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ADATA XPG GAMMIX S70 SSD – PS5 EXPANSION GUIDE & TEST RESULTS

13 septembre 2021 à 01:17

PS5 SSD Expansion Testing with the XPG GAMMIX S70 SSD

Are You considering the ADATA XPG GAMMIX S70 SSD as a PS5 upgrade? Whether you are looking at upgrading the SSD on your PS5 because you are running out of space or because you heard that some SSDs can increase load times for your favourite games, it is always going to be sensible to spend a few minutes researching before pulling the trigger at checkout and spending hundreds on the XPG GAMMIX S70 only to find out that the benefits are negligible or, worse still, actually slow your games down! Equally, you should always factor in that the PS5 is a relatively new console and games developers are still in the early stages of maximizing how much they can do with the CPU, Memory, GPU and (of course) super-fast NVMe M.2 SSD. Therefore the commitment you make on buying an SSD upgrade to your PS5 needs to also factor in that it will still perform well in the years to come. The XPG GAMMIX S70 meets a number of the key specifications of the PS5 storage bay, but then again many, MANY SSDs do. So today I want to put this SSD through it’s paces with many games to see how well it compares against the internal PS5 SSD doing the same thing. NOTE – FULL Videos of the testing of the XPG GAMMIX S70 that combined cover more than an hour can be found at the bottom of the article. This article primarily covers the load times of games and saves on the PS5 using the XPG GAMMIX S70 SSD and how they compare with the internal PS5 loading the same game. If you want to watch the full videos that cover PS5 XPG GAMMIX S70 use that feature frame rates, texture swapping, asset management and more, I recommend you watch those videos at the end of this article.

Here is the PS5 internal Benchmark for the XPG GAMMIX S70 SSD at the initialization of the system:

What Are the Specifications of the XPG GAMMIX S70 SSD?

Before we go through the load time testing of the XPG GAMMIX S70 on the PS5, it is worth taking a look at the hardware specifications. Unlike traditional Hard Drives and SSDs that were using the PS3 and PS4 that used SATA connectivity, this new generation of SSD storage using M.2 NVMe PCIe 4.0 architecture. This is a very, VERY big difference physically, in terms of maximum performance and opens up ALOT of specifications that you should keep an eye on. Aside from the capacity (i.e the amount of data the XPG GAMMIX S70 can hold in gigabytes and terabytes) the key ones to factor in when buying an SSD are the following:

  • Controller & NAND – These are the brain of the SSD (handling the transfer of data as quickly and efficiently as possible) and the physical cells on the XPG GAMMIX S70 SSD that hold the data. As long as you are using 3D TLC NAND (the industry preferred middle ground for price vs performance), you should be ok. Though the better the quality of NAND, generally the better the performance and durability long term.
  • Sequential Read – This is the reported maximum access speed that the data on the XPG GAMMIX S70 SSD can be access when accessing large blocks of data
  • Sequential Write – This is the reported maximum speed that data can be written to the XPG GAMMIX S70 SSD. As far as the PS5 architecture goes, this is much less important right now but could become important later in the system’s life as games, services and the level to which the XPG GAMMIX S70 can be accessed changes.
  • IOPS – These represent the number of individual operations the XPG GAMMIX S70 SSD can handle per second, based on the smallest size possible. Again, not strictly relevant in the PS5 right now because of the way data is largely front-loaded on modern games, but may well impact how larger and evolved worlds and multiplayer games are developed in future
  • TBW, MTBF & DWPD – Terabytes Written and Drive Writes Per Day, these indicate how much the drive is designed to withstand in activity over a 5 year or daily basis (respectively), Before the drive begins to deteriorate in performance or eventually fail. The PS5 will hardly be able to hit these kind of numbers daily BUT these figures will give you a good idea of the lifespan of the SSD beyond 5 years. Given the lifespan of some consoles can cross over a decade, the higher these numbers are, the better!

Here are the official specifications of the XPG GAMMIX S70 SSD:

ADATA GAMMIX S70

1TB – $159.99, 2TB – $299.99

PCIe Generation PCIe Gen 4
NVMe Rev NVMe 1.4
NAND 3D TLC Micron 96L
Max Capacity 2TB – Single Sided
Controller Innogrit IG5236
Warranty 5yr
500GB Model N/A
Price in $ and $ N/A
1TB Model AGAMMIXS70-1T-C
Price in $ and $ $199 / £175
2TB Model AGAMMIXS70-2T-C
Price in $ and $ $399 / £355
4TB Model N/A
Price in $ and $ N/A
500GB Model N/A
Total Terabytes Written (TBW) N/A
Mean Time Between Failures (MTBF, hours) N/A
DWPD N/A
1TB Model AGAMMIXS70-1T-C
Total Terabytes Written (TBW) 740TB
Mean Time Between Failures (MTBF, hours) 2,000,000
DWPD 0.4DWPD
2TB Model AGAMMIXS70-2T-C
Total Terabytes Written (TBW) 1480TB
Mean Time Between Failures (MTBF, hours) 2,000,000
DWPD 0.4DWPD
4TB Model N/A
Total Terabytes Written (TBW) N/A
Mean Time Between Failures (MTBF, hours) N/A
DWPD N/A
   
Brand/Series ADTA GAMMIX S70
500GB Model N/A
Sequential Read (Max, MB/s), 128 KB N/A
Sequential Write (Max, MB/s), 128 KB N/A
1TB Model AGAMMIXS70-1T-C
Sequential Read (Max, MB/s), 128 KB 7400MB
Sequential Write (Max, MB/s), 128 KB 5500MB
2TB Model AGAMMIXS70-2T-C
Sequential Read (Max, MB/s), 128 KB 7450MB
Sequential Write (Max, MB/s), 128 KB 6800MB
4TB Model N/A
Sequential Read (Max, MB/s), 128 KB N/A
Sequential Write (Max, MB/s), 128 KB N/A
Brand/Series ADTA GAMMIX S70
500GB Model N/A
Random Read (Max, IOPS), 4 KB QD32 N/A
Random Write (Max, IOPS), 4 KB QD32 N/A
1TB Model AGAMMIXS70-1T-C
Random Read (Max, IOPS), 4 KB QD32 350000
Random Write (Max, IOPS), 4 KB QD32 720000
2TB Model AGAMMIXS70-2T-C
Random Read (Max, IOPS), 4 KB QD32 650,000
Random Write (Max, IOPS), 4 KB QD32 740,000

So, now you know the hardware specifications of the XPG GAMMIX S70 SSD and you also know that (at the time of writing!) the XPG GAMMIX S70 is supported by the PS5 SSD expansion bay.

IMPORTANT – This article contains ALOT of gifs to demonstrate the loading times of the XPG GAMMIX S70 SSD versus the internal PS5 SSD, so the page/gifs might take an extra minute to load. Please be patient OR watch the videos of the full testing a the bottom of the page.

Testing the XPG GAMMIX S70 SSD with the PS5 – Test Parameters

All of the tests of the XPG GAMMIX S70 SSD on the PS5 were conducted in groups of 5 games at a time. In the event of a game arriving on a disc, the full disc data and all current updates were transferred over the XPG GAMMIX S70 SSD. The disc might be present, but it is only for system verification and would be an identical setup to the PS5 internal SSD that it is being compared against. The SSD was tested using the latest PS5 Beta Firmware update (3.0 or 3.1 depending on the time of testing as a further update was made available during the widespread testing) and although the supported drives when the SSD expansion feature might change, the XPG GAMMIX S70 SSD is fully functioning and supported on the PS5 at the time of writing. So, let’s get started on the testing of each game:

 

PS5 XPG GAMMIX S70 SSD Testing – Demon Souls Nexus Loading Test

This test was loading from the title screen to the central hub world (Nexus) of Demon Souls, comparing the XPG GAMMIX S70 vs the internal PS5 SSD:

PS5 XPG GAMMIX S70 SSD Testing – Demon Souls Archstone 2 Test

This test was loading to the Smithing Grounds of Demon Souls, comparing the XPG GAMMIX S70 vs the internal PS5 SSD:

PS5 XPG GAMMIX S70 SSD Testing – Demon Souls Archstone 1 Test

This test was loading to the first main area of Demon Souls, comparing the XPG GAMMIX S70 vs the internal PS5 SSD:

PS5 XPG GAMMIX S70 SSD Testing – Ratchet & Clank World Loading Test I

This test was loading to the starting area of Ratchet & Clank Rifts Apart, comparing the XPG GAMMIX S70 vs the internal PS5 SSD:

PS5 XPG GAMMIX S70 SSD Testing – Ratchet & Clank World Loading Test II

This test was loading to the first main transitional area of Ratchet & Clank Rifts Apart, comparing the XPG GAMMIX S70 vs the internal PS5 SSD:

PS5 XPG GAMMIX S70 SSD Testing – Borderlands 3 Full Loading Test I

This test was loading Borderlands to the Title Screen fro the PS5 Main menu on Borderlands 3, comparing the XPG GAMMIX S70 vs the internal PS5 SSD:

PS5 XPG GAMMIX S70 SSD Testing – Borderlands 3 Level Load Test II

This test was loading a save game from the title screen to the Pandora World Area, comparing the XPG GAMMIX S70 vs the internal PS5 SSD:

PS5 XPG GAMMIX S70 SSD Testing – Resident Evil Village Castle Loading Test I

This test was loading the Castle Area of Resident Evil Village, comparing the XPG GAMMIX S70 vs the internal PS5 SSD:

PS5 XPG GAMMIX S70 SSD Testing – Resident Evil Village Stronghold Loading Test II

This test was loading the Stronghold of Resident Evil Village, comparing the XPG GAMMIX S70 vs the internal PS5 SSD:

PS5 XPG GAMMIX S70 SSD Testing – Hitman 3 Dartmoor Loading Test I

This test was loading the Dartmoor level on Hitman 3, comparing the XPG GAMMIX S70 vs the internal PS5 SSD:

PS5 XPG GAMMIX S70 SSD Testing – Hitman 3 Mendoza Loading Test II

This test was loading the Mendoza level on Hitman 3, comparing the XPG GAMMIX S70 vs the internal PS5 SSD:

PS5 XPG GAMMIX S70 SSD Testing – Terminator Resistance Level Loading Test

This test was loading Terminator Resistance Infiltrator Mode, comparing the XPG GAMMIX S70 vs the internal PS5 SSD:

PS5 XPG GAMMIX S70 SSD Testing – GTA V Full Game Loading Test

This test was loading the Grand Theft Auto V from the PS5 menu to gameplay on the Single Player Mode, comparing the XPG GAMMIX S70 vs the internal PS5 SSD:

PS5 XPG GAMMIX S70 SSD Testing – Dead By Daylight Bots Test

This test was loading the tutorial Bots Mode on Dead By Daylight, comparing the XPG GAMMIX S70 vs the internal PS5 SSD:

PS5 XPG GAMMIX S70 SSD Testing – Red Dead Redemption II Campaign Loading Test

This test was loading the Blackwater Area of Red Dead Redemption II in single Player, comparing the XPG GAMMIX S70 vs the internal PS5 SSD:

PS5 XPG GAMMIX S70 SSD Testing – No Man’s Sky Creative Mode Loading Test

This test was loading No Man’s Sky in Creative Mode from the Title screen, comparing the XPG GAMMIX S70 vs the internal PS5 SSD:

PS5 XPG GAMMIX S70 SSD Testing – In Rays of the Light Loading Test I, Outside

This test was loading the outside world area of In Rays of the Light, comparing the XPG GAMMIX S70 vs the internal PS5 SSD:

PS5 XPG GAMMIX S70 SSD Testing – In Rays of the Light Loading Test II, Inside

This test was loading the underground bunker area of In Rays of the Light, comparing the XPG GAMMIX S70 vs the internal PS5 SSD:

PS5 XPG GAMMIX S70 SSD Testing – Star Wars Fallen Order Level Loading Test I

This test was loading the Kashkykk area of Star Wars Fallen Order from the title screen, comparing the XPG GAMMIX S70 vs the internal PS5 SSD:

PS5 XPG GAMMIX S70 SSD Testing – Star Wars Fallen Order Trial Loading Test II

This test was loading a combat challenge, mid-game, of Star Wars Fallen Order from the title screen, comparing the XPG GAMMIX S70 vs the internal PS5 SSD:

PS5 XPG GAMMIX S70 SSD Testing – Doom Eternal Level Loading Test I

This test was loading a level in Doom Eternal from the title screen, comparing the XPG GAMMIX S70 vs the internal PS5 SSD:

 

Full XPG GAMMIX S70 SSD PS5 Test Videos

If you want to see the FULL testing of every PS5/PS4 game with the XPG GAMMIX S70 SSD, you can watch the videos below. These tests have been grouped into 5 games per video, with each game being assessed on Loading Times, Frame Rate, Texture swapping, Asset Popping and compared against the exact game being loaded on the PS5 SSD. NOTE – These videos are being edited and published throughout September and October, so if a video is showing as ‘unavailable’ below, it might not be published yet, but should be up shortly!

ADATA GAMMIX S70

1TB – $159.99, 2TB – $299.99

XPG GAMMIX S70 PS5 SSD Test 1

XPG GAMMIX S70 PS5 SSD Test 2

XPG GAMMIX S70 PS5 SSD Test 3

XPG GAMMIX S70 SSD Review

 


Articles Get Updated Regularly - Get an alert every time something gets added to this page!


This description contains links to Amazon. These links will take you to some of the products mentioned in today's content. As an Amazon Associate, I earn from qualifying purchases. Visit the NASCompares Deal Finder to find the best place to buy this device in your region, based on Service, Support and Reputation - Just Search for your NAS Drive in the Box Below

 

SEARCH IN THE BOX BELOW FOR NAS DEALS

Need Advice on Data Storage from an Expert?

We want to keep the free advice on NASCompares FREE for as long as we can. Since this service started back in Jan '18, We have helped hundreds of users every month solve their storage woes, but we can only continue to do this with your support. So please do choose to buy at Amazon US and Amazon UK on the articles when buying to provide advert revenue support or to donate/support the site below. Finally, for free advice about your setup, just leave a message in the comments below here at NASCompares.com and we will get back to you. Need Help? Where possible (and where appropriate) please provide as much information about your requirements, as then I can arrange the best answer and solution to your needs. Do not worry about your e-mail address being required, it will NOT be used in a mailing list and will NOT be used in any way other than to respond to your enquiry. [contact-form-7] Terms and Conditions Alternatively, why not ask me on the ASK NASCompares forum, by clicking the button below. This is a community hub that serves as a place that I can answer your question, chew the fat, share new release information and even get corrections posted. I will always get around to answering ALL queries, but as a one-man operation, I cannot promise speed! So by sharing your query in the ASK NASCompares section below, you can get a better range of solutions and suggestions, alongside my own.  

 

PS5 SSD Comparison – WD BLACK SN850 v SEAGATE FIRECUDA 530 v SAMSUNG 980 PRO v SABRENT ROCKET 4+

13 août 2021 à 15:00

Should You Buy the WD Black SN850, Seagate Firecuda 530, Samsung 980 Pro or Sabrent Rocket 4 Plus M.2 SSD for PS5?

If you have been considering an SSD upgrade for your Playstation 5 now that the feature is enabled (currently in beta and full support coming very soon), then chances are that of all the many PS5 compatible PCIe4 M.2 NVMe SSDs available to buy, that one of four models are at the top of your list. The WD Black SN850 (recommended by Mark Cerny), the Seagate Firecuda 530 (heavy endurance, high speed industry recommendation), the Samsung 980 Pro (widely available, fantastic performance and great value) and the Sabrent Rocket 4 Plus (great price vs capacity and fantastic architecture). These four SSDs have been the ones that have risen above most others, for various reasons, as the hottest picks for your PS5 storage upgrade. Each drive is pretty much the fastest and most capable drive from their respective brands and although there are a few close ones (such as the Aorus 7000s, ADATA Gamix S70 and PNY CS3140), they have not been as widely embraced at these four SSDs.

TOP 4 Recommended PS5 Storage Expansion Compatible SSDs

WD Black SN850

Seagate Firecuda 530

Samsung 980 Pro

SABRENT Rocket 4 Plus

500GB – $169.99

1TB – $249.99

2TB – $549.99

500GB – $149.99

1TB – $239.99

2TB – $489.99

4TB – $949.99.

250GB – $69.99

500GB – $119.99

1TB – $199.99

2TB – $429.99

1TB – $200

2TB – $469.99

4TB – $999.99

But which one should you buy? Which SSD should you choose for your PS5 Expansion storage? Today I want to go through a large selection of loading tests that were performed on each SSD in order to work out which one is the best SSD to upgrade your PS5. Let’s begin.

Note: SN850 = WD Black SN850, FC 530 = Seagate Firecuda 530, 980 Pro = Samsung 980 Pro and Rocket+ = Sabrent Rocekt 4 Plus.

SN850 v FC 530 vs 980 Pro vs Rocket+ SSD Comparison – PS5 Internal Benchmark

The first thing to test is the PS5 internal Sequential Read performance benchmark on all four SSDs.

WD BLACK SN850 1TB – 6,457MB/s

SEAGATE FIRECUDA 530 500GB – 6,558MB/s

SAMSUNG 980 PRO 250GB – 6,317MB/s

SABRENT ROCKET 4 PLUS 2TB – 6,557MB/s

Although it HAS TO be taken into account that the capacities of these drives differ, this has very little impact on sequential real (given that all four brands say that their smallest 250/500GB drives can all hit/surpass 7,000MB/s). The Seagate Firecuda 530 SSD had the highest PS5 reported speed at 6,558MB/s. However, this is a singular reported benchmark from the system bootup and not fully representative of game loading/handling when in use. So, let’s look at the game loading comparisons.

SN850 v FC 530 vs 980 Pro vs Rocket+ SSD Comparison Test 1 – Demon Souls 1

This test was for the PS5 launch title Demon Souls and was loading into the game from the title screen (offline). Below is a quick video/gif demonstrating this and how the WD, Seagate, Samsung and Sabrent PCIe4 SSDs compared:

Though incredibly close, in the case of the Loading of the save file, frame by frame analysis shows that the WD Black SN850 was the fastest loading.

 

SN850 v FC 530 vs 980 Pro vs Rocket+ SSD Comparison Test 2 – Demon Souls 2

This test was for the PS5 launch title Demon Souls and was loading from the nexus hub and into another world (offline). Below is a quick video/gif demonstrating this and how the WD, Seagate, Samsung and Sabrent PCIe4 SSDs compared:

Once again, with barely hundredths of seconds between them all, the WD Black SN850 SSD was still the first to load this demon souls level change.

 

SN850 v FC 530 vs 980 Pro vs Rocket+ SSD Comparison Test 3 – Demon Souls 3

This test was for the PS5 launch title Demon Souls and was loading from the nexus hub and into another world (offline). Below is a quick video/gif demonstrating this and how the WD, Seagate, Samsung and Sabrent PCIe4 SSDs compared:

The last Demons Souls test was once again, painfully tight, but this time I would say it was a tie between the WD Black SN850 and the Sabrent Rocket 4 Plus SSD.

 

SN850 v FC 530 vs 980 Pro vs Rocket+ SSD Comparison Test 4 – Resident Evil Village 1

This test was loading a save file from Resident Evil Village in the later stages of the game. Below is a quick video/gif demonstrating this and how the WD, Seagate, Samsung and Sabrent PCIe4 SSDs compared:

When loading Resident Evil VIII for PS5 from a save game, the Seagate Firecuda 530 SSD was first by just a few frames in the first test.

SN850 v FC 530 vs 980 Pro vs Rocket+ SSD Comparison Test 5 – Resident Evil Village 2

This test was loading a save file from Resident Evil Village in the early castle stages of the game. Below is a quick video/gif demonstrating this and how the WD, Seagate, Samsung and Sabrent PCIe4 SSDs compared:

Once again, in the 2nd Resident Evil savegame load (this time in to a more compact environment) the Seagate Firecuda 530 SSD was the fastest, but only just.

 

SN850 v FC 530 vs 980 Pro vs Rocket+ SSD Comparison Test 6 – Ratchet & Clank 1

This test was loading a save file from Rachet & Clank and featured the long transitional world-changing sequence in the first 30mins of the game. Below is a quick video/gif demonstrating this and how the WD, Seagate, Samsung and Sabrent PCIe4 SSDs compared:

When testing the Rachet and Clank long level change transitional rail segment, the Sabrent Rocket 4 Plus and the Seagate Firecuda 530 SSD were a tie.

 

SN850 v FC 530 vs 980 Pro vs Rocket+ SSD Comparison Test 7 – Ratchet & Clank 2

This test was loading a save file from Ratchet & Clank again and the very start of the game, in a very dense asset-rich environment. Below is a quick video/gif demonstrating this and how the WD, Seagate, Samsung and Sabrent PCIe4 SSDs compared:

In the 2nd Ratchet & Clank test, the Sabrent Rocket 4 Plus was the fastest but barely 2 frames! Still, a win is a win!

 

SN850 v FC 530 vs 980 Pro vs Rocket+ SSD Comparison Test 8 – GTA V

This test was loading GTA V from the PS5 main menu (notorious for an incredibly long loading time) and into single player. Below is a quick video/gif demonstrating this and how the WD, Seagate, Samsung and Sabrent PCIe4 SSDs compared:

Grand Theft Auto 5 is a game that has been migrated and upscaled from PS3, to PS4 to PS4 Pro. Now running on PS5 for this test (with a PS5 version coming soon), the loading screen is still VERY long! Of the four SSDs, the WD Black SN850 loaded the fastest but a VERY comfortably margin!

 

SN850 v FC 530 vs 980 Pro vs Rocket+ SSD Comparison Test 9 – DOOM Eternal

This test was loading a save file from Doom Eternal from the preliminary stages of the game. Below is a quick video/gif demonstrating this and how the WD, Seagate, Samsung and Sabrent PCIe4 SSDs compared:

Loading Doom Eternal PS5 upgrade (with high graphical settings and ray tracing enabled) from a save game, the Seagate Firecuda 530 and Sabrent Rocket 4 Plus SSD were the fastest, but once again, only by a tiny number of frames.

 

SN850 v FC 530 vs 980 Pro vs Rocket+ SSD Comparison Test 10 – Destruction Allstars

This test was loading an arena match in arcade mode of Destruction Allstars. Below is a quick video/gif demonstrating this and how the WD, Seagate, Samsung and Sabrent PCIe4 SSDs compared:

For Destruction Allstars, as the game uses a sneaky form of hidden loading (as you go into the arena, the game loads assets one by one, with smart camera angling) I judged loading to be ‘completed’ when the help splash screen appeared, as this signalled the start of the player control. In this case, the Samsung 980 Pro was the fastest!

 

SN850 v FC 530 vs 980 Pro vs Rocket+ SSD Comparison Test 11 – Control

This test was for the PS5 full version of Control and was loaded from the PS5 console menu and directly into the game. Below is a quick video/gif demonstrating this and how the WD, Seagate, Samsung and Sabrent PCIe4 SSDs compared:

This one was INCREDIBLY tight, but in the case of Control for PS5, the fastest loading SSD of the four was the Samsung 980 Pro SSD, but only by 1-2 frames.

 

SN850 v FC 530 vs 980 Pro vs Rocket+ SSD Comparison – RESULTS!

It is important to remember that all four of these SSDs are still amazing drives and still easily some of the best choices when upgrading your PS5 storage. Even when one SSD managed to load a game faster than another, it did so within 10ths/100ths of a second faster than the others in some cases. Below is a breakdown of points for each time an SSD either loaded the game first or was given a higher benchmark at the start. There is also the FULL TEST video below over on YouTube that goes through these tests in greater length and detail. It is also VERY important to factor in that these 4 drives were not all the same capacity, though this would have more sway/impact in writing operations (which were largely irrelevant here). I hope you enjoyed this guide and found it useful in your search for the perfect SSD for your PS5 Expansion slot upgrade! Use the links in the table to find your SSD of choice at the best available price right now, for each capacity.

TOP 4 Recommended PS5 Storage Expansion Compatible SSDs

WD Black SN850

Seagate Firecuda 530

Samsung 980 Pro

SABRENT Rocket 4 Plus

POINTS: ★★★★★

POINTS: ★★★★

POINTS: ★★

POINTS: ★★★★

500GB – $169.99

1TB – $249.99

2TB – $549.99

500GB – $149.99

1TB – $239.99

2TB – $489.99

4TB – $949.99.

250GB – $69.99

500GB – $119.99

1TB – $199.99

2TB – $429.99

1TB – $200

2TB – $469.99

4TB – $999.99

asa

 


Articles Get Updated Regularly - Get an alert every time something gets added to this page!


This description contains links to Amazon. These links will take you to some of the products mentioned in today's content. As an Amazon Associate, I earn from qualifying purchases. Visit the NASCompares Deal Finder to find the best place to buy this device in your region, based on Service, Support and Reputation - Just Search for your NAS Drive in the Box Below

 

SEARCH IN THE BOX BELOW FOR NAS DEALS

Need Advice on Data Storage from an Expert?

We want to keep the free advice on NASCompares FREE for as long as we can. Since this service started back in Jan '18, We have helped hundreds of users every month solve their storage woes, but we can only continue to do this with your support. So please do choose to buy at Amazon US and Amazon UK on the articles when buying to provide advert revenue support or to donate/support the site below. Finally, for free advice about your setup, just leave a message in the comments below here at NASCompares.com and we will get back to you. Need Help? Where possible (and where appropriate) please provide as much information about your requirements, as then I can arrange the best answer and solution to your needs. Do not worry about your e-mail address being required, it will NOT be used in a mailing list and will NOT be used in any way other than to respond to your enquiry. [contact-form-7] Terms and Conditions Alternatively, why not ask me on the ASK NASCompares forum, by clicking the button below. This is a community hub that serves as a place that I can answer your question, chew the fat, share new release information and even get corrections posted. I will always get around to answering ALL queries, but as a one-man operation, I cannot promise speed! So by sharing your query in the ASK NASCompares section below, you can get a better range of solutions and suggestions, alongside my own.  

WD Black SN850 PS5 SSD Expansion Test

8 août 2021 à 20:00

Testing the WD Black SN850 SSD on the PS5

Yes, it’s time for another PS5 SSD Expansion Test and this time it is the drive that received one of the most high profile recommendations so far (from Mark Cerny, designer and programmer, involved in the development of the PS5 itself), the WD Black SN850. Now that Sony has enabled the ability to expand the storage of the Playstation 5 in the latest software update (in beta at the time of writing), the range of potential PCIe M.2 SSDs that PS5 gamers are able to choose from is surprisingly vast. The minimum requirements of the M.2 update are 5,500MB/s sequential read (i.e big files), no longer than 22110 in length and PCIe Gen 4 M.2 Key interface in architecture. So, that narrows things down a little, but not by a vast amount. I made a master list of current compatible SSDs for PS5 HERE with help from Reddit users, but today I want to focus on the WD Black SN850, as it is one of the most available, well priced and high performing SSDs that are supported by PS5 right now. The WD Black SN850 is certainly supported by the Playstation 5 and in today’s test, I have opted for the smallest available capacity, as whatever results are achieved by this drive are only going to be amplified/better on the higher tiers and regardless I can imagine a number of buyers who choose this drive for its great architecture, will make a saving on the capacity. Let’s take a look.

IMPORTANT – In today’s article we will be testing 4 mid-range PS5 games. Bigger and more exhaustive titles (such as Spiderman Miles Morales, Rift Apart and Demon Souls) will be tested in a FULL comparison between the 6 BIGGEST/Most Popular M.2 NVMes that are compatible with the PS5 Expansion slot. Stay Subscribed for those later this same week!

PS5 SSD Expansion WD Black SN850 – Specifications

Western Digital and its ‘WD Black’ series has been around for years! Indeed, WD was one of the very first brands to take direct-to-gamer storage media seriously, adapting the WD Black range that was originally aimed at pro-PC users and photo/video editors and shape it more towards games players. The WD Black SN850 is the latest iteration of this in NVMe (though originally released right at the tail end of 2020, ahead of many others at this storage tier), though the WD black label is carried on a large number of other data storage solutions from docks, HDDs to external drives and high-end PCIe lane media. The specifications are particularly impressive, even at the 500GB smallest capacity (though sequential read is a tad underwhelming by comparison) and only get better as you scale into the larger 2TB level at the top. The specifications are below:

Brand/Series WD Black SN850

WD Black SN850

WD Black SN850

Model ID WDS500G1X0E-00AFY0 WDS100T1X0E-00AFY0 WDS200T1X0E-00AFY0
Capacity 500GB 1000GB 2000GB
Price in $ 500GB – $169.99 1TB – $249.99 2TB – $549.99
PCIe Generation PCIe Gen 4 PCIe Gen 4 PCIe Gen 4
NVMe Rev NVMe 1.4 NVMe 1.4 NVMe 1.4
NAND BiCS4 96L TLC BiCS4 96L TLC BiCS4 96L TLC
Controller WD_BLACK G2 WD_BLACK G2 WD_BLACK G2
Sequential Read (Max, MB/s), 128 KB 7000MB 7000MB 7000MB
Sequential Write (Max, MB/s), 128 KB 4100MB 5300MB 5100MB
Warranty 5yr 5yr 5yr
Mean Time Between Failures (MTBF, hours) 1,750,000 1,750,000 1,750,000
DWPD 0.3DWPD 0.3DWPD 0.3DWPD

PS5 SSD Expansion WD Black SN850 Test – Internal Speed Test

The first test is the easiest. When you boot the PS5 with the WD Black SN850 NVMe SSD inside the expansion slot, the system will immediately identify that it is installed and format the drive. Then the system makes a performance benchmark check in order to ascertain whether the drive is suitable for PS5 Game use. The WD Black SN850 SSD achieved 6,457MB/s Sequential Read on the PS5 internal system performance test. This is only a small dip from the reported maximum 7,000MB/s, but I hoped it would be a pinch higher. Throughout my testing of SSDs in the PS5 m.2 expansion slot, the highest speed I have seen has been around 6,650MB/s reported sequential read, even on drive rated as high as 7,300MB/s, so this would indicate that the full development and fine-tuning of what the PS5 hardware can do still leaves room for growth. This is not unusual (even in previous generations of PlayStation, it took 2-3years for both Sony and Games developers to learn how to fully optimise the system hardware to its fullest degree in the lifespan of the system).

PS5 SSD Expansion WD Black SN850 Test – Moving Games

Moving games from the internal console storage and onto the WD Black SN850 SSD is very straightforward and can be conducted from the Playstation main menu, then on from the settings>storage manager menu. I moved the four games that will be used later in the article for performance and loading tests from the PS5 internal SSD and onto the WD Black SN850:

Initiating the move of these files is very easy, however when files were being transferred (much like in my testing of the PS5 and other compatible SSDs) it was nowhere near the speed I was expecting and in fact it became very apparent that the PS5 system much performs some encryption, compression or bit-checks as the files are moved. The result is that moving games from the internal PS5 SSD and onto the expansion slot with the WD Black SN850 took much, MUCH longer than I expects. This is not the fault of the M.2 SSD and more regarding the clear internal handling protocol and security of the PS5 System.

They did move however and once the games were moved onto the WD Black SN850 M.2 SSD, the data used was clearly visible in the storage manager. Let’s get on with testing the games.

PS5 SSD Expansion WD Black SN850 Loading Test 1 – Destruction Allstars

The first game to test loading times WITH the WD Black SN850 SSD on the PS5 was Destruction Allstars. Again, I started the timer from the title screen and below is the results on how the internal SSD and m.2 SSD compared:

Both games ran as well as expected, but the WD Black SN850 was able to load the game the tiniest pinch faster (under 1 sec). A good start!

PS5 SSD Expansion WD Black SN850 Loading Test 2 – Control

Next was loading the game control directly from the PS5 player GUI and to test loading the game into a save and into direct gameplay would take, comparing the internal storage to the WD Black SN850 expansion SSD.

Interestingly, once again, the WD Black SN850 seemingly loaded the game a pinch faster at 16 seconds, 1.1 seconds faster than the PS5 internal SSD. Again, a small difference, but still noteworthy. As games become more advanced in the PS5 system lifespan and the speed of storage access grows in importance, knowing you have an SSD that can keep pace or even exceed the one inside the system at game loading is going to be reassuring.

PS5 SSD Expansion WD Black SN850 Loading Test 3 – Maneater

The third game to test on the PS5 and using the WD Black SN850 SSD was Maneater. Rather than loading from the main PlayStation user interface, I opted to load the games from their own title screens, as this allowed me to not factor in the publisher and studio logos at startup that is unskippable and therefore would just hamper the comparison. Here is how the game running from the internal PS5 SSD compared with running on the WD Black SN850:

This was slightly an area of contention, as although both games loaded into the game fat (with the WD Black SN850 doing ti 1.5secs faster), they did load into different locations and this might have played a part. Nevertheless, load times were very close, and as long as they run at the same pace, that is always going to be a plus!

PS5 SSD Expansion WD Black SN850 Loading Test 4 – Wreckfest

Next up was Wreckfest. I loaded this on the WD Black SN850 and PS5 internal SSD from the title screen and quickly skipped through the options and config menus. Only off-line play was selected, to remove any server/internet connectivity delays from the equation.

Once again, the WD Black SN850 was a clear second or more after, even with the slight differences in menu transition removed from the time difference. It’s once again worth highlighting that although these differences are very small, they are all still important, as later in the system’s life, you are going to want to know that this SSD can stand the test of time and greater demands from the PS5 hardware in future titles.

PS5 SSD Expansion WD Black SN850 Loading Test 5 – Innocence A Plague Tale

Finally was A Plagues Tale. I selected this larger world title as it has a lot of world assets that need drawing very early on. The game was loaded directly from the title screen and below is both the game running from the PS5 SSD and the WD Black SN850:

For me, this was the clearest win for the WD Black SN850 SSD over the internal SSD. Although it was barely 1 second faster, it was the one where there was little to no difference in their loading side-by-side and the WD Black was clearly the faster. It’s all relative, as we are talking an odd second here or there, but it’s still good to know that upgrading your PS5 with the WD Black SN850 will not present any kind of bottleneck.

PS5 SSD Expansion WD Black SN850 – Conclusion

The WD Black SN850 is unquestionable a great PS5 SSD choice! Even without heavy market recommendations, it breezed through the preliminary testing and was even seen to exceed the PS5 internal SSD at points from a 100% even start. Clearly, the performance you have will scale depending on the capacity you choose, but even the 500GB has read performance that is more than enough to run your top tier games from. As mentioned, endurance on the WD Blck SN850, although a pinch lower than a number of other PCIe4 M.2 NVMe SSDs on the market right now (between 0.8 and 4.0 less DWPD), but is of little significance to anyone but the highest level professional gamers streamers (and even then if/when Sony open up the storage use to more than warm game storage). If you are looking for a great performing, best priced and highest recommended SSD for your PS5 SSD expansion upgrade, the WD Black is practically unbeatable!

Brand/Series WD Black SN850

WD Black SN850

WD Black SN850

Model ID WDS500G1X0E-00AFY0 WDS100T1X0E-00AFY0 WDS200T1X0E-00AFY0
Capacity 500GB 1000GB 2000GB
Price in $ 500GB – $169.99 1TB – $249.99 2TB – $549.99


Articles Get Updated Regularly - Get an alert every time something gets added to this page!


This description contains links to Amazon. These links will take you to some of the products mentioned in today's content. As an Amazon Associate, I earn from qualifying purchases. Visit the NASCompares Deal Finder to find the best place to buy this device in your region, based on Service, Support and Reputation - Just Search for your NAS Drive in the Box Below

 

SEARCH IN THE BOX BELOW FOR NAS DEALS

Need Advice on Data Storage from an Expert?

We want to keep the free advice on NASCompares FREE for as long as we can. Since this service started back in Jan '18, We have helped hundreds of users every month solve their storage woes, but we can only continue to do this with your support. So please do choose to buy at Amazon US and Amazon UK on the articles when buying to provide advert revenue support or to donate/support the site below. Finally, for free advice about your setup, just leave a message in the comments below here at NASCompares.com and we will get back to you. Need Help? Where possible (and where appropriate) please provide as much information about your requirements, as then I can arrange the best answer and solution to your needs. Do not worry about your e-mail address being required, it will NOT be used in a mailing list and will NOT be used in any way other than to respond to your enquiry. [contact-form-7] Terms and Conditions Alternatively, why not ask me on the ASK NASCompares forum, by clicking the button below. This is a community hub that serves as a place that I can answer your question, chew the fat, share new release information and even get corrections posted. I will always get around to answering ALL queries, but as a one-man operation, I cannot promise speed! So by sharing your query in the ASK NASCompares section below, you can get a better range of solutions and suggestions, alongside my own.  

 

 

Recommended PS5 Compatibile SSDs & Heatsinks – UPDATED

3 août 2021 à 23:00

FULL Current PS5 Compatible SSDs to Upgrade Your Storage

With the PS5 receiving a new update (currently in Beta at time of writing) one of the biggest and most requested features that has now finally been enabled is the M.2 NVMe SSD upgrade slot. It’s been more than half a year since the launch of the PS5 and one of the biggest complaints from users (aside from stock levels being painfully low) is that the storage available in the default model is rather small. This new update and the ability to add additional storage has been met with mixed responses, as it has now become clear to many SSD buyers that the type of storage required for PS5 is much more advanced in architecture than the SATA hard drives and SSDs of previous generations. This, combined with an increased understanding on subjects like PCIe connectivity, Heatsinks and wrapping their heads why this new SSD tech is more expensive has certainly led to a fair share of raised voices! I have already discussed why I think PS5 using PCIe Gen 4 x4 M.2 NVMe SSDs is a very good thing previously, but today I want to help you choose the right SSD for your PS5. Currently, Sony has yet to produce a full compatibility list (choosing to tell PS5 users the specifications required for the SSD in terms of size, performance and architecture instead), but that has not stopped many users online from banding together and working out their own PS5 supported and compatible SSDs and Heatsinks. So, below (with the generous assistance of u/Fidler_2K on Reddit) is a breakdown of all the current confirmed/in-progress M.2 NVMe SSDs that work on PS5, as well as heatsinks that I recommend for use with them. If you are in a rush though, here are the top 3 recommendations for PS5 SSDs right now:

TOP 3 Recommended PS5 Storage Expansion Compatible SSDs

Seagate Firecuda 530

Samsung 980 Pro

WD Black SN850

500GB – $149.99

1TB – $239.99

2TB – $489.99

4TB – $949.99.

250GB – $69.99

500GB – $119.99

1TB – $199.99

2TB – $429.99

500GB – $169.99

1TB – $249.99

2TB – $549.99

Control PS5 – Load Comparison (Click)

Maneater PS5 – Load Comparison (Click)

Plague Tale PS5 – Load Comparison (Click)

Additionally, here are my top 3 recommendations for heatsinks to use with your SSD inside the PS5, in order to effectively dissipate heat when the high performance drive is in heavy use:

TOP 3 Recommended PS5 Storage Expansion Compatible Heatsinks

ELUTENG M.2 2280 Heatsink, Double-Sided

MHQJRH M.2 2280 SSD heatsink

EZDIY-FAB M.2 SSD heatsink 2280

FIND HERE FIND HERE FIND HERE

For those who have more time, want to have more choice, or are just prepping for a later purchase when the PS5 system software 2.0-04.00.00 is fully released, below is a fuller list that I will be regularly updating here on NASCompares.

PS5 Compatible M.2 NVMe SSDs to Upgrade Your Console

lease find below the full list of SSDs that have been tested/mid-testing for PS5. If the official/inclusive heatsink from the brand (eg the WD Black SN850 and its in-house SSD heatsink) fit inside the PS5 SSD expansion slot comfortably, it will be highlighted as such. Additionally, the nature of the drive’s current confirmation of support will be updated below as appropriate. Since this PS5 SSD Storage update beta was released by Sony, many of the well known SSDs have gone out of stock but will be restocked shortly. Additionally, some SSDs like the Seagate Firecuda 530 are still yet to be fully released at this time of writing, so I strongly recommend using the links in the table to check stock availability. You don’t have to buy them, but it will give you a better understanding of what SSDs are available, pre-order or even on offer. Links are affiliated and any purchases made will result in a small commission heading back to this site. Let’s take a look below to see which SSDs are compatible with PS5 right now:

Once again, MASSIVE Credit to u/Fidler_2K ON Reddit for the list below and provided with his permission

PS5 COMPATIBLE UPGRADE SSDs AUGUST 2021

SSD Meets Requirements to Work Notes (Important) Price & Links
Seagate FireCuda 530 Yes confirmed by Seagate. Included heatsink works 500GB – $149.99, 1TB – $239.99, 2TB – $489.99, 4TB – $949.99.
Western Digital SN850 Yes confirmed by Western Digital. Included heatsink works 500GB – $169.99, 1TB – $249.99, 2TB – $549.99
Gigabyte 7000s Gen4 Yes confirmed by Gigabyte. Included heatsink works 1TB – $199.99, 2TB – $399.99
Patriot Viper VP4300 Yes (unconfirmed) Included heatsink works 1TB – $224.99, 2TB – I don’t know if this ever released?
Samsung 980 Pro Yes. Confirmed by fragilityv2. Needs a heatsink 250GB – $69.99, 500GB – $119.99, 1TB – $199.99, 2TB – $429.99
Sabrent Rocket 4 Plus Yes. Confirmed by The Verge. Needs a different heatsink than the one included 1TB – $200, 2TB – $469.99, 4TB – $999.99
Corsair MP600 Pro Yes (unconfirmed) Needs a different heatsink than the one included 1TB – $199.99, 2TB – $399.99
Inland Performance Plus Yes (unconfirmed) Needs a different heatsink than the one included 1TB – $189.99, 2TB – $399.99
Adata Gammix S70 Yes (unconfirmed) Needs a different heatsink than the one included. Very difficult to remove. 1TB – $149.99, 2TB – $299.99
MSI Spatium M480 Yes (unconfirmed) Needs a heatsink Not listed yet. More Info here.
Micron 3400 Yes (unconfirmed) Needs a heatsink Not listed yet.More Info here.
PNY CS3040 Yes. Confirmed by /u/EmergencyPomelo5180 and PNY. Included heatsink is too tall. Get version without heatsink and add your own. Also, the rated read speeds are just above the minimum specified at 5,600 MB/s reads 500GB – $89.99, 1TB – $156.99, 2TB – $308.99, 4TB – $699.99
PNY CS3140 Yes. Confirmed by PNY. Included heatsink is too tall. Get version without heatsink and add your own 1TB – $199.99, 2TB – $449.99
TeamGroup T-Force Cardea A440 Yes (unconfirmed) Aluminum heatsink is too tall, graphene heatsink may need replaced. 1TB – $179.99, 2TB – $399.99
Plextor M10P(G) Yes (unconfirmed) Included heatsink is too tall Not listed yet. Product page here.
Titanium Micro TH7175 Yes (unconfirmed) Needs a heatsink 1TB – $279.99, 2TB – $489.99
Mushkin Enhanced Gamma Yes (unconfirmed) Needs a heatsink 1TB – $216.992TB – $499.99
GALAX HOF Extreme Yes (unconfirmed) Included heatsink is too large Pricing unknown, information here.
Addlink S95 Yes (unconfirmed) Needs a heatsink 1TB – $218.99, 2TB – $448.88

 

How Do the Six Most Popular PS5 SSDs Compare?

Many users will choose one of the first 6-7 SSDs in the above list, as these are the most commonly available, recommended by performance or best price per GB/TB. However not all M.2 NVMe SSDs are created equally and in the case of PS5 compatible SSDs, there is actually a wide range of performance benchmarks to choose between, maximum/minmum capacities to choose from and a variety of endurance and handling specifications that make each of the more mainstream compatible PS5 supported SSDs quite distinct. Below is a breakdown of how they compare. The choices below are the Seagate Firecuda 530, the WD Black SN850, the Samsung 980 PRO, the Sabrent Rocket 4 Plus, the MSI SPATIUM M480 and the Gigabyte Aorus 7000s.

SSD Architecture and Specifications

Brand/Series Seagate Firecuda 530 WD Black SN850 Samsung 980 Pro Sabrent Rocket Plus MSI SPATIUM M480 AORUS Gen4 7000s
PCIe Generation PCIe Gen 4 PCIe Gen 4 PCIe Gen 4 PCIe Gen 4 PCIe Gen 4 PCIe Gen 4
NVMe Rev NVMe 1.4 NVMe 1.4 NVMe 1.3c NVMe 1.4 NVMe 1.4 NVMe 1.4
NAND 3D TLC Micron B47R 176L BiCS4 96L TLC 3D TLC B27 3D NAND 96L B27 3D NAND 96L B27 3D NAND 96L
Max Capacity 4TB – Double Sided 2TB 2TB 4TB Double Sided 2TB 2TB
Controller Phison E18-PS5018 WD_BLACK G2 Custom Elpis Phison E18-PS5018 Phison E18-PS5018 Phison E18-PS5018
Warranty 5yr 5yr 5yr 5yr 5yr 5yr

SSD Price Comparison

Brand/Series Seagate Firecuda 530 WD Black SN850 Samsung 980 Pro Sabrent Rocket Plus MSI SPATIUM M480 AORUS Gen4 7000s
500GB Model ZP500GM3A013 WDS500G1X0E-00AFY0 MZ-V8P500BW   M480-500GB  
Price in $ and $ $139 / £119 $119 / £99 $119 / £109   $119 / £105 (TBC)  
1TB Model ZP1000GM3A013 WDS100T1X0E-00AFY0 MZ-V8P1T0BW SB-RKT4P-1TB M480-1000GB GP-AG70S1TB
Price in $ and $ $239 / £199 $249 / £169 $209 / £179 $199 / £180 $239 / £189 (TBC) $199 / £189
2TB Model ZP2000GM3A013 WDS200T1X0E-00AFY0 MZ-V8P2T0BW SB-RKT4P-2TB M480-2000GB GP-AG70S2TB
Price in $ and $ $419 / £379 $399 / £339 $390 / £369 $469 / £419 $399 / £369 (TBC) $359 / £399
4TB Model ZP4000GM3A013   N/A SB-RKT4P-4TB N/A N/A
Price in $ and $ $949 / £769 N/A N/A $1099 / £999  

SSD Performance Comparison

Brand/Series Seagate Firecuda 530 WD Black SN850 Samsung 980 Pro Sabrent Rocket 4 Plus MSI SPATIUM M480 AORUS Gen4 7000s
500GB Model ZP500GM3A013 WDS500G1X0E-00AFY0 MZ-V8P500BW N/A M480-500GB N/A
Sequential Read (Max, MB/s), 128 KB 7000MB 7000MB 6900MB   6500MB  
Sequential Write (Max, MB/s), 128 KB 3000MB 4100MB 5000MB   2850MB  
1TB Model ZP1000GM3A013 WDS100T1X0E-00AFY0 MZ-V8P1T0BW SB-RKT4P-1TB M480-1000GB GP-AG70S1TB
Sequential Read (Max, MB/s), 128 KB 7300MB 7000MB 7000MB 7000MB 7000MB 7000MB
Sequential Write (Max, MB/s), 128 KB 6000MB 5300MB 5000MB 5500MB 5500MB 5500MB
2TB Model ZP2000GM3A013 WDS200T1X0E-00AFY0 MZ-V8P2T0BW SB-RKT4P-2TB M480-2000GB GP-AG70S2TB
Sequential Read (Max, MB/s), 128 KB 7300MB 7000MB 7000MB 7100MB 7000MB 7000MB
Sequential Write (Max, MB/s), 128 KB 6900MB 5100MB 5100MB 6850MB 6850MB 6850MB
4TB Model ZP4000GM3A013   N/A SB-RKT4P-4TB N/A N/A
Sequential Read (Max, MB/s), 128 KB 7300MB N/A N/A 7100MB    
Sequential Write (Max, MB/s), 128 KB 6900MB N/A N/A 6850MB  

SSD Endurance Comparion

Brand/Series Seagate Firecuda 530 WD Black SN850 Samsung 980 Pro Sabrent Rocket Plus MSI SPATIUM M480 AORUS Gen4 7000s
500GB Model ZP500GM3A013 WDS500G1X0E-00AFY0 MZ-V8P500BW   M480-500GB N/A
Total Terabytes Written (TBW) 640TB 300TB 300TB   350TB  
Mean Time Between Failures (MTBF, hours) 1,800,000 1,750,000 1,500,000   1,600,000  
DWPD 0.7DWPD 0.3DWPD 0.3DWPD   0.38DWPD  
1TB Model ZP1000GM3A013 WDS100T1X0E-00AFY0 MZ-V8P1T0BW SB-RKT4P-1TB M480-1000GB GP-AG70S1TB
Total Terabytes Written (TBW) 1275TB 600TB 600TB 700TB 700TB 700TB
Mean Time Between Failures (MTBF, hours) 1,800,000 1,750,000 1,500,000 1600000 1,600,000 1,600,000
DWPD 0.7DWPD 0.3DWPD 0.3DWPD 0.4DWPD 0.38DWPD 0.38DWPD
2TB Model ZP2000GM3A013 WDS200T1X0E-00AFY0 MZ-V8P2T0BW SB-RKT4P-2TB M480-2000GB GP-AG70S2TB
Total Terabytes Written (TBW) 2550TB 1200TB 1200TB 1400TB 1400TB 1400TB
Mean Time Between Failures (MTBF, hours) 1,800,000 1,750,000 1,500,000 1600000 1,600,000 1,600,000
DWPD 0.7DWPD 0.3DWPD 0.3DWPD 0.38DWPD 0.38DWPD 0.38DWPD
4TB Model ZP4000GM3A013   N/A SB-RKT4P-4TB N/A N/A
Total Terabytes Written (TBW) 5100TB N/A N/A 3000TB    
Mean Time Between Failures (MTBF, hours) 1,800,000 N/A N/A 1600000    
DWPD 0.7DWPD N/A 0.3DWPD 0.4DWPD  

 

SSD COMPARISON RESULT

The Seagate Firecuda 530 is the clear winner here, unsurprisingly, thanks to it having the longest time in development, featuring denser NAND and that great Phison E18 controller. It is also only one of two SSDs that arrive at the 4TB mark. However the Samsung 980 Pro is still an incredible SSD that arrives as low as 250GB, which makes it very well balanced for Price vs Capacity, whilst still maintaining some incredible performance! However in terms of the very best Value, not only in capacity, but also for the hardware you are getting for your money, the WD Black SN850 is still an incredibly well-placed drive for PS5 SSD Upgrade buyers to consider.

Seagate Firecuda 530

Samsung 980 Pro

WD Black SN850

500GB – $149.99

1TB – $239.99

2TB – $489.99

4TB – $949.99.

250GB – $69.99

500GB – $119.99

1TB – $199.99

2TB – $429.99

500GB – $169.99

1TB – $249.99

2TB – $549.99

 


Articles Get Updated Regularly - Get an alert every time something gets added to this page!


This description contains links to Amazon. These links will take you to some of the products mentioned in today's content. As an Amazon Associate, I earn from qualifying purchases. Visit the NASCompares Deal Finder to find the best place to buy this device in your region, based on Service, Support and Reputation - Just Search for your NAS Drive in the Box Below

 

SEARCH IN THE BOX BELOW FOR NAS DEALS

Need Advice on Data Storage from an Expert?

We want to keep the free advice on NASCompares FREE for as long as we can. Since this service started back in Jan '18, We have helped hundreds of users every month solve their storage woes, but we can only continue to do this with your support. So please do choose to buy at Amazon US and Amazon UK on the articles when buying to provide advert revenue support or to donate/support the site below. Finally, for free advice about your setup, just leave a message in the comments below here at NASCompares.com and we will get back to you. Need Help? Where possible (and where appropriate) please provide as much information about your requirements, as then I can arrange the best answer and solution to your needs. Do not worry about your e-mail address being required, it will NOT be used in a mailing list and will NOT be used in any way other than to respond to your enquiry. [contact-form-7] Terms and Conditions Alternatively, why not ask me on the ASK NASCompares forum, by clicking the button below. This is a community hub that serves as a place that I can answer your question, chew the fat, share new release information and even get corrections posted. I will always get around to answering ALL queries, but as a one-man operation, I cannot promise speed! So by sharing your query in the ASK NASCompares section below, you can get a better range of solutions and suggestions, alongside my own.  

 

PS5 SSD Storage Upgrades – Why it is NOT Difficult and DOES Make Sense

3 août 2021 à 10:00

Why The PS5 SSD Storage Expansion is Easy AND The Right Way for Sony To Do It

Since Sony first enabled the SSD upgrade slot of the PS5 last week, there has been a remarkably mixed reaction to how Sony has handled the whole feature on their latest generation console. From the fact that upgrading the internal storage was disabled on day one, to how they have presented its eventual activation in the PS5 system software 2.0-04.00.00 beta, many have questioned that the upgrade choices, method, flexibility and hands-on work required by the end-user when upgrading their PS5 with an additional m.2 NVMe SSD is overly complex and unnecessarily over the top. Multiple editorial sites and avid fans of other platforms have been keen to highlight that PS5 has dropped the ball on upgrading system storage and today I want to take a closer look at this whole thing and try to explain why I think this is all nonsense! Sony most certainly hasn’t handled this perfectly, but on a hardware and futureproofing level, I would like to explain why their choices so far (at least from the perspective of someone who has keenly followed both SSD technology and Computer games for more than a decade) makes a lot of sense. Remember though, these are my own observations – no need to start a console war in the comments. Let’s begin.

PS3 DRIVE UPGRADE SLOT

PS4 DRIVE UPGRADE SLOT

PS5 DRIVE UPGRADE SLOT

Reason 1 – Installation is Easy Enough and Huge Beneficial Long Term

Installing a new SSD inside your PlayStation 5 is definitely not as tough as people seem to be suggesting. One misunderstanding people seem to be having is getting to the difficulty of shopping for a compatible SSD mixed up with the complexity of installing it inside their PS5. Sony, much like how they approached installing additional storage in the PS3 and PS4 before it, have supplied their PS5 system with an available slot that allows the end-user to install an m.2 NVMe SSD of their own choosing (rather than a 1st party only drive) without voiding their warranty. The range of supported SSDs is now currently in the 20+ and slowly getting larger as compatible drives are being approved. Sony DEFINITELY should have supplied a supported list of SSDs, but then again they did not really do that with the PS3 or PS4, which both supported SATA 2.5″ SSD/HDD media. In all three console cases, Sony provided a breakdown of the minimum specifications required and then users could choose their own SSD. The only difference of note in the case of the PS5 is the necessity of a heatsink with the SSD – which generally retail from $5-25 dollars depending on the user preference. Again, this is by no means a massive issue and although it has annoyed some users (including myself I should add!) that Sony did not provide a better list of example drives, this is still a BETA update and until a formal/full release arrives of this system software, it can be understood. As for physical installation, that is even easier, with only 2 screws needing to be removed to install your SSD and Heatsink.

Why do I think that this method of SSD has more long term, beneficial consequences? Because the SSDs and SSD slot that PS5 arrives with provides the potential to install storage that will allow game developers to develop truly incredible game worlds, as the internal storage does not bottleneck the CPU+Memory+GPU when it needs massive amounts of data, very quickly! There is of course the argument that parents or less technically minded people would much rather have a lpug in expansion card or something as simple as connecting a USB. Sadly this is just not possible in the current tech world above 4,000MB/S (see Thunderbolt 3/4 and USB 4 or USB 3.2X2) and would bottleneck the storage speed and therefore effect games performance. But why did Sony not just do the same thing as Microsoft, the XBox Series X/S and its external plug and play SSD Expansion card? Surely that is better? Well…

Reason 2 – Xbox Series S/X Plug n Play Caps Performance to 2,400MB/s

Rarely spoken about is the actual performance of the external SSD slot used by the XBox Series X/S. Much like PS5, it is using M.2 PCIe 4 NVMe SSD storage, however, unlike the PCIe Gen 4 x4 on PS5 (potential 8,000MB/s Bandwidth), it uses PCIe Gen 4 x2 (potential 4,000MB/s Bandwidth). Then after more checking you find out that the SSD has a reported performance top end of 2,400MB/s and (weirdly) a 3-year Warranty! Not only is 2,400MB/s weirdly low for a PCIe Gen 4 SSD (due to the x2 PCIe) but 3 years warranty is much less than the 5 years that practically 90% of all SSDs arrive with in 2021/2022! This shorter warranty AND lower performance throughput suggest a lower endurance too (given most SSD brands will give 5yrs and/or X number of Hours or Terabytes written as their lifespan).

Right now, this 2.4GB/s is enough for the XBox Series X/S to play the latest games, however as time wears on, games developers are going to learn to harness faster SSD technology (any modern gamer PC in 2020/2021 has PCIe Gen 4 or 3 x4 M.2 SSD slots and supports a wide variety of SSDs that can reach double or even treble of the performance of the XBox X/S SSD expansion. o, even though the Seagate Expansion Card for Xbox being plug and play seems good, it is important to understand that you are getting a much more limited drive in the long run. But why is PCIe 4×4 going to be of much use in the future? Is it just pointless over the top planning by Sony on the PS5?

Reason 3 – PCIe Gen 4×4 Ensures the FASTEST Speeds in the Future for Gaming Development

There was a time when the impact of faster storage on computer/console gaming was very small. That started changing a little around about a decade ago when SSDs starting arriving on the market that were commercially affordable and people started using them for more than their windows/mac OS. People started installing SSDs inside their Playstations and XBOX’s in order to speed up their load times, but even then, the load times only improved 3-4x in speed at most. This was because the CPUs, Memory and Graphics Cards/Processors featured on earlier generation consoles could not take advantage of the faster speeds, being already maxed out by current generation games of the time. PC gamers of course have already been using M.2 NVMe SSDs for 3-4 years already (the earliest most popular consumer example being the Samsung 960 Pro) and as they have been able to upgrade their hardware more regularly than console gamers, it has led to gaming systems that can load the same game from consoles, 5-10x faster! Now, in 2021, we have the PS5, a console with a insane level of CPU+MEMORY+Memory for a home/consumer console that can process up to 9,000MB/s (9GB/s) of compressed data – so, therefore, you WANT to use storage media that can deliver that amount/speed of data to make sure that your storage is not suddenly the bottleneck of your gaming system. Now we have whole immersive world based games that can go from system boot to in-game in 20secs?!?!?

Modern games are getting BIGGER and with better graphics! That is ALOT of data and that is where PCIe 4×4 SSDs are PERFECT at pushing as much data as possible. Right now, the latest generation of consoles are not even a year old and yet designers are already starting to learn the best ways to make the most of the systems. So knowing that the PS5 can use storage that will deliver the pace of the CPU+GPU is remarkably reassuring. But wait? If the PS5 expansion slot handling 7,000MB/s+ is such a good thing. why was the PS5 SSD expansion slot disabled at launch?

Reason 4 – M.2 Slot was Disabled till now as Commercial SSDs were NOT Fast Enough

Many users (myself included) were a bit cheesed off when the PS5 launched and when they installed their M.2 NVMe SSD were met with the following message:

Yes, as many already know, the PS5 SSD expansion port was disabled when the PS5 was first released back in Nov 2020. Why on earth was that? Well, this was largely because when the PS5 was first slated for an end of 2020 release date, it was understood that big names like Samsung, WD, Seagate and more would have their latest generation of PCIe Gen 4×4 M.2 NVMe SSDs available for consumers! HOWEVER, as many will know the last few months of 2019 and the bulk of 2020 was a hell of a troubling year for everyone! From Trade Wars between the U.S and China, to water shortages caused by Semi Conductor production demand in Taiwan, to the Pandemic and its effects on working practices, production and buying trends changing construction forecasts – YOU NAME IT, IT WENT WRONG! So when the PS5 launched at the end of 2020, there was practically no PCIe Gen 4×4 SSDs on the market (at least ones that featured superior controllers to push out the 5,500MB/s Sequential Read the PS5 demands). So, Sony COULD have left this slot enabled, but there is a large possibility that buyers would have shopped for PCIe Gen 3 SSDs (not understanding the difference) or even lesser PCIe 4 SSDs and ultimately come away (at best) disappointed or (at worst) with an SSD that a year or two down the line would be a bottleneck on the system running modern games. Therefore Sony chose to disable this slot until the PCIe M.2 NVMe SSD varieties all became more accessible. And now, with many, many different types released in the last 6 months, there are many more on offer! But is having so many SSDs and Heatsinks to choose from such a good thing?

MASSIVE Credit to u/Fidler_2K ON Reddit for the list below and provided with his permission

PS5 COMPATIBLE UPGRADE SSDs AUGUST 2021

SSD Meets Requirements to Work Notes (Important) Price as of posting
Seagate FireCuda 530 Yes confirmed by Seagate. Included heatsink works 500GB – $149.99, 1TB – $239.99, 2TB – $489.99, 4TB – $949.99It’s OOS at the moment
Western Digital SN850 Yes confirmed by Western Digital. Included heatsink works 500GB – $169.99, 1TB – $249.99, 2TB – $549.99
Gigabyte 7000s Gen4 Yes confirmed by Gigabyte. Included heatsink works 1TB – $199.99, 2TB – $399.99
Patriot Viper VP4300 Yes (unconfirmed) Included heatsink works 1TB – $224.99, 2TB – I don’t know if this ever released?
Samsung 980 Pro Yes. Confirmed by fragilityv2. Needs a heatsink 250GB – $69.99, 500GB – $119.99, 1TB – $199.99, 2TB – $429.99
Sabrent Rocket 4 Plus Yes. Confirmed by The Verge. Needs a different heatsink than the one included 1TB – $200, 2TB – $469.99, 4TB – $999.99
Corsair MP600 Pro Yes (unconfirmed) Needs a different heatsink than the one included 1TB – $199.99, 2TB – $399.99
Inland Performance Plus Yes (unconfirmed) Needs a different heatsink than the one included 1TB – $189.99, 2TB – $399.99
Adata Gammix S70 Yes (unconfirmed) Needs a different heatsink than the one included. Very difficult to remove. 1TB – $149.99, 2TB – $299.99
MSI Spatium M480 Yes (unconfirmed) Needs a heatsink Not listed yet. More Info here.
Micron 3400 Yes (unconfirmed) Needs a heatsink Not listed yet.More Info here.
PNY CS3040 Yes. Confirmed by /u/EmergencyPomelo5180 and PNY. Included heatsink is too tall. Get version without heatsink and add your own. Also, the rated read speeds are just above the minimum specified at 5,600 MB/s reads 500GB – $89.99, 1TB – $156.99, 2TB – $308.99, 4TB – $699.99
PNY CS3140 Yes. Confirmed by PNY. Included heatsink is too tall. Get version without heatsink and add your own 1TB – $199.99, 2TB – $449.99
TeamGroup T-Force Cardea A440 Yes (unconfirmed) Aluminum heatsink is too tall, graphene heatsink may need replaced. 1TB – $179.99, 2TB – $399.99
Plextor M10P(G) Yes (unconfirmed) Included heatsink is too tall Not listed yet. Product page here.
Titanium Micro TH7175 Yes (unconfirmed) Needs a heatsink 1TB – $279.99, 2TB – $489.99
Mushkin Enhanced Gamma Yes (unconfirmed) Needs a heatsink 1TB – $216.992TB – $499.99
GALAX HOF Extreme Yes (unconfirmed) Included heatsink is too large Pricing unknown, information here.
Addlink S95 Yes (unconfirmed) Needs a heatsink 1TB – $218.99, 2TB – $448.88

Reason 5 – Huge Choice Of Brands, Size and Price to Consumers is Hugely Beneficial

It should be pretty obvious to most of us, but having a wider range of choices when upgrading our technology IS A GOOD THING! Yes, many of us just want a small pool of choices to make (so 10s of options, not hundreds or thousands) but at least having the CHOICE of different prices, durabilities, brands and capacities of SSD is definitely a good thing. The XBox Expansion Card, although conveniently plug and play, is ONLY available from 1x brand (Seagate) and ONLY in one capacity, 1TB. Want more? Tough, buy another card to swap it with or start deleting stuff. Want a faster card or cheaper card, as better ones are out there or this one is suddenly higher in price? Tough. I have always applauded the PS3, PS4 (and now) PS5 for having much, much wider flexibility in SSD storage upgrade options. Imagine.

BUT – Things Sony Got WRONG with the PS5 SSD Storage Expansion Upgrade

Yes, as much as I approve of the PS5’s choice of SSD compatibility, performance, flexibility and mature attitude to enabling this upgrade slot at the best time, there are several things that I think Sony did NOT handle right about the expanded storage of the PS5. So, let’s go through the things Sony got WRONG!

Sony Not Publishing a Compatibility List Alongside the Beta

Despite Sony never really giving detailed compatibility on ALL the storage media that was supported in previous generations of their consoles, I DO think they could have been a lot more helpful on the SSDs supported in the beta firmware release. They gave vague details on SSD length, architecture and speeds, but barely any actually naming of SSDs taht people can choose to BUY! It fell largely on the shoulders of beta testers and consumers in public forums (Reddit etc) to band together and put together compatibility lists unofficially. Yes, its a beta, but still – Sony will have tested ALOT of SSDs with this firmware in Alpha before invited beta, so I think it is a poor show on their part to not help testers a bit more with drives they KNOW work in their PS5 SSD Storage upgrade slot.

Not Including a Heatsink in the PS5 M.2 NVMe SSD Bay

This is a small (physically) complaint but one that has certainly upset a few people is that given the fact the PS5 uses PCIe Gen 4 M.2 NVMe SSD, that an official heatsink should have been included. This is something I can 100% agree with, as ALL NVMe SSDs should be used with a heatsink, as they can get tremendously hot and this can be detrimental to the performance and durability long term. Heatsinks are NOT expensive (see my recommendation below) and some very good ones can be purchased for $8+, but this is definitely something that Sony should have included with the PS5, as it is a necessity to the expansion slot!

Not Explaining 5,500MB/s SSD Scarcity Being The Reason for Delaying the Feature

As mentioned, the PS5 SSD storage expansion slot was not available when the Playstation 5 was released in Nov 2020. I have already detailed above the many reasons and factors that almost certainly one/all were the reason for this – however the fact that Sony largely ignored consumers asking about this feature (especially given the noticeably smaller storage available in the PS5 by default that the XBOS Series X/S) is something that really disappointed many console owners, myself included. All they had to do was highlight any one of the reasons I mentioned earlier OR tightly the necessity for faster storage and that would have been enough. Alas, no!

 

Find my FULL PS5 SSD Storage Upgrade Guide HERE , Or I have listed the Best M.2 NVMe SSDs for your PS5 Storage upgrade Below:

Here are the Recommended M.2 NVMe SSDs to Upgrade Your PS5 When the Software Update comes out of Beta

FASTEST – Seagate Firecuda 530 Find it 

MOST AVAILABLE – Samsung 980 PRO Find it Here

BEST PRICE – WD Black SN850 (Confirmed) Find it Here

2ND FASTEST – Sabrent Rocket 4 Plus Find it Here

AORUS Gen4 7000s SSD – Find It Here

Inland Performance Plus 1TB SSD – Not Available

MSI SPATIUM M480 – Find it Here

Corsair MP600 NVMe SSD (TBC) – Find it Here

 

 

 

 


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PS5 SSD Storage Activated – Which SSDs Should You Buy? A FULL Guide

29 juillet 2021 à 15:46

The Best SSD for Upgrading your PS5 Storage – Get It Right First Time

Finally, more than half a year after the release of the PlayStation 5, Sony has FINALLY enabled the ability to increase your PS5 Storage with that expansion slot. In this guide, I will explain some important things to consider before buying any compatible PS5 M.2 SSD, why it is different to a hard drive, and then recommend some drives that you should choose to upgrade your Playstation 5 Storage. We have waited a long time and although the ability to add USB storage for PS4 games has always been available, many of us have been crying out for the ability to add additional space for premium PlayStation 5 games on our system storage (that 825GB was getting pretty full!). The process of physically installing a new M.2 SSD inside your PS5 is actually surprisingly easy to do and will not invalidate your warranty. We already released a guide back in Nov 2020 to show users how to physically install an NVMe M2 solid-state drive, even before the feature was enabled by Sony in the latest firmware update. However, not all SSD are created equal and it is very important that you choose a compatible and high-performance SSD for your PS5, to make sure that it does not reduce your PlayStation 5 gaming experience, increase loading times or affect online multiplayer latency for the worse. Today I’m going to list several recommended SSD drives to install in your PlayStation 5 that can be used to store and play PS5 games directly.

If you are looking for the perfect Heatsink for your PS5 SSD, use my Guide here to PS5 Compatible SSD Heatsinks HERE. Or I have listed the Best M.2 NVMe SSDs for your PS5 Storage upgrade Below:

Here are the Recommended M.2 NVMe SSDs to Upgrade Your PS5 When the Software Update comes out of Beta

FASTEST – Seagate Firecuda 530 Find it Here

2ND FASTEST – Sabrent Rocket 4 Plus Find it Here

MOST AVAILABLE – Samsung 980 PRO Find it Here

BEST PRICE – WD Black SN850 (Confirmed) Find it Here

AORUS Gen4 7000s SSD – Find It Here

Inland Performance Plus 1TB SSD – Not Available

MSI SPATIUM M480 – Find it Here

Corsair MP600 NVMe SSD (TBC) – Find it Here

 

Sony Themselves state that your selected M.2 NVMe SSD should be:

Interface: PCIe Gen4 x4 M.2 NVMe SSD

Capacity: 250GB – 4TB

Cooling structure: Using an M.2 SSD with your PS5 console requires effective heat dissipation with a cooling structure, such as a heatsink. You can attach one to your M.2 SSD yourself, either in a single-sided format, or double-sided format. There are also M.2 SSDs that have cooling structures (such as heatsinks) built in.

Sequential read speed: 5,500MB/s or faster is recommended

Module width: 22mm width (25mm width is not supported)

Form Factor: M.2 type 2230, 2242, 2260, 2280 and 22110.
These numbers can be found on retail listings for M.2 SSD devices. The first two digits refer to the width, the remaining digits to the length.

Socket type: Socket 3 (Key M)

Total size including cooling structure:
In millimeters: smaller than 110mm (L) x 25mm (W) x 11.25mm (H).
In inches: smaller than 4.33in (L) x 0.984 in (W) x 0.442in (H).

See below for full requirements.

Length

The following M.2 SSD lengths are compatible with PS5 consoles:
30mm, 42mm, 60mm, 80mm, 110mm (corresponding to the form factor type, per above).

Width
A 22mm-wide M.2 SSD module is required.
The total structure (including an added cooling structure) cannot exceed 25mm (0.984in).

Height
The total height of the M.2 SSD and its cooling structure (such as a heatsink) – whether built-in or separate – must be less than 11.25mm (0.442in).
The height must also be in the right place, in relation to the M.2 SSD’s circuit board:

  • The size below the board must be less than 2.45mm (0.096in).
  • The total size above the board must be less than 8mm (0.314in).

Playstation 5 SSD Upgrades – Important Buying Tips First!

Modern high-performance M2 SSD are much more expensive than the hard drives that previous generations of PlayStation console arrived with. It is important to remember that the price per gigabyte of an SSD is around 4 to 5 times more expensive than a hard drive, but also that there are many different kinds of SSD in the consumer market and if you buy the wrong type, you will either be unable to install the drive in your PS5, or you risk installing an inappropriate SSD for use in the system and put your data at risk. So, here or three important buying tips when looking at any SSD to increase your PlayStation 5 storage. 

Tip 1 – Buy M.2 NVMe, not M.2 SATA

The format of a more modern SSD in 2020/2021 in terms of physical size have favoured the M.2 interface of drives. In its most basic form, M2 is a much more compact and direct connection between the storage media drive and the PC or console. However M2 has been around a long time and in fact, when it comes to getting an SSD for your PS5, you need to make sure you get an M.2 SSD that is NVMe or PCIe based. More cost-effective (i.e lower price) M2 SSD arrive in SATA format, which is considerably slower than NVMe M.2 Key and is also unsupported by the PlayStation 5. So when looking at an SSD to increase your PS5 storage, if it looks incredibly cheap, there is a good chance that it is SATA and not NVMe PCIe.

Tip 2 – Avoid QLC NAND and Choose TLC and 3D TLC NAND SSD

Another major change in SSD technology in recent years that has allowed much larger capacity options in gigabytes and terabytes is the improvement of the chips inside that hold the storage inside. The actual storage inside an SSD is contained on multiple cells known NAND, which depending on the quantity and quality chosen by the manufacturer, result in a larger capacity, faster access and improved durability. The majority of gamer and prosumer SSD used in modern consoles utilise TLC or MLC grade NAND. These provide a great balance between storage, speed and endurance. Recently the new QLC (Quad Layer Cell) quality of NAND in SSD has provided huge capacity options, allowing between 4tB and 8TB capacity. However, this larger capacity comes at a big drop in performance and endurance, therefore QLC NAND SSD is NOT recommended for use in PlayStation 5 storage upgrades. I strongly recommend buying M.2 NVMe SSD with TLC or 3D TLC memory.

Tip 3 – PCIe Gen 4 Vs PCIe Gen 3 SSD

Finally, make sure you buy an M2 SSD that is rated at PCIe Gen4 x4 or higher. More modern SSD make a point of highlighting that they are PCIe Gen4, as these are the SSD that can provide at least 4000-5000MB/s, getting theoretically as high as 8000MB/s. This has resulted in the cost of PCIe Gen 3 SSD falling in price and in some cases be as much as 50% cheaper than PCIe gen 4 SSD. Do not buy a PCIe Gen 3 NVMe SSD for your PlayStation 5, as this will severely bottleneck the performance of the PS5 when storing and accessing your game data. Both types of M2 SSD look identical, but if the specifications or retail box do not clearly state PCIe Gen 4, avoid them!

Recommended SSD Upgrades for PS5 Storage Expansion

So now you know that in order to upgrade your PS5, you need to buy an M.2 SSD that is NVMe supported, is PCIe Gen 4 and one that uses TLC or 3D TLC NAND. That narrows the list of SSDs that you can buy in 2021 from around 100,000 down to about 5,000. That is still ALOT to choose from, arriving in multiple brands, capacities, reported speeds and endurance. So, now I will break the choice down even more for you. Below I have highlighted the PS5 Compatible SSDs (remember not PS5 Hard Drives – VERY important) that you can install in your Playstation 5 to increase your storage. Each of the M.2 SSD below is available in at least 500GB, 1TB, 2TB and 4TB options, along with why I recommend them (based on Price, Speed, Endurance, Build Quality and more). Let’s take a look at the best SSD for PST Upgrades below.

Important!!! – Remember, Sony is still yet to fully complete and confirm the full specification list of supported SSDs that will be supported with the PS5 Storage Expansion Bay when enabled, so although I am 95% certain that all of the SSD below will be supported, you should double-check the Playstation 5 Compatibility list when it is published before you buy! Sony reserves the right to change the list of compatible M.2 NVMe SSD that they support.

 

RECOMMENDED – PS5 Storage Upgrade – Seagate Firecuda 530

Optional Heatsink ($55+), Max Reported Read/Write – 7,300MB/s & 6,900MB/s, Capacity Available 500GB – 4TB, Warranty 5yrs + 3yrs Data Recovery Services , $140-950

  • Newest Generation of Phison E18 Controller and Premiered on the Seagate Firecuda 530 Series
  • Insane performance, increasing at each capacity between 500GB, 1TB, 2TB and 4TB that is faster than the PS5 uncompressed performance speed
  • Included 3 years of Data Recovery services with the 5yr Manufacturer’s Warranty
  • Reported 1,000,000 Random Read/Write IOPS at the 4TB model
  • Included Enterprise Heatsink


 

 

Best Reviewed PS5 Storage Upgrade – Sabrent 1TB Rocket NVMe SB-ROCKET-NVMe4

Does Not Include Heatsink, Max Reported Read/Write – 5,00MB/s & 4,400MB/s, Capacity Available 500GB – 2TB, Warranty 5yrs, $199-999

  • NVMe M.2 PCIe Gen4 x4 Interface. PCIe 4.0 Compliant / NVMe 1.3 Compliant.
  • Power Management Support for APST / ASPM / L1.2.
  • Supports SMART and TRIM commands. Supports ONFi 2.3, ONFi 3.0, ONFi 3.2 and ONFi 4.0 interface.
  • Advanced Wear Leveling, Bad Block Management, Error Correction Code, and Over-Provision.
  • All Sabrent SSDs come with FREE Sabrent Acronis True Image for Sabrent Software for easy Cloning.

 

 


 

Cheapest PS5 Storage Upgrade – Samsung 980 Pro MZ-V8P2T0B – Still TBC!

Does Not Include Heatsink, Max Reported Read/Write – 7,000MB/s & 5,500MB/s, Capacity Available 500GB – 2TB, Warranty 5yrs, $119-399

  • Unleash the power of Samsung 980 PRO PCIe 4.0 NVMe SSD for next-level computing
  • 980 PRO is raising the bar for NVMe SSDs, delivering read speeds up to 6,900 MB/s
  • To ensure stable performance, the 980 PRO uses nickel coating to help manage the controller’s heat level and a heat spreader label to deliver effective thermal control of the NAND chip
  • Embedded with Samsung’s cutting-edge thermal control algorithm, 980 PRO manages heat on its own to deliver durable and reliable performance, while minimizing performance fluctuations during extended usage

 


 

PC Gamer SSD for PS5 Storage Upgrades – The MSI SPATIUM M480

Does Not Include Heatsink, Max Reported Read/Write – 7,000MB/s & 5,500MB/s, Capacity Available 500GB – 2TB, Warranty 5yrs, $TBC

  • Latest Gen NVMe SSD from Gamer/Mobo Giants MSI, supporting PCIe 4.0 NVMe 1.4 SSD
  • Peaking at 7,000MB/s Read and 6,850MB/s Write, thanks to the powerful Phison E18 Controller
  • Optional Heatsink available
  • PCIe Gen4x4 interface and complies with the NVMe 1.4 standard

 


 

FASTEST PS5 Storage Upgrade – PNY XLR8 CS3140 M280CS3140

Optional Heatsink ($25+), Max Reported Read/Write – 7,500MB/s & 5,650MB/s, Capacity Available 1TB – 2TB, Warranty 5yrs, $199-399 

  • Upgrade your M.2 PCIe Gen4 enabled computer to enjoy the extreme performance you demand​
  • The NVMe PCIe Gen4 x4 interface delivers exceptional performance of up to 7,500MB/s seq. read and 5,650MB/s seq. write speeds; slower when equipped in PCIe Gen3 x4 motherboards​
  • The enhanced bandwidth of the NVMe Gen4 interface allows for extreme performance and low latency, making it superior to SATA based SSD’s​
  • Ultra-high performance is ideal for demanding applications, high-end games, and intense workloads​
  • Backed by a 5 Year Warranty with support from our US-based technical support team​

 


 

PS5 SSD Expansion Test – Step By Step Walkthough

Here is a installation Guide, originally made last year in this article HEREThe NVMe SSD installation took place on a completely uninitialised PlayStation 5, as I did not want the latest firmware update affecting any potential results in this installation. I unboxed the system and prepared the console for drive installation. The installation of the NVMe was pretty straightforward and only required a Phillips head screwdriver and around 5-minutes.

The drives I wanted to test were Seagate ironwolf 520 and Samsung 980 Pro, both NVMe PCIe Gen4 X4 drives that promise between 5,000-7,000 MB/s. This is still lower than the potential maximum performance of the PlayStation 5 internal storage(9,000MB/s+) and likely the disparity between current NVMe controllers and the core Playstation system is likely the reason for this upgrade option currently being disabled in the software. Until the likes of the Phison E18 PCIe 4 SSD controller being mass-produced or WD/Samsung getting there alternative out there, this will significantly slow down drive testing by Sony. Nevertheless, these two drives are two of the fastest NVMe available in the world right now and ideal for testing in the base PS5 right now.

Removing the lid of the PS5 is incredibly straight-forward and does not require tools. most first-time users may be quite hesitant to mess around with this plastic plate for fear of breaking or damaging them, but the removing of the plate (the side that does not have the PlayStation logo, but rather the side with the optical disc input if you purchased that version) is incredibly straight-forward.

First, you need to slightly lift the top right corner as shown in the images below, then you need to slide the plate down and it comes off exceptionally easily, revealing the internal cooling fan and that small metal module where we install NVMe SSDs.

Next, you will need a small cross screwdriver to remove the single screw that keeps this expansion port cover in place. Remember, lefty loosey, righty tighty!

Upon removing this plate, you will see the full-length NVMe SSD m 2 bay. 

Mixed install the NVMe in the available bay. Don’t worry about getting it the wrong way round, just be gentle and the notched groove in the SSD media drive can only go in one way.

Once the drive is slotted inside, remove the screw at the top end of the NVMe day, as this is the holding bracket for the in NVMe M.2 Drive

Ensure that the circular silver metal bolt is in the correct circle groove of the controller board, then place the NVMe flat, thin screw the top of the bracket to secure the NVMe in place.

Now you need to replace the metal into covering and reinsert the screw to secure it in place.

Now I reconnect the base stand, ethernet cable and power connector for the PS5. Then simply boot the device with the power button, insuring I have already synced the controller or have it connected via USB.

As we can see, this is the limit to which you can currently utilise an NVMe on the PS5, as they have ensured that the system will not boot with this media expansion by populated with an SSD. This will change once the latest PS5 System Update is out of beta. You can find out more below:

Frequently asked questions

Can I insert a SATA drive into the PS5 console?
No. 

Should I remove the M.2 SSD if I send my PS5 console for repair?
Yes. Please remove the M.2 SSD before sending it for repair. 

Can I format part of the M.2 SSD for use on the PS5 console?
No, you must format the entire M.2 SSD.

Is it okay to install a heatsink on an M.2 SSD with a built-in heatsink?
No. If your M.2 SSD has a built-in heatsink, we recommend against adding any additional heatsinks. Doing so may reduce the effectiveness of the built-in heatsinks.

How is an M.2 SSD different to USB extended storage on PS5 consoles?
PS5 games are playable on M.2 SSD storage.

PS5 games can be downloaded directly to M.2 SSD storage. 
PS5 games can be updated on M.2 SSD storage. 

Is it possible to store part of a game on M.2 SSD storage?
No.

What should I do if I experience gameplay issues when I play games stored on an M.2 SSD?

  1. Press the PS button on your controller to go to the control center, and then select Downloads/Uploads. Pause any ongoing downloads
  2. If you are trying to play a game on disc, please wait for the full installation to finish. 
  3. If you are still having issues, please move the game from M.2 SSD storage to console storage.

Do PS5 consoles support Host Memory Buffer?
No. Additionally, M.2 SSD devices that support HMB (Host Memory Buffer) may see slower-than-expected performance because the PS5 does not support HMB.

 

 

 


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Buyers Guide to Seagate M.2 NVMe SSDs – Barracuda, Firecuda and Ironwolf

19 juillet 2021 à 01:13

Choosing The Right Seagate m.2 SSD – Difference Between Firecuda, Barracuda and Ironwolf

If you are making the move from regularly SATA storage and over to the newest generation of super-fast NVMe SSD, whether it is for gaming, video editing or professional streaming, then you can suddenly be faced with an overwhelming amount of information as you trawl through the remarkably complex world of M.2 PCIe storage drives. Although many brands feature various types of M.2 NVMe media in their portfolios, few have kept things as clearly defined as Seagate. Their SSD range from home, to business and to enterprise, so today I want to go through the current five types of NVMe drive they offer in 2021/2022 and help you decide which one best suits your needs.

IMPORTANT – Remember, this is not strictly about the BEST NVMe SSD (though that is highlighted), this is about helping you which M.2 NVMe best suits YOUR needs, so in some cases, the SSD that is half the price of the others or less enduring, might still be more than suitable for you. Additionally, these are ALL M.2 NVMe SSDs, so NOT SATA M.2s (which cannot exceed 500-600MB/s). So double-check your PC/Laptop/Console supports NVMe M.2 SATA before buying anything! Lastly, ALL of the drives in today’s comparison of NVMes are 2280 in length (though longer and higher capacity 22110 models might have been released later in the year when you are reading this, so check you have a PCIe M.2 NVMe slot that can fit the drive you buy!

Seagate Firecuda, Barracuda and Ironwolf NVMe SSDs – Intended Use

Before going any further though, it is important to understand what each of the Seagate Naming conventions represents. I published a full Seagate SSD Buyers Guide last year (covering their entire range of SSDs), but when it comes to NVMe, their individual series can be detailed as follows:

Seagate Barracuda Q5 & 510 – This is their range of drives for standalone computer use. So, office computers, day to day tasks and your base operating system. They are sturdy, reliable drives that arrive at one of the most affordable tiers and give you fairly standard and performance, durability and endurance. It is worth highlighting that the Barracuda 510 appears to be slowly phasing out and leaving the Barracuda Q5 to be the only NVMe at this tier. Remember that the Q in Q5 represents the use of QLC (Quad Layer Cell) NAND. This will be important later.

Seagate Ironwolf 510 – These are drives that are SPECIFICALLY designed for use in NAS servers and for caching. When the same files on a server/NAS/SAN/etc are accessed continuously by one or more users, one way you can improve performance is to install NVMe SSDs in available slots and the system will automatically move copies of these files (big or very, very small) onto this much higher performing media. However, SSD for this task is recommended to have particularly high endurance (typically measures in DWPD, TBW and MTBF) as data will be VERY frequently refreshed/replaced on these NAS caching NVMes. That is why the Ironwolf 510 NVMes exist. They have a fantastic read speed, but write speeds are much lower (leveraging more in favour of over-provisioning and channeling towards read for even faster cache access)

Seagate Firecuda 510, 520 & 530 – The Firecuda Series is the range that Seagate produced for both gamers and high-end video editors (both live broadcast and post-production). With each generation of new architecture M.2 NVMe on the market, Seagate have released a new revision of their Firecuda Prosumer series, currently in 510 (PCIe Gen 3×4), 520 (PCIe Gen 4×4 high-end controller) and 530 (PCIe Gen 4×4 Premium End controller & NAND). These are the highest tier of M.2 NVMes from Seagate you can get, but you will be paying a premium for this level of storage.

Seagate Nytro – This is Seagate’s premium SSD series for Enterprise. However, at the time of writing, there are no strict m.2 NVMe available in the series. These typically arrive in flash server-class SATA drives, SAS and U.2 interfaces and have some of the highest R/W, IOPS and DWPD ratings than any other SSD in the market. Though, there is every possibility that a Seagate Nytro M.2 NVMe will return in future that rivals the Firedcuda 530 in performance and endurance

Fianlly, it is worth highlighting that all of the Seagate M.2 NVMe’s in today’s buyer’s guide include Rescue Recovery services from Seagate – their included data recovery services. I have covered this in more detail in my review of the Seagate Rescue service last year HERE, but I recommend you check it out, as this is a service ONLY Seagate offer and for that extra layer of recovery chance from accidental deletion, corruption, physical damage beyond your control and more.

So, now you understand the different Seagate SSDs, let’s talk about how each M.2 NVMe compares and help you choose the right one for you.

Seagate Firecuda, Barracuda and Ironwolf NVMe SSDs – Controllers, Bandwidth & NAND

Not all M.2 NVMe are built equal and although the general use of PCIe based m.2 storage has existed in the consumer arena now for 4-5 years, the general standard of hardware has MASSIVELY changed. Each M.2 NVMe available in the Seagate ranges are based on quite different architecture. From smaller changes like the revision of NVMe protocol being used (with each later revision being an improvement over the last), to bigger differences in NAND quality, controller (kind of the CPU of the SSD) and bandwidth of the PCIe architecture the M.2 NVMe uses. Below is a breakdown of how each of these five M.2 NVMes from Seagate compare and although we will go into a little detail on this, later in the guide you will see exactly how these small, component level differences result in massive disparity throughout the line up:

  Seagate Firecuda 530

Seagate FireCuda 520

Seagate FireCuda 510

Seagate IronWolf 510

BarraCuda Q5

Warranty, Limited (years) 5+3yr Rescue 5+3yr Rescue 5+3yr Rescue 5+3yr Rescue 3+1yr Rescue
PCIe Gen M.2 PCIe Gen 4×4 PCIe Gen 4×4 PCIe Gen 3×4 PCIe Gen 3×4 PCIe Gen 3×4
NVMe Rev NVMe 1.4

NVMe 1.3

NVMe 1.3

NVMe 1.3

NVMe 1.3

So, the fact that only the Firecuda SSDs are available in PCIe Gen 4×4 should give you a good idea of how and why these are going to be the highest performers later on. The PCIe architecture is based around versions and multiplication. PCIe Gen 3 = 1,000MB/s potential bandwidth and the x4 figure simply multiply that number by four, which means PCIe Gen 3×4 = 4,000MB/s bandwidth. PCIe 4×4 in the Firecuda 520 and 530 is twice the bandwidth at 8,000MB/s, but it is always worth remembering that Bandwidth is a maximum POTENTIAL speed, it is the width of the pipe that data can travel through – it is still up to the SSD to fill this pipe with data (known as throughput and filling it is known as saturation). Likewise, the Firecuda 530 is the only drive here using the latest NVMe revision, as it was only released in summer 2021 shortly after NVMe 1.4 rev was fully available.

  Seagate Firecuda 530

Seagate FireCuda 520

Seagate FireCuda 510

Seagate IronWolf 510

BarraCuda Q5

NAND Type 176L 3D NAND Toshiba 96L TLC Kioxia BiCS3 64L TLC Kioxia BiCS3 64L TLC 3D QLC
Controller E18-PS018 Phison PS5016-E16 PS5012-E12DC PS5012-E12DC Unknown

Additionally, it is worth looking at the controllers and NAND used in each drive. With the exception of the affordable barracuda Q5, all the Seagate m.2 NVMes feature 3D TLC (Triple layer NAND) – this is currently the best balance of performance, endurance and capacity you can get in 2021/2022. The Barracuda uses the QLC NAND which means data is crammed in more on each cell, resulting in weaker performance and lesser lifespan (reflected later in all other specifications). Another consideration is the number of laters each NAND cell uses (reflected in the number with L on the end, eg 64L and 96L), as this allows improvements in capacity, throughput and sustainability in the NAND, without sacrificing quality. The higher this number, the better really – though it will make the drive more expensive per GB/TB. As impactful as the NAND is though, the controller featured on these SSD is where it REALLY matters! An SSD much like a computer really and is made up of a controller (like a CPU), DRAM/SD-RAM (like computer memory) and NAND cells (like storage media) and although all of these are important, the controller is incredibly important to keep data moving to the interface/connection with the client device (so, in this case m.2 NVMe) as fast as possible.

Unlike Samsung or WD, Seagate does not use ‘in-house’ controllers and have used the Phison series of controllers in a number of high profile SSDs over the years. The current gold standard in these is the Phison E18-PS5018 and this is featured on the Firecuda 530 (as well as with a few other SSDs from other brands, but with lesser NAND and NVMe revs). Overall, it is clear here in the chats that the Firecuda has the best architecture available, but provides this at quite a high price, so although it absolutely wins things in terms of ROI if your budget can cover it, the best all-round SSDs for price AND hardware are the Firecuda 520 and 510, depending on whether you have PCIe 4 or PCIe 3 m.2 slots available.

 

Seagate Firecuda, Barracuda and Ironwolf NVMe SSDs – Capacity

For some SSD buyers, the capacity (and ultimately the price per GB/TB) can be a big factor in the purchase of their new M.2 NVMe drive. The different ranges available from Seagate are all largely available in the 500GB, 1TB and 2TB tier (with a rejig mix up on  the Ironwolf 510 – which I will touch on in a bit), but there are clearly a couple of exceptions after that. The Firecuda 510 and the Ironwolf 510 are the only drives that are available in 250/240GB, because the former can often be used for the core system drive for Gamer PCs that have one or more M.2 slots to use (at least one will be a PCIe 3X4) and the latter needs to be scalable to a NAS system and the HDDs it already has in a RAID. The Firecuda 520 and 530 are not available in this capacity tier because these premium drives already work at their best with more NAND to play with (as you will be in the performance benchmarks in a bit) and the Barracuda Q5 is already using such cost-effective price vs capacity NAND that a 250GB and 500GB model would be practically the same price ultimately. See below:

  Seagate Firecuda 530

Seagate FireCuda 520

Seagate FireCuda 510

Seagate IronWolf 510

BarraCuda Q5

240GB / 250GB N/A N/A ZP250GM3A001 ZP240NM30011 N/A
2480GB / 500GB ZP500GM3A013 ZP500GM3A002 ZP500GM3A021 ZP480NM30011 ZP500CV3A001
960GB / 1000GB ZP1000GM3A013 ZP1000GM3A002 ZP1000GM3A011 ZP960NM30011 ZP1000CV3A001
1920GB / 2000GB ZP2000GM3A013 ZP2000GM3A002 ZP2000GM30021 ZP1920NM30011 ZP2000CV3A001
3840 / 4000GB ZP4000GM3A013 N/A N/A N/A N/A

The other exception to the rule is that the Seagate Firecuda 530 arrives in an impressive 4TB capacity, which is especially impressive when you remember that ALL of the NVMes above are available in 2280 M.2 2280 length, not the 22110 m.2 drives that are sometimes associated with larger capacity NVMe SSDs above 2TB. Thanks to the Firecuda having the more capable controller and choice of NAND and DRAM/SD-RAM, this means that this higher 4TB also has some fantastic performance (made possible with the NAND being distributed on either side of the PCB board – so make sure you have sufficient thermal pads or purchase the custom heatsink that this drive can be equipped with. The Ironwolf 510 SSDs arrive with a slightly different capacity, as they factor in a storage technique called Overprovisioning, whereby a small % of the available storage on NAND is given to the controller/memory in order to give them more space to handle tasks. This is particularly beneficial to Read processes in queuing and as these drives are geared towards caching, the use of overprovisioning leads to much more consistent read activity being sustained. Overall, the best drive here in terms of capacity CHOICE is the Firecuda 510, but the best drive for total capacity, of course, is going to be the Firecuda 530 M.2 NVMe SSD.

Seagate Firecuda, Barracuda and Ironwolf NVMe SSDs – Read & Write Throughput Speed

The overall performance that each of these drives is capable of will almost scale upwards as you look at each tier of capacity. This is largely due to the way the NAND is distributed on the physical PCB of the NVMe SSD. That said because each series type features quite different NAND types (ranging in layering and 3D vertical layering quantity), varying controller onboard and even vary in the PCIe interface, the result is that even the highest performance of the biggest capacity Barracuda Q5 2TB and Ironwolf 510 1.92TB can barely scratch the STAGGERING 7000/3000MB/s maximum performance of the Firecuda 530. Clearly the drives get higher in total potential performance in Read and Write as we move from the more affordable Barracuda Q5 and all the way up to that FC 530. However, there is clearly an inconsistency here, can you spot it?

  Seagate Firecuda 530

Seagate FireCuda 520

Seagate FireCuda 510

Seagate IronWolf 510

BarraCuda Q5

240/250GB N/A N/A ZP250GM3A001 ZP240NM30011 N/A
Sequential Read (Max, MB/s), 128 KB  – –  3200MB 2,450MB – 
Sequential Write (Max, MB/s), 128 KB –  1300MB 290MB
2480/500GB ZP500GM3A013 ZP500GM3A002 ZP500GM3A021 ZP480NM30011 ZP500CV3A001
Sequential Read (Max, MB/s), 128 KB 7000MB 5000MB 3450MB 2,650MB 2300MB
Sequential Write (Max, MB/s), 128 KB 3000MB 2500MB 2500MB 600MB 900MB
960/1000GB ZP1000GM3A013 ZP1000GM3A002 ZP1000GM3A011 ZP960NM30011 ZP1000CV3A001
Sequential Read (Max, MB/s), 128 KB 7300MB 5000MB 3450MB 3,150MB 2400MB
Sequential Write (Max, MB/s), 128 KB 6000MB 4400MB 3100MB 1,000MB 1700MB
1920/2000GB ZP2000GM3A013 ZP2000GM3A002 ZP2000GM30021 ZP1920NM30011 ZP2000CV3A001
Sequential Read (Max, MB/s), 128 KB 7300MB 5000MB 3450MB 3,150MB 2400MB
Sequential Write (Max, MB/s), 128 KB 6900MB 4400MB 3200MB 850MB 1800MB
3840/4000GB ZP4000GM3A013 N/A N/A N/A N/A
Sequential Read (Max, MB/s), 128 KB 7300MB – 
Sequential Write (Max, MB/s), 128 KB 6900MB – 

If you did spot it, well done. For the rest of you – look at the Write speed on ALL 4 capacity Seagate Ironwolf 510 M.2 NVMe SSDs! Not only does it just barely cross into 1,000MB/s in the 960GB model, it actually DIPS into 850MB/s at 2TB. Again, this is because of this drive being massively geared towards Read over Write for cache optimization (as well as durability and endurance, which we will touch on later). That means that the Ironwolf 510 is incredibly unsuitable to regular SSD use outside of NAS when compared to all the others, even compared with the Barracuda Q5. Regardless of this, as you would expect, the firecuda’s do hit all the usual highs, with each newer version breaking higher thresholds. It is also worth remembering that these are maximum Read and Write figures, so these do not fully depict sustained performance. The Barracuda performance figures will likely not maintain that height over extended periods of time, hence their suitability for day to day computer use (with more sporadic/lite activity than something like professional gaming with consistent performance requirements or video editing). Clearly, the m.2 slot your system features (e.g PCIe 3 or PCIe 4) will factor heavily in the drive your choose, but obviously, if you can afford it and have the architecture in place I would recommend the Firecuda 530. Otherwise, the FC 510 and 520 are solid choices for PCIe4 and PCIe3 m.2 repectively.

Seagate Firecuda, Barracuda and Ironwolf NVMe SSDs – IOPS Rating

Another popular way that SSD performance is typically measured is the IOPS (input, output operations per second), as M.2 NVMe SSDs and their much faster response handling of instructions from the system they are in. These are typically measures in the thousands, though the random read/write IOPS figures for the Barracuda Q5 drive were hard to find online and given their use of QLC and lower endurance rating (making me question the long term durability of the drive) I have not added any reported benchmarks for this drive. Unsurprisingly, the reported benchmarks for IOPS on each drive series and capacity scale up as you would expect, with the Firecuda 530 making an enormous jump thanks to its architecture:

  Seagate Firecuda 530

Seagate FireCuda 520

Seagate FireCuda 510

Seagate IronWolf 510

BarraCuda Q5

240/250GB N/A N/A ZP250GM3A001 ZP240NM30011 N/A
Random Read (Max, IOPS), 4 KB QD32     210,000 100,000 UNKNOWN
Random Write (Max, IOPS), 4 KB QD32     320,000 12,000 UNKNOWN
2480/500GB ZP500GM3A013 ZP500GM3A002 ZP500GM3A021 ZP480NM30011 ZP500CV3A001
Random Read (Max, IOPS), 4 KB QD32 400,000 430,000 420,000 193,000 UNKNOWN
Random Write (Max, IOPS), 4 KB QD32 700,000 630,000 600,000 20,000 UNKNOWN
960/1000GB ZP1000GM3A013 ZP1000GM3A002 ZP1000GM3A011 ZP960NM30011 ZP1000CV3A001
Random Read (Max, IOPS), 4 KB QD32 800,000 760,000 620,000 345,000 UNKNOWN
Random Write (Max, IOPS), 4 KB QD32 1,000,000 700,000 600,000 28,000 UNKNOWN
1920/2000GB ZP2000GM3A013 ZP2000GM3A002 ZP2000GM30021 ZP1920NM30011 ZP2000CV3A001
Random Read (Max, IOPS), 4 KB QD32 1,000,000 750,000 620,000 270,000 UNKNOWN
Random Write (Max, IOPS), 4 KB QD32 1,000,000 700,000 600,000 25,000 UNKNOWN
3840/4000GB ZP4000GM3A013 N/A N/A N/A N/A
Random Read (Max, IOPS), 4 KB QD32 1,000,000       UNKNOWN
Random Write (Max, IOPS), 4 KB QD32 1,000,000       UNKNOWN

Once again, the heavy read over write structure of the Ironwolf 510 has led to an enormous disparity between the random Read over Write IOPS on every capacity tier on this M.2 NVMe. When comparing it against the Firecuda 510 (also PCIe Gen 3×3) the Ironwolf 510 half 50% of the read IOPS and (staggeringly) around 4-5% of the write IOPS! If you are using your M.2 NVMe for a consistently engaged/interactive environment (eSports, Photo Editing, AI-assisted services, physics engines, etc) then the higher the IOPS ratings per second, the better – as that means that those hundreds/thousands of tiny instructions and changes you make to your live data will not be bottlenecked by the SSD.

The Firecuda series clearly wins the day here (note the Firecuda 530 comfortably cracks the 1,000,000 barriers on both read and write in the larger capacity tiers). If you care about IOPS and are using a system/setup that can make use of these response volumes (so not a day to day data entry PC or NAS unless as a storage pool drive in the latter), Firecuda 520 and 530 all the way.

Seagate Firecuda, Barracuda and Ironwolf NVMe SSDs – Endurance and Durability

Unlike the other points in this comparison of the Seagate M.2 NVMe SSD ranges, the Endurance and Durability of an SSD is an area that is overlooked often enough that I wanted to take a moment to focus a little more on this – you can thank me years from now! The importance of SSD durability and endurance in 2021/2022 is actually pretty massive. Now that the devices we use all feature incredibly powerful processors, often cloud/network hybrid AI processes and graphical handling that will be instantly bottlenecked by traditional hard drives, SSDs are no longer just the ‘boot’ drive for our OS and are now the day to day working drive. This combined with SSD being used as caching and larger SSD capacities allowing suitable substitution for HDDs entirely means that the CONSTANT concern about SSDs lifespan and the durability of those NAND cells is now quite paramount. SSDs wear out – it’s as simple as that. The more you write, the more wear those individual NAND cells suffer – degrading performance over the years and inevitably leading to drive failure. Likewise, the smaller the drive, the greater likelihood that you will be writing, then rewriting, then rewriting, time and time again. All of these SSDs need to factor in endurance and lifespan, as although they have varying quality NAND, there are no exceptions to the slow wearing it will suffer. However,alongside massive research and development in better controllers and interfaces to improve performance, the way NAND is improved has led to SSDs lasting lover than ever before. However, SSDs and NAND are not built equally and there is actually quite a large difference in durability between these drives. The Storage industry typically measures the predicted durability and endurance of an SSD as TBW, DWPD and MTBF. They are:

TBW = Terabytes Written, rated as the total number of terabytes that this SSD can have written to it in its warranty covered lifespan. So if the TBW was 300TB and the warranty is 5 years of coverage, that would mean that the drive can receive on average (with deleting/overwriting data each repeatedly) 60 Terabytes per year (or 5TB a month). After this point, the manufacturer highlights that durability, endurance and performance will decline. Often highlighted as an alternative to warranty length when gauging the predicted lifespan of a SSD.

DWPD = Drive Writes Per Day / Data Writes Per Day, this is a decimalized figure that represents what proportion of the capacity of an SSD (where 1.0 = 100% capacity) can be filled, erased and/or rewritten on a daily basis. This is provided using the warranty period and TBW figure. So, for example, if a 500GB drive has a 0.3DWPD rating, that is approx 150GB of data per day

MTBF = Mean Time Between Failure, which is the interval between one failure of an SSD and the next. MTBF is expressed in hours and most industrial SSDs are rated in the Millions of Hours. MTBF and MTTF (Mean Time to Failure) have largely become overlooked in recent years in favour of TBW and DWPD in SSDs, but are still stated on most Data Sheets.

So, now you know what those large Terabyte stats, hours and decimal point details are on the average SSD datasheet. So where do the Seagate Firecuda 530 and WD Black SN850 stand on this:

  Seagate Firecuda 530

Seagate FireCuda 520

Seagate FireCuda 510

Seagate IronWolf 510

BarraCuda Q5

N/A N/A ZP250GM3A001 ZP240NM30011 N/A
DWPD 0.7 0.9 0.7 1 0.2
MTBF, hours 1,800,000 1,800,000 1,800,000 1,800,000 1,800,000

This is clearly the area where the Seagate Ironwolf 510 gets to SHINE! It features a reported 1.0 DWPD (rather rare in mid-pro level m.2 NVMe) due to its lower write stats lessening the impact and over-provisioning. Over-provisioning (OP) increases SSD endurance by allowing extra space for the flash controller to manage incoming data. Over-provisioning improves wear-levelling and random write performance, and reduces the write amplification factor (WAF), thereby improving the endurance of NAND-based SSDs. That said, many users will be able to overlook the endurance rating and weigh it up against the lower write performance negatively – once again, hence its optimization for caching being rather hobbling other usage cases. The Barracuda at the end is clearly the least enduring of the bunch (already touched on) at 0.2 drive writes per day, which is reflected poorly by the performance AND the fact it only has a 3yr warranty (rather than the 5 years on the rest of the M.2 NVMes from Seagate. Overall, I am most impressed by the Seagate Firecuda 520 having it’s 0.8 drive writes per day, especially when you consider the 5000/4400MB/s top-end performance on a PCIe 4×4 m.2 bandwidth. Yes, it is only a pinch higher than the 0.7 on the Firecuda 530 and its 7300/6900MB/s, but remember these are maximum reported speeds and are very dependant on the file system and instructions being given by the client machine. Additionally, another big takeaway here is to know that these drive write per day figures are based on if you were going flat-out on these SSDs daily and within the 5-year warranty timeline. So if you are using them a tad more casually, or intermittently, these figures for durability and endurance will be considerably longer (though obviously the manufactures warranty for support only extends to 5 years)

Seagate Firecuda, Barracuda and Ironwolf NVMe SSDs – Conclusion

If there is one big, BIG takeaway that I want you to take away from this guide of Seagate m.2 NVMe SSDs, is that CLEARLY not all of them are built equally. Over on YouTube, I will constantly highlight that of all the types of modern computing technology, few areas have the diversity of use or crafted end-user design that data storage has. You have a lot of different spoons in your kitchen and they all ‘work’, but have you ever tried making a cup of tea with a wooden pasta/sauce spoon? Or cut a steak with a butter knife? The same logic is quite clear in these SSDs and although it is easy to fall into the trap of ‘most expensive must be the best’ or ‘fastest = best for everything’, but the truth is a lot more nuanced. Below is a breakdown of the best use/user for each of these drives to help you decide between Firecuda, Barracuda and Ironwolf and which Seagate NVMe SSD is the best for your needs:

  Seagate Firecuda 530

Seagate FireCuda 520

Seagate FireCuda 510

Seagate IronWolf 510

Seagate BarraCuda Q5

Best For User 4K/8K Professional Editing

Professional Gamer

eSports

Current-Gen Consoles

4K Professional Editing

Semi-Pro Gamers

eSports

AI Tasks

1080p / Compressed 4K Editing

Prosumer Gamers

Professional Computing

NAS Server Caching

Virtual Machine Caching

SAN/Shared Storage

Office Computers

Home Gamers

Operating Sytems

Where To Buy

Remember, ALL of these M.2 NVMes arrive with Rescue Data Recovery services, so that’s another little bonus you get with any of these. Thanks for reading and I hope this guide helped you choose the right M.2 Seagate NVMe SSD for your gaming PC, home console (PS5?) or professional editing machine. If you need any further assistance on choosing the right storage media for your needs, take advantage of the free advice section below. It is manned by two humans, myself and Eddie the Web guy, and is a COMPLETELY FREE advice service. It might take us a day or two extra to respond to your questions, but we answer every single one and provide unbias advice that only has your storage interests at heart! Have a lovely week and stay awesome.

 


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