for Hard drives, SSD require you to use 4 screws for each that are in the accessories box). Once you have unboxed all the accessories, you need to remove the trays (all of them, or as many as you need for your hard drives).

Then each tray has removable clips on either side. Once removed, you can slot the hard drive into the tray, with the connector facing out and the manufacturer label facing up.

Then put the clips back, ensuring the 4 plugs are inserted into the holes on the drive. Then just slide each tray+drive back into the NAS. Once this is done, connect the power brick into the rear of the NAS and then the mains power lead into the power brick and the wall socket.

Finally, you need to connect the network LAN cable into the network port on the rear of the NAS and connect the other end to your router, modem or switch (in simple speak, the box your internet service provider have you or the box the other internet things are connected to. You can now click the power button on the front of the NAS and you will hear a beep and the device will take around 2-3mins to initialise. If you are having difficulty with the physical installation of your Synology NAS, you can use the first part of the video below, where I will show you each step of the physical installation and then move on to the DSM 7 setup with the Synology Assistant and Web GUI via your browser.

The Synology NAS runs on its very own operating system, known as Diskstation Manager (DSM) and this is what separates it from most traditional USB direct-attached storage (DAS) and network drives that are just brainless storage. DSM allows users to run hundreds of applications, each with their own user interface (UI) on the NAS, that they can access on desktop computers, mobile devices and media devices. After you have installed hard drives and booted the device up, and found the device in your network (using the free Synology Assistant application for PC/Mac or DS Finder mobile app) you will be asked to proceed with the Synology DSM installation.

Install DSM 7 using a desktop Web Browser with the Web Assistant

Your Synology NAS comes with a built-in tool, Web Assistant, which helps you download the latest version of DSM from the Internet and install it on your Synology NAS. To use Web Assistant, follow the steps below:
1. Power on your Synology NAS.
2. Open a web browser on a computer within the same network where your Synology NAS is located, and go to “find.synology.com”. The status of your NAS should be Not installed.
3. Select your Synology NAS and click Connect on Web Assistant.
4. Click Install to start the installation process and follow the on-screen instructions

• Both your Synology NAS and computer must be on the same local network.
• We suggest using Chrome or Firefox as the browser for DSM installation.
• For more information on the setup of Synology NAS and DSM, please refer to the Hardware Installation Guide for your Synology NAS models available via Synology’s Download Center

Install DSM 7 with Your Mobile with the DS finder Application

You can also install DS finder (App Store/Google Play Store) on your mobile device to install DSM as demonstrated below:
1. Power on your Synology NAS.
2. Connect your mobile device to the local network where your Synology NAS is located, and launch DS finder.
3. Tap SET UP NEW NAS to start the setup process.
4. Follow the on-screen instructions to establish the connection between your mobile device and Synology NAS, and tap SEARCH. DS finder will search for your Synology NAS. The status of your NAS should be Not installed.
5. Select your Synology NAS and tap INSTALL to start the installation process and follow the onscreen instructions.

Notes:
• We take Android 10 as an example in this chapter. The actual steps may vary across OS versions and devices.
• Both your Synology NAS and mobile device must be on the same local network.
• DS finder can only run on Android and iOS devices.
• DS finder supports installing DSM on most Synology NAS models (except rack-mount models and desktop models of FS/XS series).

How to Configure storage space on your Synology NAS with the Storage Manager

This section guides you through the steps of storage pool creation using the built-in package, Storage Manager. When it’s your first time launching Storage Manager, Storage Creation Wizard will help you create and configure storage pools and volumes. A storage pool is a single storage unit consisting of multiple drives. A volume is a storage space created on a storage pool. You have to create at least one volume to store data on your Synology NAS.

How to Create a Storage pool and Volume

  1. Launch Storage Manager in the Main Menu. Storage Creation Wizard will pop up to lead you through the steps below
  2. Choose a RAID type to protect your storage. Some RAID types are available on certain models according to the number of drive bays. To know which RAID type is proper for your storage pool, you can refer to the Understand RAID types section or this article.
  3. Deploy drives to constitute the storage pool.
  4. Allocate the volume capacity.
  5. Select a file system. We recommend Btrfs for its data protection features. To learn more about the differences between Btrfs and ext4, you can refer to this article

Btrfs – Supports various data protection features, e.g., snapshot, replication, point-in-time recovery, and data integrity check.

ext4 – Features wide compatibility with Linux operating systems. It has fewer hardware requirements than Btrfs.

  1. Confirm the settings. The system will automatically run the storage creation and optimization process in the background.

How to Access and Navigate the Synology DSM 7 GUI

After installing DSM on your Synology NAS, you can sign in to DSM using the DSM user account you have just added during the first-time installation. Follow the steps below to sign in via a web browser:
1. Make sure your computer and Synology NAS are connected to the same local network.
2. Open a browser on your computer and enter one of the following in the address bar:

• find.synology.com: Enter this URL only if your computer and Synology NAS are connected to the same local area network.
• IP address of your NAS:5000: If the IP address of your Synology NAS is “192.168.48.14”, type “192.168.48.14:5000”. The IP address depends on the settings made during the initial setup

  1. Enter your username and click the rightward arrow.
  2. Enter your password and click the rightward arrow again to sign in.

Key Navigation Options Options, A Brief Overview

The DSM Browser-Based Desktop GUI

After signing in, you can see the DSM desktop, where your application and package windows are displayed. You can also create desktop shortcuts to frequently used applications. why are you copying me!

The DSM 7 Tasks, Activity & Notification Panel

The taskbar is located at the top of the screen and includes the following items:why are you copying me!

1. Show Desktop: Minimize all launched applications and packages windows.
2. Main Menu: Click the icon to view and open applications and add-on packages. You can also click and drag to create desktop shortcuts.
3. Open applications: Displays currently launched applications and packages. You can right-click and pin the applications or packages to the taskbar for faster access in the future.

4. Upload Queue: Appears when you start uploading files to your Synology NAS. Click the icon to see more details, such as progress and upload speed.why are you copying me!
5. External Devices: This appears when an external device (e.g., a USB flash drive) is attached to your Synology NAS.
6. Notifications: Displays notifications, such as errors, status updates, and package installation notifications.why are you copying me!
7. Options: Click the menu to shut down, restart, or sign out of your Synology NAS. You can also select Personal from the menu to modify personal account settings.
8. Widgets: Show or hide widgets. Widgets are located on the right side of DSM desktop by default, displaying various types of system information, such as storage, system health, etc.
9. Search: Quickly find specific applications, packages, or DSM Help articles.

The DSM Appliations & Services via the Main Menu

You can find a list of applications and packages installed on your Synology NAS here. To create a desktop shortcut, open Main Menu, and click and drag an application or package to the side.

How to Change Personal Settings in DSM 7

You can select the Personal option from the drop-down menu to manage your account settings, such as the password, display language, sign-in methods, and display preferences. The following gives you an overview of tabs under this option:

• Account: Edit account settings, enable advanced sign-in methods, and view recent login activities of your DSM account (refer to this article for more information).
• Display Preferences: Edit date and time formats as well as the appearance of your desktop (refer to this article for more information).
• Email Delivery: Add your email accounts at this tab. These email accounts are used in the following scenarios (refer to this article for more information):
• Deliver files stored in File Station as attachments.
• Send event invitation emails via Synology Calendar.
• Send notification emails when sharing files with others via Synology Drive.
• Quota: View your quota on all volumes set by the administrator’s account, as well as the amount of capacity you have used on each volume. On models with Btrfs support, you can also view the quota and capacity usage of each shared folder.
• Others: Customize other personal account options (refer to this article for more information)

How and Why to Create a shared folder to start sharing files in DSM 7

Through the setup of a shared folder, you can turn your Synology NAS into a convenient and secure file-sharing center. This section explains the role of shared folders on DSM and gives you instructions on file management using File Station and DS file. Understand shared folders A shared folder is a home directory where you can store and manage files and subfolders. You must have at least one shared folder to store files on your Synology NAS. Data stored in shared folders can be kept private or shared with specific users or groups based on custom permission settings. Some packages or services require a dedicated shared folder to ensure functionality (most will create a folder automatically). Removing any shared folder removes all the data and their snapshots within the folder. If you need the data, please back them up first before the removal.

How to Navigate, Manage and Access Files in the DSM 7 Web-Based GUI

File Station is a built-in file management tool on DSM. File Station provides a centralized interface where you can access and manage files and folders with web browsers and grant other users access to files based on the permissions you set. This section guides you through the steps of file management via File Station. Launch File Station and click Settings. You can perform the following actions here:

• Configure general settings.
• Mount shared folders, virtual drives, servers, and cloud service.
• Allow specific users to share file links or make a request for file access.
• Set speed limits for file transfer via File Station.
• Enable converting HTML files to plain text for security reasons.

Search for files or folders. File Station provides regular search and advanced search to meet different requirements:
• To perform a regular search, click the folder where the desired files or folders are located. Type a keyword in the Search field.
• To perform an advanced search, go to the folder where the desired files or folders are located. Click the magnifying glass icon next to the Search field to expand the advanced search menu, where you can set multiple search conditions for a refined search result.

How to Manage files and folders Easily in DSM 7

Select a file or folder and click Action or simply right-click it to perform the following actions:
• To send a file as email attachments: Right-click a file and select Send as email attachments. You can directly send and share files as email attachments in File Station once you have set up email delivery settings in the pop-up Personal window.
• To view or rotate pictures: Double-click a picture to open it in a viewer window, where you can view and rotate pictures.
• To edit the access permissions: Right-click a file or folder and select Properties. You can edit access permissions at the Permission tab.
• To generate file-sharing links: Right-click a file or folder and select Share. A shared link will be automatically generated. You can further specify validity periods or enable secure sharing.

How to Create local Users and Groups in DSM 7

You can grant family members or business associates access to Synology NAS by creating user accounts for them. For the ease of administration, you can create groups to categorize users and manage them together. This section guides you through how to create users and groups in Control Panel.

How to Create a User in DSM 7

  1. Go to Control Panel > User & Group > User.
  2. Click Create to launch User Creation Wizard.
  3. On the Enter user information page, enter the following user information:

• Name
• Description (Optional)
• Email (Optional): Enter the user’s email address. System notifications, such as password reset messages, will be sent to the address specified here.
• Password
• Confirm password

  1. On the same page, configure the following advanced settings that will be applied to the
    user:

• Send a notification mail to the newly created user: You have to enable email notifications in Control Panel > Notification > Email to allow the system to send emails. If you have not yet set up notification settings, a confirmation dialog box will pop up and lead you to the setup page when you tick this checkbox. For more information on the notification settings, please refer to the Manage notifications section.
• Display user password in notification mail
• Disallow the user to change account password
• Password is always valid: You will not see this option If Password Expiration at the Advanced tab is not enabled. This option makes this user’s password always valid and the rules of Password Expiration will not be applied to this user.
5. On the Join groups page, specify the groups to which the new user should belong. The default groups are administrators, http, and users. Please refer to the Create a group section to customize groups.
6. On the Assign shared folders permissions page, choose which shared folders the user can access. When the user permissions conflict with group permissions, the privilege priority is as follows: No access > Read/Write > Read only. The Preview column displays the access privileges that will take effect.
7. On the Assign user quota page, you can specify the maximum amount of space the user can use for each volume/shared folder. Enter a value and select the size unit in the User Quota
field.

  1. On the Assign application permissions page, you can control which services the user can access. When the user permissions conflict with group permissions, the Deny permission always has priority over the Allow permission.
  2. On the Set user speed limit page, you can enable a speed limit for different services (e.g., File Station, FTP, rsync, etc.) to restrict the amount of bandwidth consumed by the user when transferring files. For each service, you can select one of the following:

• Apply group settings: If the user belongs to multiple groups, the group with a higher speed limit has priority over other ones.
• Set up speed cap: Specify upload and download speed limits in the fields to the right.
• Advanced settings: Two customized speed limits and the group limit can be applied to the user according to the schedule you set. You can modify the speed limit settings and set the schedule in the pop-up window.
10. On the Confirm settings page, check and confirm the setting summary.
11. Click Done to finish the settings.

How to Create a User Create a group

  1. Go to Control Panel > User & Group > Group.
  2. Click Create to launch Group Creation Wizard.
  3. On the Enter group information page, enter a group name.
  4. On the Select member’s page, add target users to the group.
  5. On the Assign shared folder permissions page, specify group members’ permissions to each shared folder.
  6. On the Assign group quota page, you can enable the usage quota for each service to control how much storage can be used by each group member.
  7. On the Assign application permissions page, you can control which services group members can access.
  8. On the Set group speed limit page, you can enable a speed limit for different services (e.g., File Station, FTP, Rsync, etc.) to restrict the amount of bandwidth consumed by each group member when transferring files. For each service, you can select one of the following:

• Set up speed cap: Specify upload and download speed limits in the fields to the right.
• Advanced settings: Two customized speed limits and no limits can be applied according to the schedule you set. You can modify the speed limit settings and set the schedule in the pop-up window.

  1. On the Confirm Settings page, check and confirm the setting summary.
  2. Click Done to finish the settings.

Creating a Synology Account for Remote Access & Managing Services

As an owner of Synology NAS, you should have a Synology Account to access Synology online services and manage your customer information. Different from DSM user accounts, which can be used to sign in to DSM, a Synology Account allows you to manage your billing information, registered Synology products, requests for technical support, and Synology online services (e.g., QuickConnect, DDNS, and Synology C2). For more information on the differences between Synology Accounts and DSM user accounts, please refer to this article.

Sign up for a Synology Account and bind your Synology NAS during DSM installation or by following the steps below:
1. Go to this website.
2. Complete the form and click Next. Then, follow the on-screen instructions to create a Synology Account

  1. Go to the email box you have entered, and click the email titled Synology Account – sign up (sent from “[email protected]”) to get your verification code.
  2. Enter the verification code and click Next.
  3. Check the terms and privacy policy. Click Submit.
  4. Go to Control Panel > Synology Account, and click Sign in or sign up for a Synology Account.

  1. In the pop-up window, enter the credentials of your Synology Account and click Sign In.
  2. Now you have successfully registered for a Synology Account and bound your NAS to it

Creating and Editing Your QuickConnect ID

QuickConnect allows client applications to connect to your Synology NAS via the Internet without setting up port forwarding rules. It can work with Synology-developed packages, such as Audio Station, Video Station, Download Station, Surveillance Station, Synology Photos, File Station, Note Station, CMS, Synology Drive, and mobile applications. You can either specify your QuickConnect ID during DSM installation, or activate the service by following the steps below:
1. Go to Control Panel > External Access > QuickConnect.
2. Tick the Enable QuickConnect checkbox

  1. If you have not signed in to your Synology Account, a login window will pop up. Enter your existing Synology Account information or create a new account in the window.
  2. Specify a new QuickConnect ID.
  3. Click Apply.

Notes:
• A customized QuickConnect ID can only include English letters, numbers, and dashes (-). It must start with a letter, and cannot end with a dash.

How to Configure & Increase Network Access Security

Once your Synology NAS is connected to the Internet, it is crucial to ensure system security. This section provides you four methods to strengthen the security of your DSM. Configuring a Firewall, utilizing the Security Advisor, Activating 2-Step Authentication and Enabling auto block, Account Protection, and DoS protection.

How to Activate the Firewall

  1. Go to Control Panel > Security > Firewall.
  2. Tick Enable firewall and click Apply. The default firewall profile will be applied to your DSM.

Utilizing the Security Advisor

Security Advisor is a built-in application that scans your Synology NAS, checks your DSM settings, and provides advice on how to address security weaknesses. Keep your Synology NAS secure by following the steps below:

Scan your Synology NAS immediately
1. Go to Security Advisor > Overview.
2. Click Scan.

  1. Fix the security weaknesses according to the scanning results.

Set up an automatic scan schedule
1. Go to Security Advisor > Advanced.
2. Tick Enable regular scan schedule under the Scan Schedule section. Select the time to run scanning from the drop-down menus.

  1. Click Apply to save the settings.

How to Activate 2-factor authentication

2-factor authentication provides additional security for your DSM account. Once this option is enabled, you will need to enter a one-time authentication code besides your password when signing in to DSM. The code can be obtained through authenticator apps (e.g., Synology Secure SignIn and Google Authenticator) installed on your mobile device.

To enable 2-factor authentication for your account, please follow the steps below:
• Go to Personal > Account and click 2-Factor Authentication to launch the setup wizard. Enter your password to continue.

• If Secure SignIn Service is already enabled in Control Panel > Security > Account, select from either Approve sign-in, hardware security key, or OTP for the second sign-in step.
• If Secure SignIn Service has not been enabled, OTP is the only available option for the second sign-in step.

How to Enable auto block, Account Protection, and DoS protection

You can safeguard DSM through these three mechanisms: autoblock, Account Protection, and DoS protection.

Autoblock unauthorized access

  1. Go to Control Panel > Security > Protection > Auto Block.
  2. Tick Enable autoblock.
  3. Enter a value in the Login attempts field and a value in the Within (minutes) field. An IP address shall be blocked when it exceeds the number of failed login attempts within the specified duration.
  4. Tick Enable block expiration and enter a value in the Unblock after (days) field to unlock a blocked IP address after the specified number of days.
  5. Click Apply to save the settings.

Enable Account Protection to prevent login attacks

  1. Go to Control Panel > Security > Account > Account Protection.
  2. Tick Enable Account Protection.
  3. Enter a value in the Login attempts field and a value in the Within (minutes) field. An untrusted client will be blocked if it exceeds the number of failed login attempts within the specified duration.
  4. For Untrusted clients, enter a value in the Cancel account protection (minutes later) field. The account protection will be cancelled after the specified duration.
  5. For Trusted clients, enter a value in the Unblock (minutes later) field. The account protection will be cancelled after the specified duration.
  6. Click Apply to save the settings

Setting up Defence against DoS attacks

A Denial-of-Service (DoS) attack is a malicious attempt to render network services unavailable by disrupting service functionality. To avoid this type of cyberattack, follow the steps below:
1. Go to Control Panel > Security > Protection > Denial of Service (DoS) Protection.
2. Tick Enable Dos Protection and click Apply

How to Ensure your Synology NAS & DSM 7 is Constantly updated

Synology releases DSM updates from time to time. Updates may include new features function improvements and performance enhancements. This section guides you through the configuration of DSM updates. Perform manual DSM update
1. Go to Synology’s Download Center.
2. Select your model from the two drop-down menus.
3. Go to the Operating System tab of search results and download an update file.
4. Go to DSM > Control Panel > Update & Restore > DSM Update.
5. Click Manual DSM Update.

  1. In the pop-up window, click Browse to upload the file

  1. Click OK and wait for the file to be uploaded.
  2. After reading through the update information and ticking the confirmation checkbox, click Update.
  3. Click Yes in the confirmation box. The installation can take 20 to 40 minutes. Please do not shut down the system during the update.
  4. The system will restart all services and packages when the update is complete.

How to Setup the NAS to Automatically Install DSM 7 Updates

  1. Go to DSM > Control Panel > Update & Restore > DSM Update.
  2. Click Update Settings.
  3. In the pop-up window, you can configure the following settings to check for DSM releases via Synology’s Download Center.

• Automatically install important updates that fixed critical security issues and bugs (Recommended): Allow the system to automatically install important DSM updates. To ensure that your system is always protected, we recommend enabling this option.
• Automatically install the latest update: Allow the system to automatically install new DSM updates when the system check finds new updates available.
• Notify me and let me decide whether to install the new update: Have the system notify you via desktop notifications when there is a new DSM update available. You can choose whether to download the update after receiving the notification.

• Check schedule: Decide when the system should check for available updates. Specify the check time from the drop-down menus.

• An automatic update only applies to minor updates and not to major updates. Generally, minor updates consist of bug fixes and security patches, major updates include brand-new features and performance enhancement in addition to bug fixes and security patches, and important updates contain fixes for critical security issues or bugs. For more information about important updates, please refer to this article.

 

 

📧 LET ME KNOW ABOUT NEW POSTS 🔔

Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 1,258 other subscribers

Get an alert every time something gets added to this specific article!


Want to follow specific category? 📧 Subscribe

This description contains links to Amazon. These links will take you to some of the products mentioned in today's content. As an Amazon Associate, I earn from qualifying purchases. Visit the NASCompares Deal Finder to find the best place to buy this device in your region, based on Service, Support and Reputation - Just Search for your NAS Drive in the Box Below

Need Advice on Data Storage from an Expert?

We want to keep the free advice on NASCompares FREE for as long as we can. Since this service started back in Jan '18, We have helped hundreds of users every month solve their storage woes, but we can only continue to do this with your support. So please do choose to buy at Amazon US and Amazon UK on the articles when buying to provide advert revenue support or to donate/support the site below. Finally, for free advice about your setup, just leave a message in the comments below here at NASCompares.com and we will get back to you. Need Help? Where possible (and where appropriate) please provide as much information about your requirements, as then I can arrange the best answer and solution to your needs. Do not worry about your e-mail address being required, it will NOT be used in a mailing list and will NOT be used in any way other than to respond to your enquiry. [contact-form-7]     Terms and Conditions Alternatively, why not ask me on the ASK NASCompares forum, by clicking the button below. This is a community hub that serves as a place that I can answer your question, chew the fat, share new release information and even get corrections posted. I will always get around to answering ALL queries, but as a one-man operation, I cannot promise speed! So by sharing your query in the ASK NASCompares section below, you can get a better range of solutions and suggestions, alongside my own.  

NAS Synology – RAID ou SHR(2)

5 septembre 2022 à 07:00
Par : Fx
RAID VS SHR 300x225 - NAS Synology - RAID ou SHR(2)En 2014, nous avions fait plusieurs tests de performance du SHR (avec 3 disques) versus RAID 5. Ces mesures avaient faisait ressortir qu’il n’y avait pas d’écart probant entre ces deux types de RAID. Nous avons décidé de refaire nos tests afin d’actualiser les résultats et de les compléter avec le RAID 1, RAID 6 et le SHR2. RAID ou SHR, lequel choisir ? Nous profitons d’avoir un DS1522+ en test pour mettre à jour notre comparatif entre le RAID […]

Synology DSM 7.1.1-42962 est disponible

5 septembre 2022 à 12:07
Par : Fx
Synology DSM 711 300x225 - Synology DSM 7.1.1-42962 est disponibleDisponible en Realase Candidate début août (voir notre article), la version finale est enfin arrivée. En effet, Synology DSM 7.1.1 (42962) est disponible pour tous en téléchargement. Cette mise à jour est importante, car elle intègre plusieurs de nouveautés, des améliorations pour le système et surtout des corrections à des vulnérabilités. Regardons de plus près cette nouvelle version de DSM… Synology DSM 7.1.1-42962 Synology DSM 7.1.1 version finale vient tout juste d’arriver et nous vous recommandons de l’installer dans les […]

QNAP NAS Attacked By Deadbolt AGAIN – What Happened?

6 septembre 2022 à 23:00

New Reports of Deadbolt Ransomware Attacks on QNAP NAS via Photo Station

It would appear that the Deadbolt ransomware attack that has been a persistent pain for QNAP (and other NAS brands) in 2022 continues to remain current, with new reports emerging of further attacks of NAS systems in September 2022. The vulnerability that has been reported to be being exploited is in the QNAP Photo Station application and although a day one patch for the application for all current use QTS software systems has been issued, it has still resulted in users being hit in this new wave of attacked by the deadbolt ransomware group. Although the scale of this latest attack does not match that of previous attacks by the group, it is worth highlighting that the encryption of how this ransomware deploys and presentation to the user upon execution have changed a little, so even if you are not affected, it might still be worth getting clued up on this. In this article, I will cover everything that is known so far about this Photo Station vulnerability that was exploited, why deadbolt is still a thing, how it attacks, what you can do to avoid it and what can you do if you have been hit.

How Does Deadbolt Attack QNAP NAS?

Deadbolt Ransomware’s methodology in attacking your system has not changed much at all since its first attacks. We will touch on in a bit about why deadbolt is still around and the nature of software updates vs vulnerabilities, but for now we can discuss this specific instance. A vulnerability was found in Photo Station for QNAP NAS QTS/QuTS this week and this vulnerability created a small hole in the access control of the NAS that could be used to exploit as an attack vector for ransomware to be executed. It would still require your NAS to be setup in a weak remote access state (i.e. you allowed internet access to your system without sufficient layers of encryption, protection and/or authentication, such as a VPN, Firewall or disabling UPnP – will touch on these later) in order to reach ‘photo station’, but if it could, it could then execute the command to the QNAP NAS to encrypt it’s contents, create a ransom text not and modify the login screen to show the deadbolt warning. This one:

QNAP highlighted this vulnerability on their security advisor page, here under ID QSA-22-24 and state that they detected a new DeadBolt ransomware campaign on the morning of September 3rd, 2022 (GMT+8). The campaign appears to target QNAP NAS devices running Photo Station with internet exposure. This is not via the myQNAPCloud services, but rather users allowing remote access with open router ports, but no VPN or restrictive access rules in place. QNAP issued the following statement:

QNAP Product Security Incident Response Team (QNAP PSIRT) had made the assessment and released the patched Photo Station app for the current version within 12 hours. QNAP urges all QNAP NAS users to update Photo Station to the latest available version. QuMagie is a simple and powerful alternative to Photo Station. We recommend using QuMagie to efficiently manage photo storage in your QNAP NAS. We strongly urge that their QNAP NAS should not be directly connected to the Internet. This is to enhance the security of your QNAP NAS. We recommend users to make use of the myQNAPcloud Link feature provided by QNAP, or enable the VPN service. This can effectively harden the NAS and decrease the chance of being attacked.

Additionally, this warning that is displayed to the end user also has an additional note directed towards QNAP themselves that highlights that they are willing to share the nature of the exploited vulnerability for 5BTC. See here:

Now, as nefarious and immoral as you might find the Deadbolt ransomware attackers and what is being done here, we also have to put the spotlight on QNAP. In their defence (I will go into more detail on this later on in the article), they are a software developer that provides a range of tools and services to maintain many backups of your data, hugely configurable security options/variables to their system, a remote access cloud portal that acts at a checkpoint in myQNAPCloud, they provide regular updates to their software/service applications with automated update options and they provide a public security advisory panel and can only remain a single step ahead of vulnerabilities. HOWEVER, when vulnerabilities are found in their platform and services (even if patched out – which relies on users remaining updated), it continues to bring into question the strength, depth and attention to detail of their security teams during development. It is true that QNAP is not the only brand that has been successfully targetted by deadbolt (see Asustor HERE and Terramaster HERE) as well as not being the only brand targetted by malware (see Synology Synolocker HERE) , but QNAP still seems to persistently be the one that gets hit most. Ultimately, ARE QNAP NAS SAFE? We discussed this over on the YouTube channel back on Febuary 2022

PSA – GET YOUR BACKUPS IN ORDER!

Before you even go one paragraph further, I have a simple question for you – do you have a backup in place? If yes, then carry on to the next part. If not, and I cannot stress this enough, GET ONE NOW. The time you are spending reading this you could be susceptible to data loss in about 10 different ways without even factoring in ransomware (Power failure leading to hard drive corruption, Malware from a slightly iffy google search this morning, cloud storage provider going bust, OS failure on your device, etc). In this day and age owning a sufficient data backup is as sensible as buying a raincoat or looking both ways when you cross the street – you don’t do it because you like rain or like looking at cars, you do it because they are peace of mind, they are a safety net, they are for caution in case of the worst. It is a bit tenuous, but owning one or multiple backups always make me think of this quote from Shawshank Redemption by Stephen King:

shawshank redemption book

“There are really only two types of men in the world when it comes to bad trouble,” Andy said, cupping a match between his hands and lighting a cigarette. “Suppose there was a house full of rare paintings and sculptures and fine old antiques, Red? And suppose the guy who owned the house heard that there was a monster of a hurricane headed right at it. One of those two kinds of men just hopes for the best. The hurricane will change course, he says to himself. No right-thinking hurricane would ever dare wipe out all these Rembrandts, my two Degas horses, my Jackson Pollocks and my Paul Klees. Furthermore, God wouldn’t allow it. And if worst comes to worst, they’re insured. That’s one sort of man. The other sort just assumes that hurricane is going to tear right through the middle of his house. If the weather bureau says the hurricane just changed course, this guy assumes it’ll change back in order to put his house on ground zero again. This second type of guy knows there’s no harm in hoping for the best as long as you’re prepared for the worst.” 

Get a Backup in place

Why Is Deadbolt Ransomware STILL HAPPENING?

First and foremost, it is INCREDIBLY IMPORTANT that users understand the risks of allowing remote access to their NAS system (not just QNAP, but ANY NAS Drive) without specific port discipline, a VPN, a Firewall and/or custom admin credential/enabling. In the case of this recent resurgence of the ransomware attack that was executed by the Deadbolt group, it is important to note that it is made possible by two KEY VARIABLES! Weaknesses and Opportunity.

Now, with weakness, this stems from a vulnerability is found in a software/application – not uncommon and ALL software can only be one step ahead of those looking to break it. to give it a little context. In 2022 there have been 671 vulnerabilities found in Microsoft software services, 22 in Synology NAS software services and Apple iOS has had 79. This is not to besmirch their software/platforms, but ultimately the minute a software maker releases a new version/update (often to plug vulnerabilities that were found), the nefarious will then get to work on finding vulnerabilities in which to exploit for financial gain. That is why software updates are so incredibly important! However, a weakness is no good without access and/or an opportunity.

An Opportunity (in the context of ransomware and malware attacks) can largely be defined as an open door (no matter how small) that can be used to inject a command to the NAS as an administrator (eg. encrypt everything). THIS is where one of the biggest misconceptions (and indeed finger-pointing) happens when an incident of ransomware, malware or data loss occurs. A vulnerability in a software platform (especially when the bulk of software in common use today is built on Linux universally) is only any use when it can be executed. So, in the case of a NAS vulnerability, such as the Photo Station vulnerability that has been identified, it can only be exploited if the NAS user has allowed external access to their NAS via the internet. This access may well be behind user login credentials, but lacked the barrier of a VPN, a Firewall setup with amply restrictions, trusted access credentials/identity, limited/zero admin control, 2-step verification, specific port access to a GUI and many other restrictions/limitations/authentications that can be enabled. Not all these hurdles and/or barriers are as effective as others (with some vulnerabilities being built on backend access), but all/most of these should be considered when allowing any form of external access to your NAS outside of your local network. Equally, you NEED to become more acquainted with your router! Get into your router and reactive UPnP settings, as this eliminates the possibility of applications on your NAS inadvertently opening ports remotely without your direct knowledge.

  • Disable the Port Forwarding function of the router: Go to the management interface of your router, check the Virtual Server, NAT, or Port Forwarding settings, and disable the port forwarding setting of NAS management service port (port 8080 and 433 by default).
  • Disable the UPnP function of the QNAP NAS: Go to myQNAPcloud on the QTS menu, click the “Auto Router Configuration,” and unselect “Enable UPnP Port forwarding.”

Do keep in mind though that you might well be using external UPnP services on your router for other things in your home or office environment.

What is UPnP Port Forwarding?

Universal Plug and Play (UPnP) is a way of quickly forwarding the ports in use to other devices on a network automatically with one setting change and no additional configuration needed. UPnP Port Forwarding is widely used by many network devices, allowing them to communicate with each other more efficiently and to automatically create workgroups for data sharing, among other applications.

Is UPnP Port Forwarding safe?

UPnP is not a secure protocol. It uses network UDP multicasts, no encryption and no authentication. Since UPnP is not authenticated, one device could request port mapping for an another one. Hackers can abuse UPnP to attack through malicious files to infect your system and gain control. Despite its convenience, UPnP may expose your device to public networks and malicious attacks. It is recommended that your QNAP NAS stay behind your router and firewall without a public IP address. You should disable manual port forwarding and UPnP auto port forwarding for QNAP NAS in your router configuration

How Many QNAP NAS Users Have Been Affected by Deadbolt?

Getting the numbers on how many users have been impacted by this recent attack by the deadbolt group on QNAP NAS devices is exceedingly hard to identify. On the one hand, as this photo station vulnerability has been identified and effective in QTS 5 it has the potential to be high, however, it still heavily relies on having a system set up in a comparatively weak remote access configuration AND having a specific application with access credentials running. This is further reduced in scope as the Photo Station has been largely overtaken in use by QNAP users by the AI-powered QuMagie application. Still, the Photo Station application still has several ‘professional photographer’ services/structural qualities that keep it in use. The Bleeping Computer website identified 182 submissions to the ID Ransomware site reported for ‘Deadbolt’ (which requires uploading an encrypted file, attacker address and/other identifies for clarification of an attack type) with a spike that started on the 3rd of September (necessitating the patch o nthe 4th Sept). How many of the previously submitted reports in August 2022 were related to this photo station vulnerability (at that point unidentified) and how many were repeats by any one user or related to a QNAP NAS that was not updated since the early phase of the Deadbolt ransomware attacks of Jan 2022 cannot be confirmed. Nevertheless, these are still noticable numbers and can comfortably be classed as victims hitting the 3 digit mark.

Source for the below graphic and article – https://www.bleepingcomputer.com/news/security/qnap-patches-zero-day-used-in-new-deadbolt-ransomware-attacks

Alternatively, you can use server/internet service monitors such as censys to search for reported text that is used in the Deadbolt ransomware note. However, this is not the most precise and only further highlights that only QNAP themselves and Deadbolt know the extent of impact of this campaign. Unlike the original Deadbolt attacks of Jan 2022 of QNAP devices, research and strategic advisors at Unit42 noted back in May ’22 that the attack/injection of the ransomware and how it is presented to the user changed (though seemingly still using the same exploit that remained in systems that were not updated, therefore still vulnerable to the exploit in older QTS/QuTS versions and/or continued use in weak internet-facing access scenarios:

Unit 42 is observing a new wave of attacks of the Deadbolt #ransomware targeting QNAP NAS devices involving a new lock screen with updated JavaScript. Cortex Xpanse discovered ~3000 instances of infected devices. Details at https://t.co/uj0TOqACxu pic.twitter.com/RmSzZOAsTq

— Unit 42 (@Unit42_Intel) May 16, 2022

There has been no substantial analysis of the latest version of DeadBolt, but Unit 42 said in it’s May summary that the ransomware program made some significant changes since the March campaign. Specifically, the DeadBolt program now uses revised JavaScript code with a stronger SHA-256 implementation, building on the previous, lower-level ‘SubtleCrypto’ cryptography. Unit 42 researchers said this was likely changed to a stronger standard to accelerate the key verification process and also to ensure the verification works on browsers that do not support the SubtleCrypto API.

What Should You Do To Protect Your QNAP NAS from Deadbolt Ransomware Attacks?

If you are using the QNAP Photo Station application, then you need to suspend using it until you have updated to the latest version. It is worth highlighting again that this vulnerability will ONLY affect you if you have your QNAP NAS directly connected to internet access services (i.e NOT using a VPN or the myQNAPcloud link service). Updates for Photo Station have been issued for QTS 4 and QTS 5 on the brand’s official app portal of your NAS and directly downloadable from their official website:

  • QTS 5.0.1: Photo Station 6.1.2 and later
  • QTS 5.0.0/4.5.x: Photo Station 6.0.22 and later
  • QTS 4.3.6: Photo Station 5.7.18 and later
  • QTS 4.3.3: Photo Station 5.4.15 and later
  • QTS 4.2.6: Photo Station 5.2.14 and later

Outside of QNAP Photo Station, it is incredibly important that users maintain a secure layer/barrier between your NAS and your external internet connection. To protect your NAS from the DeadBolt ransomware, QNAP strongly recommends securing your QNAP NAS devices and routers by following these instructions:

  1. Disable the port forwarding function on the router.
  2. Set up myQNAPcloud on the NAS to enable secure remote access and prevent exposure to the internet.
  3. Update the NAS firmware to the latest version.
  4. Update all applications on the NAS to their latest versions.
  5. Apply strong passwords for all user accounts on the NAS.
  6. Take snapshots and back up regularly to protect your data.

Now, QNAP myQNAPCloud services are not the same as just opening your NAS connection from LAN only to LAN+Remote. myQNAPCloud creates a connection between the NAS and the QNAP access servers via a secure portal (with encryption, SSL certificates and other configurable options that can prevent interception via this tunnel). Then, if you want to create a connection remotely with your NAS, you do so via the QNAP access server – as opposed to the directly NAS connection. This DOES result in a drop in file transmission speeds remotely (as you are moving through an additional transit point), but increases security and authentication substantially. The alternative to this would be to use restrictive/specific open of ports on your router AND recommended use of a VPN – which is definitely a valid and ‘best of all worlds’ solution, but a little more technically advanced than many users are able to configure effectively/securely). If you want to set up a remote myQNAPcloud connection, you need to:

  1. Log on to QTS as an administrator.
  2. Open myQNAPcloud.
  3. Disable UPnP port forwarding.
    1. Go to Auto Router Configuration.
    2. Deselect Enable UPnP Port forwarding.
  4. Enable DDNS.
    1. Go to My DDNS.
    2. Click the toggle button to enable My DDNS.
  5. Do not publish your NAS services.
    1. Go to Published Services.
    2. Deselect all items under Publish.
    3. Click Apply.
  6. Configure myQNAPcloud Link to enable secure remote access to your NAS via a SmartURL.
    1. Go to myQNAPcloud Link.
    2. Click Install to install myQNAPcloud Link on your NAS.
    3. Click the toggle button to enable myQNAPcloud Link.
  7. Restrict which users can remotely access your NAS via the SmartURL.
    1. Go to Access Control.
    2. Next to Device access controls, select Private or Customized.
      Note: Selecting Private allows only the QNAP ID logged in to myQNAPcloud to access the NAS via the SmartURL. Selecting Customized allows you to invite other QNAP ID accounts to access the device via the SmartURL.
    3. If you selected Customized, click Add and specify a QNAP ID to invite the user.
  8. Obtain the SmartURL by going to Overview.

The final thing to do is to have two applications running on your QNAP NAS regularly. Malware Remover and the QNAP Security Counselor. The Malware tool is for scanning your system for existing threats that may have been installed/engineered inside your system. It then isolates, quarantines as appropriate and removes. The Security Councilor tool is designed to periodically check the security of your entire system, find any potential for an opening that a vulnerability could be exploited via, then makes recommendations on how to close it. This latter tool can be configured via a number of pre-set profiles that scale in severity, but can also be set to custom variables too. These (alongside having updates on both the QTS/QuTS OS and apps via the app center set to automatically download and install) should be among the FIRST things you set up on your QNAP NAS.

It is also REALLY important to note that these applications analyze and identify KNOWN vulnerabilities. They are not omnipresent and, much like in the case of the Photo Station vulnerability that has been identified here and a day 1 patch issued, until it IS recognized as a threat/attack-vector, it will not be seen

What Should You Do If Your QNAP NAS was Hit By Deadbolt Ransomware?

Unfortunately, as it stands, there is little resolution in place to reverse Deadbolt ransomware encryption without paying the 0.05 BTC to the attackers. Some users have reported that snapshots have been useful in reversing the impact (heavily dependent on your retention policy and location, as you still need the original file in a comparable form for snapshots to work). However, a full means to reverse deadbolt is not available.  Previous attacks were able to be reverse using data recovery tools such as PhotoRec to restore them to their original version on an external drive, but success in this method with deadbolt has not been exactly positive. If you have no backup in place and your data is truly irreplaceable, then paying might be the only option (at least in the short term). You can follow the instructions that are attached to the Deadbolt warning page on your QNAP NAS GUI. If you have lost access to this GUI in an QNAP update (understandable that you might action this in the vein hope of halting/reversing damage), here is a Deadbolt Decryptor tool (this still requires the encryption key however) – https://www.emsisoft.com/ransomware-decryption/deadbolt

There are several useful references and setup pointers listed in the exceptionally long QNAP forum port HERE and here are their recommendations for you in the event you have been hit:

  • If you have full external intact backups, reset your NAS and restore from backups
  • If you have no backups and don’t intend to pay, try Qrescue (if your NAS has more than 50% free space and was not written to, chances are ‘OK’ to recover most files)
  • If you decide to pay, here is a ‘user’ story’ (Make sure that all auto-updates are disabled during the decryption, so the process is not interrupted)
  • To find your decryption key after paying the ransom check here.
  • If you are missing the ransom note and bitcoin address (removed by a QNAP firmware update or Malware remover) check here

The Sad Truth about Servers, Security and Vulnerabilities

Vulnerability > Update > vulnerability > update > rinse > repeat

No platform, software or service is going to be 100% bulletproof. You can increase your personal layers of security (VPNs, Encryption, layers, restrictive white lists, etc) to hit 99.99% but whatever way you are looking at it, everything we use is software-based and therefore, fallible. Equally, users cannot pretend that it is still the early days of the internet anymore and still be annoyed when a statistical possibility that should have been factored against was not. Do I think QNAP NAS are safe? I’m sorry to say that the answer is never going to be a simple Yes/No. I think they provide what they say they provide and I think that QNAP hardware is still the best in the market right now. But their software needs to be less rushed, the extra time/budget be spent on that software, or utilize a trusted 3rd party. The need to relinquish some of the customization of their platform in efforts to remove some of the configuration out of the hands of less tech-savvy users who end up overly reliant in defaults. Perhaps a much more rigorous setup policy that, on day 1, have an EXPERT door and a NOVICE door, with randomized defaults and extremely regimented update rules on the latter. Equally, the brand (though better than it was) needs to work on its communication with its end-user base, both in the event of critical issues and education on what the user base needs to have to increase security OUTSIDE of their product. I still recommend the brand, I still think users should use their products, but we need to be realistic and honest with ourselves about what we buy and our expectations. If I buy a QNAP NAS, I expect it to store the data I store in it and allow me access to it on my terms, but ‘my terms’ might be a lot more/less strict than the next person and with that comes due diligence in 2022. I hope that the most recent ransomware attack, deadbolt, is the last ‘big’ one we hear about the year/moving forward, but I do not think it will be. More than just QNAP, one look at the vulnerabilities listed on security advisories of all the brands tell us that there is big money to be made by these intruders and the brands can only stay 1 step ahead. As always, me and Eddie here on NASCompares have been running a page that links to the bigger NAS security Advisory pages that gets regularly updated, so if you want to get notifications on these as they get added (pulled from the official pages themselves), then you can visit the page below and put your email in for updates when they happen. Have a great week and backup, backup, BACKUP.

Click Below to Read

 

 

📧 LET ME KNOW ABOUT NEW POSTS 🔔

Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 1,258 other subscribers

Get an alert every time something gets added to this specific article!


Want to follow specific category? 📧 Subscribe

This description contains links to Amazon. These links will take you to some of the products mentioned in today's content. As an Amazon Associate, I earn from qualifying purchases. Visit the NASCompares Deal Finder to find the best place to buy this device in your region, based on Service, Support and Reputation - Just Search for your NAS Drive in the Box Below

Need Advice on Data Storage from an Expert?

We want to keep the free advice on NASCompares FREE for as long as we can. Since this service started back in Jan '18, We have helped hundreds of users every month solve their storage woes, but we can only continue to do this with your support. So please do choose to buy at Amazon US and Amazon UK on the articles when buying to provide advert revenue support or to donate/support the site below. Finally, for free advice about your setup, just leave a message in the comments below here at NASCompares.com and we will get back to you. Need Help? Where possible (and where appropriate) please provide as much information about your requirements, as then I can arrange the best answer and solution to your needs. Do not worry about your e-mail address being required, it will NOT be used in a mailing list and will NOT be used in any way other than to respond to your enquiry. [contact-form-7]     Terms and Conditions Alternatively, why not ask me on the ASK NASCompares forum, by clicking the button below. This is a community hub that serves as a place that I can answer your question, chew the fat, share new release information and even get corrections posted. I will always get around to answering ALL queries, but as a one-man operation, I cannot promise speed! So by sharing your query in the ASK NASCompares section below, you can get a better range of solutions and suggestions, alongside my own.  

Clowd – outil de capture et d’enregistrement d’écran minimaliste pour Windows

7 septembre 2022 à 07:00
Par : EVOTk
Clownd capture 300x225 - Clowd - outil de capture et d'enregistrement d'écran minimaliste pour WindowsClowd est un outil de capture et d’enregistrement d’écran minimaliste. Minimaliste ne signifie pas qu’il y a peu de fonctions, bien au contraire. Ce logiciel est gratuit et son code est librement accessible à cette adresse. Discret, il se place dans la barre d’état de Windows quand vous ne l’utilisez pas et il s’active lorsque vous appuyez sur la touche « Imp. Écran« . Mais le meilleur reste à venir… Fonctionnalités de Clowd 💻 Capture de région Clowd utilise la bibliothèque Direct3D […]

New Version of Seagate Ironwolf Pro NAS Drives Available

8 septembre 2022 à 18:00

Seagate Update Ironwolf Pro Hard Drive Series with a new More Durable Enterprise NT Model

If you have been on the fence for a while about choosing the right Hard drive for your NAS, humming and ahhing about whether to choose a Pro series drive or an enterprise-class drive, then Seagate just made things a little easier for you with the release of the new Seagate Ironwolf Pro NT series of drives. Available now, these are new versions of the 2,4,6,8,10,12,14,16,18 and 20TB Seagate Ironwolf Pro series, but now have had a few build elements tweaked to improve their durability and workloads to be much more comparable to data center class drives – whilst still maintaining the advantages and firmware focus of the Ironwolf Pro HDD series.

What Are the Specifications of the Newer Generation of Seagate Ironwolf Pro?

The difference between the previous/current generation of Seagate Ironwolf Pro HDDs and these newly release NT versions is largely based on their build and design being much close to that of the Seagate EXOS series, which results in a higher sequential performance, longer/higher durability rating and a larger scope of deployment.

Main Key Differences Between Seagate Ironwolf Pro and the New NT Version

  • Standard Ironwolf Pro drives can be used in upto 24 Bay enclosures, whereas these new NT drives are data center scale in their deployment and results in limitless enclosure volume support
  • Standard Itonwolf dries have a 300TB annual workload, Ironwolf Pro can take 300TB a year and the new Seagate Ironwolf Pro NT series can reach take 550TB of writing per year
  • Across the range of capacities of Seagate Ironwolf Pro and the new Ironwolf Pro NT versions, the new NT version is around 15-30MB/s faster on reported sequential performance (likely higher in typical ad-hoc use)
  • The Seagate Ironwolf NT series arrives with a reported 2.5 Miliion hours MTBF vs the 1 Million on standard Ironwolf Pro drives

Here is how the two versions of Seagate Ironwolf pro compare side by side on the rest of the specifications

HDD Type Seagate Ironwolf Pro v.2

Seagate Ironwolf Pro

Available Capacity 2TB-20TB 2TB-20TB
Model ID Standard (X=capacity STx000NT001 STx0000NE000
Interface SATA SATA
Drive Bays Supported Unlimited 8-24-Bays
Magnetic Recording CMR CMR
Workload Rate Limit (WRL) 550TB per Year 300TB per Year
Rotational Vibration (RV) Sensors Yes Yes
On-board Cache 256MB 256MB
Mean Time Between Failures (MTBF, hours) 2.5Million 1Million
Sector Size (Bytes per Logical Sector) 512E 512E
Rescue Data Recovery Services(years) 3yrs 3yrs
Spindle Speed (RPM) 7200 7200
Max. Sustained Transfer Rate OD Seq Read (MB/s) 285MB/s (20TB)

285MB/s (18TB)

270MB/s (16TB)

270MB/s (14TB)

270MB/s (12TB)

263MB/s (10TB)

255MB/s (8TB)

250MB/s (6TB)

285MB/s (20TB)

260MB/s (18TB)

255MB/s (16TB)

255MB/s (14TB)

240MB/s (12TB)

240MB/s (10TB)

240MB/s (8TB)

220MB/s (6TB)

Rotational Vibration @ 10-1500 Hz (rad/s) 12.5 12.5
Operating Temperature (ambient, min °C) 0 0
Operating Temperature (drive reported, max °C) 65 65
Nonoperating Temperature (ambient, min °C) -40 -40
Nonoperating Temperature (ambient, max °C) 70 70
Vibration, Nonoperating: 10Hz to 500Hz (Grms) 2.27 2.27
Acoustics, Idle (typical, measured in Idle 1 state) (dBA) 20 20
Acoustics, Seek (typical) (dBA) 26 26
Shock, Operating 2ms (Read/Write) (Gs) 40/40Gs 40/40Gs
Shock, Nonoperating, 1ms and 2ms (Gs) 200 200

So, as you can see, both are available in between 2TB and 20TB at the time of recording, but it is in just a handful of specifications (though crucial to larger scale RAID/configurations

When Will the Newer Models of Seagate Ironwolf Pro HDDs Be Released?

The new Seagate Ironwolf Pro STx000NT001 range of HDDs are available now alongside the existing Pro generation on several websites, as well as being highlighted on the official Seagate product pages. Price differences between the original Ironwolf Pro and this new version are yet to be fully clarified.

 

 

📧 LET ME KNOW ABOUT NEW POSTS 🔔

Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 1,258 other subscribers

Get an alert every time something gets added to this specific article!


Want to follow specific category? 📧 Subscribe

This description contains links to Amazon. These links will take you to some of the products mentioned in today's content. As an Amazon Associate, I earn from qualifying purchases. Visit the NASCompares Deal Finder to find the best place to buy this device in your region, based on Service, Support and Reputation - Just Search for your NAS Drive in the Box Below

Need Advice on Data Storage from an Expert?

We want to keep the free advice on NASCompares FREE for as long as we can. Since this service started back in Jan '18, We have helped hundreds of users every month solve their storage woes, but we can only continue to do this with your support. So please do choose to buy at Amazon US and Amazon UK on the articles when buying to provide advert revenue support or to donate/support the site below. Finally, for free advice about your setup, just leave a message in the comments below here at NASCompares.com and we will get back to you. Need Help? Where possible (and where appropriate) please provide as much information about your requirements, as then I can arrange the best answer and solution to your needs. Do not worry about your e-mail address being required, it will NOT be used in a mailing list and will NOT be used in any way other than to respond to your enquiry. [contact-form-7]     Terms and Conditions Alternatively, why not ask me on the ASK NASCompares forum, by clicking the button below. This is a community hub that serves as a place that I can answer your question, chew the fat, share new release information and even get corrections posted. I will always get around to answering ALL queries, but as a one-man operation, I cannot promise speed! So by sharing your query in the ASK NASCompares section below, you can get a better range of solutions and suggestions, alongside my own.  
❌