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Synology DSM 7.2 – New Features in Full

8 novembre 2022 à 12:34

The Features and Improvements of Synology DSM 7.2 Revealed

When Synology first revealed that they were already in the final stages of rolling out the latest update to their popular software platform, DSM version 7.2, many of us were quite surprised about the strong focus on enterprise features and appliances being the focus point. Synology has been increasingly shifting gears on its platform toward more business and enterprise-scale users in the last few years and though DSM 7.2 updates did include a few more home, prosumer and SMB improvements, the bulk of the updates that are coming in this new revision are ones to further bolster their business single ecosystem even further! The following article covers everything we learnt about intended software and service updates for the Synology DSM Platform. How many of these end up as DSM 7.2 implementations and how many end up being rolled into individual application updates on their own (and therefore accessible in DSM 7.1 currently) is yet to be seen. Improvements in featured services such as Synology Active Backup, Drive and Surveillance Station may well arrive independently. Here is everything we learnt about future software updates and DSM 7.2. Apologies for the delay in this article. There have been recent hardware reveals in the last couple of weeks (DS723+, DS923+, WRX560 to name just a few) and a larger article that covers the planned 2023 hardware, software and DSM. You can learn about everything that was revealed at the Synology 2023 and Beyond event HERE on the blog.

Synology DSM 7.2 Release Date

Synology detailed numerous planned improvements that are arriving in the latest revision of DSM throughout the presentation. The good news is that people will not have to wait too long for DSM 7.2 to arrive, with the release stated as ‘early 2023’, with further clarification alongside other details to point towards Q1 2023 (Jan-March). This includes a great many smaller quality-of-life improvements, but some bigger ones in storage management and access. Several of the newer individual client software updates will likely be tied to DSM 7.2 and/or arrive in a beta format by the end of the year.

Volume Encryption Coming to DSM 7.2

A long-term request by Synology NAS users for a few years, the ability to encrypt your NAS beyond the current ‘folder’ level in DSM. It is a little odd that Synology has not provided Disk, Volume or Pool level encryption in the system storage manager. The ability to encrypt the full volume means that you can be a great deal broader in your protection from your storage getting intercepted outside of your own authorized use. Prior to this, encrypted upto the folder/shared-folder level meant that you would likely need to maintain multiple key files/codes, as well as result in more work as your structured your system. Volume-level encryption hugely simplifies this, as well as allowing a larger container of storage to encrypt within.

Mac OS Active Backup Client Support

Another HUGELY requested feature is parity in the Mac OS Support in Synology Active Backup that is currently available for the Windows Client. Up until now, Mac users that wanted to create a system-wide (OS level) backup relied on Apple Time Machine. This is still a solid and user-friendly option, but not hugely storage efficient, is tougher to browse through images than Synology AB and also does not play as nice with remote backups as it does with local backups (ie it supports network backups, but even then quite regimentally and does not correlate/manage those particular backups as well as using a Synology client and Synology NAS running Active Backup). Equally, Synology AB and Mac OS client app should allow viable and easier remote Mac image recovery options in a way currently not available.

Improved Active Backup NAS to NAS Remote Backup

NAS to NAS backups are NOT a new thing, but are more often than not either on a file/folder level (i.e using Hyper Backup) or, in the case of 3rd party general/linux servers, a big block of data that cannot effectively be viewed or managed natively. Improved Active Backup NAS to NAS support means that the same level of system/OS level backup image backup that is afforded to Windows PCs, VMs and More in Active Backup Suite can now be made with another Synology NAS server. Till now, the best options you had for NAS-to-NAS backups were Hyper Backup Folder level backups, Snapshot replication to send snapshot images on a schedule/sync/retention configuration, Backup your NAS image to Synology C2 Cloud (which can be synced elsewhere) and a few different file level sync/backup tools between servers. As Active Backup grows in popularity with Synology NAS users, including it in your 3-2-1 system-wide backup strategy makes alot of sense and for those that are already running a periodic/scheduled NAS to NAS backup, this makes even more sense than current file/folder level backups.

Synology Drive to Support Active Directory (AD)

Synology already has a very competent Active Directory management tool in ‘Synology Directory Server’, which turns your Synology NAS into a domain controller (DC) to manage users, devices, groups, and domain policies in a breeze. However, support of Microsoft AD is coming to Synology Drive. For the unaware, Active Directory (AD) is a directory service that runs on Microsoft Windows systems (i.e Windows Server). The main function of Active Directory from the client side is to enable administrators to manage permissions and control access to network resources. In Active Directory, data is stored as objects, which include users, groups, applications, and devices, and these objects are categorized according to their name and attributes. Then you have AD DS (Active Directory Domain Services) are a core component of Active Directory and provide the primary mechanism for authenticating users and determining which network resources they can access. AD DS also provides additional features such as Single Sign-On (SSO), security certificates, LDAP, and access rights management.

WORM Support Addition

Write Once, Read Many (WORM) has been around in the world of data storage for a considerable length of time and allows a file to be accessed by many, many users without the original file being in any way changed or corrupted – a real issue if a file/database is being accessed by many users and changes inadvertently occur which overwrite the file or changes being made by others (file/media editors tackle this in other means, such as via using shadow editing or non-linear editing). WORM (Write Once, Read Many) is used to avoid modification of saved data.  With increasingly stringent regulations on how information is stored, many countries require government agencies, financial institutions, and healthcare providers to comply with strict data archiving regulations. Many of these require storage systems to not tamper with archived data. This has led to WORM becoming increasingly common in commercial setups. Good examples are photos, contracts, financial reports, emails, employee information, and other important documents. They should not be modified once stored. In some professional fields, massive data needs to be analyzed, and huge amounts of real-time data need to be recorded and tracked. WORM technology is ideal for protecting these records so that they will not be overwritten and can be saved as a reference for future use.

The support of WORM in the Synology storage infrastructure will allow loving for files for a predetermined time, as well as configuration into two separate types – Compliance and Enterprise. Compliance issues ZERO write/edit/change, even by IT admins for the pre-defined period of time. Enterprise is similar, however, it DOES allow IT admin(s) to make changes and/or adapt the WORM access. Also, grace periods can be set in for files going into WORM configurations, which allow a period of time to pass before locks are engaged. This change along with several others that are to be implemented in DSM 7.2 are slated for Q1 of 2023 (Jan-March). In short, in WORM enabled folders data is protected from manipulation by not being able to change or delete it for a specified period of time. Immutable data backups can also be carried out via Hyper Backup for further protection and retention down the line too.

SMB Multi-Channel – Better Port Utilization and Improved Drive Integration

SMB is not new, but updates to Drive and SMB support also see changes with Synology DSM 7.2, with cross-protocol file locking between SMB shares and Drive, ensuring that files in use cannot be edited or overwritten across them. In addition, with SMB multichannel transfer, all network connections available between servers and clients can be used to increase the performance of SMB file transfer, regardless of traditional conflicts that would prevent them being bound/crossed together conventionally

Improvements to Synology Office Services and Features

Synology has provided their Office application in the DSM application list for quite a long time, serving as an in-house alternative to using 3rd party office doc tools such as Google Docs and Microsoft office. This combined with the Synology Drive application results in you being able to open all of your office format docs (text, spreadsheets, PDFs, etc) from within the Synology ecosystem, where your data lives. However, there is always room for improvement and we are told that new features such as document watermarks, improved revision recognition on docs exported over and an increase in support of file format/layouts from Microsoft Word etc.

Click to view slideshow.

Scale-Out Clusters and ‘Synology Backup Cloud’

Synology highlighted their massive HD6500 and then discussed HUGE scale out cluster storage. The new scale-out clusters are also scheduled to appear in 2023 and provide faster file and object storage. This should allow server combinations of HD6500s servers that scale upto that of 12 petabytes to operate with a write speed of up to 60 GB/s (60,000MB/s).

Additionally, Synology is improving the management of large-scale backups from a single portal point, via a new platform/service they are calling ‘Synology Backup Cloud’ (name almost certainly will change!) that will cover the operations of Active Backup, Hyper Backup and C2 Backup operations. Synology is aiming for this tool to provide the IT admin with a single easy window to manage, remote control and monitoring of all aspects of data backup.

Not a lot was said on this feature, but expect its development to be a little slower than most as, much like Active Insight, this is very much an enterprise site tool and likely at a premium.

Improvements in Synology C2 Identity

The Synology C2 Identity application that was introduced with Synology DSM 7 at launch is also going to see updates in its supported authentication methods and client tech. These will include Windows Hello and Apple Face ID/Touch ID, as well as in connection with the upcoming C2 identity user portal, employees using managed devices can be automatically signed in with SAML.

Synology Drive – Remote Erase

The benefits of Synology Drive when it comes to larger teams of users being able to access the same folder(s) of data in order to collaborate on projects are already well documented. However, what if a client system that has access to a synced drive folder gets hijacked? Or at a moment’s notice, you need to suspend access to the share from a specific client machine AND want to ensure that no locally sync’d/download copy is still there? Well, soon Synology Drive will be receiving an update to allow exactly that includes the ability to delete data remotely and is intended to minimize security risks by removing synchronized folders from stolen Windows and macOS systems.

That just about covers it. There were further improvements that were featured in Synology Secure sign-in and C2 Password services to improve the range of supported authentication methods, as well as improvements to their Synology C2 cloud platform access and implementation. However, as these are more to do with the individual services/applications, I will save this for the inevitable Synology DSM 7.2 Beta preview and included services. So, what do you think of the planned improvements coming to DSM 7.2? Would you have liked to have seen further updates to the more ‘everyman’ services, i.e upgrades to Synology Photos AI recognition to match that of Synology Moments? Or a little more parity between Windows and Mac OS compatibility? Let’s discuss it below. We pool the comments on this article and the videos that are featured in it to keep all the relevant comments in one place, so take a look and see if your POV is the same as everyone else’s.

 

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Need Advice on Data Storage from an Expert?

We want to keep the free advice on NASCompares FREE for as long as we can. Since this service started back in Jan '18, We have helped hundreds of users every month solve their storage woes, but we can only continue to do this with your support. So please do choose to buy at Amazon US and Amazon UK on the articles when buying to provide advert revenue support or to donate/support the site below. Finally, for free advice about your setup, just leave a message in the comments below here at NASCompares.com and we will get back to you. Need Help? Where possible (and where appropriate) please provide as much information about your requirements, as then I can arrange the best answer and solution to your needs. Do not worry about your e-mail address being required, it will NOT be used in a mailing list and will NOT be used in any way other than to respond to your enquiry. [contact-form-7]     Terms and Conditions Alternatively, why not ask me on the ASK NASCompares forum, by clicking the button below. This is a community hub that serves as a place that I can answer your question, chew the fat, share new release information and even get corrections posted. I will always get around to answering ALL queries, but as a one-man operation, I cannot promise speed! So by sharing your query in the ASK NASCompares section below, you can get a better range of solutions and suggestions, alongside my own.  

Synology 2023 Online Reveal – EVERYTHING They Covered

30 octobre 2022 à 23:00

Synology Reveal Details on Diskstation Manager 7.2, Mac OS Support Improvements, WORM, Volume Encryption, Cameras and more

When it comes to the value of a Synology NAS product, I think it would be fair to say that the bulk of the $$$ that you pay goes towards the software – Diskstation Manager (DSM). With an enormous range of 1st party services, features and client applications, DSM ensures that a Synology NAS (regardless of scale) is a complete hardware and software solution! The DSM platform has received numerous updates over the years, but few were as big or as polished as DSM 7. Recently at the Synology 2023 and Beyond global streaming event, Synology revealed a number of the planned features that are arriving in the DSM 7.2 software update, intended for 2023. Although typically sub revision updates like 7.0>7.1>7.2 might ordinarily be considered minor updates in most software, in the Synology DSM platform however these tend to include pretty large-scale improvements, new applications, improved service capabilities, a larger supported hardware client base and even a few extra up and coming beta services available to be tried out (under strict ‘tests’ status!). These were revealed alongside a number of new innovations coming to individual applications and services, further increasing security and data integrity (with a real buzz on immutable data, data that cannot and/or should not be changed). Finally, there was a few featured improvements highlighted for several areas of their surveillance platform that included the new cameras (already mentioned HERE) and improvements configuring Surveillance Station via DS Cam. Let’s go through everything new we learned at Synology 2023 and Beyond.

Updates and New Features Coming to Synology DSM We Know so far

The following is everything we learnt about intended software and services updates for the Synology Platform. How many of these end up as DSM 7.2 implementations and how many end up being rolled into individual application updates on their own (and therefore accessible in DSM 7.1 currently) is yet to be seen. Improvements in featured services such as Synology Active Backup, Drive and Surveillance Station may well arrive independently. Here is everything we learnt about future software updates and DSM 7.2:

Synology DSM 7.2 Release Date

Synology detailed numerous planned improvements that are arriving in the latest revision of DSM throughout the presentation. The good news is that people will not have to wait too long for DSM 7.2 to arrive, with the release stated as ‘early 2023’, with further clarification alongside other details to point towards Q1 2023 (Jan-March). This includes a great many smaller quality-of-life improvements, but some bigger ones in storage management and access. Several of the newer individual client software updates will likely be tied to DSM 7.2 and/or arrive in a beta format by the end of the year.

Volume Encryption Coming to DSM 7.2

A long-term request by Synology NAS users for a few years, the ability to encrypt your NAS beyond the current ‘folder’ level in DSM. It is a little odd that Synology has not provided Disk, Volume or Pool level encryption in the system storage manager. The ability to encrypt the full volume means that you can be a great deal broader in your protection from your storage getting intercepted outside of your own authorized use. Prior to this, encrypted upto the folder/shared-folder level meant that you would likely need to maintain multiple key files/codes, as well as result in more work as your structured your system. Volume-level encryption hugely simplifies this, as well as allowing a larger container of storage to encrypt within.

Mac OS Active Backup Client Support

Another HUGELY requested feature is parity in the Mac OS Support in Synology Active Backup that is currently available for the Windows Client. Up until now, Mac users that wanted to create a system-wide (OS level) backup relied on Apple Time Machine. This is still a solid and user-friendly option, but not hugely storage efficient, is tougher to browse through images than Synology AB and also does not play as nice with remote backups as it does with local backups (ie it supports network backups, but even then quite regimentally and does not correlate/manage those particular backups as well as using a Synology client and Synology NAS running Active Backup). Equally, Synology AB and Mac OS client app should allow viable and easier remote Mac image recovery options in a way currently not available.

Improved Active Backup NAS to NAS Remote Backup

NAS to NAS backups are NOT a new thing, but are more often than not either on a file/folder level (i.e using Hyper Backup) or, in the case of 3rd party general/linux servers, a big block of data that cannot effectively be viewed or managed natively. Improved Active Backup NAS to NAS support means that the same level of system/OS level backup image backup that is afforded to Windows PCs, VMs and More in Active Backup Suite can now be made with another Synology NAS server. Till now, the best options you had for NAS-to-NAS backups were Hyper Backup Folder level backups, Snapshot replication to send snapshot images on a schedule/sync/retention configuration, Backup your NAS image to Synology C2 Cloud (which can be synced elsewhere) and a few different file level sync/backup tools between servers. As Active Backup grows in popularity with Synology NAS users, including it in your 3-2-1 system-wide backup strategy makes alot of sense and for those that are already running a periodic/scheduled NAS to NAS backup, this makes even more sense than current file/folder level backups.

New Synology WRX560 WiFi Router Released

Note – My Full Review of the Synology WRX560 Router is now LIVE and you can watch it HERE on YouTube and read it HERE on the Blog.

Yes, Synology is working on a new WiFi 6 and 2.5G router – The Synology RT3000ax (also known as the WRX560). Before I go any further though,a little bit of background. I think it would be safe to say that Synology has been quite successful in their range of prosumer routers. When they first introduced the RT1900ac 6 years ago, it was seen as something of an experiment to see if they could bring the same level of software, design and experience that they had learned in network attached storage to one of the most common devices in all our homes and offices worldwide. Fast forward to now and they are on the 3rd Generation (technically, a little bit of overlap) and we have seen both the standard of Synology Router and the functionality of Synology Router Manager (SRM) evolve considerably – with the router arm of their portfolio getting stronger all the time. This brings us to the newly revealed WRX560 router, a more compact 802.11ax router that seems destined to serve as the refresh for the MR2200ac or (more likely) the RT2600ac at some point in the future.

With a new and intriguing design (definitely looks like what the most recent star wars trilogy did to stormtrooper helmets, but ok) and borrowed elements of the recently released RT6600ax router, the WRX560 would appear to be designed to be in a tier of their router portfolio serving as the middle-ground (when the OTT RT6600ax seems a bit pie in the sky).

Synology Drive to Support Active Directory (AD)

Synology already has a very competent Active Directory management tool in ‘Synology Directory Server’, which turns your Synology NAS into a domain controller (DC) to manage users, devices, groups, and domain policies in a breeze. However, support of Microsoft AD is coming to Synology Drive. For the unaware, Active Directory (AD) is a directory service that runs on Microsoft Windows systems (i.e Windows Server). The main function of Active Directory from the client side is to enable administrators to manage permissions and control access to network resources. In Active Directory, data is stored as objects, which include users, groups, applications, and devices, and these objects are categorized according to their name and attributes. Then you have AD DS (Active Directory Domain Services) are a core component of Active Directory and provide the primary mechanism for authenticating users and determining which network resources they can access. AD DS also provides additional features such as Single Sign-On (SSO), security certificates, LDAP, and access rights management.

WORM Support Addition

Write Once, Read Many (WORM) has been around in the world of data storage for a considerable length of time and allows a file to be accessed by many, many users without the original file being in any way changed or corrupted – a real issue if a file/database is being accessed by many users and changes inadvertently occur which overwrite the file or changes being made by others (file/media editors tackle this in other means, such as via using shadow editing or non-linear editing). WORM (Write Once, Read Many) is used to avoid modification of saved data.  With increasingly stringent regulations on how information is stored, many countries require government agencies, financial institutions, and healthcare providers to comply with strict data archiving regulations. Many of these require storage systems to not tamper with archived data. This has led to WORM becoming increasingly common in commercial setups. Good examples are photos, contracts, financial reports, emails, employee information, and other important documents. They should not be modified once stored. In some professional fields, massive data needs to be analyzed, and huge amounts of real-time data need to be recorded and tracked. WORM technology is ideal for protecting these records so that they will not be overwritten and can be saved as a reference for future use.

The support of WORM in the Synology storage infrastructure will allow loving for files for a predetermined time, as well as configuration into two separate types – Compliance and Enterprise. Compliance issues ZERO write/edit/change, even by IT admins for the pre-defined period of time. Enterprise is similar, however, it DOES allow IT admin(s) to make changes and/or adapt the WORM access. Also, grace periods can be set in for files going into WORM configurations, which allow a period of time to pass before locks are engaged. This change along with several others that are to be implemented in DSM 7.2 are slated for Q1 of 2023 (Jan-March). In short, in WORM enabled folders data is protected from manipulation by not being able to change or delete it for a specified period of time. Immutable data backups can also be carried out via Hyper Backup for further protection and retention down the line too.

SMB Multi-Channel – Better Port Utilization and Improved Drive Integration

SMB is not new, but updates to Drive and SMB support also see changes with Synology DSM 7.2, with cross-protocol file locking between SMB shares and Drive, ensuring that files in use cannot be edited or overwritten across them. In addition, with SMB multichannel transfer, all network connections available between servers and clients can be used to increase the performance of SMB file transfer, regardless of traditional conflicts that would prevent them being bound/crossed together conventionally

Improvements to Synology Office Services and Features

Synology has provided their Office application in the DSM application list for quite a long time, serving as an in-house alternative to using 3rd party office doc tools such as Google Docs and Microsoft office. This combined with the Synology Drive application results in you being able to open all of your office format docs (text, spreadsheets, PDFs, etc) from within the Synology ecosystem, where your data lives. However, there is always room for improvement and we are told that new features such as document watermarks, improved revision recognition on docs exported over and an increase in support of file format/layouts from Microsoft Word etc.

Click to view slideshow.

Scale-Out Clusters and ‘Synology Backup Cloud’

Synology highlighted their massive HD6500 and then discussed HUGE scale out cluster storage. The new scale-out clusters are also scheduled to appear in 2023 and provide faster file and object storage. This should allow server combinations of HD6500s servers that scale upto that of 12 petabytes to operate with a write speed of up to 60 GB/s (60,000MB/s).

Additionally, Synology is improving the management of large scale backups from a single portal point, via a new platform/service they are calling ‘Synology Backup Cloud’ (name almost certainly will change!) that will cover the operations of Active Backup, Hyper Backup and C2 Backup operations. Synology is aiming for this tool to provide the IT admin with a single easy window to manage, remote control and monitoring of all aspects of data backup.

Not a lot was said on this feature, but expect its development to be a little slower than most as, much like Active Insight, this is very much an enterprise site tool and likely at a premium.

Improvements in Synology C2 Identity

The Synology C2 Identity application that was introduced with Synology DSM 7 at launch is also going to see updates in its supported authentication methods and client tech. These will include Windows Hello and Apple Face ID/Touch ID, as well as in connection with the upcoming C2 identity user portal, employees using managed devices can be automatically signed in with SAML.

Synology Drive – Remote Erase

The benefits of Synology Drive when it comes to larger teams of users being able to access the same folder(s) of data in order to collaborate on projects is already well documented. However, what if a client system that has access to a synced drive folder gets hijacked? Or at a moment’s notice, you need to suspend access to the share fro a specific client machine AND want to ensure that no locally sync’d/download copy is still there? Well, soon Synology Drive will be receiving an update to allow exactly that includes the ability to delete data remotely and is intended to minimize security risks by removing synchronized folders from stolen Windows and macOS systems.

Synology BC500 and TC500 Surveillance Cameras

Yes, that is right! Synology has revealed (at their Synology Enterprise Data Management Annual Conference Event in Taiwan) that they plan on releasing a new range of Surveillance PoE cameras to be used in conjunction with their excellent CCTV/NVR software, Surveillance Station. These are the Synology BC500 compact Bullet camera and the Synology TC500 Dome camera. Although not a vast amount of information was revealed on these new cameras, it is worth highlighting that this makes Synology the FIRST commercial NAS brand to release their own range of cameras. To put that into perspective, although IP Cameras (Web cameras, internet cameras, etc) have been supported and compatible with Synology NAS systems for years (thousands of models and brands), this is the first time they have directly produced a camera that they are personally recommending for use with their systems and software.

This is something that alot of users have been asking/demanding for quite a long time. Here is the hardware that was revealed:

  • 5MP Camera
  • 2880X1620 Maximum Resolution
  • 30FPS Maximum Framerate
  • 110 Degrees Field of view
  • IP67 Weatherproof
  • PoE+ Support
  • SD Card Slot
  • Onboard Hardware for enhanced AI operations in Surveillance Station (Extent TBC)
  • Edge Recording in conjunction with the SD Card Slot

You can learn more about the Synology BC500 Bullet Camera and TC500 Turret Camera in our video below:

New Synology VS750HD KVM Surveillance Module

Synology is also working on releasing a new VisualStation device, the VS750HD partner device for surveillance coverage and monitoring in larger environments. That is a device with which you can monitor up to 75 streams and they state up to two monitors can be connected (still TBC)

This article will likely see a few updates as the week goes on! Subscribe to updates in the box below to get alerts when we add more!

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This description contains links to Amazon. These links will take you to some of the products mentioned in today's content. As an Amazon Associate, I earn from qualifying purchases. Visit the NASCompares Deal Finder to find the best place to buy this device in your region, based on Service, Support and Reputation - Just Search for your NAS Drive in the Box Below

Need Advice on Data Storage from an Expert?

We want to keep the free advice on NASCompares FREE for as long as we can. Since this service started back in Jan '18, We have helped hundreds of users every month solve their storage woes, but we can only continue to do this with your support. So please do choose to buy at Amazon US and Amazon UK on the articles when buying to provide advert revenue support or to donate/support the site below. Finally, for free advice about your setup, just leave a message in the comments below here at NASCompares.com and we will get back to you. Need Help? Where possible (and where appropriate) please provide as much information about your requirements, as then I can arrange the best answer and solution to your needs. Do not worry about your e-mail address being required, it will NOT be used in a mailing list and will NOT be used in any way other than to respond to your enquiry. [contact-form-7]     Terms and Conditions Alternatively, why not ask me on the ASK NASCompares forum, by clicking the button below. This is a community hub that serves as a place that I can answer your question, chew the fat, share new release information and even get corrections posted. I will always get around to answering ALL queries, but as a one-man operation, I cannot promise speed! So by sharing your query in the ASK NASCompares section below, you can get a better range of solutions and suggestions, alongside my own.  

 

Synology 2023 Launch Event – October 27th 2022

20 octobre 2022 à 14:45

Synology 2023 and Beyond – Online Event on Thursday 27th October

Update – This event has now passed, but you can read everything that was covered in the Synology 2023 and Beyond Video event HERE

After a period of relative silence from Synology regarding their plans for their 2023 series of hardware and software, we finally have confirmation that their annual event is taking place! ‘Synology 2023 and Beyond‘ will be a globally streamed event taking place on October 27th 2022 (times listed below, depending on your region) and will cover the brand’s plans for the next year+. These events (which in the years since the pandemic first arose have made the switch to digital exclusives) will feature the successes of the 2022 period, followed by the plans by the brand to improve existing features, introduce new ones and pepper the whole thing with their intended hardware products that will roll out in the next 12 months. Many of these we already know and have featured here on NASCompares, but I am sure there will still be some surprises along the way.

How and Where Can I Watch the Synology 2023 Video Streamed Event?

It is still yet to be confirmed how the Synology 2023 and Beyond event will be displayed at the time of writing. Given last week we saw Synology hold a big, in-person, annual conference event in Taipei, it is not impossible that we will see a fully featured and live presentation (CEOs, demonstrations and all) for the Synology2023 and Beyond event. However, the 2022 event was hosted on youtube with a preliminary ‘main’ video with keynote speakers, and then was accompanied by a series of more subject/area-specific videos from the official Synology YouTube channel that focused on innovations covered in the main video, but in greater detail (eg the network management video revealed SRM improvements and the RT6600ax, were as the Surveillance video covered Surveillance Station 9 improvements and the DVA1622). I will update this article as soon as details on where to watch the Synology 2023 event as it gets confirmed. However, I anticipate them largely repeating this same formula for the most part – If it’s ain’t broke, don’t fix it!

What Time Does the Synology 2023 Event Start?

The Synology 2023 and Beyond event is going to start on Thursday, October 27th for global streaming. Depending on your location and time zone, that means it will go live at:

Note – These are estimates and you might need to factor in Daylight Savings Time, as some regions can be selective with how/if this is observed locally!)

Thursday 27th October

  • 2PM UK, London
  • 9AM U.S, New York
  • 3PM Germany, Berlin
  • 3PM, France, Paris
  • 3PM, Italy, Rome
  • 3PM Ukraine, Kyiv
  • 3PM Croatia, Zagreb
  • 4PM Russia, Moscow
  • 9AM Canada, Toronto
  • 10PM Japan, Tokyo
  • 2PM Poland, Warsaw
  • 2PM Spain, Madrid
  • 1PM Ireland, Dublin
  • 8PM China, Shanghai
  • 2PM South Africa, Cape Town
  • 1PM Portugal, Porto
  • 2PM Sweden, Stockholm
  • 3PM Saudi Arabia, Riyadh
  • 8AM Mexico, Mexico City
  • 10AM, Brazil, Sao Paulo

Friday 28th October

  • 12AM Australia, Sydney

What Do We Expect at the Synology 2023 Launch Event?

Realistically, we are going to see a tremendous focus on the Software (both DSM and SRM, along with numerous C2 cloud innovations and client tools no doubt), as these events tend to be structured as “Our Successes in 2022 > Challenges facing Users/Business in 2023 > Plans for the Near Future > Extended Plans for 2023 and Beyond. I cannot see them moving away from this course, but certainly, there will be key software and hardware highlights of note. Synology has always been something of a secretive company, choosing very slick and organized release methodology (very comparable to Apple of course), so don’t expect the hardware to be revealed thick and fast! Here are my predictions for the Synology 2023 and Beyond Event:

In terms of Hardware:

In terms of Software:

  • Improved Mac support on Premium Synology Software Services to close the gap with Windows/Microsoft services support in Synology Drive, Active Backup and more
  • Improved Integrations of Virtual Machine Services, failover deployment and further SaaS improvements with market-leading software in this field (generally improves year on year!)
  • Even further integration of Synology C2 services with DSM applications and services
  • Improvements aimed at bringing AI-supported analysis/detection that is currently locked to the DVA1622/DVA3221 systems that make them available to other Synology Products (likely in conjunction with the BC500 and TC500 cameras)

Unlikely/Pie in the Sky Predictions!:

  • Reveal of the Synology DS1823xs+ NAS that appeared VERY briefly online in a model ID list in September ’22
  • Same as the above, but for a 1U, 4-Bay Rackstation, the Synology RS1623xs+ (potential follow-up for the RS1619xs+)
  • Synology Standard Class HDDs – Always been speculated upon and given the way the portfolio has changed in the last 18 months (and stories online of discussions with Synology Reps in multiple Forums), this is looking increasingly like it will be ‘a thing’, but when?
  • A Synology Network Switch – COME ON! This one is something of a no brainer. They current provide NAS devices, Routers, a Cloud platform in C2, Storage Media, Network Adapters and (as mentioned above) are revealing Surveillance Cameras! The ONLY missing product in this chain that currently prevents a user from having a pure 100% Synology ecosystem is a network Switch. Back in 2017, Synology demo’d a prototype Network Gateway management device know as the SG1000/SG-1000. It even had it’s own first party software and GUI, known as NSM (which looked like a precursor to SRM for their router range, but possible developed in parallel). One day Synology…One day…

And that is about it for now on the Synology 2023 and Beyond event. We will, of course, be watching the event with you and sharing the highlights here on NASCompares on the blog and over on the YouTube Channel. You can sign up for updates from Synology on this event (no doubt including the means to turn in and watch) below.

Click the link/image below to head to the official Synology page and sign up for updates on this digital event:

If you want to learn more about the Synology 2023 NAS Hardware that me and Eddie have confirmed, predicted or (sadly) denied, then you can watch our two videos on this subject below:

 

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Need Advice on Data Storage from an Expert?

We want to keep the free advice on NASCompares FREE for as long as we can. Since this service started back in Jan '18, We have helped hundreds of users every month solve their storage woes, but we can only continue to do this with your support. So please do choose to buy at Amazon US and Amazon UK on the articles when buying to provide advert revenue support or to donate/support the site below. Finally, for free advice about your setup, just leave a message in the comments below here at NASCompares.com and we will get back to you. Need Help? Where possible (and where appropriate) please provide as much information about your requirements, as then I can arrange the best answer and solution to your needs. Do not worry about your e-mail address being required, it will NOT be used in a mailing list and will NOT be used in any way other than to respond to your enquiry. [contact-form-7]     Terms and Conditions Alternatively, why not ask me on the ASK NASCompares forum, by clicking the button below. This is a community hub that serves as a place that I can answer your question, chew the fat, share new release information and even get corrections posted. I will always get around to answering ALL queries, but as a one-man operation, I cannot promise speed! So by sharing your query in the ASK NASCompares section below, you can get a better range of solutions and suggestions, alongside my own.  

 

New Synology Surveillance BC500 and TC500 Cameras Revealed

18 octobre 2022 à 16:00

Synology Reveals New Surveillance Cameras coming to their Portfolio – The BC500 and TC500

Yes, that is right! Synology has revealed (at their Synology Enterprise Data Management Annual Conference Event in Taiwan) that they plan on releasing a new range of Surveillance PoE cameras to be used in conjunction with their excellent CCTV/NVR software, Surveillance Station. These are the Synology BC500 compact Bullet camera and the Synology TC500 Dome camera. Although not a vast amount of information was revealed on these new cameras, it is worth highlighting that this makes Synology the FIRST commercial NAS brand to release their own range of cameras. To put that into perspective, although IP Cameras (Web cameras, internet cameras, etc) have been supported and compatible with Synology NAS systems for years (thousands of models and brands), this is the first time they have directly produced a camera that they are personally recommending for use with their systems and software. This is something that alot of users have been asking/demanding for quite a long time (for reasons I will get into later in the article), but for now, let’s discuss the new BC500 & TC500 Surveillance Cameras, why they are a big deal and everything that Synology has revealed on them so far.

Why Is Synology Releasing Their Own Branded Surveillance Cameras Such a Big Deal?

It would be fair to say that NAS systems are a niche area of technology (data storage focused, not as flashy as laptops, phones or TVs), however even MORE niche is Surveillance NAS use. So, it is understandable that the impact of Synology releasing the TC500 and BC500 cameras is a little underwhelming for some users. Let me explain. In all the decades of time that NAS drives have been on the market (not just Synology), the utility for a 24×7 powered large-scale storage system that is remote/network accessible has been HUGELY suitable for CCTV use in the home or business. That is one of the main reasons that early in the Synology NAS software development (not just them) the compulsion for the brand to provide their own surveillance software was a bit of a no-brainer. However, in ALL that time, Synology would never DIRECTLY recommend a camera brand. They would demonstrate their systems with 3rd party companies (which would scale depending on the solution – so AXIS for enterprise perhaps or Reolink/Hikvision for Home/SMB, etc), allow RSTP/ONVIF network support on their platform and even provide a huge compatibility list of thousands of cameras on their support pages. But when it comes to actually loudly picking a single camera brand and saying “THEY are the brand that we endorse/recommend for our NAS systems!”, that has never happened. This makes sense in a way. They are not in any kind of corporate relationship with any camera brand, they would need to heavily investigate a company and it’s portfolio, as well as develop software in partnership with them up to a point . Therefore, it made sense for them to sit on the fence a bit (sometimes to the annoyance of users who just want clear and concise Camera recommendations for their NAS and Surveillance Station).

However, this has now all changed with the reveal of the Synology BC500 and TC500 Cameras. Alongside their software platform making enormous leaps in it’s features, supported services and general GUI, the addition of AI-supported services (used in Deep Video analysis to make more effective and efficient security judgements) has resulted in them needing/wanting to promote this AAA+ feature more prominently. The idea of Synology releasing a range of branded cameras was something of an inevitability – if they didn’t, no doubt one of their biggest rivals would. Plus, this allows the brand to pair its systems and software with a camera that has it’s firmware and features tailored to their ecosystem for much better (and of course efficient) use when deployed. Let’s discuss the hardware of the TC500 and BC500 that we know so far.

Synology BC500 Compact Bullet Camera and TC500 Dome Camera Hardware

The Synology BC500 and TC500 camera hardware is still a little light on the finer details. We do have a number of the preliminary hardware specifications confirmed (recording quality, build, operation) and it looks like both cameras are going to be running the hard/similar hardware specifications – but differ in deployment design. It is fairly likely that these cameras are going to be of 3rd party creation (much like their HDD series that are Toshiba MG drives) BUT will have Synology-specific firmware onboard which means that will run in improved and more effective ways with Surveillance Station 9. Equally, there is every likelihood that some features of the camera to do with hardware onboard the camera SoC/NPU/etc for advanced detection and recognition will be primarily accessed by the NAS system natively – but that is still fully TBC. Let’s discuss the hardware that we know right now:

Synology Surveillance BC500 & TC500 Cameras

  • BC500 = Compact Bullet IP Camera
  • TC500 = Dome IP Camera
  • Pricing and Licensing Details TBC
  • 5MP – 2880×1620 – 30FPS
  • Onbard Hardare Integration
  • 110 Degree Viewing Angle
  • RJ45 PoE Support
  • 180-Day Reported Storage in SS9 (Quality/Size TBC)
  • IP67 Weatherproof
  • Encrypted Recording Transmissions
  • SD Card Support TBC
  • Release Date: H1 2023

The full details regarding the AI hardware services that these cameras will likely include/support is also TBC. We fully expect the specifics on these cameras to be revealed shortly and we will update this article accordingly when we know more. Let’s talk about the things we DO know about the BC500 and TC500 Cameras and Surveillance station from the brand’s presentation.

Synology Surveillance Station and the BC500/TC500 Camera Support

During the Synology event, a demonstration of the BC500 and TC500 cameras being set up and deployed in Surveillance station. This allowed us to see that these cameras will allow users to take advantage of the AI-supported services of the NAS software. How much of this was thanks to the camera’s onboard AI services for person/vehicle/object recognition (onboard NTU or general smart processor we will be looking into. It would appear that these cameras might well allow non DVA series NAS devices to use on-camera hardware integration and use the AI services of Surveillance station in a way currently available on the DVA3221 and DVA1622. Again though, this is still TBC! Nevertheless, it would make ALOT of sense for Synology to include this a selling point for their branded cameras.

Click to view slideshow.

There was a little information on the 5MP reported camera recording of the cameras, which is arguably quite standard in 2022. At the time of writing, we are still awaiting confirmation of camera’s capture specifics, such as the CMO, lens, optical/digital zoom and LED affected Nightvision coverage (perhaps even PiR support thanks to internal hardware). But, even the initial camera hardware we know so far is a good indication.

Click to view slideshow.

The angle of coverage(view etc) of the BC500 and TC500 was also discussed and confirmed at 110 Degrees. No mention was made of when the TC500 dome camera supported remote tilt control or manual adjustment (and the BC500 bullet camera will have zero PT – Pan/Tilt – control of course.

Click to view slideshow.

All in all, we fully expect the reveal of further hardware specifications officially before the end of the year (as Synology no doubt ramps up for it’s end of year annual event ‘Synology 2023’) and perhaps the discovery of the hardware that camera is built from (with Synology software/service integration) will arrive. If/when it does, we will of course update this article, along with further information linked accordingly

What Do We Still Need to Know About the BC500 and TC500 Synology Surveillance Cameras?

The details we have on the Synology BC500 and TC500 Surveillance Cameras are lighter than we would like, BUT are still more than this normally very secretive brand would ordinarily reveal so publically. Nevertheless, there ARE larger questions that people are going to have about Synology releasing their own branded cameras in conjunction with their systems are people are going to wonder. Below are the main questions that (at the time of writing) we still do not have answers for:

How are Synology Camera Licenses going to be handled in conjunction with these new cameras?

With all Synology NAS systems, you get full access to Surveillance Station and 2x Lifetime Camera Licenses (the exceptions being NVR/Surveillance optimized systems like the DVA1622, NVR1218, DVA3221, etc that have more included in their pricing) and the understanding has always been that if you wanted to add more cameras (i.e a business user that wanted to use them for asset protection, insurance and staff provisioning) you would need to buy further licenses at £30-50 each (bundle dependant) to add more cameras. This was done to ensure the more niche surveillance software of the platform can still massively innovate, but strike a balance between home and business users with different requirements (learn more in my NAS Surveillance Before You Buy Video HERE). However, how are things going to be handled by a Synology-branded Surveillance camera? Will these have their own inclusive Camera License OR will they not even need a license?

DVA Services on Synology BC500 and TC500 Cameras?

On the assumption that the BC500 and TC500 Synology Cameras have Synology firmware on board to allow better/more-efficient use of AI services and recognition, will that means that NON-DVA (deep video analysis) NAS systems will now be able to use the services that are currently exclusive to the DVA3221 and DVA1622 NAS?

Will Synology make any changes to Surveillance Station that mean that some features or services down the line are ONLY available for use with their cameras?

They had something of a message/presentation issue of DSM Storage Manager and their own HDDs in DSM7 (which was amended in DSM 7.1) when support and compatibility of HDD/SSDs on enterprise systems in the 2021/2022 series was different on 1st and 3rd party drives. Will some features currently in SS9 change to Synology Only cameras? Or future surveillance innovations? If you CAN make surveillance station use the onboard hardware of IP cameras to lighten server-side processes and allow the camera to do the hard work of AI analysis on the Synology camera services (likely a 3rd party camera and onboard SoC/NPU much like other cameras), will they restrict this to just their own cameras but disallow it from 3rd party cameras?

I have to stress that these are all questions that Synology has not been addressed with at the time of writing, so until we have clear confirmation on any of these, they are pure conjecture. Most/all of these are bound to be answered in the coming months, as well as Eddie in the background translating more information as we speak/write! We will of course update this article accordingly as we learn more. Otherwise, head to this article HERE as we learn more and more about the Synology 2023 Hardware in our Mega Post that is regularly updated.

When will the Synology BC500 and TP500 Cameras Be Released?

Synology did not give a particularly large amount of information on the commercial release of the TC500 and BC500 Cameras, but DID indicate ‘H1 2023’, so that means the first half of 2023. Not a particularly concise release window, but still – not hugely far away in the overall scheme of things. Expect pricing to be confirmed alongside bundle deals at launch.

What do you think of the Synology BC500 and TP500 Cameras? Let us know below in the comments below. We pool the comments on this article and the videos that are featured in it to keep all the relevant comments in one place, so take a look and see if your POV is the same as everyone else’s.

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This description contains links to Amazon. These links will take you to some of the products mentioned in today's content. As an Amazon Associate, I earn from qualifying purchases. Visit the NASCompares Deal Finder to find the best place to buy this device in your region, based on Service, Support and Reputation - Just Search for your NAS Drive in the Box Below

Need Advice on Data Storage from an Expert?

We want to keep the free advice on NASCompares FREE for as long as we can. Since this service started back in Jan '18, We have helped hundreds of users every month solve their storage woes, but we can only continue to do this with your support. So please do choose to buy at Amazon US and Amazon UK on the articles when buying to provide advert revenue support or to donate/support the site below. Finally, for free advice about your setup, just leave a message in the comments below here at NASCompares.com and we will get back to you. Need Help? Where possible (and where appropriate) please provide as much information about your requirements, as then I can arrange the best answer and solution to your needs. Do not worry about your e-mail address being required, it will NOT be used in a mailing list and will NOT be used in any way other than to respond to your enquiry. [contact-form-7]     Terms and Conditions Alternatively, why not ask me on the ASK NASCompares forum, by clicking the button below. This is a community hub that serves as a place that I can answer your question, chew the fat, share new release information and even get corrections posted. I will always get around to answering ALL queries, but as a one-man operation, I cannot promise speed! So by sharing your query in the ASK NASCompares section below, you can get a better range of solutions and suggestions, alongside my own.  

Synology DS723+ NAS 2-Bay Revealed

12 octobre 2022 à 18:00

The Synology DS723+ NAS Expandable 2-Bay Revealed

Synology has finally given us a little more information to chew on with regard to their new ‘x23+’ series, with the recent reveal of the new Synology DS723+ NAS Drive. This new expandable 2-Bay Diskstation is the intended follow-up to the Synology DS720+ NAS (released in June/July 2020 – so a 2.5yr refresh time is pretty standard) and although we do not have full hands-on with the device, the information we have gives us a pretty good indication of what this device is going to be capable of. Although we have unofficially known about this device for a few months (here in our video on early 2023 leaks and predictions) it is thanks to a reddit post by user ‘ntrprnr‘ that confirmation of some of the hardware in this system has been confirmed via a Synology site source (the Synology Knowledge Center). It confirmed that this new 2-Bay will be following in much of the design of the DS720+ (as expected), but is also switching its internal architecture more towards that of the summer 2022 released DS1522+. Let’s discuss what we know about the DS723+ NAS and what we are likely to expect from this expandable 2-bay diskstation.

The Synology DS723+ NAS Hardware Specifications

There is no avoiding that the CPU choice inside the Synology DS723+ NAS is going to split opinion the tiniest bit. Until now, this 2/7-bay expandable product family has been exclusively Intel-based and integrated graphics equipped (Celeron, with a brief dance with Pentiums in 2016) which all benefited from particularly good multimedia & graphical handling when it comes to server-side transcoding/conversions, especially with more complicated and dense media formats such as HEVC/H.265. This is why the DS720+ (and DS718+ and DS716+ predecessors) were so popular for use as a Plex Media Server, Synology Video Station, Surveillance Station and even Virtual Machine deployment. The new Synology DS723+ NAS on the other hand is the latest system that has jumped ship from Intel over to AMD, with the DS723+ being built on AMD architecture, with a Ryzen Embedded Dual Core R1600 processsor. Now, it is worth highlighting that the R1600 IS a very good CPU. It is the same processor that is in the DS1522+, which we demonstrated could saturate 10GbE in a RAID 5 (more on this later) and also the DS1522+ NAS performs well in Plex at 1080p and native (non transcoded/convereted) 4K too, so the switch by Synology from an Intel to this AMD is not without merit. Before we dig deeper though, let’s discuss the specifications that we know about the DS1522+ NAS, alongside educated guesses we can make that are based on the CPU, product family and Synology’s past with the diskstation series:

Note: Images are for demonstration purposes and are NOT official product images. Additionally, all estimations/predictions are in bold and will be addressed/confirmed closer to the official release:

CPU
CPU Model AMD Ryzen R1600
CPU Architecture 64-bit
CPU Frequency 2-core/4-Thread 2.6Ghz which can be burst/turbo to 3.1GHz
Hardware Encryption Engine (AES-NI) Yes
Memory
System Memory 2-4GB (Previous generations had 2GB, but still TBC here)
Memory Module Pre-installed TBC
Total Memory Slots TBC
Maximum Memory Capacity 32GB Supported by CPU. Still need confirmation of slots available on the DS723+
Storage
Drive Bays 2
Maximum Drive Bays with Expansion Unit 7 (DX517 x 1)
M.2 Drive Slots 2 (NVMe) – Almost certain
Compatible Drive Type
  • 3.5″ SATA HDD
  • 2.5″ SATA SSD
  • M.2 2280 NVMe SSD
Hot Swappable Drive Yes

Again, there are NOT official product images

External Ports
RJ-45 1GbE LAN Port 2x (Not confirmation of Speed/Bandwidth, but 1GbE looking increasingly certain)
USB 3.2 Gen 1 Port 2x (Based on previous releases)
eSATA Port 1 for expansion)
PCIe
PCIe Expansion 1 x Gen3 x2 network upgrade slot, for the E10G22-T1-mini. A small Cooper Upgrade module that Synology released in Summer 2022 and is almost certain to be featured on the Synology DS723+ NAS (even on a 2 Bay system that might struggle to saturate 1,000MB/s without an expansion)
File System
Internal Drives
  • Btrfs
  • EXT4
External Drives
  • Btrfs
  • EXT4
  • EXT3
  • FAT
  • NTFS
  • HFS+
  • exFAT
Appearance
Size (Height x Width x Depth) 166 mm x 106 mm x 223 mm (size of the DS720+)
Weight 1.5 kg (weight of the DS720+)
Others
System Fan 92 mm x 92 mm x 1pcs (Based on the design of the DS720+)
Fan Speed Mode
  • Full-Speed Mode
  • Cool Mode
  • Quiet Mode
Brightness Adjustable Front LED Indicators Yes
Power Recovery Yes
Noise Level* TBC
Scheduled Power On / Off Yes
Wake on LAN / WAN Yes
Power Supply Unit / Adapter 65W (Based on the DS720+)
Warranty
3-year hardware warranty, extendable to 5 years with EW201 or Extended Warranty Plus

So, in terms of its hardware capabilities, the DS723+ NAS is highly comparable to the DS1522+ NAS than that of the DS720+, but we should take a moment and ponder why Synology has made this rather big portfolio change recently towards AMD over Intel? The Synology DS723+ NAS is by no means the first example of this and in fact you can trace the shift in the brand’s CPU choices all the way back to 2020 when they replaced the Intel C3238 in their SMB solutions with the AMD Ryzen Embedded V1500B. Then the DS1522+ followed suit from man Intel J4125 in the DS1520+ into the R1600 in the latest release. Finally, in spring/summer of 2022, we learned that the highly enterprise SAS tier of their portfolio would switch from Intel to AMD and their EPYC processors in the SA6400 and SA6200 Rackstations. So, the Synology DS723+ NAS arriving with the AMD R1600 is not exactly coming out of nowhere. Still, there are going to be some users who will debate the utility of this CPU at the Home/Prosumer tier vs quad-core Intel integrated graphics CPUs. Perhaps Synology has seen the winds changing in the last few years, as Intel is regularly hit by hardware shortages that continue to undermine their market dominance AND recent news that Intel are killing off the Celeron and Pentium branding, gives AMD growing appeal (especially with a better comparative price point on many of their processors vs likewise architecture/powered at Intel).

Still, we are still talking about a 2-core (4 threads to be fair, so four virtual CPUs for VMs and also the support of ECC memory) processor that will use more power to perform heavier graphical tasks. I am still a little confused as to why Synology have yet to adopt the AMD embedded graphics processors (AMD Vega Graphics) from both the R1000 and V1000 CPU families yet. Perhaps there is a question of TDP and power, or that they are holding back on these for the DS423+ and DS223+? Here are the specifications of the AMD R1600 CPU in the DS723+ NAS:

Moving away from the CPU, we CAN talk about one thing that is likely to arrive onboard the Synology DS723+ NAS – potential 10GbE support. Now, before we get too excited, it’s really important to highlight that this would be delivered via an OPTIONAL single 10G Copper (10GBASE-T) module. The DS723+ will almost certainly arrive with 1GbE network ports, which will definitely disappoint some users who were hoping that 2022/2023 would be when Synology finally adopts 2.5GbE – especially when 2.5GbE is available on the Synology Router, arriving on many ISP routers, value routers, switches and more. It is not totally out of the question that Synology will surprise us and integrate 2.5GbE into this system, but realistically, they have been pretty clear about how little interest they have in it and I think they would see optional 10G on the DS723+ as a far more palatable choice – even on a comparatively bandwidth light 2x SATA bay system like this. 2.5G is now more than a fad in 2022. As greater than gigabit internet connectivity is becoming increasingly common (even ‘affordable’), so the thought that a NAS has the potential to be capped at 1GbE (109MB/s) when a particularly well-connected internet cloud service could exceed that is pretty disheartening. Still, the option of 10GbE would be very welcome, though in this case. some might wonder why they didn’t just roll this in and increase the DS723+ NAS price a fraction.

The possible 10GbE upgrade for the DS723+ would be an incredibly easy process – via the E10G22-T1-mini module and is significantly slicker than traditional PCIe Card upgrades. Arriving on a PCIe Gen 3×2 board, this single port accessory would slot into the back (power down necessary, as this is a PCIe upgrade) and would immediately add the 1,000MB/s+ bandwidth connection to your DS723+. As this NAS is a 2-Bay system, there is the question of whether there would be enough media throughput the saturate the full 10GBASE-T connection. Using a fully SATA SSD populated device will likely three-quarter-to saturate the 10G connection, as would using the 5-bay DX517 expansion in a combined RAID with the main 2-Bays (the DX517 connects over eSATA which is capped at 6Gb/s – so a combined RAID with the primary storage is the only way you are going to hit 1,000MB/s), but what about if you are only using the main 2x DS723+ bays with 3.5″ hard drives?

Although 2x SATA drive 10G performance on the DS723+ and it’s CPU+Memory combo cannot be confirmed right now, I CAN answer the question of how the R1600 CPU and pro-class hard drives will perform over 10GbE in a four drive combo. Previously here on the NASCompares, I was fortunate enough to run ATTO tests on the DS1522+ (same R1600 CPU, but 8GB Memory and more bays) with RAID 0 and RAID 5, over four WD Red Pro 22TB Hard Drives. Now, it is worth remembering that these are NOT your common, everyday SATA hard drives and are designed to be rugged, high-performance disks (7200RPM, 512MB Cache, 10x 2.2TB platters, etc) AND the DS1522+ was populated with four drives (twice the maximum bays of the DS723+). That said, the results in both a RAID 0 and RAID 5 setup and in particular file size tests, full saturation of read transfers of 1.15GB/s was achieved, with write performance peaking at around 800-900MB/s. Now, these ARE artificial tests (so, not really representative of everyday use), but are nevertheless very compelling results for the CPU inside the DS723+ being able (with sufficient media) to sufficiently saturate the E10G22-T1-mini upgrade. More domestic/smaller scale HDDs such as the WD Red Plus or Seagate Ironwolf drives in a 2-Bay configuration of the DS723+ would likely cap at around 400-50MB/s at most.

Note – You can READ the full article that details all the tests and results of the Synology DS1522+ NAS and WD Red Pro 22TBs over 10GbE HERE. Alternatively, you can watch my YouTube video on these tests (with 5GbE testing too) here on the NASCompares YouTube Channel.

Synology DS1522+ with 4x 22TB WD Red Pro RAID 5/10GbE Test – 64MB Synology DS1522+ with 4x 22TB WD Red Pro RAID 0/10GbE Test – 256MB

Another expected hardware element of the DS723+ NAS is that it will almost certainly arrive with two m.2 NVMe SSD bays on the base that allow you to install considerably faster SSD drives to boost the performance of particular internal file processes (with variable external bandwidth benefits). These bays cannot be used as traditional storage pools (not a tremendous shock, as Synology have maintained this position since introducing the feature way back in 2017/18 on their systems) are instead available for use in Read and Write caching. The former benefits the user by copying frequently accessed small files to the faster media to decrease access time, improve latency and make accessing the Synology NAS regularly a great deal more fluid and responsive. The latter write caching improves upload/input to the NAS by shifting initial write activity onto the faster storage media and then internally shifting the media to core storage afterwards. Synology has been one of the biggest backers in conventional turnkey NAS solutions of SSD caching since its launch, regularly updating their algorithm and efficiency on this with each update to DSM. It’s still a crying shame that these m.2 NVMe SSD bays are not usable for traditional storage pools (though it IS possible via unofficial mods over on github, it is not recommended by the brand and can potentially undermine your support down the line by them).

Image of the Synology DS720+ NAS

The Synology DS723+ NAS hardware is an interesting mix of the expected and unexpected (both internally and externally) and I think it is safe to say that this will divide opinion at the home and prosumer tiers considerably. At the small/medium business (SMB) tier of course it will be a different story, as the hardware architecture here is very competent and if the DS723+ will likely outperform the DS720+ in most other respects in/outside of DSM, so it will be very popular! Let’s discuss the potential software capabilities of the DS723+ NAS in DSM 7.1 onwards.

The Synology DS723+ NAS Software Specifications

The Synology portfolio has always been about providing software solutions. The hardware is certainly an important detail, but there is no avoiding that the brand has always had a larger focus on the software side of things and in the last year or so we have seen a large number of improvements in both the service platform DSM 7, as well as improvements in their C2 cloud services and dirty party tools. The Synology DS723+ will run DSM 7.1 largely identically to the DS1522+, but arguable different in a few ways to it’s intel powered predecessor DS720+. Below is a breakdown of the services and volume that the Synology DS723+ NAS will support (based on the DS1522+ hardware and DS720+ base):

Add-on Packages
Antivirus by McAfee (Trial) Yes
Central Management System Yes
Synology Chat Yes
Maximum Users Yes
Maximum Number of Concurrent Users 100
Document Viewer Yes
Download Station Yes
Maximum Concurrent Download Tasks 80
SAN Manager Yes
Maximum iSCSI Target Number 128
Maximum LUN 256
LUN Clone/Snapshot, Windows ODX Yes
Notes Yes
Synology MailPlus / MailPlus Server Yes
Free Email Accounts 5 (Licenses required for additional accounts)
Maximum Number of Concurrent Users 100
Maximum Server Performance 1,224,000 emails per day, approx. 37GB
Media Server Yes
DLNA Compliance Yes
Synology Photos Yes
Facial Recognition Yes
Snapshot Replication Yes
Maximum Snapshots per Shared Folder 1,024
Maximum of System Snapshots 65,536
Surveillance Station Yes
Maximum IP cam (Licenses required) 40 (including 2 Free License) (dependant on Memory)
Total FPS (H.264) 1200 FPS @ 720p (1280×720)
1050 FPS @ 1080p (1920×1080)
600 FPS @ 3M (2048×1536)
360 FPS @ 5M (2591×1944)
200 FPS @ 4K (3840×2160)
Total FPS (H.265) 1200 FPS @ 720p (1280×720)
1200 FPS @ 1080p (1920×1080)
1000 FPS @ 3M (2048×1536)
600 FPS @ 5M (2591×1944)
300 FPS @ 4K (3840×2160)
Synology Drive Yes
Recommended Number of Concurrent Sync Clients 350 (the number of connections that can be maintained when the recommended number of hosted files was reached)
Recommended Number of Hosted Files 5,000,000 (applies to files indexed or hosted by Synology Drive. For file access through other standard protocols, refer to the File Services section above)
Synology Office Yes
Maximum Users 1,200
Video Station Yes
Virtual Machine Manager Yes
Recommended Virtual Machine Instances 4
Recommended Virtual DSM Number (Licenses required) 4 (including 1 Free License)
Notes The specifications vary depending on system configuration and memory size.
VPN Server Yes
Maximum Connections 40

Of course (as mentioned at the start) there are a decent % of users who have been waiting on the release/reveal of the Synology DS723+ NAS for use as a Plex Media Server solution. The Synology Diskstation series have been recommended as great solutions for various scale Plex servers, with ARM-powered solution in the value tier for smaller scale/DLNA-based options and the plus series supporting transcoding and low-mid 4K media. However, the R1600 CPU choice in the DS723+ does throw a little bit of doubt on this. This architecture does provide a decent level of hardware power (crossing 3Ghz at burst) and when it comes to native applications for media, such as Synology Video Station (the excellent 1st party alternative to Plex with numerous client apps and arrives subscription free). Indeed, once again we can look at the performance of the similarly hardware-equipped DS1522+ with the R1600 CPU and how it performed in Video Station and Plex Media Server below. It is worth noting that 4K performance in this videos was only tested using rather advanced 4K files (at 120Mbps and higher), so although this NAS and architecture struggled with 4K playback in these tests, there are new and updated Plex 4K tests coming soon for the DS1522+ NAS on our YouTube channel that shows that it was able to playback a great deal more 4K at 16Mbps to 60Mbps quite well. Although it was still clearly using more CPU resources than an integrated alternative, even without client-side conversions.

Overall, the software support in DSM on the DS723+ is going to be very good and the depth of the hardware available means that although it will be a pinch less suitable for highly graphical tasks, it DOES have alot more capability in file handling and transmission – which is precisely what Synology want for this device and makes it increasingly appealing to traditional storage users. Equally, the architecture of this CPU inside the DS723+ allows its resources to be spread a great deal further (threads and simultaneous tasks) towards using the full range of services that DSM includes. The cloud/hybrid services too will greatly benefit form this architecture too and once again mean that this Synology NAS will bring a tremendous sense/feeling of ‘local’ storage to this network/remote server. Finally, it is worth highlighting that the DS723+ and it’s R1600 CPU benefit form more PCI lanes at PCIe3 rather than the PCIe2 of it’s predecessor, with allows better bandwidth availability to the hardware resources onboard (such as those m.2 NVMe bays)

The Synology DS723+ NAS – Release Date and Price?

The smart money would be on the Synology DS723+ NAS being released around mid-November 2022 (Maybe even very early December, post black Friday and clearance of the DS720+). This would place it 2.5yrs since the release of it’s predecessor,  which is quite reasonable. Pricing is harder to pin down. The Expandable desktop 2-Bay tier of Synology’s portfolio (the DS7xx+ device) has tended to land at the £350-400 / $450-500 / €400-450 mark (don’t forget the tax!) when released. However, the DS723+ arrives with a new CPU, possible ECC memory and a possible option of 10GbE, so this could affect the pricing (and that is even without factoring hardware/component availability in 2022/2023 affected by continued shortages). Personally, I think Synology is going to try and maintain this familiar price point, as the tiering in their portfolio on either side of this device in the Value tier (which will also see DSx23 and DSx23j additions in Q1 2023) and bigger Plus series boxes are quite important to their brand. More information will be coming soon on this and other devices in the Synology 2022/2023 hardware range soon, so subscribe to the blog OR visit this page which gets updated regularly with new information on Synology 2023 Hardware. Have a great week!

What do you think of the Synology DS723+ NAS? Let us know below in the comments below. We pool the comments on this article and the videos that are featured in it to keep all the relevant comments in one place, so take a look and see if your POV is the same as everyone else’s.

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Should You Buy the Synology DS920+ or Wait for a DS923+ NAS is Released?

9 octobre 2022 à 18:00

Should I wait for a Synology DS923+ or just get the DS920+ NAS?

Let’s be honest, it is a REALLY good question. Right now as the first quarter of 2022 draws to a close, many users who are thinking of upgrading their existing Synology NAS system, pondering migrating over to the platform or are about to make their first NAS purchase (and are concerned with longevity) are looking at the currently available highpoint of the range, the DS920+ 4-Bay, and wondering if it is due an update any time soon. This consideration is pretty valid. Synology has generally adhered to a 2-year refresh cycle on the Synology Diskstation plus series of Prosumer/SMB solutions in 2 and 4 bay, and given the 26 months (!!!!) since the release of the DS920+ (depending on where in the world you are), it is logical to imagine that a Synology DS923+ NAS could be on the horizon for Winter 2022. Synology runs a pretty tight portfolio and over the last few years in the diskstation tier have created a well-spread range of solutions that tend to be around $50-100 different in price at each tier and with each being a little more ‘extra’ than the last in terms of storage supported, CPU architecture, memory or network connectivity and a lot of the layering of their portfolio in this way is made possible by different ranges refreshing on rotation. Now, the value series of solutions (Plat, J, standard) are all ranging from 1.5-4 years since their original release and with the 20+ series all gradually hitting 2.5 years old apiece, there is a good chance that Synology (in order to propagate that layered portfolio) will need to start releasing those 2023 series of devices soon, for fear of their diskstation range becoming a little stale vs the competition. As highlighted, the currently available DS920+ is the darling of the portfolio for many, but with all indications that Synology will be refreshing solutions in 2022, a Synology DS923+ looks increasingly likely and for many that are sat on the fence, choosing between buying the DS920+ or waiting for a potential DS923+ is a tough call to make. So, today I want to go through four reasons why you should pull the trigger NOW and buy the DS920+ and four reasons why you should get comfortable, sit on your wallet and wait it out for a DS923+ NAS.

Reasons you SHOULD Buy the Synology DS920+ NAS

The Synology DS920+ NAS is a really impressive piece of hardware that, although plays it a little safe in areas of it’s hardware (I am looking at you 1GbE ports) is still a great prosumer Synology solution that is arguable the best currently fully-featured entry point into Synology NAS hardware, DSM 7 and what the brands offer that separates them from the other brands out there. Here are four reasons why you should not wait for a DS923+ NAS and just pull the trigger on the DS920+ you have in your basket.

Very Small Difference in DSM 7 Performance

For those that are not aware, all Synology Diskstation NAS solutions (big or small) arrive with DSM 7 (or DSM 6.2 in some cases is still an option) which is a complete network storage software and services platform that general can rival a lot of the software as a service (SaaS) platforms out there with the range of things it can do. From tailored file access, multi-site backups, Virtual Machine deployment, Surveillance, office administration tool, communication management, database hosting tools and more. All this is managed over numerous first-party tools, via the web browser GUI and via many client applications. It is genuinely an impressive all-encompassing platform that is far more comparable to an entire operating system than a simple data storage tool that your NAS includes. This platform allows you to create numerous users wit their own dedicated access and privileges to the NAS file/folder structure, with each user having their own DSM login/sessions running at the same time as needed, as well as being able to run many, many applications at the same time. In the event that Synology release a DS923+ NAS, as Synology have a very layered portfolio, a refresh to any system still typically maintains the structure of it’s predecessor in terms of CPU and memory. They will be upgraded, but still very much in the same basic architecture to either the DS920+ or the recently released DS1522+. The result is that a Synology DS923+ NAS will likely arrive with the AMD Embedded Ryzen R1600 or still possibly an Intel Celeron CPU and 4GB of memory by default, therefore unless you are going to particularly push the Synology NAS hardware in terms of multiple users and/or active processes internally or are prioritizing multimedia and want to be guaranteed an embedded graphics CPU, you will not see any real difference on the user side compared with the current DS920+. Synology NAS hardware will make the most of the available hardware (especially memory) it can to stay as fast and responsive as possible, intelligently flushing the case when things are getting particularly busy. Therefore, unless you are going to be running tasks that were going to tax/stress the DS920+ to begin with, the DS923+ isn’t likely to provide a significant/noticeable improvement in the general DSM 7 user experience right now. Maybe a few years down the line as the software further develops into DSM 7.1, DSM 7.2, DSM 8, etc, but not for quite a while!

Synology DS920+ NAS Prices are already good and will only get better

One advantage of hardware that has been in the market for a longer length of time (but crucially is still a flagship product by a brand) is that the pricing gets considerably more flexible the longer it is in available. Barring hardware shortages caused by external/3rd party influences, this is generally always true and it has to be said that the Synology DS920+ is certainly more affordable than its launch RRP back in summer 2020, as well as deals/promotions being regularly available at different retails and seasonal events occurring with more frequency. The DS920+ can now often be seen at the £400-450 at different retailers (admittedly in short promos) and that is a decent step down from the approx £550 it was listed at launch in most retailers.

Although Synology generally maintains a steady price point when refreshing a series (typically mating the predecessor pricepoint and increasing in single-digit % in line with inflation or standout hardware upgrades), so alongside the DS920+ already being at a nicer price point right now than ever, it seemingly appears in more promos AND if/when a DS923+ NAS is launched, expect that price to be even better. So, that means that buying a DS920+ is a better price choice and even allows you to hedge your bets a bit and still catch the DS920+ later in the event of clearance sales, etc.

Unlikely but possible HDD Compatibility Factors in a potential DS923+ NAS

Now it should be stressed that I do NOT think that this is hugely likely to happen, but not impossible. In recent Synology Diskstation series devices for business and enterprise, the brand has changed its policies on hard drive compatibility. This has resulted (after arguably some too and frow between users and the brand online) Synology’s own hard drives and SSDs being fully supported and compatible with all the storage services of their DSM software, whereas third party drives from Seagate and WD (such as the WD Red and Seagate Ironwolf series) still work and are visible to the Synology DSM storage system, but some features and services are not available (as well as the system displaying a warning message in conjunction with the unsupported HDDs being used and changes to how the brand supports users with these non-Synology HDDs – highlighting the need for their support teams to emulate their end-user setup being integral in support in many cases).

Now, this is NOT a compatibility question on the Prosumer and SMB desktop Diskstation right now solutions such as the DS920+ NAS. Indeed, I cannot see this policy being extended to a potential Synology DS923+ NAS, as the likes of the HAT5300 Hard Drives are crafted for considerably more rugged use than that expected by a plus series 4 bay. However, this is still not 100% confirmed and if Synology were to release a more affordable/value tier to their drive media that is designed for these smaller systems, such as re-purposing the Toshiba N300 NAS range as they did with the Toshiba MG06/07/08 in their enterprise tier (again, there have been ZERO indications about this right now and I am hypothesizing here)  – THEN that would bring into doubt the HDD compatibility of a new DS923+ NAS and make the DS920+ a much more attractive purchase for many new users. Again, I would say the chances of this one are very, VERY small, however, if you hear Synology reveal a value HDD series in the future – then maybe it’s something to ponder. Recent testing of the new WD Red Pro 22TB Hard drives in the Synology DS920+ NAS HERE shows that they clearly work AND work well in the older generation. The Synology DS923+ NAS will almost certainly support these new bigger WD Red drives too, but how they are presented in DSM 7.1 and it’s storage manager is still TBC.

Synology Have R&D’d the Intel J4125 and J4025 Significantly in the DSx20+ Series

When Synology release a hardware solution and introduce hardware combination (typically a CPU+MEMORY+NETWORK INTERFACE combo), they then integrate that combination and chipset towards a fleshed out range of different scale solutions. We have seen it in the Intel Atom ranges that spanned out into 5, 6, 8 and 12-Bay desktop solutions over several generations, we saw it in the Realtek RTD1296 ARM processor combination across 1, 2 and 4 Bay solutions and with the DSx20+ series released in 2020, we saw the Intel J4125 and J4025 span out into 2, 4 and 5-Bay solutions across 3 different sub-ranges. When Synology does this, you tend to find that they really push the envelope on what a processor can do and as further firmware updates roll out and development of new apps and this hardware architecture in advance also takes place in the R&D for months or even YEARS, it means that the longer a hardware combination is available, the more Synology are able to do with it in their proprietary applications.

This is no exception in the case of the DS920+ and the Intel J4125 Celeron Quad-Core processor features have been extremely well stretched by the bods in the Synolgoy R&D and Product Management teams for their platform. Now if a Synology DS923+ NAS was released, it would use a new CPU and although it is almost certainly going to be either the dual core AMD Ryzen R1600 or the quad core Intel N5105/J6412 (though I would bet on the R1600 AMD chip), it will still be a different chip and Synology will start the merry-go-round again to learn how much they can get out of it for their applications and service – pushing it as much as they can in terms of efficiency and capability. So, if you want the best and most efficient experience of Synology DSM 7 and are choosing between a very real and established DS920+ or a theoretical and potential DS923+, the DS920+ will be the better choice in terms of a product that has been significant;y road-tested by the brand.

Reasons You SHOULD WAIT for a Synology DS923+ NAS

As good as all of the benefits (both realistic and potential of course) that I have outlined above that suggest buying a Synology DS920+ NAS now is the right thing to do – it’s not all so cut and dry. There are several considerations that, based on Synology’s behaviour in previous generation refreshes, as well as changes in modern hardware architecture, that would comfortably support waiting for a Synology DS923+ NAS. Below I have outlined four reasons to wait for a DS923+, some you might be already thinking, but I bet you didn;t think of all of them. Let’s go.

The DS923+ will almost certainly feature either Optional 10GbE or 2.5GbE Network Connectivity

When the Synology DS920+ NAS was first revealed in the months before it’s formal release, one factor about it’s hardware specifications rubbed quite a few users up the wrong way – namely the continued inclusion of 1GbE (gigabit ethernet) network ports on the system. It features two ports (as found in the previous few revisions of this series and allows via link aggregation/port-trunking to hit 2GbE with a supported switch) but in spring/summer 2020, most other NAS hardware vendors were providing 2.5GbE ports at the same price point as 1GbE, alongside a few hardware client hardware that would share the network environment (switches, routers, etc) starting to implement 2.5GbE. Fast forward to spring/summer 2022 and 2.5GbE is a noticeable degree higher in uptake. Its still nowhere near as ubiquitous as 1GbE of course, but it is now being rolled into ISP routers, multi-port affordable switches, computers and even the late 2021 revealed Synology RT6600ax features a 2.5GbE port. Now, this means that Synology will almost certainly integrate the optional 10GbE upgrade port (the E10G22-T1-mini supported adapter that was featured on the DS1522+) or finally introduce 2.5GbE on their DS923+ NAS – to not do either would not only leave to steeped disappointment but also with greater than gigabit internet connectivity being more widely available globally, the thought that your NAS over the network could potentially be outpaced by an internet-connected cloud would be pretty damning.  There is of course the users who think that the DS923+ is long overdue for a default/on-board 10GbE revision and, as ideal as that would be, realistically unless Synology fundamentally changes their hardware portfolio and structured hardware pricing, 10GbE is pretty unlikely to land on the DS923+ or gen after. That said, never say never!

Potential for Synology to double jump the CPU to the AMD Embedded Ryzen R1600 or Intel J6412 Celeron in the DS923+

Since the release of the Synology DS1522+ 5-Bay Diskstation, many have been sharing their thoughts and experiences of the system and it’s unique CPU. The AMD embedded Ryzen R1600 that it features is a dual-core architecture, 2.6-3.1Ghz clock speed and support of DDR4 ECC 3200Mhz memory upto 32GB. Although that means that embedded graphics or hardware transcoding is off the table, in most other respects it is a great CPU in terms of power vs efficiency. In the past when Synology released the 4/5 Bay systems, they tended to use the same CPU+Memory combo, but increase the level of hardware and expandability in the 5-Bay version (eg DS918+ vs DS1019+, DS920+ vs DS1520+ and now the possible DS923+ and DS1522+ NAS). So there is a good chance that a new DS923+ will have that processor.

Alternatively, they might well continue pushing forward with Intel’s in this product series, but which one? This was an intriguing factor and one that I would not put past Synology to action if the DS923+ becomes an increasingly later and later release. The next-generation refresh of NAS from the bulk of the established off-the-shelf NAS hardware providers that we know so far for 2022 have all seemingly opted for the Intel Celeron N5105/N5095/N5095A Quad-Core processor for their prosumer/SMB desktop hardware. Now, there are a couple of things to unpack. First off, yes, I listed three different CPUs there. Thanks in part to hardware shortages, to the pandemic and to disruption at the production level moving forward through 2021/2022, this has resulted in Intel’s own refresh cycle of their individual ranges overlapping quite considerably. Typically they phase out (retire) a specific component after a period of time and introduce a new revision or a completely new version, with the Intel Celeron series being no exception. However, due to those interruptions mentioned, it has resulted in these three CPU revisions running and having stock spread across them. They are all very, very similar revisions with only small differences in video encode/decode (favouring the N5105 marginally) and most feel that one, two or all three of these will run in the DS923+ NAS upon it’s reveal (likely N5105 and/or N5095). I largely agree with this and although it is a better CPU than the current J4125 in the DS920+, it is a small jump that does not really justify ignoring the DS920+ on it’s own.

All this said, Synology has been moving several of their premium series to an AMD Chip (with the R1600, V1500B and now even AMD EPYC processors starting to appear in their SAS SA6400 and SA6200 series). So although it would be nice to see these Intel processors in the DS923+, I think that we are more likely too see comparable hardware to that found in the DS1522+ NAS. That said, I can definitely see Synology keep the likes of the DS223+ and DS423+ series on an Intel CPU, to perhaps reshape the portfolio and distinguish between the home and Prosumer tiers better. Regardless, any/all of this means that waiting on a DS923+ NAS will almost certainly result in a more capable CPU in the NAS for you.

Higher Maximum memory to upgrade too in current AMD Embedded Ryzen and 2021/2022 Gen Intel Celeron Processors

This is a much more minor point than CPU procrastination and second-guessing. Regardless of which CPU the Synology DS923+ NAS arrives with, practically all of the post-2020 AMD and Intel processors that would be serviceable in a desktop NAS solution arrive with 16/32GB maximum memory support. Now, the Intel J4125 that the DS920+ arrives with has an 8GB officially supported maximum and Synology largely adhere to this, with 4GB of soldered memory in the DS920+ and a DDR4 SODIMM slot that can allow an additional 4GB upgrade. So, on the one hand, that’s great news – the DS923+ will almost certainly support 16GB of memory at the very, very least – meaning more apps, more users and more services can be totally used on the system. Now, I say ‘almost certainly’ as we cannot ignore that Synology has steadily been integrating soldered/controller board attached memory on their SMB/Prosumer diskstation systems such as the DS920+, DS220+ and DS720+ over the years.

In the case of the DS920+, it wasn’t a huge deal – 4GB soldered, 4GB upgrade slot, 8GB max , done. However, in the DS220+, DS420+ and DS720+, the fact they arrived with 2GB of pre-attached memory means that a 4GB SODIMM upgrade results in an odd 6GB maximum on these systems (despite the CPU being able to support 8GB). So, do take into consideration that if the DS923+ NAS features 4GB of memory by default and it is similarly soldered, you are looking at a maximum 12/20GB of memory being the limit on this DS923+ hardware if they repeat the design of the DS920+. Or perhaps they will return to twin SODIMM slots as found in the DS1522+ and allow an AMD powered DS923+ NAS to hit the sweet spot of 32GB! Regardless, It is still more than the memory cap of the DS920+ and something to watch out for.

Questions around Diskstation Expandability in the Next Generation

Now, this point is a little more nebulous and something that will only be a concern to a smaller % of users who are weighing up between the DS920+ and a potential DS923+ NAS if revealed. I want to talk about JBOD storage expansions – I know, sexy, sexy stuff! Hear me out! One of the appeals of the DS920+ (and indeed the DS918+ and DS916+ before it) is the expandability of the system to allow you to use a Synology 5-Bay expansion down the line to add more storage to your existing RAID/SHR (i.e. the 9 in the model ID means that this is the maximum number of bays that the system can be expanded/migrated towards). Now, why should that be something to think about? The DS920+ and the potential DS923+ would both be expandable, so it’s no dice as a deciding factor. Well, did you know that expansions on the Synology NAS hardware platform ALSO get refreshed? The DX510, the DX513 and currently DX517 are the 5-Bay expansion devices (connected by 6Gb/s) are the means to add those additional 5 bays and it would not surprise me if Synology release a new expansion chassis (DX523? DX524?) to further refresh this series (improved SATA protocol, power management, etc) and when that happens, several factors raise their heads. First, production of the predecessor (the current DX517) will decrease in favour of the potential newer expansion.

Now, very, VERY few people buy an expansion for a NAS system in the first 2-3 years of their systems life – if they are producing that much data, they would opt for a larger NAS (DS1821+ or DS2422+ for example). Some users might use an expansion as a means of creating a synchronized backup with the local system, but local backups that cannot be easily disconnected such as these are less than ideal in the long term. Regardless, the point I am making is that if you opt for a DS920+ NAS now and a few years later are looking for a DX517 to expand your system, they might not be so readily available from your preferred retailer (or indeed available new in fewer quantities and therefore at a possible premium due to necessity vs scarcity). This is still a remarkably minor point of course and hinges on a lot of ‘what if’s’, but something to factor in and perhaps – if this is something that concerns you now, you should maybe jump from the DS923+ altogether and opt for something bigger on day one such as a DS1520+, DS1621+ or DS1821+ NAS now, then partially populate it in an SHR and add drives to the array as and when.

Our Predictions on the Synology 2023 NAS Hardware & Software

Synology is famously one of the most secretive companies in the NAS market and although we know a decent chunk of information on DSM 7.1, their surveillance hardware/software upgrades and even big movements on their router series, solid formal information on the Synology Diskstation and Rackstation information is only arriving in smaller dribs and drabs. That said, they still follow a few refresh trends and between these routines and smaller imprints they have made online, me and Eddie the web guy were able to make several predictions and assertions on Synology in 2022/2023. You can watch the video one of the two videos we have made on Synology 2023 Hardware, Confirmed and Predicted, below:

Video Article – SEPT 2022 Video Article – JULY 2022

Alternatively, you can read our Synology 2023 NAS Hardware MEGATHREAD over HERE.

More information on the Synology DS920+ NAS

If all of the above has led you to strengthen your resolve, get off the fence and find out more about whether the Synology DS920+ suits your needs, then you can find out more information on the Summer 2020 released NAS in the reviews below in both video and written form. It covers the things I liked, the things I didn’t and ultimately helps you understand whether Synology and it’s DS920+ deserves your data. If you are choosing Amazon, eBay or to purchase your DS920+, please use the links here as it helps support the site, costs you nothing extra and allow us to keep creating our reviews, guides and free support services. Cheers!

Video Review of the DS920+ NAS Written Review of the Synology DS920+ NAS
Video Review Synology DSM 7 Written Review Synology DSM 7
SOFTWARE - 9/10
HARDWARE - 8/10
PERFORMANCE - 10/10
PRICE - 9/10
VALUE - 10/10


9.2
PROS
👍🏻Dual NVMe M.2 cache
👍🏻Great RAID Options
👍🏻Excellent choice of Apps
👍🏻Snapshot Replication
👍🏻BTRFS and SHR
👍🏻Support Plex
👍🏻Virtualization
👍🏻4K Video transcoding
👍🏻Full Plex Transcoding
👍🏻Hot-Swap trays
👍🏻DLNA Compliant
👍🏻Expandable
CONS
👎🏻No Copy button
👎🏻Only 1Gbe Ethernet ports
👎🏻No PCIe slots
👎🏻Only a single accessible Memory Bay

 

 

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Need Advice on Data Storage from an Expert?

We want to keep the free advice on NASCompares FREE for as long as we can. Since this service started back in Jan '18, We have helped hundreds of users every month solve their storage woes, but we can only continue to do this with your support. So please do choose to buy at Amazon US and Amazon UK on the articles when buying to provide advert revenue support or to donate/support the site below. Finally, for free advice about your setup, just leave a message in the comments below here at NASCompares.com and we will get back to you. Need Help? Where possible (and where appropriate) please provide as much information about your requirements, as then I can arrange the best answer and solution to your needs. Do not worry about your e-mail address being required, it will NOT be used in a mailing list and will NOT be used in any way other than to respond to your enquiry. [contact-form-7]     Terms and Conditions Alternatively, why not ask me on the ASK NASCompares forum, by clicking the button below. This is a community hub that serves as a place that I can answer your question, chew the fat, share new release information and even get corrections posted. I will always get around to answering ALL queries, but as a one-man operation, I cannot promise speed! So by sharing your query in the ASK NASCompares section below, you can get a better range of solutions and suggestions, alongside my own.  

New Synology RT3000ax Router

14 septembre 2022 à 17:30

Synology Planning on a New RT3000ax WiFi 6 and 2.5GbE Router for 2022/2023

Yes, Synology is working on a new WiFi 6 and 2.5G router – The Synology RT3000ax. Before I go any further though,a little bit of background. I think it would be safe to say that Synology has been quite successful in their range of prosumer routers. When they first introduced the RT1900ac 6 years ago, it was seen as something of an experiment to see if they could bring the same level of software, design and experience that they had learned in network attached storage to one of the most common devices in all our homes and offices worldwide. Fast forward to now and they are on the 3rd Generation (technically, a little bit of overlap) and we have seen both the standard of Synology Router and the functionality of Synology Router Manager (SRM) evolve considerably – with the router arm of their portfolio getting stronger all the time. Which brings us to the newly revealed RT3000ax router, a more compact 802.11ax router that seems destined to serve as the refresh for the MR2200ac or (more likely) the RT2600ac at some point in the future. With a new and intriguing design (definitely looks like what the most recent star wars trilogy did to stormtrooper helmets, but ok) and borrowed elements of the recently released RT6600ax router, the RT3000ax would appear to be designed to be in a tier of their router portfolio serving as the middle-ground (when the OTT RT6600ax seems a bit pie in the sky). Let’s discuss this new router, the hardware we know about, the software and whether this device is worth waiting for.

Hardware Specifications of the Synology RT3000ax Router

The Synology RT3000ax router is quite comparable to the RT6600ax in a number of ways when it comes to it’s general hardware specifications (those the details on the qualcomm processor and on board RAM remain a mystery at the time of writing), with the system supporting 2.5GbE on a WAN/LAN port (as well as 4 more 1GbE LAN ports, with one being dedicated WAN), failover support, WiFi 6 support and USB storage compatibility that allows the use of applications (modified Synology DSM NAS apps) to be used on the system with SRM. However, there is always clear build choices here that show that the RT3000ax is designed for slightly more modest deployments. It’s a dual-band (2.4/5G design), uses internal antennae, is more verticle in it’s shape, is wall mountable and I have yet to hear if mesh support is available (assume yes, but still TBC). Here are the specifications that I know about so far:

Synology RT3000ax Router

Wireless Standards 2.4GHz: 802.11 b/g/n/ax

5GHz: 802.11 a/n/ac/ax

Frequency/Bandwidth 802.11ax (2.4GHz): Up to 600 Mbps

802.11ax (5GHz): Up to 2400 Mbps

5.9Ghz Support TBC
WAN Gigabit WAN x 1

2.5G WAN / LANx 1 (Dual WAN)

LAN Gigabit LAN x 3 and 2.5G LAN x 1
USB USB 3.2 Gen 1 (Type-A) x 1
File System EXT4, EXT3, FAT, NTFS, HFS+ (Ext Drive)
Physical Buttons/Switches • Power • WPS • Wi-Fi On/Off • Reset
Wireless Modes Wireless Router

Wireless AP (Access Point)

Antenna Internal 2T2R Omni-directional high-gain dipole (2.4GHz)

Internal 4T4R Omni-directional high-gain dipole (5GHz)

Size 233 x 194 x 66mm

Setup of the Synology RT3000ax router is largely the same as that of the rest of the RT and MR series from the brand, with it being usable as a primary router point or as an additional access point. The dual WAN design allows users to connect their ingoing/outgoing internet connection to an upto 1GbE (1000Mb/100MMB) connection, or use the 2.5GbE connection for greater than gigabit external connections. This also means that the support of failover is available, with the option to connect more two internet connections to the system (either both via WAN connection and/or with use of a 4G/5G LTE SIM connection via a supported USB device). Something I tested (along with other recovery features of SRM and the RT6600ax) in the video lower in the article.

These are still questions surrounding some SRM supported features and recent Synology router services that are available on the RT6600ax router and whether they will be available on the RT3000ax, such as:

  • Will the RT3000ax Router use/access the 5.9Ghz Band, allowing larger 160Mhz connections? Almost certainly yes, but still TBC
  • Will Mesh connectivity with other Synology Routers (RT6600ax, RT2600ax, MR2200ac) be available, and at launch? Again, almost certainly yes, but still TBC

We will update this article and the larger Synology 2023 Hardware Page as soon as we know more. You can visit the BIG Synology 2023 Page HERE

How Does the Synology RT3000ax Compare with the RT6600ax Router?

Many users who are considering buying the Synology RT6600ax right now in Autumn 2022 might hear the news of a new RT3000ax WiFi6 router coming at some point in the future and be thinking about whether to buy now or wait. It’s a very good question! However, the more you look into the specifications (even based on the few we know right now comparatively) it is clear that the RT6600ax router is the more powerful and capable price. So, if you were already about to buy the RT6600ax as it sounded ideal for your needs, then waiting for the release of the RT3000ax will not be worth it for you. However, if you were only considering the RT6600ax for its WiFi 6 and 2.5G capabilities and you were not looking to upgrade your setup until the end of 2022 or the first quarter of 2023 (when this new outer is likely to arrive realistically), then here are how the Synology RT3000ax and RT6600ax compare:

Model Synology RT3000ax

Synology RT6600ax

Price TBC $309 – £260 – €299
Wireless Standards 2.4GHz: 802.11 b/g/n/ax

5GHz: 802.11 a/n/ac/ax

2.4GHz: 802.11 b/g/n/ax

5GHz: 802.11 a/n/ac/ax

Frequency/Bandwidth 802.11ax (2.4GHz): Up to 600 Mbps

802.11ax (5GHz): Up to 2400 Mbps

802.11ax (2.4GHz): Up to 600 Mbps

802.11ax (5GHz-1): Up to 1200 Mbps

802.11ax (5GHz-2): Up to 4800 Mbps

5.9Ghz Support TBC YES
WAN Gigabit WAN x 1

2.5G WAN / LANx 1 (Dual WAN)

Gigabit WAN x 1

2.5G WAN / LANx 1 (Dual WAN)

LAN Gigabit LAN x 3 and 2.5G LAN x 1 Gigabit LAN x 3 and 2.5G LAN x 1
USB USB 3.2 Gen 1 (Type-A) x 1 USB 3.2 Gen 1 (Type-A) x 1
File System EXT4, EXT3, FAT, NTFS, HFS+ (Ext Drive) EXT4, EXT3, FAT, NTFS, HFS+ (Ext Drive)
Physical Buttons/Switches • Power • WPS • Wi-Fi On/Off • Reset • Power • WPS • Wi-Fi On/Off • Reset
Wireless Modes Wireless Router

Wireless AP (Access Point)

Wireless Router

Wireless AP (Access Point)

Antenna Internal 2T2R Omni-directional high-gain dipole (2.4GHz)

Internal 4T4R Omni-directional high-gain dipole (5GHz)

2T2R Omni-directional high-gain dipole (2.4GHz/5GHz-1)

4T4R Omni-directional high-gain dipole (5GHz-2)

Size 233 x 194 x 66mm 65 x 280 x 180 MM

So, as you can see, the main difference here is the scope of bandwidth, coverage and distance that is covered between the RT6600ax and RT3000ax – with the RT6600ax clearly being the larger (thanks to that tri-band support and larger external antenna coverage. But if you are looking for a smaller deployment and are not in a big rush right now, the RT3000ax router will provide most of the other features on offer!

Software and Security of the Synology RT3000ax Router

The Synology RT3000ax router will arrive with Synology Router Manager (SRM), as well as a range of client applications, Synology DSM-built tools that have been modified to work on their router platform and compatibility/support of all the usual OS’. You can find out more on the latest release of SRM (version 1.3) in my FULL SRM REVIEW HERE on YouTube and in my long written review of SRM1.3 here on NASCompares, but the highlights are:

SRM Features LAN/WAN management

– Port forwarding
– Network segmentation
– Traffic Control
– IPv4/IPv6 Dual Stack
– Smart/Auto WAN Switching
– Failover and load balancing
– Policy routing
– IPTV & VoIP Support
– MAC address filtering
– Set up web filtering
– Router Bridge Mode Support

Monitoring

– Live view per device
– Application statistics
– Bandwidth Device Control
– Client Application QoS
– User QoS
– Detailed Report Generation (PDF,CSV,HTML etc)

Synology Safe Access

– User & network profiles
– Access Time management
– User Internet schedule & Time quota
– Highly-customizable Web filters
– Site Access Schedules
– Safe Search integration (YouTube, Google, Bing and more)
– User Unblock/Access Request and Control GUI
– DNS over HTTPS Available
– Let’s Encrypt integration
– Dual-stack firewall
– Automatic blocking and two-factor authentication
– 5 Network and 15 SSID Creation for Network Layers
– Automatic security database updates
– DNS & IP threat intelligence Database
– Google Safe Browsing
– VPN Plus Application Service
– Site-to-Site VPN
– Access your network without VPN client
– TLS 1.2/1.3 support
– Supports the ChaCha cipher
– Validated by Microsoft Azure
– Bandwidth control & block list
– Active Directory and LDAP support

Add On Apps (Requires a USB Drive)

– VPN Plus Server
– Download Station
– Media Server
– DNS Server
– RADIUS Server
– Threat Prevention

QuickConnect and DDNS for Encrypted/Secure Remote Management

Supported Clients (for SRM) Windows 7 onwards, Mac OS 10.12 onwards
Security WPA2-Personal, WPA/WPA2-Personal, WPA2-Enterprise, WPA/WPA2-Enterprise, Opportunistic Wireless Encryption (OWE), WPA3-Personal, WPA3-Enterprise, WPA2/WPA3-Persona

Find out more on the automated recovery of connectivity in wired/wireless configuration, how the system handles failover, mesh self healing and more in my Synology Router Experiments video below:

When Will the Synology RT3000ax Router Be Released?

Right now, the information we have on the RT3000ax router is a long way from complete and that, combined with the relatively recent release of the Synology RT6600ax, likely means that this new router will not see release particularly soon (though I would expect it to be highlighted at the Synology 2023 digital event). More likely, the Synology RT3000ax will be looking at a VERY later 2022 release or (more likely) a Q1 2023 release. As more information on this device becomes available, I will update this article, the Synology 2023 SUPER ARTICLE and comparisons with the current generation of Synology Routers as information arrives. Subscribe to the NASCompares blog OR just chuck your email in the notification box below (no sign-up needed, you just get the alerts to updates to this article) to stay informed on the Synology RT3000ax router Have a great week!

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