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Big Hard Drives vs More Hard Drives – Which Is Better?

20 janvier 2023 à 18:00

Should You Use Fewer Larger HDDs or More Smaller HDDs?

The technology behind hard drives has evolved RAPIDLY! In just the last few years we have seen HDDs hit over 20 terabytes, seen the number of platters being squeezed into a single hard drive casing reach more than 10 and the performance and durability of these drives somehow continue to improve too! Still, one area that we have seen very little change in over the years is the price per terabyte of most HDDs. Despite the range of capacities available from most HDD brands (Seagate, WD, Toshiba, etc), the cost of the latest and largest HDDs still maintains a hefty price tag, whilst the smaller capacity drives (still broadly keeping their lower price point) are more readily available, occasionally on offer and this leads alot of data storage buyers to ask themselves – Is it better to buy a small number of MASSIVE hard drives or a larger number of SMALLER HDDs? Thanks to modern development and efficient evolution of RAID (redundant array of independent disk) management in NAS and DAS systems*, alongside storage enclosures now ranging from as little as 2 Bay desktop case scale all the way upto 24-60 Bay rackmounts, it is actually quite easy to achieve the same amount of capacity of a handful of ‘max capacity’ drives with a smaller cluster of more affordable smaller drives. So, today I want to look into the benefits/downfalls of either setup and hopefully help you decide whether you need to opt for bigger or smaller hard drives in your data storage setup in 2023 onwards.

Note – If you are looking for the Best Price per Terabyte of any Hard Drive from WD or Seagate, you can use our HDD comparison tool that will provide you with the best hard drive for your needs if you want to use X number of drives, have at least X amount of storage, using X type of RAID and/or spend X amount of money. Find out more about the tool and how to use it HERE – https://nascompares.com/2022/12/28/how-to-choose-the-best-value-hard-drive-and-best-price-per-tb-get-it-right-first-time

*NAS = Network Attached Storage, always featuring RAID management onboard. DAS = Direct Attached Storage, with them either having on-board/hardware-RAID or will be JBOD (Just a Bunch of Drives) that needs your host computer to set up and maintain the RAID

Why Should You Use A Larger Quantity of Smaller Capacity Hard Drives

So, first up, lets discuss the advantages of opting for a larger number of smaller capacity hard drives in a RAID in your NAS/DAS system. It is worth remembering that when I am discussing smaller capacity HDDs, that (in order to keep things simple to differentiate) I am classing any HDD 1-10TB as ‘smaller’ capacity and 12-22TB (with 24TB and 26TB arriving quite soon) as ‘large’ capacity. So, lets discuss why you might want to go high volume, low capacity!

More HDDs Can Cost less than fewer larger HDDs in the right RAID Configuration

A massively overlooked advantage when it comes to choosing a larger number of smaller capacity HDDs is that, thanks to the development of RAID technology, you can often save a good 10-15% of the cost of your data storage media by choosing a RAID 5 configuration of smaller HDDs, rather than a RAID 1 with smaller drives. Larger HDDs (which already cost significantly more, but are similar in price per TB broadly) provide you with a HUGE amount of storage space. However, because of the importance of your data (home or business), you are going to need to factor in things like backups and redundancy*. If you are buying at least 1x MASSIVE 20TB or 22TB hard drive, then you have to accept that you are going to buy AT LEAST 1 more (to act as a backup or for redundancy in a RAID 1). Below is a breakdown of the pricing of WD Red Pro and Seagate Ironwolf Regular NAS Hard Drives (enterprise/pro drives have a higher build standard, faster, longer warranty and ultimate around £30-50 more than their non-pro alternatives):

Cost of NAS Hard Drives in Jan 2023 (5/1/23)
Seagate Ironwolf HDDs (Regular) WD Red Pro HDDs (Pro Series)
1TB – $35
2TB – $65
4TB – $105
6TB – $158
8TB – $177
10TB – $224
12TB – $258
14TB – $271
16TB – $309
18TB – $389
4TB – $140
6TB – $173
8TB – $215
10TB – $245
12TB – $253
14TB – $270
16TB – $298
18TB – $349
20TB – $419
22TB – $551

In most cases, the price per terabyte on both sides will remain largely consistent at each capacity. HOWEVER, when you start putting these drives into a NAS/DAS enclosure and acting in the RAID configuration, it soon becomes apparent that the ben efits in Drive #s in a RAID 1 vs a RAID 5 immediately show a saving in almost every single capacity the smaller you go! Below are two examples of achieving 12TB in a NAS enclosure using RAID 1 vs using RAID 5 (so, still maintaining 1 disk drive failure protection and having 12TB of storage to use):

12TB Storage in a RAID 1 MIRROR 12TB Storage in a RAID 5

So, often, it can work out cheaper to purchase multiple smaller hard drives rather than fewer larger HDDs in order to hit certain capacity levels, whilst still maintaining an identical level of redundancy. This does mean you will need to choose a NAS of a larger bay number/size, ut more on that later.

*Backups and redundancy should not be confused as the same thing! Backups are a complete copy of the same data in a different location (physically, ideally). Redundancy can be thought of as a safety net. In a RAID (in most cases) you will have to supply enough media/space to facilitate the system keep your data intact in the event of a mechanical drive failure. Redundancy is NOT a backup, because it is in the same physical computer location and intertwined with the primary storage – so lose/break the NAS/DAS and redundancy is useless!

Bigger HDDs Can result in ‘all eggs in one basket’ issue

Possibly one of the early benefits of RAID (aside from benefits in larger storage in general) was to ensure that your storage had that safety net in place to withstand a drive failure. HDDs are like any other kind of mechanical technology and as soon as you introduce moving parts, pressure, workloads over years and electricity to run, you are immediately going to have to accept that they are open to one day breaking down. However, larger capacity HDDs (in particular larger capacity drives used in smaller RAID/deployment configurations) introduce the ‘all eggs in one basket’ principle. If you have a HUGE amount of data in one single container, that means that just that 1 container has to fail to lose EVERYTHING! There are arguments for and against having this single-layer failure point vs the statistics of a multi-point of failure setup (will touch on that later), but bigger hard drives and the immediate necessity to double that capacity in RAID/Backups can be daunting enough for some more cost aware users to cut corners in their data storage setup (perhaps being a bit casual in their data storage retention and depth policies). Opting for multiple drives in smaller capacities means that although you have multiple drives instead of one, that your data is a little more spread out. There IS a counterargument to this but I will touch on that later.

Smaller Capacity HDDs are more regularly on SALE

This one is a little more obvious than the differences in RAIDD configs and capacity we have already covered. Smaller capacity HDDs have a higher chance to be on offer at retailers than larger capacity drives (by quite a noticeable margin!). This is down to three main reasons:

  • Smaller capacity HDDs have been available for a longer amount of time in the market and can therefore extend to more creative pricing
  • Smaller capacity HDDs, because of their longer amount of time since release, have larger stock available post-manufacture and that means the buy/sell demand is a little more favourable to the buyer
  • Smaller capacity HDDs often require less hardware resources in their production than larger capacity HDDs with their more enterprise/pro design in line with improved R&D

Ultimately, this means that smaller-capacity HDDs are more regularly on offer than their larger-capacity alternatives. In particular, 4TB, 6TB and 8TB HDDs are often found on promotion at the majority of retailers and when you fact that in with the benefits of RAID 5 vs RAID 1 in your configuration, this can all add up to real savings. Here are a few examples from very recently:

Click to view slideshow.

Larger capacity HDDs are occasionally on offer, however, these are far, far less frequent and rarely see the price drops found in the smaller capacities (outside of big, BIG sales such as Black Friday)

More HDDs in a RAID (almost) Always results in Higher Performance

Another big, big benefit of using multiple smaller HDDs in a larger RAID config compared with larger HDDs in a smaller RAID is to do with performance. Depending on the number of drives in the RAID, you can see some fantastic improvements in performance. Years ago, RAID configurations such as RAID 5 and RAID 6 were seen to have a performance penalty because of the extra work being done by the CPU/Resources of the NAS keeping them running smoothly and safely. However, in recent years thanks to the improvements in NAS CPUs being used and the software that is running on them, RAID 5/6 doesn’t have anywhere near the performance loss it once did. In fact, RAID 5 and RAID  6 can grant you some great benefits. This is thanks to a RAID allowing read and write activity being spread across multiple disks at once (as opposed to a single drive being accessed in a normal 1 drive setup). Different RAID configurations result in different benefits (with a RAID 0 being the fastest, but utterly lacking any kind of redundancy/safety-net):

So, for example, using Seagate Ironwolf HDDs at the prices above, if we were to compare 2x 16TB HDDs in a RAID 1 ($618) vs 3x 8TB HDDs in a RAID 5 ($541) vs 5x 4TB HDDs in a RAID 5 ($525), the result is that although all three RAID configurations will provide 16TB of available capacity and protection, the LOWEST PRICED 5x4TB RAID 5 Setup will actually give the HIGHEST PERFORMANCE as it is the most drives being read/written with at any given time.

Bigger Capacities are more often ‘PRO’ or ‘Enterprise’ ONLY

This is something of a growing trend, but because of the development of larger HDD capacities requiring modern storage technology to improve in big ways (to increase that storage cap, but also remain stable and maintain performance), we are starting to see more and more HDD brand release big, BIG capacities, but limit them to ONLY the PRO or Enterprise tiers of their portfolios. Seagate doesn’t do this too much on their NAS series, but WD Red has been involved in this kind of range division for a few years now, with their WD Red Plus series capping at 14TB, but their WD Red Pro range now available in upto 22TB (with 24TB around the corner). See below from the official WD HDD site:

So, if you DO want larger capacity HDDs, do not be surprised if it means you are forced to opt for more industrious HDDs in Pro or Enterprise ranges. This does mean longer warranties and slightly higher individual performance, but also means higher power use and one other big issue that main smaller/home/SMB NAS/DAS users complain about when in closer proximity to larger HDD arrays. Namely noise…

Enterprise and PRO HDDs make more click-and-access noise

Yep, Noise. It shouldn’t come as a big surprise, but when you cram as much hardware into a single 3.5″ HDD casing, then those moving/mechanical parts are going to have to work harder! In the case of larger HDDs that are forced into the Pro/Enterprise ranges due to their hardware development, the result is that these drives make noticeably more noise when they are spinning up, being accessed and especially during high-volume access. This is because larger capacity HDDs have more platters (the circles inside that your data lives on) and the actuator/arm (the bit that is constantly moving across the platters to read/write data all over those disks) is constantly having to move in/out/up/down. This is particularly noticeable with even a single larger capacity HDD and when you have multiple running in a single RAID, the noise is especially noticeable (often louder than the NAS that they are inside!). Here is the noise of 4x WD Red Pro 20TB HDDs in a 4-Bay Synology DS920 NAS during high access:

Now, this is not going to be a problem for everyone. If you plan on running your NAS far away or in a part of your home/office that is suitably noise cancelled, then the noise of larger HDDs is not really going to be a factor for you. However, those of you who are going to be in close proximity to your NAS, you will definitely notice the industrial quality of larger capacity HDDs!

WD Red Pro Noise WD Red Plus Noise

Why You Should Use a Smaller Quantity of Larger Hard Drives

There are two sides to every coin! As good as the points above are that highlight the benefits of smaller HDDs in larger quantities – there are also a whole bunch of advantages to opting for larger HDDs instead. Let’s go through them now.

Using Bigger Capacity HDDs Can Mean You Can Use a Smaller/Cheaper NAS

Yep, despite my highlighting that the using multiple smaller HDDs in the right RAID can result in a lower price per TB (after redundancy) vs larger HDDs – using MORE hard drives will mean that you need to use a larger NAS/DAS system. Larger NAS/DAS systems are always more expensive, as they need to have more physical space, resource use in production and power/PSU sizes to run the larger enclosure. Add to this, thanks to memory shortages right now, that smaller scale NAS systems are starting to arrive with more memory by default (as 2-4GB is becoming less cost-effective to produce with chip shortages) and often with little/no increase in the base price. For example, below is the TS-264 and TS-464 NAS. Same CPU, design and ports – however the 2-Bay system has 8GB memory by default AND IS STILL $134 cheaper!

So, this can often mean that you can save money on smaller quantities of larger capacity HDDs becuase the enclosure they are going in is cheaper over all.

Using More HDDs in a RAID Means Increase Points of Failure

Yes, this might seem a little counterintuitive, given my comments earlier about single containers vs multiple and failure. However, using more HDDs in a single RAID array opens the door to more points of failure (i.e more drives, more chance of a drive failure). Now, on the face of it, this kinda balances against big drives anyway, but there are some users who want to have as fewer points of failure in their system as possible, as then they have fewer areas to monitor. This is further exacerbated when you factor in things like an unexpected power failure during heavy write operations breaking multiple drives at once and/or potential bad-batches at the factor level. Ultimately more/less HDDs is going to be something of a percentages game and although I personally do not really subscribe to this as a reason to avoid smaller HDDs in larger quantities, I know there are some users who would disagree!

More HDDs mean increased Power use/Electricity cost

This is a smaller factor, but one that (in these very energy cost aware and climate-concerned times) is growing in importance for many users. Most HDDs (big or small) use a nearly identical amount of power and you cannot really see the running power use difference between, eg. a 2TB and 20TB HDD, unless you have multiple drives running at once. However, if it DOES add up and its is further compounded by the increased power use of larger NAS/DAS systems that have more bays. Larger RAID configurations will also increase CPU usage a pinch too and once you add all these factors in 24×7 systems like those of NAS rackmounts and large-scale desktop tower systems. Below is how the power use of the WD Red Pro series compares across all the capacities:

Not much between them! Using fewer HDDs (i.e larger capacities) in a smaller NAS/DAS enclosure with an easier-to-manage RAID configuration will always result in a smaller power consumption overall (whether you are concerned with energy use environmentally or the electric bill at the end of the month – though for the latter, you will need to factor in the cost of the larger drives, remember!). Of course, we are talking about very small margins here, but for those running on limited or low power capacity situations/environments, these small differences can have BIG impacts!

More HDDs mean an increase in drive noise in drive spin-and-vibration

NOISE! It’s back again, as although the larger HDDs make more noise in clicks, access and spin noise in the larger capacity HDDs, it is also worth keeping in mind that if you decide to go for a larger collection of smaller capacity HDDs that you will encounter a different kind of noise issue sometimes. Namely, vibration (a persistent humm) noise in the larger NAS/DAS systems with more drives inside. Although this is nowhere near as annoying as the clicks and whirs of the larger capacity drives (in my opinion at least), it CAN be very annoying for those working close to the NAS/DAS and are sensitive to persistent humming. Additionally, larger capacity NAS/DAS systems (in 6-Bays and above ) that you will need to support a larger RAID array of smaller capacity HDDs arrive in mostly metal NAS enclosures (2-4 Bay NAS are normally 60/40 plastic outside and aluminium inside). These metal chassis amplify that vibration hum too! Then there s the larger NAS enclosures needing improved cooling and ventilation systems to maintain cool operational noise over 24×7 use – at least 2 fans, with multiple smaller fans sometimes for the PSU and CPU respectively. It all adds up and are factors of noise that users considering larger RAID arrays of smaller HDDs should consider!

Larger Capacity HDDs Benefit from modern build techniques and development

This is certainly something of a double-edged sword (and one that will come down to you, the end user, and how you feel about ‘new tech’ at launch) but when HDD manufacturers like WD and Seagate invest heavily in developing new techniques to improve the level of capacity, durability and performance in their drives – they almost always apply these new techniques to just the larger capacities! Most of the time, these will never be extended to the smaller capacities, as either the margins are too thin, the benefits are not needed on these established lines or they are looking to get as larger a return on investment (ROI) as possible by targeting new and exciting larger capacities that trend well. So, in the last two years we have seen exciting techniques being developed to increase storage capacity massively, such as Heat Assisted Magnetic Recording (HAMR), Energy Assisted Magnetic Recording (EAMR), OptiNAND for leveraging flash storage for drive I/O space adding to drives to free up traditional storage space and this will soon be moving forward into Microwave Assisted recording (which is what will be opening the doors all the way to 50TB and 100TB HDDs by the end of the decade). Then you have developments such as Mach 2 from Seagate that will allow twice the read/write activity of HDDs that make the jump from 250-270MB/s over SATA all the way upto 440-450MB/s. Practically all of these developments will be extended to the largest capacities and not suitable/available for the smaller ones. HDD technology develops FAST (see the video below that details the development of WD Red HDDs in the last 10 years for more of an idea how much has changed):

Of course, there are some users who will happily avoid the newest, largest and most expensive HDDs as they enter the market – instead wanting to see them out in the field for a whilst to ‘work out the kinks’ before they choose to invest their money. There are arguments on both sides.


More HDDs vs BIG HDDs – Conclusion & Verdict

There are plenty of reasons why you should opt for smaller or larger Hard drives that extend to alot more than ‘which one costs less’, with factors such as power consumption, performance, noise and durability being the main factors for business users and home users alike! On balance, larger-scale HDDs are always going to be designed, presented and released with business in mind. If you are a home user, you are much better off getting smaller-capacity HDDs, grabbing a few good bargains along the way, and get yourself a much more capable and usable NAS/DAS system to populate. Business users, who tend to produce the most data, use the HDDs for longer sustained periods and need assurances of the drive withstanding this larger usage are much more in position to take advantage of larger HDDs (longer warranties, more space, higher workload rates, etc). These are NOT iron rules and your own personal setup might well differ. To summarize though:

Reasons to Buy Larger Quantities of Smaller HDDs Reasons to Buy Larger HDDs in Smaller Quantities
Higher RAID Performance when you have more HDDs

Better Price per TB in the right RAID of smaller HDDs vs Big

More Regular Offers/Sales on Smaller Cap HDDs

Larger HDDs make more running noise individually

Larger HDDs are often Noisier in Access

More HDDs opens the door to 2 drive Failure Protection

Smaller Capacities have more proven success in operation than new larger drives

Longer Default Warranties when drives are PRO/Ent only at high Cap (3yr vs 5yr)

Higher Individual Drive Performance

Access to Modern HDD R&D + Techniques

Lower Power Consumption in smaller #s and smaller NAS’

Smaller NAS/DAS systems = Lower NAS/DAS Cost to Buy

Fewer Points of Failure

Larger Bay NAS = More Vibration NAS Noise and Fan Noise

If you are thinking of buying New Hard Drives (and you found this guide helpful), please use the links below to take you to Amazon, as it will not cost you anything extra and will result in a small % in commission from ANYTHING you buy being sent through to us at NASCompares (just me and Eddie) which goes directly back into making more videos and articles. Thanks!
Alternatively, you can visit one of the retailers below, which will also help us make further content too! Thanks for being awesome!


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Amazon UK 720.57 OFF (WAS 7670) [LINK HERE]
Amazon USA 11.24 OFF (WAS 101) [LINK HERE]
Amazon USA 6.41 OFF (WAS 274) [LINK HERE]

 



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Terramaster F2-423 NAS Review

13 janvier 2023 à 18:00

Review of the Terramaster F2-423 NAS Drive

The Network Attached Storage industry (NAS) unlike many areas of the tech world is actually surprisingly small in terms of the companies that fight for market dominance. With less than 10 big players and less than 5 of those being real marketing recognized, choosing a NAS solution is actually quite restricted. In that small paddock of NAS brands, the one that is by FAR the best hardware value (as in, getting the most for your money in terms of hardware) is Terramaster. A brand that has evolved incredibly rapidly in the personal home/office server market in the last 7-8 years. Although not as well established as bigger brands with decades in the server industry (such as Synology and QNAP), in the short time they have been in the NAS market, they have produced a range of solutions that sneak up remarkably close in hardware/software to those bigger brands, whilst sometimes arriving close to half the price for the same architecture. Their latest series is the x23 series (arriving in 2, 4, 9 and 12-Bay desktop solutions so far, at the time of writing) and today I want to review their F2-423 2-Bay NAS. Going up against the likes of the Asustor Lockerstor 4 Gen 2 and QNAP TS-464 NAS (released around a month on either side of the F2-423), as well as competing with Synology’s DS920+ right now, the F2-423 has some steep competition.  Nevertheless, with its pricetag already £100-180 less (depending on where you shop) the F2-423 already seemingly has the high ground in terms of affordability, but what about software, quality and overall performance? Let’s review this new Terramaster NAS and see if it deserves your data.

Terramaster F2-423 NAS Review – Quick Conclusion

Terramaster still continues to be the most affordable fully-featured provider of the whole NAS market and although a number of their solutions have always felt a little rough around the edges, you always got the impression that you were getting a good deal for the hardware that was available from QNAP and Synology. Now in 2022/2023, the same continues to be true but in the F2-423 NAS’ case, you are actually getting some pretty top tier (for the Home/Prosumer) market at a price tag that is really tough to argue with. Terramaster has clearly been watching their bigger competitors and cherry-picked the features that people have been asking for (2.5GbE, USB 3.2 Gen 2, M.2 NVMe SSD bays, etc) for this new generation. In terms of software, things are a little less convincing and although TOS 5 (currently in Beta at the time of writing) still continues to evolve into something genuinely fully featured and impressive, TOS 4 that the F2-423 includes at launch is usable (if unexciting) platform that provides the base level services that a new NAS user would want, but lacks killer apps that their competitors are offering right now (File Streaming, AI photo recognition, Surveillance, etc). Most of these ARE included in TOS5, but until it arrives much later in 2022 in a full release, the F2-423 feels like a powerful NAS that doesn’t have the software to show off its strengths yet. If you are reading this later in 2022 or 2023, this might well be irrelevant though, as the brand rolls out their bit firmware update to ALL Terramster NAS devices. Overall, I definitely CAN recommend the F2-423 NAS for its hardware, for Plex Media server or as an affordable multi-tier backup solution, but if you are looking for a NAS for more tailored data access or in a much more fully-featured package – hold out a little longer till TOS 5 gets released first.

SOFTWARE - 7/10
HARDWARE - 9/10
PERFORMANCE - 8/10
PRICE - 9/10
VALUE - 9/10


8.4
PROS
👍🏻2.5GbE at the Price of 1GbE
👍🏻TRAID Flexible RAID is great stuff!
👍🏻Good CPU for the Price Point
👍🏻Supports Current 22TB HDDs from WD and Seagate
👍🏻VERY easy TrueNAS installation is possible
👍🏻USB 3.2 Gen 2 is very forward-thinking for local backups
👍🏻Great RAID Options
👍🏻Snapshot Replication
👍🏻BTRFS Support if preferred
👍🏻Supports Plex and all 1080p Transcoding
👍🏻4K Video transcoding natively
👍🏻A large amount of maximum memory supported (16-32GB - TBC)
👍🏻Includes two M.2 NVMe SSD Bays that can be used for storage or caching
CONS
👎🏻HDMI Currently Unsupported
👎🏻Although TOS 5 has seen some big improvements and more AAA+ apps and services added, it is still not as polished as DSM or QTS from their competitors

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Terramaster F2-423 NAS Review – Unboxing, Packaging & Presentation

The initial impressions of the presentation Terramaster F2-423 NAS were a little meh! As this is a more affordable solution, it is understandable that some areas of the retail package are going to be a little understated. Additionally, NAS systems like the F2-423 NAS are going to 99% of the time be purchased online (not in your local I.T shop or generally in line of sight at the point of sale), so the need for flashy packaging is less important. That said, many brands still put a little effort into this and present their solutions as a means to promote a brand, lifestyle or general vibe or excellence in their product (i.e. “the first bite is with the eye” etc). The Terramaster F2-423 arrives in a very plain brown box and just has the model ID with a sticker and the brand logos.

Remarks of presentation aside, the packaging of the Terramaster F2-423 is pretty good in terms of protection. The unit is well held in foam (a little softer in density than I would like maybe) and the accessories are neatly and securely contained. There is practically no room for the system to move in transit and ultimately, that is all that matters (silent shock/motion damage to the components).

The accessories box contains lots of accessories and although most are pretty standard (setup instructions, power supplier, warranty information, screws, etc), there are a couple of unusual additional that I have never received in other brand’s products, namely the inclusion of additional HDD tray clip/screw washers and additional rubber feet for the NAS. This isn’t really a good/bad thing and for those that need them, it’s a handy addition. Just seemed an unusual addition.

One small but positive area of note is the LAN cable included. As mentioned earlier, in more affordable NAS solutions (like more tech), the way savings can be made is by cutting corners. Therefore I was surprised that the Terramaster F2-423 arrived with a surprisingly high-quality LAN cable. Thick, Cat 6 and very high quality at the connector. Again, this is a small point, but companies such as QNAP and Terramaster HAVE provided Cat 5e cables of a shorter length, thinner material and nowhere near the quality of this one with their 1/2.5GbE solutions. It’s a VERY minor point, but this is the sort of area I would have assumed Terramster would have saved a few £/$ on and I am impressed.

The Terramaster F2-423 arrives with an external PSU (quite standard in 2-bay desktop systems) and it’s quite non-descript and not too much to write home about. It’s a 2-pin connector 60W PSU.

Overall, there is quite a good range of accessories included with the Terramaster F2-423. Nothing spectacular, but pretty much everything you are going to need (aside from storage media) to set up your NAS quickly and easily. Let’s discuss the design of the F2-423.

Terramaster F2-423 NAS Review – Design

Terrasmaster NAS drives are pretty distinctive. The brand has been using largely the same chassis in its 2 and 4 Bay systems for about 5 years. There HAVE been improvements (port placement, removal of the odd handle on the top and the tray quality is massively improved) but in the desktop 2/4-Bay systems, things have changed very little. The design is looking a little dated now in 2022, but it is still very functional and whereas brand like QNAP has 8-10 different design chassis in their portfolio, it is nice that Terramster have at least kept a consistent look/shape to the solutions in their portfolio for brand recognition.

The Terramaster F2-423 NAS chassis is a combination of Metal and plastic (with the front, rear and media trays all arriving in plastic, but the 1 piece surrounding the middle area is metal). Indeed, at a glance you might assume the whole thing is metal, with the brushed silver colour scheme, but no. The system’s passive cooling (vents) are located between each of the media bays, and at the base of the machine. The system seemingly takes advantage of horizontal airflow through the chassis (with the rear fans facilitating this) and the metal middle section providing dissipation for the internal mechanisms getting warm.

The ventilation on the base of the Terramaster F2-423 is pretty much the entire system and the rubber feet of this NAS are noticeably taller than other NAS 2-Bay systems. Although these are chiefly under the drive media bays, they are pretty much over the entire controller board too, to create an angled air circulation through the bays/board and via the fans on the rear.

The Terramaster F2-423 chassis lacks any LCD panel (these days only QNAP and Asustor seemingly include these on a few of their systems) and system information is provided by multiple LEDs on the front. These cover the activity, status and health of the media bays, the network connection and the power of the system.

The main storage bays of the Terramaster F2-423 NAS are SATA-connected plastic trays that support 2.5″ and 3.5″ media (i.e HDDs and SSDs). The system can operate with a single drive if you choose, allowing you to gradually add more storage over time. However, the Terramaster F2-423 (like most NAS) works at it’s best with multiple drives in a RAID configuration for the safety net of redundancy and/or a performance increase of multiple drives being read/written to at the same time.

The trays inside the Terramaster F2-423 support the toolless installation of 3.5″ HDDs (i.e no screwdriver needed and drives click in securely) and 2.5″ SSD/HDDs need the included screws. The SATA connections inside are combined data/power, so no loose cables or tricksy installation. Lastly, the Terramaster F2-423 supports hot swapping, so drives can be inserted/removed without powering down the system, just BE AWARE that removing a drive that is in a RAID is not recommended (by ANY NAS brand).

And that is about it for the design of the Terramaster F2-423 chassis. They have used this same design in the bulk of the desktop 2/4 systems, so there are few surprises here. But nonetheless, it seemingly does the job and aside from the design perhaps looking a little old these days compared with Synology’s more expensive Diskstation series, it’s a solid enough build. Let’s discuss the ports and connections of the F2-423 NAS.

Terramaster F2-423 NAS Review – Ports and Connections

The connections available on the Terramaster F2-423 NAS, although few in number, are all pretty good for what the devices are costing right now. Only three connections to discuss (and one of them is a bit negligible) but given the device’s price point, the available external bandwidth here is impressive. The rear chunky fan module that is located on the rear of the F2-423 (much like previous Terramaster NAS systems) is a little unsightly, but as it is on the rear of the unit, you are never going to see it much.

The twin fans are thicker than many other fans in the market and although that results in a greater draw of air into the system when it is operational, it does also mean that when in operation, the Terramaster F2-423 is a pinch louder. These fans can be adjusted in rotations per minute (RPM) in the TOS software of course, but it is not recommended and it’s best to leave the system fans on automatic so they can dynamically adjust to the internal temperature for efficiency.

Of course, the first big improvement of the Terramaster F2-423 over its predecessors (F2-422 and F2-421) is the inclusion of 2.5-gigabit ethernet (2.5GbE). The NAS arrives with two ethernet ports that can provide around 250-279MB/s throughout each, as well as allowing link aggregation (aka Port Trunking) to combine their bandwidth and provide 5GbE (around 500-550MB/s throughput) with the use of a smart switch. In the last few years, we have seen several brands provide 2.5GbE connections at the same cost as 1GbE ports and with internet service providers and affordable switch manufacturers providing 2.5GbE solutions, it was only natural that NAS brands would make the jump towards it. Hypothetically, if you had a faster than Gb internet connection (fiber etc) and a google drive account, that means that you would be able to connect with your cloud drive FASTER than a NAS system in your home if you only have 1GbE. This is why NAS systems need to arrive with 2.5/5/10GbE in 2022, for the sake of futureproofing and to keep up with the growing demands for data access. Additionally, 2 SATA storage bays (as well as the use of those internal SSD bays that I will touch on later) will easily saturate a 2.5GbE and even LAG supported 5GbE connection, so these ports allow you to maximize your storage potential and share that bandwidth with multiple connected users.

One slight letdown is that the Terramaster F2-423arrives with an HDMI port BUT they do not have any kind of HDMI/Visual GUI that can be accessed (unlike QNAP’s HD Station and Asustor’s Portal applications) The HDMI out DOES allow you to access SSH/Telnet level/stylized backend controls with a USB keyboard, but with this CPU and hardware architecture supporting embedded graphics, 4K media and multimedia services, it is a real shame that you cannot do anything more home/SMB friendly than command line. Maybe one-day Terramaster will update TOS to take advantage of this feature in a more graphical/KVM way, but it has been 2 years of these systems having HDMI and we have yet to see any change on this.

The USB ports of the Terramaster F2-423 are a subtle upgrade over previous/older NAS systems from the brand, with this NAS featuring 2x USB 3.2 Gen 2 Type-A ports. These allow connections of up to 10Gb/s (1,000MB/s – double that of the USB 3.2 Gen 1 5Gb/s in older systems) and that means much, MUCH faster local backups to external storage drives, as well as the support of USB JBOD storage expansions. The real benefits of USB 3.2 Gen 2 in expansions are only really felt when using larger SSD arrays or 5-8 bay expansions. Nevertheless, these ports are a nice extra for the system. Additionally, Terramaster recently released an affordable USB-to-2.5GbE adapter for £25+ that allows you to connect ANOTHER 2.5GbE port on this system. Add a 2-4 Bay storage expansion to the other USB port and you have a great deal of storage and network bandwidth for this system to graduate towards, all thanks to those newer gen USB ports.

The ports and connections of the Terramaster F2-423 are few in number but still nonetheless good upgrades over it’s predecessor. Terramaster could have EASILY cut a few corners here (i.e USB 3.2 Gen 1 or just a single 2.5GbE port) and most users would not have batted an eye (as it is noticeably lower in price than the similar USB 3.2/2.5G QNAP TS-464). Let’s get our screwdriver and take a look inside this NAS to see how Terramster have approached the internal specifications of the F2-423.

Terramaster F2-423 NAS Review – Internal Hardware

The internal hardware of the Terramaster F2-423 NAS is a mix of current-generation hardware choices and quirky applications. The internal boards comprise two PCBs (one for the SATA storage and another for… well… everything else). In most cases, a user will almost never completely dismantle a NAS drive in its lifespan. However, in the case of the F2-423, you are going to need to take it apart quite considerably in order to access a number of the upgrade options. In order to access these, you will need to remove the six rear screws of the chassis and then remove the rear panel. This rear panel contains the active cooling fans and either awkwardly hangs from the chassis or you will need to disconnect the fan (something only fractionally less ideal). From here you will need to slide the entire internal framework out and that allows you to access/upgrade a couple of the internal hardware components as needed.

Once the full internal board is disconnected, you are able to see a wide variety of heatsinks, ports and modules. This is a slightly unconventional means of accessing these bits but something that most PC builders will be ok with. The board is double-sided with the m.2 SSD slots and a single SODIMM memory slot on one side, and the Internal CPU and another populated SODIMM slot on the other side – which is significantly harder to access and requires removal of even more of the internal framework to access.

The CPU featured in the Terramaster F2-423 NAS is a quad-core Intel Celeron N5105 CPU, a processor that has been very much the ‘CPU of choice’ among the 2022/2023 generation of NAS hardware from most of the brands (except Synology). This is a quad-core x86 64bit processor that is 2.0Ghz in clock speed, that can be burst up to 2.9Ghz when needed. It features an onboard AES-NI encryption engine, as well as Intel embedded graphics for visual data tasks such as native multimedia playback, transcoding, photo management and improved services in TOS 5 (still in beta) towards AI photo recognition and surveillance with IP Cameras. As mentioned, although this is never going to challenge the likes of an Intel Pentium or Intel Core in 2022, it is still a very good CPU and in the context of NAS and this price point, very competent indeed.

Alongside that CPU, the Terramaster F2-423 NAS also arrives with 4GB of DDR4 Memory. However, closer inspection of the F2-423 architecture does raise a couple of small questions. Firstly, the 4GB of memory the system arrives with is a single 2133Mhz SODIMM module. Most other NAS systems with this architecture arrive with 2400-2666Mhz memory. It’s a small point, but this is the first NAS I have seen with DDR4 memory at 2133Mhz. Additionally, the 4GB module is located in an incredibly difficult place under the main cage array, so installing larger/faster memory is not going to be possible without much more dismantling. Talking of ‘adding more memory’, Terramaster state that the F2-423 NAS supports up to 32GB of DDR4 SODIMM memory across its two slots. However, Intel state that this CPU only supports a maximum 16GB across two channels – so although I am sure the system would definitely see 32GB of memory if you have 2x 16GB installed, I do wonder if you will definitely be able to actually USE all 32 correctly.

The Terramaster F2-423 also features two M.2 NVMe SSD bays that allow you to install significantly faster SSDs into the system alongside SATA HDDs, meaning that you have another option for your storage. Now, there is good and bad news here regarding these ports. On the plus side, they can be used for either caching alongside the larger HDD RAID configuration (to allow read/write caching and significantly improve their performance in key areas) or as it’s own storage pool. This is something that popular NAS competitor Synology has never implemented to their NVMe bays, despite it being a highly requested feature. On a slight downside, as the Intel N5105 CPU inside the Terramaster F2-423 is already being stretched a little thing in it’s architecture, these M.2 NVMe SSD bays are PCIe Gen 3 x1 speed. This means that NVMe SSDs such as the Seagate Ironwolf 510/525 or WD Red SN700 at PCIe Gen 3/4 x4 will be limited down to a maximum 1,000MB/s per bay. This is still something you can incorporate into a solid RAID for improved performance and its better to have them, than not at all though.

The internal hardware inside the Terramaster F2-423 is still good for the money and certainly gives you a solid base level of hardware to work with. The means to access and upgrade the system hardware is less smooth than most/all other commercial NAS brands, but once you have jumped these odd hurdles, you have some great kit here to use in conjunction with 1st and 3rd party applications. So, let’s move into the subject of software and TOS on the F2-423.

Terramaster F2-423 NAS Review – Software

If you are an existing Terramaster NAS owner, or are someone that has been considering their NAS brand for your private server purchase, then you might have heard that they recently released their latest BIG software update. Upgrading from TOS 4 to TOS 5, this new update brings a huge range of improvements in the GUI, available applications, supported services, security and user controls to their NAS systems.  It is important to note that even though TOS 5 is now fully released and in its non-beater version, some applications are still in beta within this software platform and although I will touch on them throughout this review, I will make a point of highlighting when some applications in full release or are still in Beta. These include Terra Photos, Terrasync tools, Centralized Backup, and elements of Terra Search and Surveillance Manager. Although all of these applications are still available in the app center, the experiences I had with them still demonstrate that they are not in their final form and suffered weak resource sharing with the rest of TOS5. Otherwise, all other elements discussed in this review are in their full release candidate form. Additionally, at the time of writing, TOS5 is not available for ARM processor NAS devices. I made a MASSIVE review of TOS 5 in it’s own dedicated article below, which I recommend you read if you want to know the FULL scope of what TOS 5 can and cannot do:

 

What I liked in TOS 5

  • The GUI is considerably clearer and much more vibrant.
  • The options and icons in the GUI are much more responsive and clear against other background activities.
  • There are considerably more backup and synchronization tools in TOS5.
  • There are a vastly improved number of storage configurations and services available at your disposal.
  • The mixed drive TRAID Is going to win serious points with ex-synology owners.
  • The system includes direct tech support and remote access terminal for official support and difficulties
  • The network isolation mode in TOS5 is both unique to the brand and particularly helpful.
  • The resource monitor is 10 times better than in previous versions of TOS 5 and genuinely useful.
Click to view slideshow.

What I did not like in TOS 5

  • The upgrade path between TOS4 and TOS5 is not as smooth as it should be. And will confuse some and concern others.
  • Multimedia tools are a little lacking and although there is a general DLNA media server application and the photo app in beta, there is no dedicated video or music tool available.

Terramaster F2-423 NAS Review – Conclusion

Terramaster still continues to be the most affordable fully-featured provider of the whole NAS market and although a number of their solutions have always felt a little rough around the edges, you always got the impression that you were getting a good deal for the hardware that was available from QNAP and Synology. Now in 2022/2023, the same continues to be true but in the F2-423 NAS’ case, you are actually getting some pretty top tier (for the Home/Prosumer) market at a price tag that is really tough to argue with. Terramaster has clearly been watching their bigger competitors and cherry-picked the features that people have been asking for (2.5GbE, USB 3.2 Gen 2, M.2 NVMe SSD bays, etc) for this new generation. In terms of software, things are a little less convincing and although TOS 5 (currently in Beta at the time of writing) still continues to evolve into something genuinely fully featured and impressive, TOS 4 that the F2-423 includes at launch is usable (if unexciting) platform that provides the base level services that a new NAS user would want, but lacks killer apps that their competitors are offering right now (File Streaming, AI photo recognition, Surveillance, etc). Most of these ARE included in TOS5, but until it arrives much later in 2022 in a full release, the F2-423 feels like a powerful NAS that doesn’t have the software to show off its strengths yet. If you are reading this later in 2022 or 2023, this might well be irrelevant though, as the brand rolls out their bit firmware update to ALL Terramster NAS devices. Overall, I definitely CAN recommend the F2-423 NAS for its hardware, for Plex Media server or as an affordable multi-tier backup solution, but if you are looking for a NAS for more tailored data access or in a much more fully-featured package – hold out a little longer till TOS 5 gets released first.

PROS of the Terramaster F2-423 CONS of the Terramaster F2-423
  • 2.5GbE at the Price of 1GbE
  • TRAID Flexible RAID is great stuff!
  • Good CPU for the Price Point
  • Supports Current 22TB HDDs from WD and Seagate
  • VERY easy TrueNAS installation is possible
  • USB 3.2 Gen 2 is very forward-thinking for local backups
  • Great RAID Options
  • Snapshot Replication
  • BTRFS Support if preferred
  • Supports Plex and all 1080p Transcoding
  • 4K Video transcoding natively
  • A large amount of maximum memory supported (16-32GB – TBC)
  • Includes two M.2 NVMe SSD Bays that can be used for storage or caching
  • HDMI Currently Unsupported
  • Although TOS 5 has seen some big improvements and more AAA+ apps and services added, it is still not as polished as DSM or QTS from their competitors

Click the link below to take you to your local Amazon store and where to buy the terramaster F2-423 NAS.

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Best Surveillance NAS of the Year – 2022/2023

31 décembre 2022 à 18:00

A Guide to the Best Surveillance NAS Drives to Buy Right Now

When you consider investing in a NAS drive in your home or business environment, you always want to maximize your investment in this new kind of technology. Systems are designed to do many different things at once and each top-tier NAS brand includes a complete software and application environment with their hardware, allowing you to support multiple different services at any given time. The most popular services that new buyers tend to choose are that of multi-tiered backups, multimedia playback, shared drives for collaboration and, of course, surveillance. Utilising a NAS system as a bespoke and highly proficient NVR (network video recorder) system is growing in popularity all the time and allows home to small business users to ensure the safety and security of family and employees alike. It is for this reason that the majority of brands have their own surveillance software included with the purchase of your NAS, allowing you to add multiple IP cameras in your network environment that can be accessed and recorded from 24/7, with customised alerts and an enterprise-level dashboard with which to control them. Because all of the NAS brands tend to include surveillance software with their hardware, it can be hard to choose the right NAS for your own particular surveillance setup. Factors such as the maximum number of cameras you can use, compatibility with IP Camera brands and available camera licenses will always play a part. So today I am showing you the top 3 NAS for surveillance to buy in 2022/2023. Each one has been selected based on their own individual highlights, with one being the best value surveillance solution, one being the most robust surveillance NAS and finally one is the best business class enterprise NAS surveillance solution where power and performance are key. Let’s take a look.

Best Surveillance NAS – What Qualifies?

As mentioned, almost all NAS drives have an element of surveillance included to a greater or lesser extent, so how can I break down thousands of NAS solutions down to just three? Well, first off all NAS that are considered need to confirm against the following qualifications for a NVR use NAS system:

  • Only Desktop/Tower systems are being considered, Rackmount servers are generally harder to compare and are more tailored to data center and/or general server file storage
  • Each solution must be a combined Hardware+Software solution – Include a Surveillance Management utility
  • Must have at least 2 years of manufacturers warranty
  • MUST include at least 4 Camera Licenses (a large part of the cost ultimately)
  • Must be at least a 4-Bay NAS, as you need to provision for storage AND redundancy in the event of a failed drive
  • Must have the ability to export footage without interrupting live feeds
  • Must support accepted camera brands (AXIS, Hikvision, Edimax, Reolink, Annke, etc) as well as ONVIF protocol and client applications

The above rules certainly narrow down the available NAS drives in the market down a little, but it still means that a lot of NAS drives are suitable, but not PERFECT. So, below is my top three recommended NAS to buy for surveillance in 2022/2023.

What Have All the Best Surveillance NAS Drives Have in Common?

It is worth remembering that although there are ALOT of different Surveillance NAS drives available to buy, they are by no means created equal! With numerous super-budget brands popping up online, it can be tempting to consider these alongside the premium NAS brands. However, all too often they offer solutions righty seem ‘too good to be true’ and then are gone from the web before your warranty even gets cold! So, whether you are looking at the three best Surveillance solutions that I am recommending below OR are looking at another Surveillance NAS you saw on offer/recommended elsewhere – the best NAS system ALWAYS includes the following software and services:

  • Combined Hardware & Software Solution – That means that you are buying the hardware, but it ALSO includes a web browser GUI, mobile apps and desktop client apps (including backup, media, streaming, surveillance and file management software)
  • All NAS systems in this guide are compatible with (and can be accessed by) Windows, Mac, Android and Linux operating systems
  • All NAS Solutions arrive with between 2-3 years Warranty (with the option to extend to 5 years)
  • All NAS drives can be accessed locally over the network, as well as secure remote access is possible with brand-supported services (at no additional cost)
  • The most modern and regularly updated NAS systems will support the very latest 20TB NAS hard drives (such as the Seagate Ironwolf 22TB and WD Red 22TB)
  • All the recommended solutions support multiple drive configurations (RAID) for drive failure protection and performance enhancements
  • All solutions receive regular updates to their security, features and services
  • All recommended NAS drives can connect and synchronize with cloud services (Google Drive, DropBox, OneDrive, etc), as well as Business/Enterprise services such as AWS, Azure, Backblaze and more
  • All NAS solutions (regardless of brand) feature the ability to host a shared drive on your PC/Mobile/Laptop systems that are synchronized with the NAS via the network/internet, but is shown in your native operating system file manager (i.e Mac Finder or Windows Explorer)
  • All the NAS solutions listed can be accessed DIRECTLY via an ethernet/network cable being connected from your PC/Mac system, to the NAS RJ45 port for 100MB/s and higher connectivity
  • All the best NAS solutions (regardless of brand) feature backup and sync tools that can be installed on your local client computer and allow regular backups of your files and system data

So, make sure that if you are looking at a NAS solution that is NOT recommended below, that it includes all of the above as these are some of the clearest areas that brands all too often cut orders to produce cheaper by ultimately inferior NAS servers for home and business. So, let’s discuss the very best Surveillance NAS to buy now in 2022/2023.


Best All Round Surveillance NAS Drive – QNAP TS-453E NAS

0-88TB, 8 Surveillance Camera Licenses, 40x Camera Max, M.2 Google TPU Support for AI Services, USB Camera Support,KVM Support, 2x M.2 Gen 3 NVMe 2280, Intel J6412 Celeron CPU, 8GB Memory, 2x 2.5Gbe Port, 3yr Warranty

Current Price/Availability on Amazon – $599

Hardware Review – LINK

YouTube Video Review – Watch

What I said in my review Aug ’22:

The QNAP TS-453E NAS is a device that really grew on me! With these home/business server companies releasing refreshes of their ranges every 2-2.5yrs or so, it is easy to see them fall into repetitive patterns when it comes to how the hardware is picked at each tier/price-point. The TS-453E NAS on the other hand manages to carve a new tier into the brand’s portfolio right now in 2022, managing to give you some really solid internal/external hardware that most would have assumed would be half of what it is at this level of QNAP’s 4-bay portfolio (i.e Quad-Core, 8GB, NVMe M.2s, 2.5GbE, 10G USB, 3yr warranty, etc) and it will certainly make some buyers wonder about whether the current Prosumer/flagship TS-464 is as necessary to their home or office as they once thought.

Click to view slideshow.

The fixed memory, even at 8GB default, is rather annoying and a lack of PCIe slot means that 10GbE will remain out of reach – but look at this NAS sandwiched between the TS-451D2 & TS-464 and it makes alot of sense. This is for those not really looking at expandability years from now and although that plastic case still looks a little dated/cheap, this is not a device designed to be noticed day-to-day. For those looking to make their first tentative entry into the world of NAS a decent one or looking to upgrade cautiously from an ARM system, the QNAP TS-453E is an excellent shout!

SOFTWARE - 8/10
HARDWARE - 10/10
PERFORMANCE - 9/10
PRICE - 8/10
VALUE - 9/10


8.8
PROS
👍🏻Exceptional CPU choice for the Scale/Tier
👍🏻8GB of DDR4 Memory
👍🏻2.5GbE (x2) Ports on Day 1
👍🏻Two USB 3.2 Gen 2 (10Gb/s) Ports!
👍🏻2x M.2 NVMe Slots alongside those 4x SATA Bays for Storage (Caching, Tiered Storage or standalone Pools)
👍🏻Includes VM, Surveillance (8 licenses and upto 32 Cams), Backup, Sync, Multimedia, SaaS sync/migration and office tools (some with added AI services)
👍🏻3-Year Warranty (Can be extended)
👍🏻VERY Compact, low-impact design
👍🏻Supports 1-2x Expansions
👍🏻20TB and 22TB Confirmed Compatibility
CONS
👎🏻Memory Cannot be Upgraded
👎🏻M.2 NVMe SSD Slots are Gen 3 x2
👎🏻Chassis is still a little dated looking

 


Most Powerful Surveillance NAS System – Synology DVA3221 NAS

0-88TB, 4-Bays, Intel C3538 4-Core CPU,  4-32GB ECC Memory, 4x 1Gb Ports, NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1650, 3yr Warranty, 8 Camera License included, 

Current Price/Availability on Amazon – $2000+

Hardware Review – LINK

YouTube Video Review – Watch

What I said in my review Nov ’20:

The Synology DVA3221 is a NAS that when I heard it could be used as a surveillance station NAS and a Diskstation NAS made me very happy indeed. However, now with the benefit of hindsight, I can see that this compromise in dedicated surveillance use has led to some choices (the CPU and lack of HDMI/DVI + KVM output) that in many ways limit its complete potential. I have no hesitation in saying this is the very best and most capable surveillance NAS that Synology has ever produced, and once you take into account the inclusion of that graphics card and 8 camera licences for surveillance station, the price can even be justified for the most part. What it comes down to is whether you desperately need these features and don’t mind paying more now to save lots later. A year from now Synology might allow users to install their own graphics cards or will find a way to introduce some deep video analysis features onto non-GPU NAS – of this there is no guarantee, but if you need these features in 2020/2021, this is the best NAS you can get right now. The DVA3221 NVR NAS features familiar internal hardware in terms of CPU and available memory. Arriving with the Intel C3538 Atom CPU, this quad-core processor with a 2.1 GHz clock speed has already proven on several occasions to be a highly capable processor for everything from surveillance to virtual machines and multimedia use in the likes of the DS1819+ and DS1618+. I know it is not the most popular processor in the market right now since Synology has moved their SMB devices towards the Ryzen-embedded V1500B, but Synology has spent quite a few years working with this CPU family and has optimised the hell out of it for the DSM platform. Though it’s the support of 4K is less than other Celeron and Pentium processors right now, it is still a CPU with a tremendous amount of potential still left in it.

Once again, they could have opened the door to a more capable processor such as the Intel Xeon found in the DS1621xs+, but this would have only served to increase the base price point of the DVA3221 again. This CPU is further supported with 8GB of DDR4 memory, that can be upgraded all the way to an impressive 32GB of memory. Additionally, this memory is Error Code Correction (ECC) memory, which is especially attractive to business users and (in the case of an NVR solution) is another layer of protection from data failure to have. If you intend to use the DVA3221 to its full potential, it is recommended that you increase the base memory of this device to at least 16GB, as although the memory on the graphics card provides great real-time analytics and analysis of captured footage, the standard memory of the NAS is still going to be tremendously important for the typical running of this device.
SOFTWARE - 10/10
HARDWARE - 7/10
PERFORMANCE - 8/10
PRICE - 8/10
VALUE - 7/10


8.0
PROS
👍🏻Affordable Alternative to the DVA3221
👍🏻Real-Time AI Camera recording saves hundreds of man-hours
👍🏻Uses CPU Integrated Gfx, using less power than a separate Graphics Card
👍🏻8 Camera Licenses included (worth around £300)
👍🏻BTRFS and SHR Support
👍🏻Great Surveillance Person/Thing tracking
👍🏻Intelligent Motion Tracking
👍🏻Intelligent Counting and Border Control
👍🏻Additional Deep Video Analysis Options
👍🏻KVM Support over a 4K 60FPS HDMI
👍🏻Synology Recently released first-party cameras!
CONS
👎🏻ONLY 6GB Max Memory
👎🏻Quite expensive for a 2-Bay NAS and not expandable
👎🏻The CPU is a little disappointing for 2022
👎🏻No m.2 slots and only 1 LAN

Surveillance Station DVA1622 DVA3221
Video Analysis Deep Video Analytics Features
  • People and vehicle detection (with license plate recognition)
  • People counting
  • Vehicle counting
  • Intrusion detection
  • Face recognition
  • People and vehicle detection (with license plate recognition)
  • People counting
  • Vehicle counting
  • Intrusion detection
  • Face recognition
Deep Video Analytics Tasks
  • People and vehicle detection (with license plate recognition): up to 2 tasks
  • People counting: up to 2 tasks
  • Vehicle counting: up to 2 tasks
  • Intrusion detection (detecting specific objects): up to 2 tasks
  • Face recognition: up to 1 task
  • People and vehicle detection (without license plate recognition): up to 12 tasks
  • People and vehicle detection (with license plate recognition): up to 6 tasks
  • People counting: up to 12 tasks
  • Vehicle counting: up to 12 tasks
  • Intrusion detection (detecting specific objects): up to 12 tasks
  • Intrusion detection (detecting all objects): up to 6 tasks
  • Face recognition: up to 6 tasks

Best Affordable AI Surveillance System NAS  – Synology DVA1622 NAS

0-44TB, 2-Bays, Intel Celeron J4125 4-Core CPU, 4-32GB ECC Memory, 1x 1Gb Ports, Uses Integrated Graphics for AI Processes, 3yr Warranty, 8 Camera License included, 16 CAMS Max

Current Price/Availability on Amazon – $599

Hardware Review – (Coming Soon)

YouTube Video Review – (Coming Soon, Hardware Overview HERE)

Synology NVR DVA1622 is a 2-bay desktop recording server that gives home and small business users access to fast, smart, and accurate video surveillance powered by deep learning-based algorithms. Built-in automated event detection helps safeguard properties by detecting people, vehicles, or objects and alerting staff when self-configured rules or thresholds are breached

Click to view slideshow.

Complete Surveillance Solution With Built-in AI Capabilities
The DVA1622 makes powerful AI-enabled surveillance available for everyone in a compact solution that includes everything you need to create an efficient surveillance system.

  • Cover all angles: Record and manage up to 16 IP camera feeds
  • Leverage deep learning: Run 2 simultaneous real-time video analysis processes or 1 facial recognition task
  • Licenses included: Add up to 8 IP cameras without purchasing additional licenses
  • Direct video output: Simply plug a monitor into the built-in HDMI port to watch surveillance feeds without a separate PC or mobile device
  • Local management: Set up, manage, and control your deployment locally by attaching a keyboard and mouse
SOFTWARE - 10/10
HARDWARE - 7/10
PERFORMANCE - 8/10
PRICE - 8/10
VALUE - 7/10


8.0
PROS
👍🏻Affordable Alternative to the DVA3221
👍🏻Real-Time AI Camera recording saves hundreds of man-hours
👍🏻Uses CPU Integrated Gfx, using less power than a separate Graphics Card
👍🏻8 Camera Licenses included (worth around £300)
👍🏻BTRFS and SHR Support
👍🏻Great Surveillance Person/Thing tracking
👍🏻Intelligent Motion Tracking
👍🏻Intelligent Counting and Border Control
👍🏻Additional Deep Video Analysis Options
👍🏻KVM Support over a 4K 60FPS HDMI
👍🏻Synology Recently released first-party cameras!
CONS
👎🏻ONLY 6GB Max Memory
👎🏻Quite expensive for a 2-Bay NAS and not expandable
👎🏻The CPU is a little disappointing for 2022
👎🏻No m.2 slots and only 1 LAN

 


 


Where to Buy a Product
amzamexmaestrovisamaster 24Hfree delreturn VISIT RETAILER ➤ 
amzamexmaestrovisamaster 24Hfree delreturn VISIT RETAILER ➤

Need More Help Choosing the right NAS?

Choosing the right data storage solution for your needs can be very intimidating and it’s never too late to ask for help. With options ranging from NAS to DAS, Thunderbolt to SAS and connecting everything up so you can access all your lovely data at the touch of a button can be a lot simpler than you think. If you want some tips, guidance or help with everything from compatibility to suitability of a solution for you, why not drop me a message below and I will get back to you as soon as possible with what you should go for, its suitability and the best place to get it. This service is designed without profit in mind and in order to help you with your data storage needs, so I will try to answer your questions as soon as possible. Just enter in a few details of your setup, storage requirements and (in the case of buying a new solution) your budget – then me and Eddie the Web guy can help you with your question. This is a completely free service, is NOT provided with profit in mind and is manned by two humans (no bots, no automated replies, etc). Assistance might take an extra day or two (the service gets a lot of visitors) but we do try to answer every message. If you want to support this service, you can find out how to donate HERE. Otherwise, you can still just message us for free advice anyway!

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This description contains links to Amazon. These links will take you to some of the products mentioned in today's content. As an Amazon Associate, I earn from qualifying purchases. Visit the NASCompares Deal Finder to find the best place to buy this device in your region, based on Service, Support and Reputation - Just Search for your NAS Drive in the Box Below

Need Advice on Data Storage from an Expert?

We want to keep the free advice on NASCompares FREE for as long as we can. Since this service started back in Jan '18, We have helped hundreds of users every month solve their storage woes, but we can only continue to do this with your support. So please do choose to buy at Amazon US and Amazon UK on the articles when buying to provide advert revenue support or to donate/support the site below. Finally, for free advice about your setup, just leave a message in the comments below here at NASCompares.com and we will get back to you. Need Help? Where possible (and where appropriate) please provide as much information about your requirements, as then I can arrange the best answer and solution to your needs. Do not worry about your e-mail address being required, it will NOT be used in a mailing list and will NOT be used in any way other than to respond to your enquiry. [contact-form-7]  

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    Terms and Conditions Alternatively, why not ask me on the ASK NASCompares forum, by clicking the button below. This is a community hub that serves as a place that I can answer your question, chew the fat, share new release information and even get corrections posted. I will always get around to answering ALL queries, but as a one-man operation, I cannot promise speed! So by sharing your query in the ASK NASCompares section below, you can get a better range of solutions and suggestions, alongside my own.  

Thank You for Supporting NASCompares in 2022

24 décembre 2022 à 18:00

A Sincere THANK YOU from NASCompares!

As 2022 draws to a close and many of us prepare to spend some long overdue time with our families and friends, myself* and Eddie the web guy wanted to take this opportunity to thank you from the bottom of our I.T enthused hearts for taking the time to watch, read or just simply share our content in 2022!

A HUGE reason that we were able to do as much as we could this year was thanks to those ‘go the extra mile’ users who chose to donate and support NASCompares (Unsubtle plug, I know). I need to stress, this is NOT an email intended to drum up more donations or an effort to promote our channel or services further (especially if you have already donated, as it would be rather ‘preaching to the choir’ a bit). No, this email is to sincerely thank you for supporting us by taking the time to donate and support our YouTube and Website – whether it was via donating, or simply choosing not to skip an ad on YouTube or visiting the site with your Ad-Blocker off/low. This year we have published 335 videos, produced 195 Articles & Guides, created 381 Comparisons and News Pages and helped 3,580 users in our free advice section & forum, and it simply would not have been possible without heroes like you! Your donations or Ad revenue went into purchasing new equipment for our studio for better sound, better video production quality, and better testing equipment leading to us slowly but surely revisiting all of our older-gen videos to update them to the latest setup.

Thanks to your donations and support, we were able to fully explore the following new subjects on NASCompares this year:

  • TrueNAS Core and TrueNAS Scale
  • UnRaid Installations and how-to guides coming in 2023
  • Deeper coverage of 4K Multimedia on NAS
  • Expand into the topic of NAS Security and Safety
  • Coverage and Testing of Mammoth 20TB and 22TB Hard Drives
  • Start our ‘Data News of the Week’ weekly news round-up (returning in 2023 after a pause during a slew of new releases this Autumn/Winter)
  • Exploration of the subject of the Energy Cost of NAS and the TCO you need to know
  • Extensive PCIe Gen 4 SSD Coverage and Testing
  • Deeper and Meetier Software Reviews (spanning hours in length)
  • Thunderbolt 4 and USB 4 Hardware and Performance Testing (Big series on this coming in Jan)
  • Deeper focus into Routers, as well as exploring WiFi 6E and the 5.9Ghz Band
  • Purchase of a toy seagull for when the anger builds up
  • Updating our buyers guides, as well as introducing whole new brands and subjects for new ones
  • Improving the quality and quantity of our content on Surveillance cameras
  • A wide range of web tools developed by Eddie to assist users in finding the best Price per TB drive for their needs, the most efficient Energy Cost and Performance Scaling

Let me reiterate, we do not receive any financial subsidy from the brands we cover to facilitate the content we make (with the exception of a recent WD campaign to promote 10yrs of WD Red, which went towards a server upgrade) as this allows us to be independent of outside influence. Sadly, this does mean that the majority of hardware that is unable to be provided by the brand for hands-off-review collaboration, we have to purchase ourselves. This is why we are so fantastically grateful that you took the time to support us and further support our passion for this subject. So, thank you for being incredible and we look forward to keeping you informed, assisted and entertained (ok, that one might be pushing it) in 2023!

Of course, it would be remiss not to thank everyone who went that extra step and donated to NASCompares. You could have watched the videos, let the ad at the start do its thing, leave an ad playing on the blog whilst you read – just trust the ads to support the content. You could have done that and that’s fine and dandy. But you went the extra mile! You donated to us (whether through the advice section or just point-to-point on Paypal) and that money went directly into making content. An ENORMOUS thank you to the following people who supported us this year (whether it was just a $1 or those of you that actually spent time calculating the value of the advice/support you received and donated much more – John in Sweden!). Below is the roll call of NASCompares supporting heroes!

THANK YOU TO THE FOLLOWING PEOPLE FOR SUPPORTING US WITH YOUR DONATIONS here on KoFi or via YouTube!

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*one for the objective pronoun fans…

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This description contains links to Amazon. These links will take you to some of the products mentioned in today's content. As an Amazon Associate, I earn from qualifying purchases. Visit the NASCompares Deal Finder to find the best place to buy this device in your region, based on Service, Support and Reputation - Just Search for your NAS Drive in the Box Below

Need Advice on Data Storage from an Expert?

We want to keep the free advice on NASCompares FREE for as long as we can. Since this service started back in Jan '18, We have helped hundreds of users every month solve their storage woes, but we can only continue to do this with your support. So please do choose to buy at Amazon US and Amazon UK on the articles when buying to provide advert revenue support or to donate/support the site below. Finally, for free advice about your setup, just leave a message in the comments below here at NASCompares.com and we will get back to you. Need Help? Where possible (and where appropriate) please provide as much information about your requirements, as then I can arrange the best answer and solution to your needs. Do not worry about your e-mail address being required, it will NOT be used in a mailing list and will NOT be used in any way other than to respond to your enquiry. [contact-form-7]  

Support What We Do


support what we do
    Terms and Conditions Alternatively, why not ask me on the ASK NASCompares forum, by clicking the button below. This is a community hub that serves as a place that I can answer your question, chew the fat, share new release information and even get corrections posted. I will always get around to answering ALL queries, but as a one-man operation, I cannot promise speed! So by sharing your query in the ASK NASCompares section below, you can get a better range of solutions and suggestions, alongside my own.  

Best 8-Bay NAS Drive – 2022/2023

23 décembre 2022 à 18:00

A Guide to the Best 8-Bay NAS Drives to Buy Right Now

If you have been looking at getting a NAS for your business, then I think it is safe to say that 8-Bay is where things get SERIOUS. Up until this point, most NAS system can typically fall into home use, budget use, small business and effective storage for a small group of users and their data. However, 8 drive (hard drive or SSD) NAS systems are where you start to see the NAS brands flex their muscles a bit. 8-Bays have typically been the jumping-off point from Desktop to Rackmount servers (slightly less so in recent years admittedly), thanks to the larger degree of storage on offer allowing greater performance, capacity and redundancy – So you start to see hardware appearing inside/outside that can greatly enhance the system’s utility. Features such as 10-gigabit ethernet, Xeon processors, considerably more memory and ultimately a system that can support a much wider number of users and processes than the systems that came before it. NAS brands very early on championed the inclusion of 8-Bay desktop servers in their portfolios, recognizing the need for a desktop server for compact deployment that could challenge the traditionally high power of rackmount solutions, so there are ALOT of different 8-Bay NAS systems on the market to choose from – all with their own distinct hardware and software capabilities, yet all at comparable pricing. Today I want to highlight to you the best three 8-Bay NAS to buy in 2022 and 2023 out of the hundreds (maybe even thousands) that are currently available on the market. These are systems that I choose, based on their value, scalability and overall power. Let’s begin.

What Have All the Best 8-Bay NAS Drives Have in Common?

It is worth remembering that although there are ALOT of different 8-Bay NAS drives available to buy, they are by no means created equal! With numerous super-budget brands popping up online, it can be tempting to consider these alongside the premium NAS brands. However, all too often they offer solutions righty seem ‘too good to be true’ and then are gone from the web before your warranty even gets cold! So, whether you are looking at the three best 8-Bay solutions that I am recommending below OR are looking at another 8-Bay NAS you saw on offer/recommended elsewhere – the best NAS system ALWAYS includes the following software and services:

  • Combined Hardware & Software Solution – That means that you are buying the hardware, but it ALSO includes a web browser GUI, mobile apps and desktop client apps (including backup, media, streaming, surveillance and file management software)
  • All NAS systems in this guide are compatible with (and can be accessed by) Windows, Mac, Android and Linux operating systems
  • All NAS Solutions arrive with between 2-3 years Warranty (with the option to extend to 5 years)
  • All NAS drives can be accessed locally over the network, as well as secure remote access is possible with brand-supported services (at no additional cost)
  • The most modern and regularly updated NAS systems will support the very latest 20TB NAS hard drives (such as the Seagate Ironwolf 22TB and WD Red 22TB)
  • All the recommended solutions support multiple drive configurations (RAID) for drive failure protection and performance enhancements
  • All solutions receive regular updates to their security, features and services
  • All recommended NAS drives can connect and synchronize with cloud services (Google Drive, DropBox, OneDrive, etc), as well as Business/Enterprise services such as AWS, Azure, Backblaze and more
  • All NAS solutions (regardless of brand) feature the ability to host a shared drive on your PC/Mobile/Laptop systems that are synchronized with the NAS via the network/internet, but is shown in your native operating system file manager (i.e Mac Finder or Windows Explorer)
  • All the NAS solutions listed can be accessed DIRECTLY via an ethernet/network cable being connected from your PC/Mac system, to the NAS RJ45 port for 100MB/s and higher connectivity
  • All the best NAS solutions (regardless of brand) feature backup and sync tools that can be installed on your local client computer and allow regular backups of your files and system data

So, make sure that if you are looking at a NAS solution that is NOT recommended below, that it includes all of the above as these are some of the clearest areas that brands all too often cut orders to produce cheaper by ultimately inferior NAS servers for home and business. So, let’s discuss the very best 8-Bay NAS to buy now in 2022/2023.


Best All Round 8-Bay NAS Drive – Synology DS1821+ NAS

0-176TB, 8-Bays, 2x NVMe Cache Bays, Quad-Core Ryzen V1500B 2.2Ghz CPU, 4-32GB DDR4 ECC Memory, 4x 1Gbe Port, 1x PCIe 3×8 Upgrade Slot, 5yr Warranty

Current Price/Availability on Amazon – $1099

Hardware Review – LINK

YouTube Video Review – Watch

What I said in my review Dec ’20:

What you have here is a solid piece of hardware that very much lives up to everything Synology promises, even if some of those promises aren’t to everyone’s taste. With a hardware architecture that we have already tested to notable success in the DS1621+ previously, we already knew that this NAS would be able to do everything it promised. Many users looking to spend their annual business budgets on an improved or extended data storage solution will find the balanced position of hardware vs software found by the Synology DS1821+ to be quite desirable, as well as the scaled potential to upgrade external performance via PCIe and storage via eSATA. However, there is no ignoring that despite the fact this 2020 release excels in many things, it also arrives with a little bottlenecking in a number of others. The continued default utilisation of 1Gbe on the newest generation by Synology is somewhat perplexing and although I have continued admiration for Synology’s engagement with intelligent M2 NVMe cache utilisation and providing a solution that allows more flexible upgrade paths, I know that there are still users who just wish they could use that super fast NAND for raw storage pools and have better than gigabit connections out by default.

Click to view slideshow.

It has never been a secret that buying a Synology NAS solution was always a largely ‘software over hardware’ purchase, and the DS1821+ is still a fine example of that balance. However, with other brands closing the gap in what they can offer the SMB (Small/Medium Business) user, while still providing superior hardware and similar warranty coverage, there is the tiniest feeling that the DS1821+ is a NAS that sits on its laurels a bit. Hugely upgradable and still with that award-winning and fantastically intuative DSM software, the DS1821+ is about buying a solution you can adapt within its lifespan and not one that will knock your socks off on day one. A solid and dependable data storage solution, if a little safe, at the end of 2020.

SOFTWARE - 8/10
HARDWARE - 8/10
PERFORMANCE - 8/10
PRICE - 8/10
VALUE - 8/10


8.0
PROS
👍🏻Desktop Ryzen Powered Solution
👍🏻Dual NVMe M.2 cache
👍🏻PCIe Gen 3 x8 PCIe Equipped
👍🏻Great RAID Options (inc SHR)
👍🏻Excellent choice of Apps
👍🏻DDR4 ECC Memory up to 32GB
👍🏻Numerous Backup Software Options
👍🏻Huge Virtualization Support
👍🏻3yr Warranty and Extendable to 5yrs
CONS
👎🏻1Gbe Ports seem a bit limited now
👎🏻Shame it does not support 1/2 x DX1215
👎🏻NVMe SSDs cannot be used for RAW storage

 


Most Powerful 8-Bay NAS Drive – QNAP TVS-h874 NAS

0-176TB, 8-Bays, 2x PCIe 4 M.2 NVMe 2280, PCIe Gen 4×16 Upgrade Slot, Intel Core 12th Gen i5/i7/i9 CPU, 16-64GB DDR4 Memory, 2.5Gbe Port, 10Gb x2 Prots (Intel i9 Version), KVM, ZFS or EXT4 Setup, 3-5yr Warranty

Current Price/Availability on Amazon – $2000-2500-3000

Hardware Review – LINK

YouTube Video Review – Watch

What I said in my review Dec ’22:

The QNAP TVS-h874 NAS is easily one of the most hardware-capable desktop NAS systems that I have ever seen (as you would expect for £2500+) and has clearly been designed with phenomenal future proofing in mind! If you are concerned about the longevity of this NAS, this hardware architecture will still be top tier 5 years from now, with the added support of PCIe 4 meaning that high capacity and performing micro upgrades throughout its life also ensuring it remains relevant long after. It’s price tag clearly moves this purchase out of the home and squarely into the business market (though likely those that take their media seriously will add it to the cart) and the TVS-h874 will function as a solid solution for Video editing (even at 8K), high frequency and performing VMs, large scale AI powered Surveillance setup, hybrid cloud/on-prem alternative to Office 365/Google Workspace services and as the center point for all your data storage operations. Crucially though, it is that the hardware on offer here will be able to do ALL of these at the same time, therefore maximising the investment for most businesses that want to move aware from their cloud dependant ops. In terms of software,t things are a little less absolute, with QTS and QuTS still getting a little busy at times, with a steeper learning curve than its big rival DSM from Synology. That said, die-hard fans of ZFS (Zettabyte File System) will adore the inclusion of benefits in RAID handling, management and recovery that are exclusive to that platform, whilst enjoying the wide range of applications and service benefits in QuTS that are often restricted to Linux platforms.

Click to view slideshow.

The slightly conveluded approach to release hardware that does complicate the selection process (different CPUs in the Intel 12th Gen family changing the rest of the system architecture) is something that I hoped this brand would graduate from (for the sake of simplicity), but for many, this level of choice in hardware and budget will be welcome. As is QNAP’s position on the support of 3rd party hardware (drives, PCIe upgrades, etc) and software, something that we have seen a worrying trend in the last few years against elsewhere in the industry but some other brands, to err towards 1st party/proprietary compatibility more and more. There are still lingering doubts by some on the security of NAS, with ransomware attacks on the rise and ALL brands and ALL platforms being targetted (NAS, Cloud ,etc), finding a middle ground between ease of use and depth of security being a tricky tie rope walk indeed. The TVS-h874 arrives with a wide range of Day 1 tools, further rigid defaults in QTS/QuTS in 2022/2023, considerable security settings to configure and multiple system scan tools for recommendations & preventative measures available. The QNAP TVS-h874 is probably the most powerful desktop/tower NAS drive I have ever reviewed and if you are looking for a system that can legitimately do anything server-side, but you are also willing to put in the time to configure it correctly – you will genuinely be hard pushed to find a better system in 2022, 2023 and likely 2024 at this price point and scale.

SOFTWARE - 8/10
HARDWARE - 10/10
PERFORMANCE - 10/10
PRICE - 8/10
VALUE - 9/10


9.0
PROS
👍🏻First Commercial Intel Core 12th Gen i5, i7 and i9 NAS Drive
👍🏻Upto 20 Cores, 24 Threads and High End Integrated Graphics
👍🏻PCIe Gen 4 x16 Upgrade Slot for 10/25/100GbE Cards and 2x PCIe Gen 4 x4 M.2 NVMe Slots for 7GB SSDs
👍🏻No Obstinant 3rd Party Hardware Limitations on Support or Compatibility
👍🏻Much larger support of 3rd Party Software Services than most other NAS Brands
👍🏻10Gb/s USB Connectivity, in Type A and Type C
👍🏻Upto 64GB of Memory and Potential for 128GB
👍🏻ZFS or EXT 4 File System Choice
👍🏻M.2 NVMe SSD Bays can be used for Storage or Caching
👍🏻Volume Encryption, SED SSD Support and WORM
👍🏻Enhanced AI Surveillance Services, with opt to upgrade with $30 Google TPU
👍🏻AI Photo Management Tool (QuMagie) Includes Thing Recognition and works offline
👍🏻ALL the ZFS Benefits, whilst also the GUI and App benefits of a Linux Software Platform in one
CONS
👎🏻Available Versions/Configs of the 4/6/8-Bay are confusing
👎🏻QVR Elite (not QVR Pro) only has 2 Cam Licences
👎🏻HDMI Output is 1.4b
👎🏻10Gbe is ONLY included with the most expensive Intel i9 Model
👎🏻Noisy when in operation when fully populated
👎🏻Too Many licenses on Enterprise Tools (Drive Analyzer, Face Tiger, etc) with too few free licenses

 


Best Value Hardware 8-Bay NAS Drive – Terramaster T9-423 NAS

0-198TB, 9-Bays, 1x PCIe Gen 3 M.2 NVMe 2280, Intel Celeron N5105 Quad Core CPU, 8-32GB Memory, 2x 2.5GbE Port, 2yr Warranty

Current Price/Availability on Amazon – $999

Hardware Review – LINK

YouTube Video Review – Watch

What I said in my review April ’22:

I like the terramaster T9-423 NAS a lot more than I thought I was going to! Over the years I have seen several quirky NAS designs appear from brands looking to find gaps in the existing market between the traditional 2-bay, 4-bay, 8-bay and rackmount systems. In most cases, these brands tend to never really hit the ground running with these systems and a lot of that is because they are either priced poorly, have bad internal hardware choices for the sake of offsetting the overall cost of a new design or simply do not read the room in knowing what people want. I’m pleased to say that the Terramaster T9-423 does not seem to suffer any of these things. This 9-Bay arrives in a chassis that is a smaller and more convenient frame than many eight-bay desktops, arrives at a price point that for the scale is reasonable and has the same or better hardware than most other mid-range desktop NAS in 2022. Alongside this, Terramaster’s innovations in TOS5 to improve their platform to include many more storage services, backup methods and a few premium apps in the works means that the brand still manages to be competitive in spite of its more cost-effective reputation and hardware focus.

Click to view slideshow.

First-party app development still pales in comparison to bigger NAS brands (though popular third-party tools that already exist in the market are supported and available to download) and in terms of software, this system is still a little underwhelming, if very functional. Then you have the build quality. The construction of this chassis is particularly higher than I anticipated and unlike many of the brand’s rather dated or plastic-looking cases in 2 and 4 bays, The T9-423 is remarkably well constructed with excellent considerations being made to ventilation and keeping the device compact despite its large storage potential. As long as you keep in mind that you are buying a more cost-effective or value alternative to top-tier brands, as well as having perhaps a little more patience with the software than you might like, the Terramaster T9-423 is a great NAS and an exceedingly positive move by the brand to further evolve.

SOFTWARE - 7/10
HARDWARE - 9/10
PERFORMANCE - 9/10
PRICE - 9/10
VALUE - 9/10


8.6
PROS
👍🏻Surprisingly compact for 9 Bays of Storage
👍🏻Good Middle ground between a Rackmount and Desktop System
👍🏻2.5GbE at the Price of 1GbE
👍🏻Good CPU for the Price Point
👍🏻USB 3.2 Gen 2 is very forward-thinking for local backups
👍🏻Great RAID Options
👍🏻Snapshot Replication
👍🏻BTRFS Support if preferred
👍🏻Supports Plex and all 1080p Transcoding
👍🏻4K Video transcoding natively
👍🏻A large amount of maximum memory supported (16-32GB – TBC)
👍🏻M.2 SSD Bay inside for caching/storage at PCIe Gen 3×2
CONS
👎🏻Only 1x M.2 NVMe SSD Bay
👎🏻Default 4GB memory is 2133Mhz
👎🏻HDMI Currently Unsupported
👎🏻TOS Software feels a little empty of Killer-Apps at the moment (as the AI photo recognition, Surveillance, Centralized Backup tools, etc are still in Beta)


Where to Buy a Product
amzamexmaestrovisamaster 24Hfree delreturn VISIT RETAILER ➤ 
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Need More Help Choosing the right NAS?

Choosing the right data storage solution for your needs can be very intimidating and it’s never too late to ask for help. With options ranging from NAS to DAS, Thunderbolt to SAS and connecting everything up so you can access all your lovely data at the touch of a button can be a lot simpler than you think. If you want some tips, guidance or help with everything from compatibility to suitability of a solution for you, why not drop me a message below and I will get back to you as soon as possible with what you should go for, its suitability and the best place to get it. This service is designed without profit in mind and in order to help you with your data storage needs, so I will try to answer your questions as soon as possible. Just enter in a few details of your setup, storage requirements and (in the case of buying a new solution) your budget – then me and Eddie the Web guy can help you with your question. This is a completely free service, is NOT provided with profit in mind and is manned by two humans (no bots, no automated replies, etc). Assistance might take an extra day or two (the service gets a lot of visitors) but we do try to answer every message. If you want to support this service, you can find out how to donate HERE. Otherwise, you can still just message us for free advice anyway!

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This description contains links to Amazon. These links will take you to some of the products mentioned in today's content. As an Amazon Associate, I earn from qualifying purchases. Visit the NASCompares Deal Finder to find the best place to buy this device in your region, based on Service, Support and Reputation - Just Search for your NAS Drive in the Box Below

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We want to keep the free advice on NASCompares FREE for as long as we can. Since this service started back in Jan '18, We have helped hundreds of users every month solve their storage woes, but we can only continue to do this with your support. So please do choose to buy at Amazon US and Amazon UK on the articles when buying to provide advert revenue support or to donate/support the site below. Finally, for free advice about your setup, just leave a message in the comments below here at NASCompares.com and we will get back to you. Need Help? Where possible (and where appropriate) please provide as much information about your requirements, as then I can arrange the best answer and solution to your needs. Do not worry about your e-mail address being required, it will NOT be used in a mailing list and will NOT be used in any way other than to respond to your enquiry. [contact-form-7]  

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    Terms and Conditions Alternatively, why not ask me on the ASK NASCompares forum, by clicking the button below. This is a community hub that serves as a place that I can answer your question, chew the fat, share new release information and even get corrections posted. I will always get around to answering ALL queries, but as a one-man operation, I cannot promise speed! So by sharing your query in the ASK NASCompares section below, you can get a better range of solutions and suggestions, alongside my own.  

Best 2-Bay NAS of the Year – 2022/2023

6 décembre 2022 à 18:00

A Guide to the Best 2-Bay NAS Drives to Buy Right Now

When you are looking for a new data storage solution, chances are that in terms of cost vs storage, a 2 drive solution is pretty much a solid choice – especially for tech novices or those dipping their toes into owning their own server for the first time. If you can overcome the initial downfall of losing 50% of your storage space (RAID 1 over two hard drives), you can get some genuinely incredible 2 bay solutions in 2022, as well as many 2023 releases having already appeared. 2 Disk storage systems always held a rather wimpy reputation till about 2017/18, as it was assumed that because the system had limited capacity and throughput to work with, it would be a waste to make it powerful. Fast forward to now and the general standard of hardware that is equipped on some of the 2-Bay NAS released in the last year or so has escalated hugely, 10GbE support has appeared and add to that the fact that NAS hard drives (such as Seagate Ironwolf and WD Red) are now available in 20-22TB sizes, a 2 HDD NAS server is compact, powerful and hugely capacity enabled! So today I want to talk about the best 2-Bay NAS drives of the year and help you choose the right one for your home or business needs, covering the best for software, the best for hardware and the best for both. Let’s begin.

What Have All the Best 2-Bay NAS Drives Have in Common?

It is worth remembering that although there are ALOT of different 2-Bay NAS drives available to buy, they are by no means created equal! With numerous super-budget brands popping up online, it can be tempting to consider these alongside the premium NAS brands. However, all too often they offer solutions righty seem ‘too good to be true’ and then are gone from the web before your warranty even gets cold! So, whether you are looking at the three best 2-Bay solutions that I am recommending below OR are looking at another 2-Bay NAS you saw on offer/recommended elsewhere – the best NAS system ALWAYS includes the following software and services:

  • Combined Hardware & Software Solution – That means that you are buying the hardware, but it ALSO includes a web browser GUI, mobile apps and desktop client apps (including backup, media, streaming, surveillance and file management software)
  • All NAS systems in this guide are compatible with (and can be accessed by) Windows, Mac, Android and Linux operating systems
  • All NAS Solutions arrive with between 2-3 years Warranty (with the option to extend to 5 years)
  • All NAS drives can be accessed locally over the network, as well as secure remote access is possible with brand-supported services (at no additional cost)
  • The most modern and regularly updated NAS systems will support the very latest 20TB NAS hard drives (such as the Seagate Ironwofl 22TB and WD Red 22TB)
  • All the recommended solutions support multiple drive configurations (RAID) for drive failure protection and performance enhancements
  • All solutions receive regular updates to their security, features and services
  • All recommended NAS drives can connect and synchronize with cloud services (Google Drive, DropBox, OneDrive, etc), as well as Business/Enterprise services such as AWS, Azure, Backblaze and more
  • All NAS solutions (regardless of brand) feature the ability to host a shared drive on your PC/Mobile/Laptop systems that are synchronized with the NAS via the network/internet, but is shown in your native operating system file manager (i.e Mac Finder or Windows Explorer)
  • All the NAS solutions listed can be accessed DIRECTLY via an ethernet/network cable being connected from your PC/Mac system, to the NAS RJ45 port for 100MB/s and higher connectivity (higher in some cases)
  • All the best NAS solutions (regardless of brand) feature backup and sync tools that can be installed on your local client computer and allow regular backups of your files and system data

So, make sure that if you are looking at a NAS solution that is NOT recommended below, that it includes all of the above. As these are some of the clearest areas that brands all too often cut orders to produce cheaper by ultimately inferior NAS servers for home and business. So, let’s discuss the very best 2-Bay NAS to buy now in 2022/2023.

NoteORIGINALLY I would have put the QNAP TS-264 in this category, regretfully though, it is still unavailable at the time of writing, so it cannot be included. However, it would DEFINITELY deserve to be here and might even be the real ‘best all-round 2-Bay NAS.


Best All Round 2-Bay NAS Drive – QNAP TS-253E NAS

0-44TB, 2-Bays, 2x PCIe Gen 3×2 M.2 NVMe 2280, Intel Celeron J6412 CPU, 8GB Memory, 2x 2.5Gbe Port, USB 3.2 Gen 2 (10G), 1x HDMI 1.4b 4K 30FPS, 3-5yr Warranty

Current Price/Availability on Amazon – $509

Hardware Review – LINK

YouTube Video Review – Watch

What I said in my review Aug ’22 Review of the TS-453E (4-Bay Alternative):

The QNAP TS-453E NAS is a device that really grew on me! With these home/business server companies releasing refreshes of their ranges every 2-2.5yrs or so, it is easy to see them fall into repetitive patterns when it comes to how the hardware is picked at each tier/price-point. The TS-453E NAS on the other hand manages to carve a new tier into the brand’s portfolio right now in 2022, managing to give you some really solid internal/external hardware that most would have assumed would be half of what it is at this level of QNAP’s 4-bay portfolio (i.e Quad-Core, 8GB, NVMe M.2s, 2.5GbE, 10G USB, 3yr warranty, etc) and it will certainly make some buyers wonder about whether the current Prosumer/flagship TS-464 is as necessary to their home or office as they once thought.

Click to view slideshow.

The fixed memory, even at 8GB default, is rather annoying and a lack of PCIe slot means that 10GbE will remain out of reach – but look at this NAS sandwiched between the TS-451D2 & TS-464 and it makes alot of sense. This is for those not really looking at expandability years from now and although that plastic case still looks a little dated/cheap, this is not a device designed to be noticed day-to-day. For those looking to make their first tentative entry into the world of NAS a decent one or looking to upgrade cautiously from an ARM system, the QNAP TS-453E is an excellent shout!

SOFTWARE - 8/10
HARDWARE - 8/10
PERFORMANCE - 9/10
PRICE - 7/10
VALUE - 8/10


8.0
PROS
👍🏻Exceptional CPU choice for the Scale/Tier
👍🏻8GB of DDR4 Memory
👍🏻2.5GbE (x2) Ports on Day 1
👍🏻Two USB 3.2 Gen 2 (10Gb/s) Ports!
👍🏻2x M.2 NVMe Slots alongside those 4x SATA Bays for Storage (Caching, Tiered Storage or standalone Pools)
👍🏻Includes VM, Surveillance (8 licenses and upto 32 Cams), Backup, Sync, Multimedia, SaaS sync/migration and office tools (some with added AI services)
👍🏻3-Year Warranty (Can be extended)
👍🏻VERY Compact, low-impact design
👍🏻Supports 1-2x Expansions
👍🏻20TB and 22TB Confirmed Compatibility
CONS
👎🏻
👎🏻Memory Cannot be Upgraded
👎🏻M.2 NVMe SSD Slots are Gen 3 x2
👎🏻Chassis is still a little dated looking

 


Best Software 2-Bay NAS Drive – Synology DS720+ NAS

(Note – The Synology DS723+ NAS was first revealed unofficially in October ’22. This is the refresh to the Synology DS720+ NAS, but with a Ryzen Processor, ECC Memory and optional 10GbE upgrade. However, launch of that device looks like it will be Jan ’23)

0-44TB, 2-Bays, 2x PCIe Gen 2×4 M.2 NVMe 2280, Quad Core Intel Celeron J4125 CPU, 2-6GB DDR4 Memory, 2x 1Gbe Port, 3-5yr Warranty

Current Price/Availability on Amazon – $399

Hardware Review – LINK

YouTube Video Review – Watch

What I said in my review June ’20:

The Synology NAS brand is one that we have long associated with software as the KEY selling point. However, users these days know alot more about this kind of technology than ever before and Synology has clearly responded some ways better than others. The inclusion of NVMe SSD caching is absolutely something that I can get behind in a positive way! The standard of 1Gbe (x2 technically) is still a bit of a sore one and something many would have assumed would serve as a pricing/buying tier between the DS220+ vs DS720+ (also the DS420+ vs DS920+) but though 2.5Gbe is still in its infancy, it is growing trend that Synology will not ignore for much longer and perhaps something that will give more experienced users pause before clicking the ‘buy now’ button.

Click to view slideshow.

In practically EVERY OTHER WAY the DS720+ is a worthy successor to the DS718+, as well as easily earning the title of the best 2-Bay the biggest brand in modern NAS has ever put out. From its strengths in supporting DSM as one of the best software GUIs and platforms in the area of storage to its mould-breaking utilization of SSD caching in DSM 6.2 (with promised improves even more in DSM 7.0), the Synology DS720+ is a NAS drive that gives you ALOT of power and potential under the hood to help you enjoy your data, just know that it arrives with the tiniest bit of a network ‘glass-ceiling’ down the line.

SOFTWARE - 9/10
HARDWARE - 9/10
PERFORMANCE - 9/10
PRICE - 7/10
VALUE - 8/10


8.4
PROS
👍🏻Dual NVMe M.2 cache add-on
👍🏻Great RAID Options
👍🏻Excellent choice of Apps
👍🏻Snapshot Replication
👍🏻BTRFS and SHR
👍🏻Support Plex
👍🏻Virtualization
👍🏻4K Video transcoding
👍🏻Full Plex Transcoding
👍🏻Hot-Swap trays
👍🏻DLNA Compliant
👍🏻Expandable
CONS
👎🏻Only 1Gbe Ethernet ports
👎🏻No PCIe slots
👎🏻2GB Memory is a little low in the long term
👎🏻Only a single accessible Memory Bay

 


Best Value Hardware 2-Bay NAS Drive – Asustor Lockerstor 2 Gen2 NAS

0-44TB, 2-Bays, 4x PCIe Gen 3×2 M.2 NVMe 2280, Intel N5105 CPU 4-Core Integrated Gfx, 4-16GB DDR4 Memory, 2x 2.5Gbe Port, 1x HDMI 2.0b, 3-5yr Warranty

Current Price/Availability on Amazon – $399

Hardware Review – LINK

YouTube Video Review – Watch

What I said in my review Dec’22:

The Lockerstor 2 Gen 2 NAS is a respectable piece of kit! Indeed, the hardware here is almost faultless! Unless you are particularly noise sensitive (and therefore the metal chassis adding a few dBa to the ambient sound), there is almost nothing I can fault here on the devices hardware. The scaling up of practically all hardware over the Gen 1 Lockerstor, such as Better CPU, Better Memory that goes higher, HDMI 2.0b, USB 3.2 Gen 2, a 10GbE upgrade option and THOSE FOUR M. 2 NVMe SSD SLOTS – you simply cannot fault how much is getting included here at the price point vs it’s competitors. The software is a little less compelling, with a smaller range of 1st party applications on offer, more of a reliance on 3rd party services and the absence of a few AAA+ features that are present on other devices in the market (AI services, Cloud Bolt on live synchronization, 1st Party SaaS native sync with Google Workspace/Office365, etc).

Click to view slideshow.

That said, ADM does run very well, is clear and still quite user-friendly. The addition of a choice of file systems EXT4 or BTRFS, flexibility on the use of those M.2 NVMe SSD bays and the Asustor HDMI portal still bring fantastic flexibility to the Lockerstor 2 Gen 2 NAS too. Ultimately, this is a system that is clearly making big waves on it’s hardware more than it’s software, but as long as you keep your feet on the ground and appreciate that this system is more of a 70/30 purchase of hardware vs software, you will come to respect and rely on this Asustor NAS as the backbone of your data storage setup.

SOFTWARE - 8/10
HARDWARE - 9/10
PERFORMANCE - 8/10
PRICE - 8/10
VALUE - 8/10


8.2
PROS
👍🏻Hard/Impossible to find this level of NAS Hardware elsewhere at this price point
👍🏻Those FOUR M.2 NVMe 2280 SSD slots are great and turn this 2-Bay NAS into an 6-Bay
👍🏻2.5GbE by default, as well as the option to add further 2.5/5Gb connections over USB
👍🏻$45 increase over RRP of Lockstor Gen 1, but upgrades practically everything 1-2 levels (New Celeron CPU, Better/High Memory Max, USB 10G, HDMI 2.0b, PCIe Gen 3 Architecture)
👍🏻Includes support for either EXT4 or BTRFS
👍🏻Includes KVM Support with Parallel GUI over HDMI, Asustor Portal
👍🏻ADM is better than it has ever been, responsive, clear and intuitive
👍🏻Several different setup and initialization options
👍🏻Full Support of the traditional RAID levels
👍🏻Storage can be expanded with TWO of the Asustor AS6004U 4-Bay
CONS
👎🏻Lack of a fluid RAID System (such as Synology Hybrid RAID, Drobo BeyondRAID or Terramaster TRAID) to allow mixed drive media and easier scaling of storage over time
👎🏻Metal chassis and trays is going to result in an increase of ambient noise (hum/vibration) than other plastic casing/tray NAS systems
👎🏻Some apps (such as the Surveillance Center apps) are long overdue an update in visuals and services
👎🏻ADM is good, but lacks the killer apps/AAA and AI service tools that are being offered by other brands right now
👎🏻They were targeted by the Deadbolt ransomware attack at the start of 2022 and although the linux vulnerability that was used has been reported to be closed and they worked with affected users, this is still going to be on the minds of some buyers

Lowest Priced Plex 2-Bay NAS Drive – Terramaster F2-423 NAS

0-44TB, 2-Bays, 2x Gen 3 x1 M.2 NVMe 2280, Intel N5105 Celeron CPU Quad-Core Integrated Gfx CPU, 4-16GB Memory, 2x 2.5Gbe Port, USB 3.2 Gen 2 10G, 3yr Warranty

Current Price/Availability on Amazon – $389

Hardware Review – LINK

YouTube Video Review (4-Bay Review, but F2-423 Coming Very Soon) – Watch

What I said in my review May’22:

Terramaster still continues to be the most affordable fully-featured provider of the whole NAS market and although a number of their solutions have always felt a little rough around the edges, you always got the impression that you were getting a good deal for the hardware that was available from QNAP and Synology. Now in 2022/2023, the same continues to be true but in the F2-423 NAS’ case, you are actually getting some pretty top tier (for the Home/Prosumer) market at a price tag that is really tough to argue with. Terramaster has clearly been watching their bigger competitors and cherry-picked the features that people have been asking for (2.5GbE, USB 3.2 Gen 2, M.2 NVMe SSD bays, etc) for this new generation.

Click to view slideshow.

In terms of software, things are a little less convincing and although TOS 5 still continues to evolve into something genuinely fully featured and impressive, TOS 4 that the F2-423 includes at launch is usable (if unexciting) platform that provides the base level services that a new NAS user would want, but lacks killer apps that their competitors are offering right now (File Streaming, AI photo recognition, Surveillance, etc). Most of these ARE included in TOS5, but until it arrives much later in 2022 in a full release, the F2-423 feels like a powerful NAS that doesn’t have the software to show off its strengths yet. If you are reading this later in 2022 or 2023, this might well be irrelevant though, as the brand rolls out their bit firmware update to ALL Terramster NAS devices. Overall, I definitely CAN recommend the F2-423 NAS for its hardware, for Plex Media server or as an affordable multi-tier backup solution, but if you are looking for a NAS for more tailored data access or in a much more fully-featured package.

SOFTWARE - 7/10
HARDWARE - 9/10
PERFORMANCE - 8/10
PRICE - 9/10
VALUE - 9/10


8.4
PROS
👍🏻2.5GbE at the Price of 1GbE
👍🏻TRAID Flexible RAID is great stuff!
👍🏻Good CPU for the Price Point
👍🏻Supports Current 22TB HDDs from WD and Seagate
👍🏻VERY easy TrueNAS installation is possible
👍🏻USB 3.2 Gen 2 is very forward-thinking for local backups
👍🏻Great RAID Options
👍🏻Snapshot Replication
👍🏻BTRFS Support if preferred
👍🏻Supports Plex and all 1080p Transcoding
👍🏻4K Video transcoding natively
👍🏻A large amount of maximum memory supported (16-32GB - TBC)
👍🏻Includes two M.2 NVMe SSD Bays that can be used for storage or caching
CONS
👎🏻HDMI Currently Unsupported
👎🏻Although TOS 5 has seen some big improvements and more AAA+ apps and services added, it is still not as polished as DSM or QTS from their competitors

 


Where to Buy a Product
amzamexmaestrovisamaster 24Hfree delreturn VISIT RETAILER ➤ 
amzamexmaestrovisamaster 24Hfree delreturn VISIT RETAILER ➤

Need More Help Choosing the right NAS?

Choosing the right data storage solution for your needs can be very intimidating and it’s never too late to ask for help. With options ranging from NAS to DAS, Thunderbolt to SAS and connecting everything up so you can access all your lovely data at the touch of a button can be a lot simpler than you think. If you want some tips, guidance or help with everything from compatibility to suitability of a solution for you, why not drop me a message below and I will get back to you as soon as possible with what you should go for, its suitability and the best place to get it. This service is designed without profit in mind and in order to help you with your data storage needs, so I will try to answer your questions as soon as possible. Just enter in a few details of your setup, storage requirements and (in the case of buying a new solution) your budget – then me and Eddie the Web guy can help you with your question. This is a completely free service, is NOT provided with profit in mind and is manned by two humans (no bots, no automated replies, etc). Assistance might take an extra day or two (the service gets a lot of visitors) but we do try to answer every message. If you want to support this service, you can find out how to donate HERE. Otherwise, you can still just message us for free advice anyway!

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This description contains links to Amazon. These links will take you to some of the products mentioned in today's content. As an Amazon Associate, I earn from qualifying purchases. Visit the NASCompares Deal Finder to find the best place to buy this device in your region, based on Service, Support and Reputation - Just Search for your NAS Drive in the Box Below

Need Advice on Data Storage from an Expert?

We want to keep the free advice on NASCompares FREE for as long as we can. Since this service started back in Jan '18, We have helped hundreds of users every month solve their storage woes, but we can only continue to do this with your support. So please do choose to buy at Amazon US and Amazon UK on the articles when buying to provide advert revenue support or to donate/support the site below. Finally, for free advice about your setup, just leave a message in the comments below here at NASCompares.com and we will get back to you. Need Help? Where possible (and where appropriate) please provide as much information about your requirements, as then I can arrange the best answer and solution to your needs. Do not worry about your e-mail address being required, it will NOT be used in a mailing list and will NOT be used in any way other than to respond to your enquiry. [contact-form-7]  

Support What We Do


support what we do
    Terms and Conditions Alternatively, why not ask me on the ASK NASCompares forum, by clicking the button below. This is a community hub that serves as a place that I can answer your question, chew the fat, share new release information and even get corrections posted. I will always get around to answering ALL queries, but as a one-man operation, I cannot promise speed! So by sharing your query in the ASK NASCompares section below, you can get a better range of solutions and suggestions, alongside my own.  

Best 4-Bay NAS of the Year – 2022/2023

1 décembre 2022 à 16:00

A Guide to the Best 4-Bay NAS Drives to Buy Right Now

I think it would be fair to say that, when it comes to users who are making the jump professionally from Cloud to their own private server, the 4-Bay NAS market is often their first choice! Aside from the obvious benefits in capacity (NAS hard drives are now available at 22TB and 24TB is just around the corner) and redundancy (i.e safety nets), 4 disk servers tend to be where NAS brands introduce better hardware internally and externally. As NAS technology has improved year on year, the standard of the average prosumer/small-business 4-Bay NAS has increased quite substantially – all the while with the price point largely remaining the same at each tier (give or take a few %). So, today I want to discuss the very best 4-Bay NAS drives that you can buy right now at the end of 2022 and into 2023. I have reviewed hundreds of NAS devices in the last few years, and I can comfortably say that 2022/2023 has easily been the most competitive. We have seen the evolution of M.2 NVMe SSD use in these systems extending to caching and storage across all NAS brands, the continued growth of 2.5GbE, a new generation of processors arrive that open the doors to larger bandwidth internally and all the while, the software that all these devices arrive with become incredibly diverse and capable! So, let’s get down to it, what are the best 4-Bay NAS drives of 2022 and 2023? Let’s go.

What Have All the Best 4-Bay NAS Drives Have in Common?

It is worth remembering that although there are ALOT of different 4-Bay NAS drives available to buy, they are by no means created equal! With numerous super-budget brands popping up online, it can be tempting to consider these alongside the premium NAS brands. However, all too often they offer solutions righty seem ‘too good to be true’ and then are gone from the web before your warranty even gets cold! So, whether you are looking at the three best 4-Bay solutions that I am recommending below OR are looking at another 4-Bay NAS you saw on offer/recommended elsewhere – the best NAS system ALWAYS includes the following software and services:

  • Combined Hardware & Software Solution – That means that you are buying the hardware, but it ALSO includes a web browser GUI, mobile apps and desktop client apps (including backup, media, streaming, surveillance and file management software)
  • ALL the solutions in my top 4-Bay NAS of the year feature both SATA and M.2 NVMe SSD bays (an absolute must-have right now)
  • All NAS systems in this guide are compatible with (and can be accessed by) Windows, Mac, Android and Linux operating systems
  • All NAS Solutions arrive with between 2-3 years Warranty (with the option to extend to 5 years)
  • All NAS drives can be accessed locally over the network, as well as secure remote access is possible with brand-supported services (at no additional cost)
  • The most modern and regularly updated NAS systems will support the very latest 20TB NAS hard drives (such as the Seagate Ironwofl 22TB and WD Red 22TB)
  • All the recommended solutions support multiple drive configurations (RAID) for drive failure protection and performance enhancements
  • All solutions receive regular updates to their security, features and services
  • All recommended NAS drives can connect and synchronize with cloud services (Google Drive, DropBox, OneDrive, etc), as well as Business/Enterprise services such as AWS, Azure, Backblaze and more
  • All NAS solutions (regardless of brand) feature the ability to host a shared drive on your PC/Mobile/Laptop systems that are synchronized with the NAS via the network/internet, but is shown in your native operating system file manager (i.e Mac Finder or Windows Explorer)
  • All the NAS solutions listed can be accessed DIRECTLY via an ethernet/network cable being connected from your PC/Mac system, to the NAS RJ45 port for 100MB/s and higher connectivity
  • All the best NAS solutions (regardless of brand) feature backup and sync tools that can be installed on your local client computer and allow regular backups of your files and system data

So, make sure that if you are looking at a NAS solution that is NOT recommended below, that it includes all of the above. As these are some of the clearest areas that brands all too often cut orders to produce cheaper by ultimately inferior NAS servers for home and business. So, let’s discuss the very best 4-Bay NAS to buy now in 2022/2023.


Best All Round 4-Bay NAS Drive – QNAP TS-464 NAS

0-88TB, 4-Bays, 2x PCIe Gen 3×1 M.2 NVMe 2280, Intel Celeron N5105 CPU, 4-16GB Memory, 2x 2.5Gbe Port, 1x PCIe Gen 3×2 Slot, 1 HDMI 2.0 4K 6-FPS, 3-5yr Warranty

Current Price/Availability on Amazon – $550

Hardware Review – LINK

YouTube Video Review – Watch

What I said in my review April ’22:

The TS-464 comfortably arrives with the best hardware in its tier of the NAS market and that is something that QNAP has always been quite good at. Even if you rewind just 5 years, the level of hardware scalability and ease of upgradability that the TS-464 provides is frankly incredible and, fast forward to 2022, is still pretty unmatched. A Desktop 4-Bay NAS (eg Prosumer RAID 5 storage) has always been the next confident step for users who are tired of their hands being tied by subscription cloud services from Google, OneDrive and DropBox, who are looking for their own competent, flexible and fully-featured private server. In the TS-464 NAS, you find a system that is unquestionable the best hardware for your money you can possibly get right now. In software, things are a little less straightforward. QTS 5, although massively software and service-rich, arrives as a complete operating system in your web browser with multiple mobile/desktop clients and hundreds of applications and apps that can be installed at the touch of a button – which can all too often be something of a steep learning curve for many.

Click to view slideshow.

Lacking the slightly chewable, user-friendly nature of many of their rivals, QNAP and its software/service still have a tendency to be a bit of an information overload that can quickly intimidate the novice. However, for those that are looking for a system that is completely customizable in how/when/where you want data presented to you, as well as a wide degree of 3rd party support, QNAP and QTS 5 still manages to provide a huge degree of brand-unique service that are simply not available elsewhere. Just be prepared to invest your time wisely in its setup and more time ensuring the system is perfect for your needs.

SOFTWARE - 8/10
HARDWARE - 10/10
PERFORMANCE - 9/10
PRICE - 8/10
VALUE - 9/10


8.8
PROS
👍🏻Very compact chassis design, despite large storage potential
👍🏻A BIG jump in hardware and scale from the TS-453Be and TS-453D, but with a largely identical RRP at launch
👍🏻Easily one of the most hardware packed SMB/Mid-range 4-Bay on the market
👍🏻Up to 16GB of Memory is fantastic
👍🏻m.2 NVMe SSD Bays AND a PCIe Upgrade Slot (no need to choose one upgrade path)
👍🏻8x Included Camera Licenses
👍🏻Includes Anti-virus, Firewall Tool, VPN client tools, Malware Remover, network manager and Security Councilor Tool
👍🏻3 Different Container/VM tools that also feature image download centers
👍🏻10Gb/s (1,000MB/s) USB Ports will be incredibly useful
👍🏻Large range of expansion options in the TR/TL series in 2, 4, 6, 8 and 12 Bays
CONS
👎🏻The PCIe Slot is PCIe 3×2 and the M.2 SSD Bays are PCIe 3×1 (likely limitations of all this H/W on a Celeron+chipset
👎🏻QNAP Has had 3 ransomware hits in 2019-2021 (Qlocker, Qsnatch and Deadbolt). Lots of Security app/changes since, but people remember and QNAP needs to win back that trust in 2022/2023

 


Best Software 4-Bay NAS Drive – Synology DS923+ NAS

0-88TB, 4-Bays, 2x PCIe Gen 3 M.2 NVMe 2280, Dual Core AMD Emb.Ryzen R1600 CPU, 4-32GB DDR4 ECC Memory, 2x 1Gbe Port, 10GbE Optional Upgrade Slot, 3-5yr Warranty

Current Price/Availability on Amazon – $550+

Hardware Review – LINK

YouTube Video Review – Watch

What I said in my review Nov’22:

Synology has clearly made something of a gamble in the release of the Synology DS923+ NAS. There is no avoiding that making the switch from the Intel Celeron that has historically been the build choice of this product family and opting for the AMD Emb.Ryzen has ruffled some feathers! On the face of it, the R1600 here has a heck of alot of going for it over the previous generation! Higher clock speed, greater PCIe Gen 3 Support throughout, that 4-32GB of DDR4 memory in such a compact system and just generally giving you a lot more horsepower to play with, as well as better bandwidth potential inside and out! But at what cost? The 1GbE standard connectivity in the base model leaves alot to be desired, the proprietary 10Gb upgrade (though incredibly handy) limits the upgradability a tad and the lack of an integrated graphics processor is likely going to result in many long-term Synology advocates to skip this generation. Synology Diskstation Manager (DSM 7.1 at the time of writing) still continues to impress and although the brand still continues to heavily push their 1st party priorities, they have left a little more wriggle room in DSM 7.1 than DSM 7 before it in terms of media compatibility.

Click to view slideshow.

In terms of design, I cannot fault Synology on this as the DS923+ chassis still arrives as one of the best-looking and still exceptionally well-structured devices at this physical scale and storage level. As always, a Synology NAS is more about the software than the hardware (and the DS923+ delivers in spades on the software side!) and with DSM 7.2 around the corner improving things. Just always keep in mind that the Synology DS923+ NAS is a system that arrives with the slight emphasis on having to do many things ‘their way’. If you are less technically versed, then you will definitely appreciate this level of user-friendly design and assistance, but more technically minded admins’ main strain a pinch! In short, the DS923+ IS a good NAS drive, but its focus has certainly ebbed more towards the business user this generation than the home.

SOFTWARE - 10/10
HARDWARE - 7/10
PERFORMANCE - 9/10
PRICE - 8/10
VALUE - 9/10


8.6
PROS
👍🏻DSM 7/7.1 (and DSM7.2 Around the corner) still continues to be an absolute tour-de-force of NAS Software
👍🏻This latest generation expandable 4-Bay arriving with a 10G Upgrade Option is fantastic
👍🏻ECC Memory Support and scalability to 32GB is completely unparallel at this price point
👍🏻The design of the DS923+ NAS still continues to be market-leading
👍🏻The New CPU architecture allows great PCIe3 bandwidth to be afforded to the rest of the hardware, inside and out
👍🏻Low Noise, Low Physical Impact and Intelligent Automatic Power Use Adjustment Settings
👍🏻Increased Support for macOS in Synology Drive and Active Backup Suite (DSM 7.2)
👍🏻Synology C2 Cloud Services, 1st Party Backup/Sync Tools and Collaboration Suite App = Complete 1st Party Eco-system that can rival Office365 and Google Workspace
👍🏻PCIe Gen 3 M.2 NVMe SSD Support as Storage Pools!!! FINALLY!
👍🏻Tremendously User-Friendly!!!
CONS
👎🏻The AMD Emb.Ryzen instead of a Intel Celeron (with Integrated Graphics) will be a dealbreaker for alot of users
👎🏻The default 1GbE ports that the system arrives with are tremendously dated
👎🏻The USB ports on the system are older gen USB 3.2 Gen 1 (5Gb/s) and their support/usability have been quite pared back in recent DSM releases
👎🏻The continued moves by Synology to prioritize 1st party hardware and software services may put some users off
👎🏻Plex Support on the Synology DS923+ is still great for native playback, client-side handling and client devices with relevant multimedia licenses in place, but if server-side media conversions are needed - this system will struggle in comparison with the DS920+ before it

 


Most Powerful 4-Bay NAS Drive – QNAP TVS-h474 NAS

0-88TB, 4-Bays, 2x Gen 3 x2 M.2 NVMe 2280, Intel Pentium Gold G7400 2-core/4-thread 3.7 GHz CPU, Intel Embedded UHD Graphics 710, 8-128GB DDR4 Memory, 2x 2.5Gbe Port, PCIe Gen 4 x16 + PCIe Gen 3 x2, USB 10G, HDMI 2.0B, 3-5yr Warranty

Current Price/Availability on Amazon – $1,199

Hardware Preview – LINK

YouTube Video Review – Watch

What I said in my Preview Sept ’22:

As previously mentioned, the QNAP TVS-h474, TVS-h674 and TVS-h874 are the follow-ups to the popular TVS-472XT, TVS-672XT and TVS-872XT released in the closing stages of 2018. In the 4 years since their initial release, that thunderbolt 3 product series ended up being diversified into a standalone 10GbE version and a 5GbE version – all of which using 2/4/6 Core, 8th Gen Intel Core processors and PCIe 3 architecture. The newer 4, 6 and 8-Bay x74 series have pretty much ramped up every element of their predecessor’s architecture (even the USB ports) and although the CPU is the main reason for this tremendous upscaling of the result of the hardware architecture, you do still get some fantastic hardware under the bonnet generally. That said, it’s worth highlighting that the scaling of the hardware between each capacity tier (and even sub-versions at each tier) means that depending on which system in the series you choose, some hardware options might not be available. The TVS-h874-64GB 8-Bay version is the full Intel i9 16 Core version with full PCIe4 support and 10GbE, whereas the most affordable tier is the TVS-h474-8G 4-Bay with PCIe 3/4 architecture, a Dual Core Pentium Gold and 2.5GbE. Let’s quickly compare the hardware architecture of the three NAS systems and their sub-versions:

Click to view slideshow.

So, let’s dig a little deeper into those CPUs.  With QNAP slowly revealing more and more PCIe 4 upgrade and expansion cards (such as the 2x10GbE+2xPCIe4 NVMe Combo card QM2-2P410G2T and the Dual Port 100GbE QXG-100G2SF-CX6), the necessity for their business class and desktop enterprise solutions to utilize these cards is going to be tremendously important. However, PCIe 4 bandwidth is what makes these cards possible, as a single PCIe4 lane provides approx 2,000MB/s compared with the 1000MB/s of PCIe3 – even when you add x4 or x16 lane multipliers that form the architecture of PCI slots, that still means a difference of 16GB vs 32GB of potential bandwidth. The barrier for many though is that PCIe4, although established in many motherboards and accessories, is not quite as widely supported in server-class CPUs till around 2021 onwards. This (alongside a hugely powerful onboard embedded graphics component) is what continues to push QNAP to utilize the Intel Core family of CPUs in this product tier over the years. With CPUBenchmark scoring for these CPUs ranging from 6,600+ to 36,000+, you have some series Xeon/EPYC challenging processors here and when you consider these are DESKTOP solutions, not rackmount, that is especially impressive!

SOFTWARE - 9/10
HARDWARE - 10/10
PERFORMANCE - 10/10
PRICE - 7/10
VALUE - 8/10


8.8
PROS
👍🏻ZFS and EXT4 Support
👍🏻Pentium Gold Processor 4-Bay - NICE
👍🏻Graphics Card Support
👍🏻PCIe Gen 4 Lanes and a 4x16 Slot
👍🏻2.5GbE by default
👍🏻Massive Memory Support
👍🏻LCD Panel Always Useful
👍🏻USB 10G Ports
👍🏻m.2 NVMe SSD Slots for Caching OR Storage Pools
👍🏻Best Plex 4-Bay NAS in 2022/2023 by a good distance!
CONS
👎🏻Expensive!
👎🏻Still waiting for an I3 option
👎🏻Power Hungry and a pinch noisy in operation

 


Best Value Hardware 4-Bay NAS Drive – Asustor Lockerstor 4 Gen2 NAS

0-88TB, 4-Bays, 4x PCIe Gen 3×1 M.2 NVMe 2280, Intel N5105 CPU 4-Core Integrated Gfx, 4-16GB DDR4 Memory, 2x 2.5Gbe Port, 1x HDMI 2.0b, PCIe Upgrade Slot, 3-5yr Warranty

Current Price/Availability on Amazon – $579

Hardware Review – LINK

YouTube Video Review – Watch

What I said in my review Nov’22:

The Lockerstor 4 Gen 2 NAS is a respectable piece of kit! Indeed, the hardware here is almost faultless! Unless you are particularly noise sensitive (and therefore the metal chassis adding a few dBa to the ambient sound), there is almost nothing I can fault here on the devices hardware. The scaling up of practically all hardware over the Gen 1 Lockerstor, such as Better CPU, Better Memory that goes higher, HDMI 2.0b, USB 3.2 Gen 2, a 10GbE upgrade option and THOSE FOUR M. 2 NVMe SSD SLOTS – you simply cannot fault how much is getting included here at the price point vs it’s competitors. The software is a little less compelling, with a smaller range of 1st party applications on offer, more of a reliance on 3rd party services and the absence of a few AAA+ features that are present on other devices in the market (AI services, Cloud Bolt on live synchronization, 1st Party SaaS native sync with Google Workspace/Office365, etc).

Click to view slideshow.

That said, ADM does run very well, is clear and still quite user-friendly. The addition of choice of file systems EXT4 or BTRFS, flexibility on the use of those M.2 NVMe SSD bays and the Asustor HDMI portal still bring fantastic flexibility to the Lockerstor 4 Gen 2 NAS too. Ultimately, this is a system that is clearly making big waves on it’s hardware more than it’s software, but as long as you keep your feet on the ground and appreciate that this system is more of a 70/30 purchase of hardware vs software, you will come to respect and rely on this Asustor NAS as the backbone of your data storage setup.

SOFTWARE - 8/10
HARDWARE - 10/10
PERFORMANCE - 8/10
PRICE - 8/10
VALUE - 9/10


8.6
PROS
👍🏻Hard/Impossible to find this level of NAS Hardware elsewhere at this price point
👍🏻Those FOUR M.2 NVMe 2280 SSD slots are great and turn this 4-Bay NAS into an 8-Bay
👍🏻2.5GbE by default, as well as the option to add further 2.5/5Gb connections over USB
👍🏻The option to scale up the network connectivity to 10GbE down the line (4 and 6 Bay only)
👍🏻$60 increase over RRP of Lockstor Gen 1, but upgrades practically everything 1-2 levels (New Celeron CPU, Better/High Memory Max, USB 10G, HDMI 2.0b, PCIe Gen 3 Architecture)
👍🏻Includes support for either EXT4 or BTRFS
👍🏻Includes KVM Support with Parallel GUI over HDMI, Asustor Portal
👍🏻ADM is better tha nit has ever been, responsive, clear and intuitive
👍🏻Several different setup and initialization options
👍🏻One of very few 4-Bay NAS drives that still feature a fully functional and controllable LCD Panel
👍🏻Full Support of the traditional RAID levels for this scale (RAID 0-1-5-6)
👍🏻Storage can be expanded with TWO of the Asustor AS6004U 4-Bay
CONS
👎🏻Lack of a fluid RAID System (such as Synology Hybrid RAID, Drobo BeyondRAID or Terramaster TRAID) to allow mixed drive media and easier scaling of storage over time
👎🏻Metal chassis and trays is going to result in an increase of ambient noise (hum/vibration) than other plastic casing/tray NAS systems
👎🏻Some apps (such as the Surveillance Center apps) are long overdue an update in visuals and services
👎🏻ADM is good, but lacks the killer apps/AAA and AI service tools that are being offered by other brands right now
👎🏻They were targeted by the Deadbolt ransomware attack at the start of 2022 and although the linux vulnerability that was used has been reported to be closed and they worked with affected users, this is still going to be on the minds of some buyers

Lowest Priced Plex 4-Bay NAS Drive – Terramaster F4-423 NAS

0-88TB, 4-Bays, 2x Gen 3 x1 M.2 NVMe 2280, Intel N5105 Celeron CPU Quad-Core Integrated Gfx CPU, 4-16GB Memory, 2x 2.5Gbe Port, 3yr Warranty

Current Price/Availability on Amazon – $500

Hardware Review – LINK

YouTube Video Review – Watch

What I said in my review May’22:

Terramaster still continues to be the most affordable fully-featured provider of the whole NAS market and although a number of their solutions have always felt a little rough around the edges, you always got the impression that you were getting a good deal for the hardware that was available from QNAP and Synology. Now in 2022/2023, the same continues to be true but in the F4-423 NAS’ case, you are actually getting some pretty top tier (for the Home/Prosumer) market at a price tag that is really tough to argue with. Terramaster has clearly been watching their bigger competitors and cherry-picked the features that people have been asking for (2.5GbE, USB 3.2 Gen 2, M.2 NVMe SSD bays, etc) for this new generation.

Click to view slideshow.

In terms of software, things are a little less convincing and although TOS 5 (currently in Beta at the time of writing) still continues to evolve into something genuinely fully featured and impressive, TOS 4 that the F4-423 includes at launch is usable (if unexciting) platform that provides the base level services that a new NAS user would want, but lacks killer apps that their competitors are offering right now (File Streaming, AI photo recognition, Surveillance, etc). Most of these ARE included in TOS5, but until it arrives much later in 2022 in a full release, the F4-423 feels like a powerful NAS that doesn’t have the software to show off its strengths yet. If you are reading this later in 2022 or 2023, this might well be irrelevant though, as the brand rolls out their bit firmware update to ALL Terramster NAS devices. Overall, I definitely CAN recommend the F4-423 NAS for its hardware, for Plex Media server or as an affordable multi-tier backup solution, but if you are looking for a NAS for more tailored data access or in a much more fully-featured package – hold out a little longer till TOS 5 gets released first.

SOFTWARE - 5/10
HARDWARE - 8/10
PERFORMANCE - 8/10
PRICE - 10/10
VALUE - 8/10


7.8
PROS
👍🏻2.5GbE at the Price of 1GbE
👍🏻Good CPU for the Price Point
👍🏻USB 3.2 Gen 2 is very forward-thinking for local backups
👍🏻Great RAID Options
👍🏻Snapshot Replication
👍🏻BTRFS Support if preferred
👍🏻Supports Plex and all 1080p Transcoding
👍🏻4K Video transcoding natively
👍🏻A large amount of maximum memory supported (16-32GB – TBC)
👍🏻Includes two M.2 NVMe SSD Bays that can be used for storage or caching
CONS
👎🏻Default 4GB memory is 2133Mhz
👎🏻HDMI Currently Unsupported
👎🏻Until TOS5 is Fully Released, TOS Software feels a little empty of Killer-Apps (AI photo recognition, Surveillance, etc)

 


Where to Buy a Product
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The Synology DS723+ vs Terramaster F2-423 NAS – Best 2-Bay?

19 décembre 2022 à 18:00

Synology DS723+ or Terramaster F2-423 NAS – Which Should You Buy?

For such a long time, the general hardware that all the NAS brands were offering was generally comparable (Celeron CPU, 2/4GB Memory, coupled of 1GbE and USB) and it was only when you delved into the software that you could see the big differences. However, 2022 has really thrown a spanner in the works and although all the big-name brands (not just Synology and Terramaster) have released new hardware into the market, they are all so different this time around! The F2-423 from Terramaster (largely considered the more cost-effective and value arm of the NAS industry) arrived in Summer ’22 and featured 2.5GbE Gen 3 PCIe M.2 slots and a new Intel Celeron. Meanwhile, Synology held off right till the end of 2022 to release their DS723+ with an Optional 10GbE upgrade, switching to an AMD-embedded Ryzen processor and ramping the memory up to business-class ECC modules. If this is your first tentative steps into the world of NAS and you are considering a Synology or Terramaster NAS, you would be forgiven for being a little confused by these recent changes by the brands in 2022/2023 and wondering which one of them is best served to store your data. So today I want to compare the flagship 2-Bays from Synology and Asustor to help you decent which one is best for you.

Terramaster F2-423vs Synology DS723+ NAS – Internal Hardware

These 2-Bay NAS dives from Synology and Terramaster have always arrived as Intel Celeron or Pentium-powered solutions – but in 2022, Synology changed tac and decided to move the DS723+ to an AMD chip. Its predecessor, the DS920+ NAS from 2020, first arrived with a 4 Core Intel Celeron Processor that featured integrated graphics, 2-6GB of DDR4 2666Mhz memory and NVMe SSD upgrade slots. In the two years since its release though, Synology clearly decided to make some big changes in the DS723+ to make it considerably more scalable and general business/file-ops focused. The newer 2-Bay Diskstation features a dual-core AMD R1600 that, although arriving with half the cores of the Celeron in the Terramaster F2-423 has more threads, has a higher CPU frequency and can have it’s frequency increased further in turbo/burst when needed. That said, users will be surprised to learn that this CPU also does not feature embedded graphics, so therefore the DS723+ will be less CPU efficient at handling complex multimedia tasks or generally more graphically demanding operations. The double thread count of the Celeron in the Terramaster will make a difference certainly, but with the R1600 CPU having a higher power consumption and threads (though more efficient) will not be as effective in operations as having more cores. You can learn more about the main user differences in our video below (in which me and Eddie take to either side of the Emb.Ryzen v Celeron debate) to see their respective strengths and weaknesses.

Though both systems feature DDR4 memory, the DS723+ has the much higher pedigree (but half the capacity of 2GB vs 4GB) and thanks to its use of much more impressive ECC (error code correction) memory to identify and repair any bit-level write errors (AVOIDING BITROT) and can also be scaled to a considerably higher 32GB of memory (with the Terramaster F2-423 NAS maxing out at 16GB). Returning to those M.2 NVMe slots, both system feature 2 bays that can be used for SSD storage upgrades, although both the DS723+ and F2-423 support SSD caching (when a pool of SSDs is used to speed up data write/read in conjunction with the larger HDD RAID array), the Terramaster is the only one that also allows this to be used as a standalone storage pool and volumes. This is the first of several key differences between the Terramaster F2-423 and Synology DS723+ NAS that show the divide in hardware between these units. Now, if Synology were to allow NVMe SSD usage for raw storage pools and volumes (something of a rumour that is floating around about DSM 7.2 allowing this feature – which I am still looking into at the time of writing), that would be a different story, as the DS723+ is running on PCIe3 lane architecture, with the bays inside the NAS likely being M.2 NVMe PCIe Gen 3 x2 or x4 (so 2,000-4,000MB/s bandwidth). But again, this is still a very, very tenuous rumour at this stage and therefore cannot be counted on.

 

Model Synology DS723+ NAS

 Terramaster F2-423 NAS

Number of SATA Bays x2 x2
Supported RAID RAID 0, 1 and SHR (Flexible) RAID 0, 1 and TRAID (Flexible)
Number of M.2 NVMe Bays (Gen) 2x NVMe M.2 2280 Gen 3 x4 (TBC) 2x NVMe M.2 2280 Gen 3×2
M.2 NVMe Deployment? Caching Only (at the time of writing) Caching and/or Storage Pools
CPU AMD Embedded Ryzen Intel Celeron N5105 CPU
Cores 2-Core 4-Core
Frequency 2.6-3.1Ghz 2.0Ghz-2.9Ghz
Integrated Graphics No Yes
Default Memory 2GB DDR4 SODIMM ECC 4GB DDR4 SODIMM
Max Memory 32GB SODIMM – 2 SLOTS 16GB SODIMM – 2 SLOTS
Storage Expandability Yes, eSATA connected DX517 No, but external USB RAID is Supported
Power Supplier 65W 65W

The Intel Celeron inside the Terramaster F2-423 and its integrated graphics are definitely going to make it more popular with Plex NAS users. Tasks that require more advanced graphical techniques, such as encode, decode, QuickSync-supported tasks, viewing images that can be manipulated in the viewer and running of anything presented in HEVC/H.265 compression are going to benefit from the graphical toolkit present in the N5105 CPU, whereas the R1600 will need to complete these tasks less efficiently, with raw power. For example, earlier in 2022 we compared the two NAS’ with VERY similar hardware to the DS723+ and F2-423,  the QNAP TS-464 against the Synology DS1522+ NAS (which also runs on the AMD R1600 CPU) on 4K Plex playback. In those tests, both the Intel N5105 and AMD R1600 were about to playback UHD 4K Media upto 60Mbps bitrate in H.264 equally well, with the embedded graphics on the celeron not presenting any advantage. However, when it came to transcoding and converting HEVC/H.265 media in practice, the R1600 struggled (hitting 100% CPU utilization almost immediately). Now, there are lots of ways to get around the HEVC/H265 barrier. You can:

  • Use Media Client Hardware for watching your Plex Server Media that is powerful enough to allow ‘client side’ conversions
  • Only Use H.264 Compressed media
  • Use a client hardware device that includes an HEVC/H.265 Licence purchase option

However, if you are running your Plex Media streaming to mobile devices (many of which do not allow client-side hardware conversions) or an Amazon Fire Stick (same again), these will rely quite heavily on the NAS doing the heavy lifting in the event of you needing HEV/H265 content modified. So, although BOTH the Terramaster F2-423 and Synology DS723+ NAS are going to be good for Plex in native playback, when it comes to media that is going to need some extra horsepower server-side, the Terramaster F2-423 NAS has the better internal Hardware. Also, the power use/efficiency of the Intel Celeron in 24×7 use is going to typically be lower in like-for-like use cases (with a TDP rating of 10W on the Celeron vs 25W on the R1600 – but these represent max usage/non-typical). Finally, the Intel Celeron in the Terramaster is a 4-core processor, double that of the R1600 at 2-core. 4 Cores means that you can spread those dedicated cores to other processes more effectively and present a larger degree of processing power to those tasks. Now, the DS723+ and it’s AMD R1600 does counter all of these points with some impressive strengths of it’s own. For a start, that much higher base and turbo frequency of 2.6Ghz > 3.1Ghz. This means that you have a much more powerful NAS at your disposal to get most other tasks done and if you are not focused on those graphical areas mentioned earlier that the N5105 favours, the R1600 is going to get most other tasks done quicker and/or have more resources to spread out to more users at once.

Synology DS723+ or Terramaster F2-423 NAS – Design

This is going to be a real area of contention for some users who are either in close proximity to the NAS they buy or are a little more sensitive to noise. I say this because the Terramaster F2-423 NAS has great hardware, but the design is a little less impressive. The chassis (arriving in a combination of plastic and metal internal structure) is a little more dated in design than the Synology DS723+. This is further underlined when you measure the two NAS side by side. The result is a NAS that is a bit wider than the DS723+. Additionally, the chassis feels a little more cost-effective/budget on the Terramster than the Synology. Synology has been using this 2-Bay chassis since around 2017 in this product series and it still looks pretty modern by comparison.

The rear of these two chassis reveals that they both arrive with two active cooling fans. These fans are designed to maintain the best possible internal running temperature, as NAS servers of this scale rarely have CPU fans and rely on well-placed heatsinks and strategically placed airflow throughout the system to keep the components running at the most efficient temperature 24×7. The fans on the Synology are a little more subtle, but are also a fraction larger (92cm sq each on the Synology vs 80cm sq on the Terramaster). You might think this means that the Synology is the noisier of the two. However, in reality, the Terramaster is the tiniest pinch louder in ambient noise when in operation. This is due to several factors. The first is that the fans are part of a larger external block on the rear of the device (as opposed to being contained within the larger casing). The other reason is that the Terramaster NAS chassis contains more metal (on the base and a much more structured use of aluminium internally by comparison to the Synology which features alot more plastic in it’s framework and external. The noise difference is very, VERY small, but will be increased a pinch more when using more industrially designed HDDs above 10TB (that have more platters thanks to helium-sealed drive technology, dedicated 7200RPM) because of the increased vibration and resulting hum, clicks and whirrs. It’s a very small difference, but the particular noise sensitive will notice this.

The final thing to discuss in the chassis design of the Synology DS723+ and Terramaster F2-423 is velitation and passive cooling. Both of these NAS drive’s have ventilation places around their casing to work in conjunction with those active cooling fans. The Synology arguably does a better job of things on this too, as not only do the sides of the casing have the familiar brand logo in a vented design, but the M.2 slots have ventilated covers on the base and even the trays have a bit more airflow between the drives. The Terramaster has a small amount of ventilation on the front between the bays, but the bulk of the passive ventilation on the F2-423 is on the base of the chassis (under the storage bays). Although the overall impact of these passive ventilation methods is still going to be heavily dependent on the fans and internal heatsinks, the design of the Synology DS723+ chassis just seems a little more thought out.

Overall, the SYNOLOGY design wins overall, thanks to its better middle ground design between airflow, chassis size and noise compared with the Terramaster F2-423. Although neither brand provides its solutions in a variety of colours, the Black and largely square Diskstation chassis will blend in better in most environments too. Next, let’s discuss network connectivity.

Synology DS723+ or Terramaster F2-423 NAS – Ports and Connections

The connections that a NAS arrives with will heavily dictate the access speed and performance between it and your client devices. This becomes especially true when your NAS is going to be accessed by a large number of users/tasks at any given time, as the result is the bandwidth (the maximum potential connection speed) being shared between them all. Now the  DS723+ arrives with arguably very dated connectivity (in its default state, but scalability is possible). This is especially true when compared with the F2-423.  Here is how they compare off the bat:

Model Synology DS723+ NAS

 Terramaster F2-423 NAS

Default Network Connections 2x 1GbE 2x 2.5GbE
Network Upgrade / PCIe Slot Yes, PCIe Gen 3×2 for E10G22-t1-mini 10G Upgrade No
USB 3.2 Gen 2 (10G) 0 2x
USB 3.2 Gen 1 (5G) 2x 0
USB 2.0 0 0
eSATA 1 0
HDMI No 1x HDMI 2.0 (Command Interface ONLY, no GUI)
Audio In/Out No No

So, alot of difference here to unpack. Some things are quite brand specific, such as the Synology DS723+ featuring an eSATA port that is used for the DX517 JBOD expansion 5-Bay. The same goes for the Terramaster F2-423 having an HDMI port for local (command level) access with a USB Keyboard, something Synology have never provided outside of very specific Surveillance solutions. Bt the areas we CAN compare are the USB connectivity and the network connectivity. The USB ports on the Synology are USB 3.2 Gen 1 (5Gb/s) and have limited support in the system software (DSM), but are largely used for external storage drives and UPS devices, that’s about it (you can assign them to a VM). The USB ports on the Terraamster on the other hand are USB 3.2 Gen 2 (10Gb/s), so twice as higher bandwidth than the Synology, as well as supporting a larger number of USB devices (so storage and UPS’ like the Synology, but also devices such as printers, scanners, network adapters and WiFi dongles). The next big difference is that the Synology arrives with two 1GbE Network ports (these can be combined via LAG/Port-Trunking to 2GbE with a smart switch) and the Terramaster has 2x 2.5GbE ports (which can also be combined too). This means the Terramster has a significantly higher external network bandwidth available. You will still need to be using a greater than Gigabit Router or Switch in order to take advantage of these speeds, but given that now you can get USB-to-2.5GbE adapters for as little as £20, this is getting easier to take utilize. If you are in a pure 1GbE network environment and have zero intention to upgrade to 2.5G or 10G in the next few years, you can largely ignore this advantage, but given that an increasing number of day-to-day devices are arriving with 2.5G at the same price as 1G (ISP Routers with WiFi 6, Prosumer routers, Switches, PC Motherboards, etc), its tough to overlook that extra external connectivity that the F2-423 provides here in the default/day 1 state. However, things can change if you take advantage of the network upgrade slot of the DS723+ NAS.

Moving away from the CPU, we CAN talk about one the stand-out features of the Synology DS723+ NAS that has been demanded for quite a long time – 10GbE support. Now, before we get too excited, it’s really important to once again highlight that this is OPTIONAL 10GbE and available via an additional purchase of the E10G22-T1-mini upgrade module. The DS723+ by default arrives with 1GbE network ports, but the option of 10GbE is very welcome indeed, though many will wonder why they didn’t just roll this in and increase the DS723+ NAS price a fraction. There are many who argue that 2.5GbEsuch as it is found on the F2-423 NAS is still something of a fad (with 1GbE still massively available in it’s decades of use and 10GbE becoming more affordable as a client hardware upgrade with interchangeable hardware and backwards compatibility with legacy devices) but there is also the question of future-proofing to consider. When you buy ANY piece of hardware, you are buying it BOTH to be compatible with current hardware trends AND to remain useful in the future. 2.5GbE has gained traction thanks to $25 adapters over USB supported on Windows/Mac, affordable network cards, growing wireless network adoption of WiFi 6/6e and more hardware peripherals proving 2.5GbE at the same cost as 1GbE in 2022. Plus, a 2.5GbE NAS will still give you 250-279MB/s connected to a 10GbE network if/when you upgrade to Copper/RJ45/10GBASE-T. So, although the inclusion of optional 10GbE on the DS723+ with the E10G22-T1-mini adapter IS a very welcome addition, the lack of 2.5GbE will certainly be noticed!

The 10GbE upgrade for the DS723+ is an incredibly easy process – with the E10G22-T1-mini module being significantly easier than traditional PCIe Card upgrades. Arriving on a PCIe Gen 3×2 board, this singe port accessory slots into the back (power down necessary, as this is a PCIe upgrade) and immediately adds the 1,000MB/s+ bandwidth connection to your DS723+. As this NAS is a 2-Bay system, there is the question of whether there is enough media throughput the saturate the full 10GBASE-T connection. Using a fully SATA SSD populated device will likely full/close-to saturate the 10G connection, as would using the 5-bay DX517 expansion in a combined RAID with the main 4-Bays (the DX517 connects over eSATA which is capped at 6Gb/s – so a combined RAID with the primary storage is the only way you are going to hit 1,000MB/s), but what about if you are only using the main 2x DS723+ bays with 3.5″ hard drives?

Luckily, I can answer the question of how this NAS CPU and 4 hard drives will perform over 10GbE now. Previously here on the NASCompares, I was fortunate enough to run ATTO tests on the DS1522+ (same R1600 CPU, 8GB Memory) with RAID 0 and RAID 5 with four WD Red Pro 22TB Hard Drives. Now, it is worth remembering that these are NOT your common, everyday SATA hard drives and are designed to be rugged, high-performance disks (7200RPM, 512MB Cache, 10x 2.2TB platters, etc). In a RAID 0 and RAID 5 setup and in particular file size tests, full saturation of read transfers of 1.15GB/s was achieved, with write performance peaking at around 800-900MB/s. Now these ARE artificial tests (so, not really representative of everyday use), but nevertheless, very compelling results for 4 drives over 10GbE and DO indicate that the DS723+ +Expansion hardware is sufficient to saturate the E10G22-T1-mini upgrade. More domestic/smaller scale HDDs such as the WD Red Plus or Seagate Ironwolf drives without the use of a DX517 expansion, will likely cap at around 350-450MB/s at most.

Note – You can READ the full article that details all the tests and results of the Synology DS1522+ NAS and WD Red Pro 22TBs over 10GbE HERE. Alternatively, you can watch my YouTube video on these tests (with 5GbE testing too) here on the NASCompares YouTube Channel.

Synology DS723+ or Terramaster F2-423 NAS – Software

On the subject of NAS software, this is where the Synology NAS is exceedingly strong! Although the Terramaster NAS platform has seen a huge number of improvements in recent years (TOS version 5 was launched in Summer 2022), with new apps, services and modes included, Synology and DSM is still considered the dominant force in NAS software. The Synology DSM platform feels alot more responsive, has a huge number of first-party applications (As well as mobile and desktop client applications too) and although 3rd party application support is available in a number of their tools, the real strength in the Synology software is how the brand releases it’s own 1st party alternatives (allowing you to create a single ecosystem of tools for your NAS storage and network). Use Skype or Whatsapp? Then you can use Synology Chat. Use DropBox or Google Drive for team sharing and local storage synchronization? Use Synology Drive. Use Google Docs, Google Cloud Space and Google Workspace? Then use Synology Collaboration Suite and Active Backup. Plex or Emby? Use Synology Video Station instead, as it has metadata scraping and no subscription. Even high-end business is covered. Synology Virtual Machine Manager instead of Hyper-V or VMware, Surveillance Station instead of Milestone – the list is huge AND crucially, all of these apps are compatible with 3rd party tools too, whether it is to sync with them to create a bare-metal NAS backup, or to open and continue from your 3rd party setup into a 1st party setup. Below is my full review of Terramater TOS 5 and Synology DSM:

Now, this isn’t to say that the Terramaster TOS system is not good, it is better than it has ever been, very responsive, features improved 1st party apps in its latest version (new AI-powered Photo recognition tool Terra Photos, Surveillance Center application, VM support, improved muti-tier and multi-site backup manager and more), but the apps and the GUI does not feel quite as polished as the Synology platform and you definitely get the feeling that a larger % of the cost of a terramaster goes towards the hardware than the software. If you are only planning on using the NAS as a target drive for your 3rd party tools, then the Trramaster will support you well. Just know that the total Hardware+software type buyer will want to opt for Synology and the award-winning DSM.

Synology DS723+ or Terramaster F2-423 NAS – Conclusion and Verdict

Many home and prosumer users that are comparing these two NAS in terms of hardware are doing so because of Plex Media Server support (with that Intel inside the Terramaster doing alot of the heavy lifting here). However, you have to look at the F2-423 and DS723+ NAS as complete hardware+software solutions and are priced as such. So, therefore the choice between the Synology DS723+ and the Terramaster F2-423 NAS comes down to two main factors. 1) Do you prioritize Hardware or Software? As the Terramaster is the best for the former and the Synology is much better for the latter! 2) What do you expect from the NAS system? If you want a system that is designed to just be your storage system and sit in the background and do its job, then the Terramaster will not only be the more economical choice, but it will also be the one that is better for direct and no-frills tasks. If however, you want a more dynamic system or one that you plan on wrapping your small business around – then the Synology will be the better choice, as it has been designed with precisely this kind of user and deployment in mind. If you came to this article wondering why the Terramaster NAS online always seems to be more affordable/cheaper in price, I hope this guide helped you understand. Both the DS723+ and F2-423 or among the best examples of what each brand has on offer right now in 2022 – but it is a case of what you, the end user, want for your money. Then you have to factor in the upgrade option of the Synology that allows you to scale it up to 10GbE (for around £129+) and it’s CPU upto 32GB ECC Memory combo that is designed much more towards throughput and performance than graphical management, so in a somewhat ‘tortoise and the hare’ style, the Synology has the potential to outperform the Terramaster here down the line. Then again, Plex users who are reliant on server-side transcoding/conversions (eg thanks to H.265/HEVC compression barriers) are going to have a CONSIDERABLY better experience on the F2-423 when playing back these files.

Synology DS723+ NAS

 Terramaster F2-423 NAS

Reasons to Buy Reasons to Buy
10GbE Upgradability

More User Friendly with noticeably more polished Apps, Tools and GUI

Allows a greater Max Memory of 32GB, which is also ECC

Synology HybridRAID Migration and Expansion

Includes 1st party apps to replace/sync with your existing 3rd party ones

Better File Throughput internally

The BEST NAS Surveillance Application

Enterprise Grade tool Active Backup Suite

Much More Affordable and Regularly on Offer

Better Plex HEVC/H.265 Media Management on the Server side

TRAID Flexible RAID

Easy Software Switch to TrueNAS (HERE)

2.5GbE by Default

USB 3.2 Gen 2 (10Gb) Connectivity for Storage

Wide HDD and SSD Compatibility (upto 22TB – Dec ’22)

TOS 5 has an AI Photos App and Surveillance (Entry Level)


Where to Buy a Product
amzamexmaestrovisamaster 24Hfree delreturn VISIT RETAILER ➤ 
amzamexmaestrovisamaster 24Hfree delreturn VISIT RETAILER ➤

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Best 6-Bay NAS of the Year – 2022/2023

12 décembre 2022 à 18:00

A Guide to the Best 6-Bay NAS Drives to Buy Right Now

In the last 5 years or so, the popularity of 6-Bay NAS systems has skyrocketed! Up until that point, most users in the home/small-business market who were looking at desktop solutions would either settle for the modest 2/4 Bay scale of system, or jump up towards the 8-Bay scale when they needed more storage capacity to play with. However, the recent increase in 6 Drive server systems is larger thanks to two factors. The first is the huge capacities of drive that have arrived in the last few years (currently hitting 22TB sizes and with 24TB around the corner) that have allowed even modest-sized NAS systems to easily break into the 100TB storage mark. The second factor is the growing concerns over data redundancy and doubt about the single drive safety net afforded by RAID 5 compared with the 2 drive failure protection of RAID 6. These two factors together have resulted in 6-Bay NAS systems specifically leveraging large drives in a RAID 6 configuration to become a great deal more affordable and palatable. NAS Manufacturers have definitely observed this and we have seen considerable growth in the range of 6-Bay NAS solutions arriving on the market, scaling in hardware, power and price. Today I want to share with you my recommended 6-Bay NAS drives to buy in 2022 and 2023. These are solutions that stand out for their own specific reasons. So, let’s go through the best 6-Bay NAS servers you should be considering

What Have All the Best 6-Bay NAS Drives Have in Common?

It is worth remembering that although there are ALOT of different 6-Bay NAS drives available to buy, they are by no means created equal! With numerous super-budget brands popping up online, it can be tempting to consider these alongside the premium NAS brands. However, all too often they offer solutions righty seem ‘too good to be true’ and then are gone from the web before your warranty even gets cold! So, whether you are looking at the three best 6-Bay solutions that I am recommending below OR are looking at another 6-Bay NAS you saw on offer/recommended elsewhere – the best NAS system ALWAYS includes the following software and services:

  • Combined Hardware & Software Solution – That means that you are buying the hardware, but it ALSO includes a web browser GUI, mobile apps and desktop client apps (including backup, media, streaming, surveillance and file management software)
  • All NAS systems in this guide are compatible with (and can be accessed by) Windows, Mac, Android and Linux operating systems
  • All NAS Solutions arrive with between 2-3 years Warranty (with the option to extend to 5 years)
  • All NAS drives can be accessed locally over the network, as well as secure remote access is possible with brand-supported services (at no additional cost)
  • The most modern and regularly updated NAS systems will support the very latest 20TB NAS hard drives (such as the Seagate Ironwolf 22TB and WD Red 22TB)
  • All the recommended solutions support multiple drive configurations (RAID) for drive failure protection and performance enhancements
  • All solutions receive regular updates to their security, features and services
  • All recommended NAS drives can connect and synchronize with cloud services (Google Drive, DropBox, OneDrive, etc), as well as Business/Enterprise services such as AWS, Azure, Backblaze and more
  • All NAS solutions (regardless of brand) feature the ability to host a shared drive on your PC/Mobile/Laptop systems that are synchronized with the NAS via the network/internet, but is shown in your native operating system file manager (i.e Mac Finder or Windows Explorer)
  • All the NAS solutions listed can be accessed DIRECTLY via an ethernet/network cable being connected from your PC/Mac system, to the NAS RJ45 port for 100MB/s and higher connectivity
  • All the best NAS solutions (regardless of brand) feature backup and sync tools that can be installed on your local client computer and allow regular backups of your files and system data

So, make sure that if you are looking at a NAS solution that is NOT recommended below, that it includes all of the above as these are some of the clearest areas that brands all too often cut orders to produce cheaper by ultimately inferior NAS servers for home and business. So, let’s discuss the very best 6-Bay NAS to buy now in 2022/2023.


Best All Round 6-Bay NAS Drive – QNAP TS-664 NAS

0-132TB, 6-Bays, 2x M.2 NVMe 2280, Intel N5105 4-Core 2.0-2.9Ghz CPU, 8-16GB Memory, 2x 2.5Gbe Port, 4K HDMI 2.0 Port, USB 3.2 Gen 2 10G, PCIe Gen 3×2 Slot, 3-5yr Warranty

Current Price/Availability on Amazon – $799

Hardware Review – LINK

YouTube Video Review – Watch

What I said in my review April ’22:

In terms of hardware, it is extremely hard to fault the QNAP TS-664 NAS. For its price tag, short of building your own system from the ground up, what you have here is the best example of a 6-Bay NAS available for under $800-850. Then the fact that it features embedded graphical, upgradability in a number of ways (storage, network bandwidth, both), faster local backup options and an aggressive 16GB memory maximum (almost unheard of at this price tier without going higher end SMB). So yeah, the hardware included in the TS-664 certainly (especially when you factor in that this is a hardware/software combined solution when you pay for it) is a good deal. All that said, the system has certainly spread itself a little thin in places to ensure this level of upgradability, trimming those PCIe and M.2 slots in bandwidth to allow the CPU to stay on top of everything, something that only the especially die-hard NAS user is going to notice in day to day use. Now, in terms of software, the sheer range of applications available from QNAP included with the TS-664, as well as the range of 3rd party support that the system can handle has to be appalled, though the learning curve on day 1 has to be acknowledged and means the TS-664 might not be the right system for those that largely want to ‘setup and forget’ the system.

Click to view slideshow.

Then there is the subject of ransomware and security that QNAP has been taken to task over in the last 2021/2022. Although the company has stressed that vulnerabilities found in an earlier version of their software (some from Linux that practically all NAS software from all brands is built on, but also ones found in their own services stemming from poor security defaults and control being given to users without sufficient understanding of the consequences) have been addressed, with changes and improvements throughout the platform, many buyers are still going to view the TS-664 with slight trepedation. Overall I would still highly recommend the TS-664 NAS and if you know what you are doing, have a well-developed 3-2-1 backup strategy in place (as we ALL should) and don’t become overly reliant on default settings, you will genuinely struggle to find a better 6 Bay for your prosumer RAID6 in the market right now.

SOFTWARE - 8/10
HARDWARE - 10/10
PERFORMANCE - 9/10
PRICE - 8/10
VALUE - 9/10


8.8
PROS
👍🏻Very compact chassis design, despite large storage potential
👍🏻A BIG jump in hardware and scale from the TS-453Be and TS-653D, but with a largely identical RRP at launch
👍🏻Easily one of the most hardware packed SMB/Mid-range 6-Bay on the market
👍🏻Up to 16GB of Memory is fantastic
👍🏻m.2 NVMe SSD Bays AND a PCIe Upgrade Slot (no need to choose one upgrade path)
👍🏻8x Included Camera Licenses
👍🏻Includes Anti-virus, Firewall Tool, VPN client tools, Malware Remover, network manager and Security Councilor Tool
👍🏻3 Different Container/VM tools that also feature image download centers
👍🏻10Gb/s (1,000MB/s) USB Ports will be incredibly useful
👍🏻Large range of expansion options in the TR/TL series in 2, 4, 6, 8 and 12 Bays
CONS
👎🏻The PCIe Slot is PCIe 3×2 and the M.2 SSD Bays are PCIe 3×1 (likely limitations of all this H/W on a Celeron+chipset
👎🏻QNAP Has had 3 ransomware hits in 2019-2021 (Qlocker, Qsnatch and Deadbolt). Lots of Security app/changes since, but people remember and QNAP needs to win back that trust in 2022/2023

 


Best Software 6-Bay NAS Drive – Synology DS1621+ NAS

0-132TB, 6-Bays, 2x M.2 NVMe 2280, AMD Emb.Ryzen V1500 4-Core 2.2Ghz CPU, 4-32GB DDR4 ECC Memory, 4x 1Gbe Port, 1x PCIe Gen 3×8 Slot, 3-5yr Warranty

Current Price/Availability on Amazon – $899

Hardware Review – LINK

YouTube Video Review – Watch

What I said in my review Oct ’20:

Whether you’re looking at buying the new Synology DS1621+ as your first footsteps into the world of NAS, or as an upgrade to your existing smaller network-attached storage system, the DS1621+ ticks practically every box. Although some might argue that the hardware might seem almost a little too mid-range, they are missing the point of this device entirely. The DS1621+ is a prime example of everything that Synology is about and frankly, if you love the brand you will love this NAS device. Finding a fair middle ground internally and externally at this price point, the DS1621+ represents Synology doubling down on hardware R&D over the last 2 years and is largely successful in every way. It would have been nice to see a more graphically equipped processor, or something a tad closer in architecture to that of the comparatively powerhouse DS1621xs +, but right now this is the best Synology 6 bay you are going to find and without breaking the bank. 

Click to view slideshow.

The Synology ‘Plus’ series of devices has long held a reputation for providing mid-range hardware to mid-range business customers. Because of this, the DS1621+ needs to balance a fine line between providing fast and reliable hardware, whilst still maintaining a price point that won’t intimidate the average small-medium business user. In this regard, I think the Synology DS1621+ NAS gets it right, finding an impressive halfway point between these two factors. However, it is important for buyers to understand what they are buying and where the budget for the Synology DS1621+ is being aimed. Although it seemingly lacks some of the multimedia and prosumer features of ‘cheaper’ NAS devices in the Synology portfolio, it doubles down on more business and enterprise-level features in efforts to support that core audience. It’s about getting the right tool for the job and in that area, Synology almost completely succeed. The lack of +gigabit connectivity afforded to a NAS unit at this price point, compared with their competitors, may put some users off, but on the whole, you are getting good performance and excellent value on this combined hardware and software solution with some excellent scalability.

SOFTWARE - 8/10
HARDWARE - 8/10
PERFORMANCE - 8/10
PRICE - 7/10
VALUE - 8/10


7.8
PROS
👍🏻Desktop Ryzen Powered Solution
👍🏻Dual NVMe M.2 cache
👍🏻PCIe Gen 3 x8 PCIe Equipped
👍🏻Great RAID Options (inc SHR)
👍🏻Excellent choice of Apps
👍🏻DDR4 ECC Memory up to 32GB
👍🏻Numerous Backup Software Options
👍🏻Huge Virtualization Support
👍🏻3yr Warranty and Extendable to 5yrs
CONS
👎🏻1Gbe Ports seem a bit limited now
👎🏻Shame it does not support 1/2 x DX1215
👎🏻NVMe SSDs cannot be used for RAW storage

 


Best Value Hardware 6-Bay NAS Drive – Asustor Lockerstor 6 Gen 2 NAS

0-132TB, 6-Bays, 4x M.2 NVMe 2280 (PCIe Slot Swap Opt for 10GbE), Intel N5105 4-Core 2.0-2.9Ghz CPU, 8-16GB Memory, 2x 2.5Gbe Port, 4K HDMI 2.0b Port, USB 3.2 Gen 2 10G, 3-5yr Warranty

Current Price/Availability on Amazon – $809

Hardware Review – LINK

YouTube Video Review – Watch

What I said in my review Nov ’22:

The Lockerstor 6 Gen 2 NAS is a respectable piece of kit! Indeed, the hardware here is almost faultless! Unless you are particularly noise sensitive (and therefore the metal chassis adding a few dBa to the ambient sound), there is almost nothing I can fault here on the device’s hardware. The scaling up of practically all hardware over the Gen 1 Lockerstor, such as Better CPU, Better Memory that goes higher, HDMI 2.0b, USB 3.2 Gen 2, a 10GbE upgrade option and THOSE FOUR M. 2 NVMe SSD SLOTS – you simply cannot fault how much is getting included here at the price point vs it’s competitors. The software is a little less compelling, with a smaller range of 1st party applications on offer, more of a reliance on 3rd party services and the absence of a few AAA+ features that are present on other devices in the market (AI services, Cloud Bolt on live synchronization, 1st Party SaaS native sync with Google Workspace/Office365, etc).

Click to view slideshow.

That said, ADM does run very well, is clear and still quite user-friendly. The addition of choice of file systems EXT4 or BTRFS, flexibility on the use of those M.2 NVMe SSD bays and the Asustor HDMI portal still bring fantastic flexibility to the Lockerstor 6 Gen 2 NAS too. Ultimately, this is a system that is clearly making big waves on it’s hardware more than it’s software, but as long as you keep your feet on the ground and appreciate that this system is more of a 70/30 purchase of hardware vs software, you will come to respect and rely on this Asustor NAS as the backbone of your data storage setup.

SOFTWARE - 7/10
HARDWARE - 9/10
PERFORMANCE - 8/10
PRICE - 9/10
VALUE - 9/10


8.4
PROS
👍🏻Hard/Impossible to find this level of NAS Hardware elsewhere at this price point
👍🏻Those FOUR M.2 NVMe 2280 SSD slots are great and turn this 6-Bay NAS into an 10-Bay
👍🏻2.5GbE by default, as well as the option to add further 2.5/5Gb connections over USB
👍🏻The option to scale up the network connectivity to 10GbE down the line (4 and 6 Bay only)
👍🏻$60 increase over RRP of Lockstor Gen 1, but upgrades practically everything 1-2 levels (New Celeron CPU, Better/High Memory Max, USB 10G, HDMI 2.0b, PCIe Gen 3 Architecture)
👍🏻Includes support for either EXT4 or BTRFS
👍🏻Includes KVM Support with Parallel GUI over HDMI, Asustor Portal
👍🏻ADM is better tha nit has ever been, responsive, clear and intuitive
👍🏻Several different setup and initialization options
👍🏻One of very few 6-Bay NAS drives that still feature a fully functional and controllable LCD Panel
👍🏻Full Support of the traditional RAID levels for this scale (RAID 0-1-5-6)
👍🏻Storage can be expanded with TWO of the Asustor AS6004U 4-Bay
CONS
👎🏻Lack of a fluid RAID System (such as Synology Hybrid RAID, Drobo BeyondRAID or Terramaster TRAID) to allow mixed drive media and easier scaling of storage over time
👎🏻Metal chassis and trays is going to result in an increase of ambient noise (hum/vibration) than other plastic casing/tray NAS systems
👎🏻Some apps (such as the Surveillance Center apps) are long overdue an update in visuals and services
👎🏻ADM is good, but lacks the killer apps/AAA and AI service tools that are being offered by other brands right now
👎🏻They were targeted by the Deadbolt ransomware attack at the start of 2022 and although the linux vulnerability that was used has been reported to be closed and they worked with affected users, this is still going to be on the minds of some buyers

 


Best Price Hardware 6-Bay NAS Drive – Terramaster T6-423 NAS

0-132TB, 6-Bays, 2x M.2 NVMe 2280, Intel N5105 4-Core 2.0-2.9Ghz CPU, 8-32GB Memory, 2x 2.5Gbe Port, 4K HDMI 2.0b Port (Code/Command Level Access, no GUI), USB 3.2 Gen 2 10G, 3yr Warranty

Current Price/Availability on Amazon – $649

Hardware Review – LINK

YouTube Video Review – Watch

What I said in my review July ’22 of the T9-423 9-Bay (Same Hardware, but 3 More Bays!):

I like the terramaster T9-423 NAS a lot more than I thought I was going to! Over the years I have seen several quirky NAS designs appear from brands looking to find gaps in the existing market between the traditional 2-bay, 4-bay, 8-bay and rackmount systems. In most cases, these brands tend to never really hit the ground running with these systems and a lot of that is because they are either priced poorly, have bad internal hardware choices for the sake of offsetting the overall cost of a new design or simply do not read the room in knowing what people want. I’m pleased to say that the Terramaster T9-423 does not seem to suffer any of these things. This 9-Bay arrives in a chassis that is a smaller and more convenient frame than many eight-bay desktops, arrives at a price point that for the scale is reasonable and has the same or better hardware than most other mid-range desktop NAS in 2022.

Click to view slideshow.

Alongside this, Terramaster’s innovations in TOS5 to improve their platform to include many more storage services, backup methods and a few premium apps in the works means that the brand still manages to be competitive in spite of its more cost-effective reputation and hardware focus. First-party app development still pales in comparison to bigger NAS brands (though popular third-party tools that already exist in the market are supported and available to download) and in terms of software, this system is still a little underwhelming, if very functional. Then you have the build quality. The construction of this chassis is particularly higher than I anticipated and unlike many of the brand’s rather dated or plastic-looking cases in 2 and 4 bays, The T9-423 is remarkably well constructed with excellent considerations being made to ventilation and keeping the device compact despite its large storage potential. As long as you keep in mind that you are buying a more cost-effective or value alternative to top-tier brands, as well as having perhaps a little more patience with the software than you might like, the Terramaster T9-423 is a great NAS and an exceedingly positive move by the brand to further evolve.

SOFTWARE - 7/10
HARDWARE - 9/10
PERFORMANCE - 9/10
PRICE - 9/10
VALUE - 9/10


8.6
PROS
👍🏻Surprisingly compact for 9 Bays of Storage
👍🏻Good Middle ground between a Rackmount and Desktop System
👍🏻2.5GbE at the Price of 1GbE
👍🏻Good CPU for the Price Point
👍🏻USB 3.2 Gen 2 is very forward-thinking for local backups
👍🏻Great RAID Options
👍🏻Snapshot Replication
👍🏻BTRFS Support if preferred
👍🏻Supports Plex and all 1080p Transcoding
👍🏻4K Video transcoding natively
👍🏻A large amount of maximum memory supported (16-32GB – TBC)
👍🏻M.2 SSD Bay inside for caching/storage at PCIe Gen 3×2
CONS
👎🏻Only 1x M.2 NVMe SSD Bay
👎🏻Default 4GB memory is 2133Mhz
👎🏻HDMI Currently Unsupported
👎🏻TOS Software feels a little empty of Killer-Apps at the moment (as the AI photo recognition, Surveillance, Centralized Backup tools, etc are still in Beta)

 


Where to Buy a Product
amzamexmaestrovisamaster 24Hfree delreturn VISIT RETAILER ➤ 
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Need More Help Choosing the right NAS?

Choosing the right data storage solution for your needs can be very intimidating and it’s never too late to ask for help. With options ranging from NAS to DAS, Thunderbolt to SAS and connecting everything up so you can access all your lovely data at the touch of a button can be a lot simpler than you think. If you want some tips, guidance or help with everything from compatibility to suitability of a solution for you, why not drop me a message below and I will get back to you as soon as possible with what you should go for, its suitability and the best place to get it. This service is designed without profit in mind and in order to help you with your data storage needs, so I will try to answer your questions as soon as possible. Just enter in a few details of your setup, storage requirements and (in the case of buying a new solution) your budget – then me and Eddie the Web guy can help you with your question. This is a completely free service, is NOT provided with profit in mind and is manned by two humans (no bots, no automated replies, etc). Assistance might take an extra day or two (the service gets a lot of visitors) but we do try to answer every message. If you want to support this service, you can find out how to donate HERE. Otherwise, you can still just message us for free advice anyway!

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This description contains links to Amazon. These links will take you to some of the products mentioned in today's content. As an Amazon Associate, I earn from qualifying purchases. Visit the NASCompares Deal Finder to find the best place to buy this device in your region, based on Service, Support and Reputation - Just Search for your NAS Drive in the Box Below

Need Advice on Data Storage from an Expert?

We want to keep the free advice on NASCompares FREE for as long as we can. Since this service started back in Jan '18, We have helped hundreds of users every month solve their storage woes, but we can only continue to do this with your support. So please do choose to buy at Amazon US and Amazon UK on the articles when buying to provide advert revenue support or to donate/support the site below. Finally, for free advice about your setup, just leave a message in the comments below here at NASCompares.com and we will get back to you. Need Help? Where possible (and where appropriate) please provide as much information about your requirements, as then I can arrange the best answer and solution to your needs. Do not worry about your e-mail address being required, it will NOT be used in a mailing list and will NOT be used in any way other than to respond to your enquiry. [contact-form-7]  

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    Terms and Conditions Alternatively, why not ask me on the ASK NASCompares forum, by clicking the button below. This is a community hub that serves as a place that I can answer your question, chew the fat, share new release information and even get corrections posted. I will always get around to answering ALL queries, but as a one-man operation, I cannot promise speed! So by sharing your query in the ASK NASCompares section below, you can get a better range of solutions and suggestions, alongside my own.  

Synology DS720+ vs Terramaster F2-423 NAS Comparison

8 décembre 2022 à 18:00

Should You Buy the Synology DS720+ or Terramaster F2-423 NAS Drive

Prosumer 2-Bay’s such as the Synology DS720+ and Terramaster F2-423 NAS are designed for users who prioritize system power over maximum capacity in their server. If you have just made the decision to switch from public cloud services (Google Dive, DropBox, etc) towards your own private NAS server, then chances are you might have been a little surprised by the price tag of the average NAS. Because subscription services are months subscription-based that are spread over years and years, requiring little-to-no extra physical hardware on the client side (you!), a fully deployed NAS server with HDDs and/or SSDs can seem quite the investment up from for a small home or business user. Thankfully, the NAS market has evolved quite alot over it’s 20+ years of commercial availability, resulting in scaled solutions/brands that do a reasonable job of fulfilling their portfolio with NAS drives that allow you to make more targeted purchases (i.e you pay for the things you want to use and save on the bits you don’t). Now, in the world of private servers, the big brand that everyone recommends as your entry point into NAS is Synology. This brand has an extensive portfolio of solutions, trades more on it’s 1st party software than hardware and despite its ‘generally higher than most pricetag’ is considered the top brand in NAS. However, that higher price point and prioritising software over hardware has always been something of an annoyance to some of the more DiY or technically-versed buyers. These are users that want to adapt a solution themselves, want value for money and don’t want to be locked in too much to a single ecosystem. Into this debate, arrives Terramaster. Terramaster is a smaller company, that trades more on it’s hardware than its software – whilst still keeping things affordable. Changes are you came to this article because you have been comparing the Synology DS720+ from 2020 and the Terramaster F2-423 from 2022, trying to figure out how a Synology that is 2.5yrs old with lesser hardware is STILL more expensive than the 3 months old Terramaster with pretty current Prosumer hardware on board. So, that is the purpose of today’s comparison, to lay out how they differ, and how they are the same and ultimately help you decide which solution is best for you and your data in 2022/2023!

Synology DS720+ or Terramaster F2-423 NAS – Internal Hardware

Now, the hardware inside the Terramaster F2-423 is definitely the more modern (unsurprisingly given the 2+ year release difference) and, frankly, in terms of the traditional hardware available in the default model of each, the Synology is certainly showing its age a tiny bit. Both of these are 2-Bay SATA 3.5/2.5″ drive systems that support multiple 2 Disk RAID systems (JBOD, RAID 0 and RAID 1) and an internal Fluid/Flexible RAID (SHR or TRAID respectively) for better scaling of storage over time. As well as traditional storage, they also feature two M.2 NVMe 2280 SSD bays. Now, after this, the comparisons get a little all over the place! For a start, the M.2 NVMes on the Synology can only be used for read/write caching performance benefits, whereas the slots on the Terramaster can be used for caching AND raw storage pools (i.e to store data the same as the HDD bays). Both systems support the choice of BTRFS or EXT4 as the file system at initialization – though traditional file system performance (regardless of the hardware difference) seems better on the Synology NAS. They both arrive with DDR4 memory by default, but the Synology DS720+ arrives with 2GB and can only be upgraded to 8GB (CPU/Brand recommendation), whereas the Terramaster F2-423 arrives with 4GB and can be upgraded to 16GB. Before we dip into the main CPU differences, here are the internal specifications side-by-side:

Model Synology DS720+ NAS

 Terramaster F2-423 NAS

Number of SATA Bays x2 x2
Supported RAID RAID 0, 1 and SHR (Flexible) RAID 0, 1 and TRAID (Flexible)
Number of M.2 NVMe Bays (Gen) 2x NVMe M.2 2280 Gen 2 x4 2x NVMe M.2 2280 Gen 3×2
M.2 NVMe Deployment? Caching Only Caching and/or Storage Pools
CPU Intel Celeron J4125 CPU Intel Celeron N5105 CPU
Cores 4-Core 4-Core
Frequency 2.0Ghz-2.7Ghz 2.0Ghz-2.9Ghz
Integrated Graphics Yes Yes
Default Memory 2GB DDR4 SODIMM (Fixed) 4GB DDR4 SODIMM
Max Memory 6GB SODIMM – 1 SLOT 16GB SODIMM – 2 SLOTS
Storage Expandability Yes, eSATA connected DX517 No, but external USB RAID is Supported
Power Supplier 65W 65W

The CPU inside the Synology DS720+ NAS is an Intel J4125, released at the end of 2019 and although was a very popular CPU at the time (with many brand, including Terramaster featuring it in their systems), it has now seen a couple of newer generation quad-core Celeron’s for servers released in that time – the N5105 and J6412. Now the pandemic and its effect on the supply chains through 2020/2021 did make things rather messy in the Celeron family (at one point the N5105/N5095/N5095A were all running at the hardware/OEM level), but things have levelled out now and in terms of this scale of storage, most other brand have moved onto the N5105 or J6412 CPU. As you can see in the chart below (N5105 highlighted in particular, as it is the best of the three), in the release time between the Intel J4125 and N5105, there have been multiple improvements in architecture, efficiency and scalability of the CPU inside the Terramaster NAS.

Now, this margin of difference between the DS720+ and F2-423 NAS’ CPU is NOT Synology’s fault – we ARE comparing two devices that were commercially released two years apart! However, with the recent news that the next-gen DS723+ NAS is arriving with an AMD Embedded Ryzen Dual Core R1600 CPU (no integrated graphics, half the cores, higher TDP/Power use potential – but the same threads and higher clock speed), right now the DS720+ is still the go-to NAS for Prosumers/Plex Media users wanting a 2-Bay Synology NAS with an integrated graphics CPU for things like transcoding and conversion of HEVC/H.265 media on the server side. So, in THAT context, the hardware in the DS720+ still needs to be compared against that of the F2-423 and, sadly, is found a little lacking 2.5yrs on. The general hardware, performance and throughput of the Synology DS920+ NAS is still excellent, but if you are considering a NAS server for it’s hardware so you can run 3rd party processes and want value for money, the Terramaster F2-423 NAS is the hardware favourite here!

Synology DS720+ or Terramaster F2-423 NAS – Design

This is going to be a real area of contention for some users who are either in close proximity to the NAS they buy or are a little more sensitive to noise. I say this because the Terramaster F2-423 NAS has great hardware, but the design is a little less impressive. The chassis (arriving in a combination of plastic and metal internal structure) is a little more dated in design than the Synology DS720+. This is further underlined when you see that the F4 series used the same chassis material, design and shape as the F5 and F4 systems. The result is a NAS that is a bit wider than the DS720+. Additionally, the chassis feels a little more cost-effective/budget on the Terramster than the Synology. Synology has been using this form of design in their 2-Bay and 4-Bay chassis since around 2017 in the Diskstation series and it still looks pretty modern by comparison.

The rear of these two chassis reveals that they both arrive a single rear active cooling fan. These fans are designed to maintain the best possible internal running temperature, as NAS servers of this scale rarely have CPU fans and rely on well-placed heatsinks and strategically placed airflow throughout the system to keep the components running at the most efficient temperature 24×7. The fans on the Synology are a little more integrated into the shape, but are also a fraction larger (92cm sq on the Synology vs 80cm sq on the Terramaster). You might think this means that the Synology is the noisier of the two. However, in reality, the Terramaster is the tiniest pinch louder in ambient noise when in operation. This is due to several factors. The first is the fan is part of a larger external block on the rear of the device (as opposed to being contained within the larger casing). The other reason is that the Terramaster NAS chassis contains more metal (on the base and a much more structured use of aluminium internally by comparison to the Synology which features alot more plastic in it’s framework and external. The noise difference is very, VERY small, but will be increased a pinch more when using more industrially designed HDDs above 10TB (that have more platters thanks to helium-sealed drive technology, dedicated 7200RPM) because of the increased vibration and resulting hum, clicks and whirrs. It’s a very small difference, but the particular noise sensitive will notice this.

The final thing to discuss in the chassis design of the Synology DS720+ and Terramaster F2-423 is velitation and passive cooling. Both of these NAS drive’s have ventilation places around their casing to work in conjunction with those active cooling fans. The Synology arguably does a better job of things on this too, as not only do the sides of the casing have the familiar brand logo in a vented design, but the M.2 slots have ventilated covers on the base and even the trays have a bit more airflow between the drives. The Terramaster has a small amount of ventilation on the front between the bays, but the bulk of the passive ventilation on the F2-423 is on the base of the chassis (under the storage bays). Although the overall impact of these passive ventilation methods is still going to be heavily dependent on the fans and internal heatsinks, the design of the Synology DS720+ chassis just seems a little more thought out.

Overall, the SYNOLOGY design wins overall, thanks to its better middle ground design between airflow, chassis size and noise compared with the Terramaster F2-423. Although neither brand provides its solutions in a variety of colours, the Black and largely square Diskstation chassis will blend in better in most environments too. Next, let’s discuss network connectivity.

Synology DS720+ or Terramaster F2-423 NAS – Ports and Connections

The connections that a NAS arrives with will heavily dictate the access speed and performance between it and your client devices. This becomes especially true when your NAS is going to be accessed by a large number of users/tasks at any given time, as the result is the bandwidth (the maximum potential connection speed) being shared between them all. Now the 2020 released DS720+ arrives with arguably very dated connectivity. This is especially true when compared with the 2022 released F2-423.  Here is how they compare off the bat:

Model Synology DS720+ NAS

 Terramaster F2-423 NAS

Default Network Connections 2x 1GbE 2x 2.5GbE
Network Upgrade / PCIe Slot No No
USB 3.2 Gen 2 (10G) 0 2x
USB 3.2 Gen 1 (5G) 2x 0
USB 2.0 0 0
eSATA 1 0
HDMI No 1x HDMI 2.0 (Command Interface ONLY, no GUI)
Audio In/Out No No

So, alot of difference here to unpack. Some things are quite brand specific, such as the Synology DS720+ featuring an eSATA port that is used for the DX517 JBOD expansion 5-Bay. The same goes for the Terramaster F2-423 having an HDMI port for local (command level) access with a USB Keyboard, something Synology have never provided outside of very specific Surveillance solutions. Bt the areas we CAN compare are the USB connectivity and the network connectivity. The USB ports on the Synology are USB 3.2 Gen 1 (5Gb/s) and have limited support in the system software (DSM), but are largely used for external storage drives and UPS devices, that’s about it (you can assign them to a VM). The USB ports on the Terramaster on the other hand are USB 3.2 Gen 2 (10Gb/s), so twice as higher bandwidth than the Synology, as well as supporting a larger number of USB devices (so storage and UPS’ like the Synology, but also devices such as printers, scanners, network adapters and WiFi dongles). The next big difference is that the Synology arrives with two 1GbE Network ports (these can be combined via LAG/Port-Trunking to 2GbE with a smart switch) and the Terramaster has 2x 2.5GbE ports (which can also be combined too). This means the Terramster has a significantly higher external network bandwidth available. You will still need to be using a greater than Gigabit Router or Switch in order to take advantage of these speeds, but given that now you can get USB-to-2.5GbE adapters for as little as £20, this is getting easier to take utilize. If you are in a pure 1GbE network environment and have zero intention to upgrade to 2.5G or 10G in the next few years, you can largely ignore this advantage, but given that an increasing number of day-to-day devices are arriving with 2.5G at the same price as 1G (ISP Routers with WiFi 6, Prosumer routers, Switches, PC Motherboards, etc), its tough to overlook that extra external connectivity that the F2-423 provides here.

Synology DS720+ or Terramaster F2-423 NAS – Software

On the subject of NAS software, this is where the Synology NAS is exceedingly strong! Although the Terramaster NAS platform has seen a huge number of improvements in recent years (TOS version 5 was launched in Summer 2022), with new apps, services and modes included, Synology and DSM is still considered the dominant force in NAS software. The Synology DSM platform feels alot more responsive, has a huge number of first-party applications (As well as mobile and desktop client applications too) and although 3rd party application support is available in a number of their tools, the real strength in the Synology software is how the brand releases it’s own 1st party alternatives (allowing you to create a single ecosystem of tools for your NAS storage and network). Use Skype or Whatsapp? Then you can use Synology Chat. Use DropBox or Google Drive for team sharing and local storage synchronization? Use Synology Drive. Use Google Docs, Google Cloud Space and Google Workspace? Then use Synology Collaboration Suite and Active Backup. Plex or Emby? Use Synology Video Station instead, as it has metadata scraping and no subscription. Even high-end business is covered. Synology Virtual Machine Manager instead of Hyper-V or VMware, Surveillance Station instead of Milestone – the list is huge AND crucially, all of these apps are compatible with 3rd party tools too, whether it is to sync with them to create a bare-metal NAS backup, or to open and continue from your 3rd party setup into a 1st party setup. Below is my full review of Terramater TOS 5 and Synology DSM:

Now, this isn’t to say that the Terramaster TOS system is not good, it is better than it has ever been, very responsive, features improved 1st party apps in its latest version (new AI-powered Photo recognition tool Terra Photos, Surveillance Center application, VM support, improved muti-tier and multi-site backup manager and more), but the apps and the GUI does not feel quite as polished as the Synology platform and you definitely get the feeling that a larger % of the cost of a terramaster goes towards the hardware than the software. If you are only planning on using the NAS as a target drive for your 3rd party tools, then the Trramaster will support you well. Just know that the total Hardware+software type buyer will want to opt for Synology and the award-winning DSM.

Synology DS720+ or Terramaster F2-423 NAS – Conclusion and Verdict

Overall the choice between the Synology DS720+ and the Terramaster F2-423 NAS comes down to too main factors. 1) Do you prioritize Hardware or Software? As the Terramaster is the best for the former and the Synology is much better for the latter! 2) What do you expect from the NAS system? If you want a system that is designed to just be your storage system and sit in the background and do its job, then the Terramaster will not only be the more economical choice, but it will also be the one that is better for direct and no-frills tasks. If however, you want a more dynamic system or one that you plan on wrapping your small business around – then the Synology will be the better choice, as it has been designed with precisely this kind of user and deployment in mind. If you came to this article wondering why the Terramaster NAS online always seems to be more affordable/cheaper in price, I hope this guide helped you understand. Both the DS720+ and F2-423 or among the best examples of what each brand has on offer right now in 2022 – but it is a case of what you, the end user, want for your money.

Synology DS720+ NAS

 Terramaster F2-423 NAS

Reasons to Buy Reasons to Buy
More User Friendly with noticeably more polished Apps, Tools and GUI

Synology HybridRAID Migration and Expansion

Includes 1st party apps to replace/sync with your existing 3rd party ones

Better File Throughput internally

The BEST NAS Surveillance Application

Enterprise Grade tool Active Backup Suite

1st Party Cloud offering in Synology C2

Much More Affordable and Regularly on Offer

TRAID Flexible RAID

Easy Software Switch to TrueNAS (HERE)

2.5GbE by Default

USB 3.2 Gen 2 (10Gb) Connectivity for Storage

Wide HDD and SSD Compatibility (upto 22TB – Dec ’22)

TOS 5 has an AI Photos App and Surveillance (Entry Level)


Where to Buy a Product
amzamexmaestrovisamaster 24Hfree delreturn VISIT RETAILER ➤ 
amzamexmaestrovisamaster 24Hfree delreturn VISIT RETAILER ➤

Need More Help Choosing the right NAS?

Choosing the right data storage solution for your needs can be very intimidating and it’s never too late to ask for help. With options ranging from NAS to DAS, Thunderbolt to SAS and connecting everything up so you can access all your lovely data at the touch of a button can be a lot simpler than you think. If you want some tips, guidance or help with everything from compatibility to suitability of a solution for you, why not drop me a message below and I will get back to you as soon as possible with what you should go for, its suitability and the best place to get it. This service is designed without profit in mind and in order to help you with your data storage needs, so I will try to answer your questions as soon as possible.

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This description contains links to Amazon. These links will take you to some of the products mentioned in today's content. As an Amazon Associate, I earn from qualifying purchases. Visit the NASCompares Deal Finder to find the best place to buy this device in your region, based on Service, Support and Reputation - Just Search for your NAS Drive in the Box Below

Need Advice on Data Storage from an Expert?

We want to keep the free advice on NASCompares FREE for as long as we can. Since this service started back in Jan '18, We have helped hundreds of users every month solve their storage woes, but we can only continue to do this with your support. So please do choose to buy at Amazon US and Amazon UK on the articles when buying to provide advert revenue support or to donate/support the site below. Finally, for free advice about your setup, just leave a message in the comments below here at NASCompares.com and we will get back to you. Need Help? Where possible (and where appropriate) please provide as much information about your requirements, as then I can arrange the best answer and solution to your needs. Do not worry about your e-mail address being required, it will NOT be used in a mailing list and will NOT be used in any way other than to respond to your enquiry. [contact-form-7]  

Support What We Do


support what we do
    Terms and Conditions Alternatively, why not ask me on the ASK NASCompares forum, by clicking the button below. This is a community hub that serves as a place that I can answer your question, chew the fat, share new release information and even get corrections posted. I will always get around to answering ALL queries, but as a one-man operation, I cannot promise speed! So by sharing your query in the ASK NASCompares section below, you can get a better range of solutions and suggestions, alongside my own.  

The Synology DS923+ vs Terramaster F4-423 NAS – Best for your Budget?

22 novembre 2022 à 18:00

Synology DS923+ or Terramaster F4-423 NAS – Which Should You Buy?

Remember when buying a NAS drive was easy? For such a long time, the general hardware that all the NAS brands were offering was generally comparable (Celeron CPU, 2/4GB Memory, coupled of 1GbE and USB) and it was only when you delved into the software that you could see the big differences. However, 2022 has really thrown a spanner in the works and although all the big-name brands (not just Synology and Terramaster) have released new hardware into the market, they are all so different this time around! The F4-423 from Terramaster (largely considered the more cost-effective and value arm of the NAS industry) arrived in Summer ’22 and featured 2.5GbE Gen 3 PCIe M.2 slots and a new Intel Celeron. Meanwhile, Synology held off right till the end of 2022 to release their DS923+ with an Optional 10GbE upgrade, switching to an AMD-embedded Ryzen processor and ramping the memory up to business-class ECC modules. If this is your first tentative steps into the world of NAS and you are considering a Synology or Terramaster NAS, you would be forgiven for being a little confused by these recent changes by the brands in 2022/2023 and wondering which one of them is best served to store your data. So today I want to compare the flagship 4-Bays from Synology and Terramaster to help you decent which one is best for you.

Terramaster F4-423vs Synology DS923+ NAS – Internal Hardware

These 4-Bay NAS dives from Synology and Terramaster have always arrived as Intel Celeron or Pentium-powered solutions – but in 2022, Synology changed tac and decided to move the DS923+ to an AMD chip. Its predecessor, the DS920+ NAS from 2020, first arrived with a 4 Core Intel Celeron Processor that featured integrated graphics, 4-8GB of DDR4 2666Mhz memory and NVMe SSD upgrade slots. In the two years since its release though, Synology clearly decided to make some big changes in the DS923+ to make it considerably more scalable and general business/file-ops focused. The newer 4-Bay Diskstation features a dual-core AMD R1600 that, although arriving with half the cores of the Celeron in the Terramaster F4-423 has more threads, has a higher CPU frequency and can have it’s frequency increased further in turbo/burst when needed. That said, users will be surprised to learn that this CPU also does not feature embedded graphics, so therefore the DS923+ will be less CPU efficient at handling complex multimedia tasks or generally more graphically demanding operations. The double thread count of the Celeron in the Terramaster will make a difference certainly, but with the R1600 CPU having a higher power consumption and threads (though more efficient) will not be as effective in operations as having more cores. You can learn more about the main user differences in our video below (in which me and Eddie take to either side of the Emb.Ryzen v Celeron debate) to see their respective strengths and weaknesses.

Though both systems feature 4GB of DDR4 memory, the DS923+ has the much higher pedigree and wins here thanks to its use of much more impressive ECC (error code correction) memory to identify and repair any bit-level write errors (AVOIDING BITROT) and can also be scaled to a considerably higher 32GB of memory (with the Terramaster F4-423 NAS maxing out at 16GB). Returning to those M.2 NVMe slots, both system feature 2 bays that can be used for SSD storage upgrades, although both the DS923+ and F4-423 support SSD caching (when a pool of SSDs is used to speed up data write/read in conjunction with the larger HDD RAID array), the Terramaster is the only one that also allows this to be used as a standalone storage pool and volumes. This is the first of several key differences between the Terramaster F4-423 and Synology DS923+ NAS that show the divide in hardware between these units. Now, if Synology were to allow NVMe SSD usage for raw storage pools and volumes (something of a rumour that is floating around about DSM 7.2 allowing this feature – which I am still looking into at the time of writing), that would be a different story, as the DS923+ is running on PCIe3 lane architecture, with the bays inside the NAS likely being M.2 NVMe PCIe Gen 3 x2 or x4 (so 2,000-4,000MB/s bandwidth). But again, this is still a very, very tenuous rumour at this stage and therefore cannot be counted on.

 

Model Synology DS923+ NAS

 Terramaster F4-423 NAS

Number of SATA Bays x4 x4
Supported RAID RAID 0, 1, 5, 6 and SHR (Flexible) RAID 0, 1, 5, 6 and TRAID (Flexible)
Number of M.2 NVMe Bays (Gen) 2x NVMe M.2 2280 Gen 3 x4 (TBC) 2x NVMe M.2 2280 Gen 3×1
M.2 NVMe Deployment? Caching Only (at the time of writing) Caching and/or Storage Pools
CPU AMD Embedded Ryzen Intel Celeron N5105 CPU
Cores 2-Core 4-Core
Frequency 2.6-3.1Ghz 2.0Ghz-2.9Ghz
Integrated Graphics No Yes
Default Memory 4GB DDR4 SODIMM ECC 4GB DDR4 SODIMM
Max Memory 32GB SODIMM – 2 SLOTS 32GB SODIMM – 2 SLOTS
Storage Expandability Yes, eSATA connected DX517 No, but external USB RAID is Supported
Power Supplier 100W 90W

The Intel Celeron inside the Terramaster F4-423 and its integrated graphics are definitely going to make it more popular with Plex NAS users. Tasks that require more advanced graphical techniques, such as encode, decode, QuickSync-supported tasks, viewing images that can be manipulated in the viewer and running of anything presented in HEVC/H.265 compression are going to benefit from the graphical toolkit present in the N5105 CPU, whereas the R1600 will need to complete these tasks less efficiently, with raw power. For example, earlier in 2022 we compared the two NAS’ with VERY similar hardware to the DS923+ and F4-423,  the QNAP TS-464 against the Synology DS1522+ NAS (which also runs on the AMD R1600 CPU) on 4K Plex playback. In those tests, both the Intel N5105 and AMD R1600 were about to playback UHD 4K Media upto 60Mbps bitrate in H.264 equally well, with the embedded graphics on the celeron not presenting any advantage. However, when it came to transcoding and converting HEVC/H.265 media in practice, the R1600 struggled (hitting 100% CPU utilization almost immediately). Now, there are lots of ways to get around the HEVC/H265 barrier. You can:

  • Use Media Client Hardware for watching your Plex Server Media that is powerful enough to allow ‘client side’ conversions
  • Only Use H.264 Compressed media
  • Use a client hardware device that includes an HEVC/H.265 Licence purchase option

However, if you are running your Plex Media streaming to mobile devices (many of which do not allow client-side hardware conversions) or an Amazon Fire Stick (same again), these will rely quite heavily on the NAS doing the heavy lifting in the event of you needing HEV/H265 content modified. So, although BOTH the Terramaster F4-423 and Synology DS923+ NAS are going to be good for Plex in native playback, when it comes to media that is going to need some extra horsepower server-side, the Terramaster F4-423 NAS has the better internal Hardware. Also, the power use/efficiency of the Intel Celeron in 24×7 use is going to typically be lower in like-for-like use cases (with a TDP rating of 10W on the Celeron vs 25W on the R1600 – but these represent max usage/non-typical). Finally, the Intel Celeron in the Terramaster is a 4-core processor, double that of the R1600 at 2-core. 4 Cores means that you can spread those dedicated cores to other processes more effectively and present a larger degree of processing power to those tasks. Now, the DS923+ and it’s AMD R1600 does counter all of these points with some impressive strengths of it’s own. For a start, that much higher base and turbo frequency of 2.6Ghz > 3.1Ghz. This means that you have a much more powerful NAS at your disposal to get most other tasks done and if you are not focused on those graphical areas mentioned earlier that the N5105 favours, the R1600 is going to get most other tasks done quicker and/or have more resources to spread out to more users at once.

Synology DS923+ or Terramaster F4-423 NAS – Design

This is going to be a real area of contention for some users who are either in close proximity to the NAS they buy or are a little more sensitive to noise. I say this because the Terramaster F4-423 NAS has great hardware, but the design is a little less impressive. The chassis (arriving in a combination of plastic and metal internal structure) is a little more dated in design than the Synology DS923+. This is further underlined when you see that the F4 series used the same chassis as the F5 5-Bay (it just removes the additional SATA Bay and bay, but maintains the same width_. The result is a NAS that is a bit wider than the DS923+. Additionally, the chassis feels a little more cost-effective/budget on the Terramster than the Synology. Synology has been using this 4-Bay chassis since around 2017 in this product series and it still looks pretty modern by comparison.

The rear of these two chassis reveals that they both arrive with two active cooling fans. These fans are designed to maintain the best possible internal running temperature, as NAS servers of this scale rarely have CPU fans and rely on well-placed heatsinks and strategically placed airflow throughout the system to keep the components running at the most efficient temperature 24×7. The fans on the Synology are a little more subtle, but are also a fraction larger (92cm sq each on the Synology vs 80cm sq on the Terramaster). You might think this means that the Synology is the noisier of the two. However, in reality, the Terramaster is the tiniest pinch louder in ambient noise when in operation. This is due to several factors. The first is that the fans are part of a larger external block on the rear of the device (as opposed to being contained within the larger casing). The other reason is that the Terramaster NAS chassis contains more metal (on the base and a much more structured use of aluminium internally by comparison to the Synology which features alot more plastic in it’s framework and external. The noise difference is very, VERY small, but will be increased a pinch more when using more industrially designed HDDs above 10TB (that have more platters thanks to helium-sealed drive technology, dedicated 7200RPM) because of the increased vibration and resulting hum, clicks and whirrs. It’s a very small difference, but the particular noise sensitive will notice this.

The final thing to discuss in the chassis design of the Synology DS923+ and Terramaster F4-423 is velitation and passive cooling. Both of these NAS drive’s have ventilation places around their casing to work in conjunction with those active cooling fans. The Synology arguably does a better job of things on this too, as not only do the sides of the casing have the familiar brand logo in a vented design, but the M.2 slots have ventilated covers on the base and even the trays have a bit more airflow between the drives. The Terramaster has a small amount of ventilation on the front between the bays, but the bulk of the passive ventilation on the F4-423 is on the base of the chassis (under the storage bays). Although the overall impact of these passive ventilation methods is still going to be heavily dependent on the fans and internal heatsinks, the design of the Synology DS923+ chassis just seems a little more thought out.

Overall, the SYNOLOGY design wins overall, thanks to its better middle ground design between airflow, chassis size and noise compared with the Terramaster F4-423. Although neither brand provides its solutions in a variety of colours, the Black and largely square Diskstation chassis will blend in better in most environments too. Next, let’s discuss network connectivity.

Synology DS923+ or Terramaster F4-423 NAS – Ports and Connections

The connections that a NAS arrives with will heavily dictate the access speed and performance between it and your client devices. This becomes especially true when your NAS is going to be accessed by a large number of users/tasks at any given time, as the result is the bandwidth (the maximum potential connection speed) being shared between them all. Now the  DS923+ arrives with arguably very dated connectivity (in its default state, but scalability is possible). This is especially true when compared with the F4-423.  Here is how they compare off the bat:

Model Synology DS923+ NAS

 Terramaster F4-423 NAS

Default Network Connections 2x 1GbE 2x 2.5GbE
Network Upgrade / PCIe Slot Yes, PCIe Gen 3×2 for E10G22-t1-mini 10G Upgrade No
USB 3.2 Gen 2 (10G) 0 2x
USB 3.2 Gen 1 (5G) 2x 0
USB 2.0 0 0
eSATA 1 0
HDMI No 1x HDMI 2.0 (Command Interface ONLY, no GUI)
Audio In/Out No No

So, alot of difference here to unpack. Some things are quite brand specific, such as the Synology DS923+ featuring an eSATA port that is used for the DX517 JBOD expansion 5-Bay. The same goes for the Terramaster F4-423 having an HDMI port for local (command level) access with a USB Keyboard, something Synology have never provided outside of very specific Surveillance solutions. Bt the areas we CAN compare are the USB connectivity and the network connectivity. The USB ports on the Synology are USB 3.2 Gen 1 (5Gb/s) and have limited support in the system software (DSM), but are largely used for external storage drives and UPS devices, that’s about it (you can assign them to a VM). The USB ports on the Terraamster on the other hand are USB 3.2 Gen 2 (10Gb/s), so twice as higher bandwidth than the Synology, as well as supporting a larger number of USB devices (so storage and UPS’ like the Synology, but also devices such as printers, scanners, network adapters and WiFi dongles). The next big difference is that the Synology arrives with two 1GbE Network ports (these can be combined via LAG/Port-Trunking to 2GbE with a smart switch) and the Terramaster has 2x 2.5GbE ports (which can also be combined too). This means the Terramster has a significantly higher external network bandwidth available. You will still need to be using a greater than Gigabit Router or Switch in order to take advantage of these speeds, but given that now you can get USB-to-2.5GbE adapters for as little as £20, this is getting easier to take utilize. If you are in a pure 1GbE network environment and have zero intention to upgrade to 2.5G or 10G in the next few years, you can largely ignore this advantage, but given that an increasing number of day-to-day devices are arriving with 2.5G at the same price as 1G (ISP Routers with WiFi 6, Prosumer routers, Switches, PC Motherboards, etc), its tough to overlook that extra external connectivity that the F4-423 provides here in the default/day 1 state. However, things can change if you take advantage of the network upgrade slot of the DS923+ NAS.

Moving away from the CPU, we CAN talk about one the stand-out features of the Synology DS923+ NAS that has been demanded for quite a long time – 10GbE support. Now, before we get too excited, it’s really important to once again highlight that this is OPTIONAL 10GbE and available via an additional purchase of the E10G22-T1-mini upgrade module. The DS923+ by default arrives with 1GbE network ports, but the option of 10GbE is very welcome indeed, though many will wonder why they didn’t just roll this in and increase the DS923+ NAS price a fraction. There are many who argue that 2.5GbEsuch as it is found on the F4-423 NAS is still something of a fad (with 1GbE still massively available in it’s decades of use and 10GbE becoming more affordable as a client hardware upgrade with interchangeable hardware and backwards compatibility with legacy devices) but there is also the question of future-proofing to consider. When you buy ANY piece of hardware, you are buying it BOTH to be compatible with current hardware trends AND to remain useful in the future. 2.5GbE has gained traction thanks to $25 adapters over USB supported on Windows/Mac, affordable network cards, growing wireless network adoption of WiFi 6/6e and more hardware peripherals proving 2.5GbE at the same cost as 1GbE in 2022. Plus, a 2.5GbE NAS will still give you 250-279MB/s connected to a 10GbE network if/when you upgrade to Copper/RJ45/10GBASE-T. So, although the inclusion of optional 10GbE on the DS923+ with the E10G22-T1-mini adapter IS a very welcome addition, the lack of 2.5GbE will certainly be noticed!

The 10GbE upgrade for the DS923+ is an incredibly easy process – with the E10G22-T1-mini module being significantly easier than traditional PCIe Card upgrades. Arriving on a PCIe Gen 3×2 board, this singe port accessory slots into the back (power down necessary, as this is a PCIe upgrade) and immediately adds the 1,000MB/s+ bandwidth connection to your DS923+. As this NAS is a 4-Bay system, there is the question of whether there is enough media throughput the saturate the full 10GBASE-T connection. Using a fully SATA SSD populated device will likely full/close-to saturate the 10G connection, as would using the 5-bay DX517 expansion in a combined RAID with the main 4-Bays (the DX517 connects over eSATA which is capped at 6Gb/s – so a combined RAID with the primary storage is the only way you are going to hit 1,000MB/s), but what about if you are only using the main 4x DS923+ bays with 3.5″ hard drives?

Luckily, I can answer the question of how the DS923+ NAS CPU and 4 hard drives will perform over 10GbE now. Previously here on the NASCompares, I was fortunate enough to run ATTO tests on the DS1522+ (same R1600 CPU, 8GB Memory) with RAID 0 and RAID 5 with four WD Red Pro 22TB Hard Drives. Now, it is worth remembering that these are NOT your common, everyday SATA hard drives and are designed to be rugged, high-performance disks (7200RPM, 512MB Cache, 10x 2.2TB platters, etc). In a RAID 0 and RAID 5 setup and in particular file size tests, full saturation of read transfers of 1.15GB/s was achieved, with write performance peaking at around 800-900MB/s. Now these ARE artificial tests (so, not really representative of everyday use), but nevertheless, very compelling results for 4 drives over 10GbE and DO indicate that the DS923+ hardware is sufficient to saturate the E10G22-T1-mini upgrade. More domestic/smaller scale HDDs such as the WD Red Plus or Seagate Ironwolf drives will likely cap at around 600-700MB/s at most.

Note – You can READ the full article that details all the tests and results of the Synology DS1522+ NAS and WD Red Pro 22TBs over 10GbE HERE. Alternatively, you can watch my YouTube video on these tests (with 5GbE testing too) here on the NASCompares YouTube Channel.

Synology DS923+ or Terramaster F4-423 NAS – Software

On the subject of NAS software, this is where the Synology NAS is exceedingly strong! Although the Terramaster NAS platform has seen a huge number of improvements in recent years (TOS version 5 was launched in Summer 2022), with new apps, services and modes included, Synology and DSM is still considered the dominant force in NAS software. The Synology DSM platform feels alot more responsive, has a huge number of first-party applications (As well as mobile and desktop client applications too) and although 3rd party application support is available in a number of their tools, the real strength in the Synology software is how the brand releases it’s own 1st party alternatives (allowing you to create a single ecosystem of tools for your NAS storage and network). Use Skype or Whatsapp? Then you can use Synology Chat. Use DropBox or Google Drive for team sharing and local storage synchronization? Use Synology Drive. Use Google Docs, Google Cloud Space and Google Workspace? Then use Synology Collaboration Suite and Active Backup. Plex or Emby? Use Synology Video Station instead, as it has metadata scraping and no subscription. Even high-end business is covered. Synology Virtual Machine Manager instead of Hyper-V or VMware, Surveillance Station instead of Milestone – the list is huge AND crucially, all of these apps are compatible with 3rd party tools too, whether it is to sync with them to create a bare-metal NAS backup, or to open and continue from your 3rd party setup into a 1st party setup. Below is my full review of Terramater TOS 5 and Synology DSM:

Now, this isn’t to say that the Terramaster TOS system is not good, it is better than it has ever been, very responsive, features improved 1st party apps in its latest version (new AI-powered Photo recognition tool Terra Photos, Surveillance Center application, VM support, improved muti-tier and multi-site backup manager and more), but the apps and the GUI does not feel quite as polished as the Synology platform and you definitely get the feeling that a larger % of the cost of a terramaster goes towards the hardware than the software. If you are only planning on using the NAS as a target drive for your 3rd party tools, then the Trramaster will support you well. Just know that the total Hardware+software type buyer will want to opt for Synology and the award-winning DSM.

Synology DS923+ or Terramaster F4-423 NAS – Conclusion and Verdict

Many home and prosumer users that are comparing these two NAS in terms of hardware are doing so because of Plex Media Server support (with that Intel inside the Terramaster doing alot of the heavy lifting here). However, you have to look at the F4-423 and DS923+ NAS as complete hardware+software solutions and are priced as such. So, therefore the choice between the Synology DS923+ and the Terramaster F4-423 NAS comes down to two main factors. 1) Do you prioritize Hardware or Software? As the Terramaster is the best for the former and the Synology is much better for the latter! 2) What do you expect from the NAS system? If you want a system that is designed to just be your storage system and sit in the background and do its job, then the Terramaster will not only be the more economical choice, but it will also be the one that is better for direct and no-frills tasks. If however, you want a more dynamic system or one that you plan on wrapping your small business around – then the Synology will be the better choice, as it has been designed with precisely this kind of user and deployment in mind. If you came to this article wondering why the Terramaster NAS online always seems to be more affordable/cheaper in price, I hope this guide helped you understand. Both the DS923+ and F4-423 or among the best examples of what each brand has on offer right now in 2022 – but it is a case of what you, the end user, want for your money. Then you have to factor in the upgrade option of the Synology that allows you to scale it up to 10GbE (for around £129+) and it’s CPU upto 32GB ECC Memory combo that is designed much more towards throughput and performance than graphical management, so in a somewhat ‘tortoise and the hare’ style, the Synology has the potential to outperform the Terramaster here down the line. Then again, Plex users who are reliant on server-side transcoding/conversions (eg thanks to H.265/HEVC compression barriers) are going to have a CONSIDERABLY better experience on the F4-423 when playing back these files.

Synology DS923+ NAS

 Terramaster F4-423 NAS

Reasons to Buy Reasons to Buy
10GbE Upgradability

More User Friendly with noticeably more polished Apps, Tools and GUI

Allows a greater Max Memory of 32GB, which is also ECC

Synology HybridRAID Migration and Expansion

Includes 1st party apps to replace/sync with your existing 3rd party ones

Better File Throughput internally

The BEST NAS Surveillance Application

Enterprise Grade tool Active Backup Suite

Much More Affordable and Regularly on Offer

Better Plex HEVC/H.265 Media Management on the Server side

TRAID Flexible RAID

Easy Software Switch to TrueNAS (HERE)

2.5GbE by Default

USB 3.2 Gen 2 (10Gb) Connectivity for Storage

Wide HDD and SSD Compatibility (upto 22TB – Dec ’22)

TOS 5 has an AI Photos App and Surveillance (Entry Level)


Where to Buy a Product
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