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Split-brain DNS deployment using Windows Server DNS policy

30 novembre 2022 à 15:21

It is common for organizations to host websites and other resources that may be accessible from external and internal clients on the LAN. Traditionally, organizations may have maintained two different DNS servers for this reason. Microsoft's split-brain DNS deployment using DNS policy helps consolidate these resources using Active Directory-integrated zones.

The post Split-brain DNS deployment using Windows Server DNS policy first appeared on 4sysops.

Wi-Fi not working? Analyze with free Wi-Fi stumblers

5 novembre 2022 à 05:43

Your Wi-Fi isn't working? When it comes to building out, configuring, and troubleshooting a wireless network, there are valuable tools that help with all three of these tasks. Utilities that allow you to analyze wireless networks are called Wi-Fi stumblers.

The post Wi-Fi not working? Analyze with free Wi-Fi stumblers first appeared on 4sysops.

Synology WRX560 Router Review

27 octobre 2022 à 16:00

Synology WRX560 Router Review – Premium Networking?

The importance of a competent router in your home or business environment has never been more pertinent than RIGHT NOW! Finding that sweet spot for your internet access needs of high bandwidth, ease of access, yet secure and multi-layered is a terrifically difficult middle ground to achieve. Alongside this, the less technical savvy user doesn’t want to spend their days learning the intricacies of firewalls, port forwarding, encrypted authentication processes and micro-managing the privileges of their client user base. Synology’s range of routers first arrived on the scene back in 2015 and in the years since has evolved into a decent range of solutions, all of which have been designed to make the arguably complex and technical subject of router management much, much easier. Still, we ARE talking about a premium/paid router solution when most users can get a free router/basic-modem from their internet service provider (ISP) with their data plan – so in today’s review of the Synology WRX560 Router, we need to answer three main questions, 1) How does this router stack against the average free domestic ISP Router, 2) What advantages does this solution provide to the end user that cannot be found elsewhere, and 3) How does the WRX560 compare with other routers in the Synology device lineup right now? Let’s take a closer look at this new WiFi 6 and 2.5GbE-equipped router and see if it deserves your data!

Note – This review makes numerous references to other Synology Routers that are currently available. You can find my review of these in the links below:

Synology RT6600ax Review

Synology MR2200ac Review 

WRX560 Review Chapters

Synology WRX560 Router Review – Quick Conclusion

The Synology WRX560 is definitely a good router and one that is dripping in the charm, design and user-friendly software presentation that Synology has been committed to since their very first router. In the brand’s efforts to create its perfect eco-system (where is the Synology switch?), the WRX560 alongside the earlier 2022 released RT6600ax makes alot of sense. It is designed to expand the coverage and services that are available to Synology users, as well as make the overly complex subject of network and wifi management into something genuinely intuitive, accessible and easy for the average consumer. There is only so-far that you can take this (make it too simple and you run the risk of an insecure or inefficient network), but SRM is arguably as close as it gets to a perfect world for this. The hardware is reasonable, though a little lacking behind recent releases at a similar price point such as the Google Nest Pro with WiFi 6E rolled out this same week, but WiFi 6E and 6Ghz utilization still remains at a low %. I started the review of the Synology WRX560 with three questions.

How does this router stack against the average free domestic ISP Router? In terms of price, it is a big ask for many low-level users and those who just want an easy internet gateway. However, in practically every other way it is vastly superior, with WiFi 6, 2.5Gbs and the incredibly SRM platform included. Domestic/ISP routers are starting to edge fractionally closer to including some of these services, but to a significantly lower level. But they are still a long, LONG way away from this level of usability and control with such ease.

What advantages does this solution provide to the end user that cannot be found elsewhere? In short, features like the support if 5.9Ghz allowing a greater number of higher performing 160Mhz connections, all the features and services of SRM, additional optional NAS Apps, entry-level NAS style storage services and just an inarguably level of control of your home network and security of client users. There is simply no software platform that brings all this other than Synology right now. The hardware seems a touch too ‘safe’ and ‘standard’, but the software, services and bandwidth management is unparalleled.

How does the WRX560 compare with other routers in the Synology device lineup right now?

THIS is something that, right now, is a little tougher to answer. The launch price of the WRX560 is at a level that puts it a tad too close to that of the significantly more hardware/bandwidth capable RT6600ax (which has benefitted from more time in the market and a price tag floating around the £260-270 market at the time of writing. Down the line, as the pricing for the WRX560 distances itself inevitably from the RRP, this should resolve itself over time. But right now at launch, you can get the RT6600ax (with the same software and better hardware) for just a small extra quid versus that of the WRX560 Router.

Overall, the Synology WRX560 Router is a solid price kit that might have benefitted from being released BEFORE the RT6600ax companion router, but still a great piece of kit that is a fraction diminished by tough hardware choices (USB/2.5G).

SOFTWARE - 10/10
HARDWARE - 8/10
PERFORMANCE - 8/10
PRICE - 7/10
VALUE - 7/10


8.0
PROS
👍🏻SRM is still top-notch and easily still one of the best (if not THE best) router software in the market in 2022
👍🏻The Support of 5.9Ghz Radio Frequency sets this ahead of ALOT of routers right now in terms of maximum bandwidth possible
👍🏻2.5GbE port for your WAN or a LAN excellent
👍🏻A huge degree of user profile and device clustering options to create an intelligently controlled but still user-friendly network
👍🏻LAN/WAN failover Support (including with a SIM Dongle or Phone tethering)
👍🏻USB Drive Support is treated exceptionally well with several Synology NAS class applications available
👍🏻The inbuilt threat prevention database deserves more credit/attention than it seems to
👍🏻Synology Safe Access - Solid 10/10 Service!
CONS
👎🏻A single USB Port limits the use of both an External storage drive AND 2nd mobile SIM failover connection at once
👎🏻A single 2.5GbE port is a shame
👎🏻Quite large compared with many other Synology Routers
👎🏻Quite expensive given more affordable WiFi 6 routers in the market and 6E making a name for itself, as well as the price point being alot closer to that of the RT6600ax right now

Where to Buy a Product
VISIT RETAILER ➤ 
VISIT RETAILER ➤

Synology WRX560 Router Review – Presentation

The retail box of the Synology WRX560 Router is pretty standard stuff from Synology, arriving in a standard recycled cardboard container with a system-branded label, but also the retail box is printed with WRX560 specific details of the router’s capabilities and hardware specifications. All fairly standard stuff and slightly more detail than the average Synology product, as this item is a little more likely to make it to a physical retail shelf than the rest of their portfolio.

The inside of the retail box is a fraction different than the previous Synology router range (and indeed most other routers on the market) that arrive with that ‘egg carton’ style pulped cardboard-shaped inner layer, instead favouring a much more layered panel design. Obviously, the router itself takes up the lion’s share of the space, arriving in a paper fabric Synology branded cover. Synology has (in both their NAS and routers) always been quite ‘aware’ of maintaining a brand image and design in both the internal and external of their products and the WRX560 router is no exception to this. I am not going to say that the packaging we are seeing here is massively protective (if you compared it with their larger NAS systems), but this is quite a robust router casing and I think we can let it slide on this one this time.

The included accessories are quite small in number, with the retail box arriving with the WRX560 router, setup instructions, 2-year warranty information, an external 36W PSU (with regional mains adapter changing clip – only UK was included in my version but the appropriate clip will arrive if you purchase ‘in-country’) and a 1M Cat 5e RJ45 LAN cable. This is pretty much everything you are going to need (most other routers, including ISP routers, only supply a single LAN cable and if you purchase any RJ45-equipped client hardware, it will have its own cable) and therefore the result is the WRX560 being a small but low waste retail kit that I imagine is pretty high in the recycle/sustainability stakes generally.

That’s really it for the retail kit of the WRX560. Setup is done with via a PC/Mac desktop system via the web browser (free Synology Assistant client software is an option) or using an iOS or Android device with the Synology DS Router application, so there is no inclusive driver software needed. A small but competent selection of hardware. Let’s discuss the design of the Synology WRX560 Router.

Synology WRX560 Router Review – Design

The physical design of the Synology WRX560 is…well… it is quite a bit different than the rest of the Synology Routers that we have seen over the last 5+ years. Unlike the Synology RT1900ac, RT2600ac and RT6600ac routers that were a lot more horizontal in their design and featured external antennae, the WRX560 is a great deal more vertical, like the MR2200ac. However, even then, Synology went a little bit rough on the aesthetics and shape and make something that looks like a Synology re-imagining of a traditional tall home ISP router – whilst keeping that slick Synology design. That said, I cannot shake the thought that it looks like the current generation of stormtrooper helmets. Not a bad thing, just something I am now unable to shake from my mind.

When information on the Synology WRX560 Router arrived, the very first thing that struck me was that although the general colour, casing flourishes and overall brand aesthetic was in line with the rest of the Synology Router line-up, it did look quite large. When I finally got my hands on it, that turned out to be very true! Arriving at 233 mm x 194 mm x 66 mm in size, that makes it noticeable larger than the rather modest scale MR2200ac WiFi 5 mesh router. This is almost certainly so that the 2T2R + 4T4R high-gain dipole (2.4 GHz/5 GHz) antennae inside are spaced out as much as possible, at the corners of the system. The Synology branding is unavoidable though and overall, I do like the design. That said, I am not a big fan of the name, with the bulk of Synology’s routers having the ‘RT’ prefix, there were moments in early leaks/appearances of this system when it had the name ‘RT3000ax’, which makes ALOT more sense in line with the portfolio (i.e 3000 = 2400Mb and 600Mb across the 5/2.4Ghz bands). The name WRX560 seems like an odd gear shift that, although I am sure makes sense in line with a newer naming convention, seems odd after the recent RT6600ax router being released in Summer 2022.

Ventilation across the whole system is as good as you would expect. The Synology WRX560, like most routers, has no active internal cooling (fan etc) and therefore in order to maintain a good level of system ambient temperature (i.e low temp = better running), as much passive ventilation as possible is required. You can see this on all sides of the device (alongside the 30W PSU being external). That said, the fact that you cannot wall mount the WRX560 is a bit of a shame. Although this device can DEFINITELY be used as a standalone router, I think it is most likely that it will become a valuable mesh point to existing RT6600ax Router users, allowing considerably better coverage over large areas AND WiFi 6/5.9Ghz radio space coverage in all areas.

However, the size of the WRX560 means that it is going to take up a noticeable chunk of space on a desk/shelf and therefore wall mounting would have been beneficial for less noticeably deployment AND improving coverage in areas that are structured more vertically. It really is a minor complaint in the grand scheme of things, but it is something that will bother some users who will want to phase out the MR2200acs in their home/business.

Here is how the Synology WRX560 Router stacks up in size and design next to the RT6600ax premium router and the Synology MR2200ac mesh router device:

It does stand out a bit, doesn’t it! You cannot fault the design quality and no doubt the benefits on coverage with the system spreading out the internal antenna (which are fed into separate Qualcomm controller blocks), but you might need to make a little more room on the shelf for this one. Next, let’s discuss the new and largely exclusive 5.9Ghz radio frequency support available in the WRX560 router and why this is something to care about.

Why is the Synology WRX560 Router’s use of the 5.9Ghz band such a big deal?

It is a valid question. Synology has talked a big game about their new RT6600ax and WRX560 routers supporting the 5.9Ghz band and 160Mhz channel support, but what do they mean in real terms to the end user? To get to grips with this, we first need to understand what prevented 5.9Ghz use till recently. Whenever we broadcast anything, it needs a way to get from point A to point B. When delivering goods, the mode of transportation is a truck. When delivering information, the mode of transportation is the airwaves. The same can be said of wireless radio frequencies and especially those that we now use in our homes every day for wireless internet/network connectivity.

 

Radiofrequency is broken down into spectrums from 30 Hz to 300 GHz. Spectrums are further broken down into sections called bands. Governments regulate those bands and spectrums by allocating them for specific uses. For example, the 30-300 MHz spectrum is used for radio and television broadcasts. The extremely high frequency of 30-300 GHz is for stuff like radio astronomy and directed-energy weapons. The point of regulating frequencies is to make sure no band or spectrum is congested to the point of rendering it useless.

 

Currently, most Wi-Fi devices communicate using the 2.4 GHz or 5 GHz bands. The lower bands deliver farther, whereas the higher band travels faster. That’s why there will need to be more transmitters for 5G cellphones, for example. For the past two decades, the entire 5.9 GHz spectrum (5.850-5.925) was reserved for intelligent transportation systems like C-V2X. Meaning, that only devices for transportation-related purposes have been allowed access to that spectrum. Now that most of the bands in that spectrum are accessible to devices like prosumer routers and the Synology WRX560 is one of the first to take advantage of this, that is what makes this very special router indeed right now. 160Mhz frequencies are a factor here as this is the frequency when you will get the best performance out of WiFi 6 but until the 5.9Ghz band was opened up for use, it limited the range of shared bandwidth afforded to WiFi 6 and the total volume of 160Mhz frequency that could be used is increased (as well as the potential for increased smaller channels). Let’s move away from the subject of wireless connectivity and onto the physical ports and connections of the WRX560.

Synology WRX560 Router Review – Ports & Connections

The connectivity of the Synology WRX560 is near enough identical to the Synology RT6600ax premium model. That is (for the most part) very good news indeed, as there is the expected range of client connections available, as well as a greater than gigabit option and USB storage support that (thanks to Synology’s NAS pedigree) is virtually unparallel when compared to other prosumers in the market.

The WAN connection is a standard 1GbE (Gigabit RJ45 Copper) connection. The system can be used as your primary router (if your in-house internet connection feeds into a wall box with Cat RJ45 connectivity) or behind an existing router (ISP, etc). Additionally, the system has auto failover support built into SRM that can be configured in quite a few ways when used in conjunction with a mobile device with a SIM or via a 2nd Copper-connected internet connection via LAN/WAN port 1. However, there is something we do need to discuss…

Yes, that 2.5GbE Port. This is the optional WAN/LAN connection that can be used for an existing greater than a gigabit internet connection, or to a 2.5Gbps or greater device (client end-user hardware, switch, NAS, etc) to allow a potential 270MB/s (not megabit) or so bandwidth. Great stuff, right? Well, as pleased as I was when Synology embraced 2.5G on their routers, the fact it is only a single port is a little disappointing. This means that IF you use it for a greater than Gigabit internet connection, there is no additional comparable bandwidth port to get that full speed on the network. It DOES allow the larger internet connection to be more fully enjoyed across multiple 1GbE/109MB/s bandwidth devices (i.e more to go around), but many users who pay for more expensive high bandwidth internet connections like this like a primary device (gaming machine, NAS, network switch) to receive the full benefits. Only having 1x 2.5GbE results in the end user being forced to choose between high-speed internet getting shared, of a single client device to benefit – not both. This is a small % of users of course, but still something of an annoyance for some and one that was raised numerous times in the RT6600ax review video in the comments.

The side of the Synology WRX560 Router reveals a few extra interfaces. There is an auto connection WPS button (quite common, but handy), a WiFi on/off switch (10x easier than logging in via the GUI to configure on the fly) and a USB port. This port can be used for a cellular (SIM/LTE) connected internet device as a primary/failover connection (very useful – here is a demo of how that works in practice), but for anyone that has followed Synology over the years, it will be good to know that the USB storage support on this port is 10/10. Several Synology applications are supported on the system (more on those later) that genuinely bring an element of NAS-level storage access in presentation and services to the WRX560 – compared with the FTP/Samba/Breadcrumb level of storage access that 99% of other routers bring when adding storage. The port is USB 3.2 Gen 1 (so 5Gb/s or 500MB/s+ bandwidth available), but this is still perfectly fine for storage, unless you are considering external m.2 NVMe SSDs or RAID-equipped external USB storage here – whereupon I would always recommend a standalone NAS anyway).

It is something of a shame that there is only a single USB Port, not even an additional USB 2.0 port. As (much like the single 2.5Gb/s port) this means the end user is once again forced to make a choice when considering a USB storage device or USB-connected internet service for failover.

Additionally, several of the SRM applications are dependent on a storage drive target, so this might hamper some of the more business-led optional applications alongside that failover cellular internet connection. Again, a very niche scenario, but definitely something that more enterprising users are going to spot. However, let’s discuss the big one – SRM (Synology Router Manager). The software that the WRX560 arrives with is (arguably) one of the MAIN reasons that people buy Synology products.

Synology WRX560 Router Review – Software

At the time of writing, the Synology WRX560 arrives with SRM 1.3 (Synology Router Manager), the latest version of the brand’s popular router management system software. Note – the images and services below are a mixture of WRX560 and RT6600ax, but the software on each is identical and unless you plan on taking advantage of the tri-band architecture of the RT6600ax, the user experience is largely the same. I don’t think it would be a tremendous overstatement to say that more than half of the price tag of the WRX560 goes towards this software and, fair play to Synology, SRM is by FAR the best router management software that I have ever used. The brand has already produced one of the best NAS management platforms in the market in DSM and you can clearly see that ALOT of the logic, methodology and attention to the customer UX has been applied here. SRM has been around now for a good few years and despite my high praise, it is also worth highlighting that the platform has generally received fewer significant updates and feature improvements compared with DSM 6>6.1>7>7.1 in the same time frame (though regular security and database updates have been reliably constant).

Pretty much ALL routers arrive with a software GUI that you can access via your web browser (that includes your free IS router too) and from here you can manage the connections, security settings, ports and users on the system. So, what is it that makes Synology Router Manager any different? Well mainly, it is in how easy it is to comprehend the controls and the extent to which you can configure and customize the system to your own network needs. SRM 1.2 always had this and it would take a long time to go through the full range of services and features of SRM (which is why I made a FULL review of SRM 1.3 HERE that covers everything new and old) but for this review of the WRX560 I will just focus on the new additions, as well as the standout features that continue to impress.

One of the new features of SRM 1.3 on the WRX560 that arguably should have been there much, MUCH sooner was the option to create vLAN (i.e virtual networks) that can exist inside the router system for sub-networks that can be separated/connected as needed to the wider system network – such as for IP cameras, VOIP systems, or collected users in a single network. This is something that is more often associated with network switches than routers, but is still an available option on many premium router systems for a few years. There is also the means for priority of the incoming internet connection to go towards VOIP or IPTV services if needed.

vLANs were sadly not available in SRM 1.2 and it’s arrival in SRM 1.3 is very useful, but still massively overdue (see below). These virtual networks can be customized in several ways in their identity and address, but also can be bonded to a specific network interface (LAN) port, which is useful if you are going to attach a switch to one of these ports for connecting a bunch of other network devices. These virtual networks can also be attached to existing wireless SSIDs or even have a new SSID created specifically for that network.

Navigating the browser interface of SRM 1.3 is really, really easy and if you have ever used an operating system such as MAC OS, Windows or Android (which clearly you have if you are reading this!) then you will typically find that all the configuration and options for navigating SRM on the WRX560 are exactly where you would expect them to be. Leaning ever so slightly more towards the Mac side of design and placement (Synology has always had a lot of Mac branding influence, even if their support and compatibility of services always seems to end up with Windows users first – blame Apple I guess), the main desktop can be changed in a few lite ways, as well as desktop shortcuts and additional applications can be downloaded and installed easily from the App Center.

Click to view slideshow.

As touched on earlier in the review, the USB port on your router is hugely useful to the SRM 1.3 platform, with it allowing use of several Synology NAS-generation applications that you can install in SRM that including File Station, Download Station, Media Server and more. Additionally, it is recommended that in order to fully utilize the database software to catalogue remote threats and potential intrusions, you have a USB drive installed to maintain those databases.

One key element of using SRM 1,3 and the WRX560 to their fullest extent is in how the system is deployed in your network environment. You can choose to deploy the router either as your primary internet access point or operate the system as your secondary router with another router/modem (such as one provided by your ISP in between.

If you use the WRX560 and SRM as a secondary layer, a number of the security and network management features will be absent, but if used as the main management point for your internet connection, the full range of services will be available to customize. This configuration can be easily changed on the fly at any time.

The coverage and network connectivity of the three bands of wireless coverage of the WRX560 can be monitored and adjusted very easily on the WRX560, with the extent of their maximum bandwidth and frequency changed easily.

When testing of the Synology WRX560 router started, we decided to test the wireless 160Mhz WiFi connection with the Killer AX m.2 802.11ax adapter AND connect to the router via its 2.5Gps connection over wired LAN. Straight away, windows reported both connections as 2.4Gbs and 2.5Gbs respectively. This still left ample wireless connectivity on the 80Mhz and 160Mhz bands to share and in both cases, we were able to fully saturate the ethernet connection with ease.

Of course, one of the biggest draws of the Synology Router systems is their support of intelligent profiles and management. Alongside the ability to create user profiles for all connected users, you can connect individual devices to those users and then spread access rules to be applied to that user’s devices easily and borderline instantaneously. This extends to creating website access rules, internet access rules that are shared between devices and preset rules that allow you to impose access conduct configurations in around 3 clicks that are tailored towards friends, family or professional colleagues.

Click to view slideshow.

Learn a great deal more about Synology Router Manager in my five-part dedicated series below:

Synology Router Manager 1.3 Review Chapters

SRM 1.3 Synology Router Software Review, ALL Parts - HERE
SRM 1.3 Synology Router Software Review, Part 1, Design & Control - HERE
SRM 1.3 Synology Router Software Review, Part 2, Safety & Security - HERE
SRM 1.3 Synology Router Software Review, Part 3, Network Management - HERE
SRM 1.3 Synology Router Software Review, Part 4, Safe Access - HERE
SRM 1.3 Synology Router Software Review, Part 5, USB Storage Services & Conclusion - HERE 

Alternatively, you can watch the FULL review of Synology’s SRM 1.3 Router Software on YouTube via the link below:

Synology WRX560 Router Review – Review Conclusion

The Synology WRX560 is definitely a good router and one that is dripping in the charm, design and user-friendly software presentation that Synology has been committed to since their very first router. In the brand’s efforts to create its perfect eco-system (where is the Synology switch?), the WRX560 alongside the earlier 2022 released RT6600ax makes alot of sense. It is designed to expand the coverage and services that are available to Synology users, as well as make the overly complex subject of network and wifi management into something genuinely intuitive, accessible and easy for the average consumer. There is only so-far that you can take this (make it too simple and you run the risk of an insecure or inefficient network), but SRM is arguably as close as it gets to a perfect world for this. The hardware is reasonable, though a little lacking behind recent releases at a similar price point such as the Google Nest Pro with WiFi 6E rolled out this same week, but WiFi 6E and 6Ghz utilization still remains at a low %. I started the review of the Synology WRX560 with three questions.

How does this router stack against the average free domestic ISP Router? In terms of price, it is a big ask for many low-level users and those who just want an easy internet gateway. However, in practically every other way it is vastly superior, with WiFi 6, 2.5Gbs and the incredibly SRM platform included. Domestic/ISP routers are starting to edge fractionally closer to including some of these services, but to a significantly lower level. But they are still a long, LONG way away from this level of usability and control with such ease.

What advantages does this solution provide to the end user that cannot be found elsewhere? In short, features like the support if 5.9Ghz allowing a greater number of higher performing 160Mhz connections, all the features and services of SRM, additional optional NAS Apps, entry-level NAS style storage services and just an inarguably level of control of your home network and security of client users. There is simply no software platform that brings all this other than Synology right now. The hardware seems a touch too ‘safe’ and ‘standard’, but the software, services and bandwidth management is unparalleled.

How does the WRX560 compare with other routers in the Synology device lineup right now?

THIS is something that, right now, is a little tougher to answer. The launch price of the WRX560 is at a level that puts it a tad too close to that of the significantly more hardware/bandwidth capable RT6600ax (which has benefitted from more time in the market and a price tag floating around the £260-270 market at the time of writing. Down the line, as the pricing for the WRX560 distances itself inevitably from the RRP, this should resolve itself over time. But right now at launch, you can get the RT6600ax (with the same software and better hardware) for just a small extra quid versus that of the WRX560 Router.

Overall, the Synology WRX560 Router is a solid price kit that might have benefitted from being released BEFORE the RT6600ax companion router, but still a great piece of kit that is a fraction diminished by tough hardware choices (USB/2.5G).

PROs of the Synology WRX560 Router CONs of the Synology WRX560 Router
SRM is still top-notch and easily still one of the best (if not THE best) router software in the market in 2022

The Support of 5.9Ghz Radio Frequency sets this ahead of ALOT of routers right now in terms of maximum bandwidth possible

2.5GbE port for your WAN or a LAN excellent

A huge degree of user profile and device clustering options to create an intelligently controlled but still user-friendly network

LAN/WAN failover Support (including with a SIM Dongle or Phone tethering)

USB Drive Support is treated exceptionally well with several Synology NAS class applications available

The inbuilt threat prevention database deserves more credit/attention than it seems to

Synology Safe Access – Solid 10/10 Service!

A single USB Port limits the use of both an External storage drive AND 2nd mobile SIM failover connection at once

A single 2.5GbE port is a shame

Quite large compared with many other Synology Routers

Quite expensive given more affordable WiFi 6 routers in the market and 6E making a name for itself, as well as the price point being alot closer to that of the RT6600ax right now

If you are interested in Buying the Synology WRX560 Router from Amazon, use the link below to help us keep making great content.

You can watch the FULL review of the latest WiFi 6 Router from Synology, the RT6600ax, over on YouTube below:

Alternatively, my FULL review of the Synology DS Router application is available too on NASCompares. You can find the video below:

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Setting up a virtualization host with Ubuntu and KVM

11 octobre 2022 à 15:51

To run virtual machines, most organizations use commercial virtualization solutions on the market, such as VMware, Hyper-V, and Nutanix. As an alternative, you can consider the free kernel-based virtual machine (KVM) that turns Ubuntu Linux into a hypervisor host.

The post Setting up a virtualization host with Ubuntu and KVM first appeared on 4sysops.

Configure an SFTP server on Windows

5 octobre 2022 à 13:08

Windows Server 2019 and Windows 10 (build 1809) have support for OpenSSH out-of-the-box, so there is no need to use any third-party library to run an SSH server or SFTP. In this post, I will demonstrate how to configure an SFTP server in Windows and use it to transfer files.

The post Configure an SFTP server on Windows first appeared on 4sysops.

Free network IP scanners

30 septembre 2022 à 19:07

As hosts come online and go offline, there is a constant churn of hosts communicating on a local area network (LAN). Scanning networks with an IP scanner allows IT, network admins, and SecOps professionals to see which IPs are communicating and what types of devices occupy which IP addresses. It also helps to spot rogue, unsanctioned hosts that may be connected to the network. Several network IP scanners are freely available for download and help network administrators and IT admins discover devices on the network and manage IP resources. Let's look at the following tools: Nmap, Advanced IP Scanner, Angry IP Scanner, free IP scanner by Eusing
and the built-in command line and PowerShell.

The post Free network IP scanners first appeared on 4sysops.

Cisco CUCM (CallManager) architecture

28 septembre 2022 à 18:46
Par : John Kull

One of the most popular Voice Over IP systems is the Cisco Unified Communication Manager System. Cisco uses several abbreviations for its VOIP system: Cisco Unified (CM), CallManager, and CUCM. This intro will focus on the CUCM architecture; that is, I will explain the most important components and concepts you need to understand if you plan to deploy CallManager in your organization.

The post Cisco CUCM (CallManager) architecture first appeared on 4sysops.

WD Red Pro 22TB and QNAP NAS 10GbE Tests – RAID 0 vs RAID 5 vs RAID 6

26 septembre 2022 à 18:00

QNAP TS-464 NAS 10GbE RAID 0/5/6 Testing with the WD Red Pro 22TB HDDs

When you buy a new NAS and drives, one of the most important long-term decisions that you will make is choosing your RAID level. A RAID (Redundant Array of Independent Disks) is the process of combining multiple media drives together into a single area of storage (a Storage Pool). Different RAID configurations provide different benefits and although it is not impossible to switch/change your RAID level years down the line it is not particularly straightforward, is quite limited in the range of RAID change options and often just makes you wish you had picked better the first time around! That is one of the main purposes of today’s article, to understand the performance differences between the big three RAID configurations that people choose for their first NAS system – RAID 0, RAID 5 and RAID 6. In order to achieve this, I have opted to use the 2022 released QNAP TS-464 4-Bay NAS, combined with a 10GbE upgrade and alongside this I have fully populated the device with FOUR of the new massive capacity 22TB WD Red Pro series Hard drives. What we have here is a fully-featured, Prosumer NAS system with an external 1,000MB/s external throughput and a potential 88 Terabytes to play with! This will be a great way to test the performance potential of RAID 0 vs RAID 5 vs RAID 6 for users who are considering a modest scale 4-Bay NAS and want to make sure they pick the right RAID configuration for their needs right – FIRST TIME!

Skip Ahead? Use the links here to skip ahead to the Appropriate Test:

RAID 0, 10GbE Testing, QNAP TS-464 and WD Red Pro 22TB HDDs

RAID 5, 10GbE Testing, QNAP TS-464 and WD Red Pro 22TB HDDs

RAID 6, 10GbE Testing, QNAP TS-464 and WD Red Pro 22TB HDDs

Before we get started, if you are interested in emulating these tests for yourself, or are keen to achieve these results in your own setup and want to know the devices I used in these tests, you can use the links below to find each item on Amazon in your local region. Using these links will result in amazon sending a small % back to us here at NASCompares that goes directly back into our site and services, allowing us to continue making these articles, videos and more – Thanks in advance!

Hardware Used in today’s Tests

Note – If you would rather WATCH these tests in video form, you can watch the WD Red 22TB and QNAP TS-464 NAS Performance Tests here on the NASCompares YouTube Channel. Alternatively, you can watch my review of either the QNAP TS-464 NAS or WD Red Pro 22TB NAS Hard Drive below:

 QNAP TS-464 NAS Review WD Red Pro 22TB Review

QNAP TS-464 NAS & WD Red Pro 22TBs – The Test Setup and Hardware Used

These tests were conducted in a Windows 10 client machine environment over 3 days (factoring RAID rebuild times and cool downs) and all three RAID configurations (RAID 0, 5, 6) were conducted with four WD Red Pro series 22TB hard disks. The benchmark software used for these tests was Atto Disk Benchmark, as it provides a very wide range of test setups – as well as working much more smoothly with iSCSI targets/LUNs in windows and providing clearly information to display to the layman for this article. Additionally, given that just one of the WD 22TB hard drives can achieve more than 250MB/s throughput, I went ahead with a 10GbE, point-to-point connection between my PC and the NAS, using a QNAP 1st party 1 Port 10GbE card and the Sonnet Solo 10GbE Thunderbolt to 10GbE adapter. Here is a breakdown of the specific test setup components:

  • QNAP TS-464 4-Bay NAS with QTS 5

  • WD Red Pro 22TB NAS Hard Drives x4, RAID 0 or RAID 5 Configuration (dependingClick to view slideshow.
  • 20TB iSCSI LUN via the Default iSCSI Manager Target, connected to the Windows PC with the iSCSI initiator as a local appearing drive for Atto Disk Benchmark
Click to view slideshow.
  • Local PC Network Adapter using the Thunderbolt-to-10GbE adapter
Click to view slideshow.
  • Windows 10 Pro PC, Intel(R) Core(TM) i7-8750H CPU @ 2.20GHz 2.20 GHz, 32GB DDR4 2666Mhz Memory, Internal Samsung 970 Pro 1TB SSD

  • MTU / Jumbo Frames set to 9K on both the NAS and the Network Adapter, Direct Connection (LAN-to-LAN), no network switch
Click to view slideshow.

Before we go further though, we need something to measure against. Here is the default performance of a SINGLE WD Red Pro 22TB NAS Hard Drive, using the QNAP QTS Storage Manager Benchmark Tool:

As you can see, even on it’s own, a single WD Red Pro 22TB HDD can largely saturate even a single external 2.5GbE connection. So, at the very least, you are going to get 240-260MB/s with just the one drive. So, let’s get down to business! I performed a wide scope of tests, so let’s go through those results!

QNAP TS-464 NAS, RAID 0 10GbE Performance Tests

The first RAID we are testing in our WD Red Pro 22TB and QNAP TS-464 NAS setup is RAID 0. In a RAID 0 configuration, ALL of the available capacity of the drives you select is available BUT you have no redundancy (i.e no safety net if a drive fails) and in the event of one of your HDDs going bust, you almost certainly lose ALL of your data (this can be very marginally negated if you spend some time deciding on a spanning or stripe style RAID protocol). So, why do people choose RAID 0 if it has such a high cost in the event of drive failure? Well, there are the massive storage benefits of course, but there is the other big bonus that the NAS will be reading and writing ALL the drives at once, hugely increasing the maximum performance that can be achieved. Also, as RAID 0 has no redundancy and no CPU resources are being used to calculate parity (a blueprint of data that is used for data restoration) which further increases performance AND lowers overall system hardware use. Therefore I expect the performance of the WD Red Pro 22TB HDDs to be very good in a RAID 0 configuration over 10GbE.

ATTO DiskBenchmark 64MB File Test, 512B-to-64MB I/O Size

Peak Write Performance – 803MB/s  /  Peak Read Performance – 837MB/s


ATTO DiskBenchmark 256MB File Test, 512B-to-64MB I/O Size

Peak Write Performance – 803MB/s  /  Peak Read Performance – 835MB/s


ATTO DiskBenchmark 1GB File Test, 512B-to-64MB I/O Size

Peak Write Performance – 814MB/s  /  Peak Read Performance – 835MB/s


ATTO DiskBenchmark 4GB File Test, 512B-to-64MB I/O Size

Peak Write Performance – 806MB/s  /  Peak Read Performance – 730MB/s


ATTO DiskBenchmark 16GB File Test, 512B-to-64MB I/O Size

Peak Write Performance – 803MB/s  /  Peak Read Performance – 805MB/s


QNAP TS-464 NAS, RAID 5 10GbE Performance Tests

Next, I wanted to test the most popular RAID configuration for 4-Bay NAS drives like the QNAP TS-464 – RAID 5. In this configuration, it pools the four 22TB WD Red Pro hard disks together, but thanks to a system of data being striped across the disks during writing (i.e. data is written across the disks in a 1, 2, 3, etc pattern continuously AND one disk on each stripe having parity data (a blueprint of the data written on the other disks in that particular stripe), it means that in the event of a drive dying, you can rebuild the data that was on the broken drive from the remaining data on the other disks and the availability parity data. This also means that in order to maintain a balance of combined storage and ensure space for parity data, a RAID 5 will result in 1 drive’s worth of data capacity being educated from the overall total. So, in the case of the TS-464 and four 22TB Hard Drives, you would get 66TB of available data (as 22TB of that is used for parity data provisioning). Additionally, although you are still reading AND writing from multiple disks at once, the calculation, creation and maintenance of parity data in a RAID 5 has a negative impact on the total performance, as the system is using more resources (CPU+Memory) in order to keep things running smoothly in your storage pool. Modern NAS systems have done an excellent job of choosing very capable CPUs and RAID 5 configurations in recent years have been substantially better in performance. However, a RAID 5 will still have a lower degree of performance to a comparable RAID 0 hardware setup. Here is how the RAID 5 on the WD Red Pro 22TBs and the QNAP TS-464 NAS performed:

ATTO DiskBenchmark 64MB File Test, 512B-to-64MB I/O Size

Peak Write Performance – 800MB/s  /  Peak Read Performance – 779MB/s


ATTO DiskBenchmark 256MB File Test, 512B-to-64MB I/O Size

Peak Write Performance – 517MB/s  /  Peak Read Performance – 781MB/s


ATTO DiskBenchmark 1GB File Test, 512B-to-64MB I/O Size

Peak Write Performance – 535MB/s  /  Peak Read Performance – 781MB/s


ATTO DiskBenchmark 4GB File Test, 512B-to-64MB I/O Size

Peak Write Performance – 520MB/s  /  Peak Read Performance – 687MB/s


ATTO DiskBenchmark 16GB File Test, 512B-to-64MB I/O Size

Peak Write Performance – 525MB/s  /  Peak Read Performance – 724MB/s


QNAP TS-464 NAS, RAID 6 10GbE Performance Tests

Our final test of the QNAP TS-464 NAS was a configuration setup up of a RAID 6 on the four WD Red Pro 22TBs. Now, a RAID 6 is highly comparable to a RAID 5 (discussed above), but instead of 1 drive of failure protection (the redundancy/safety net), you have TWO drives of safety. You need at least four drives in order to setup a RAID 6, but most users who consider RAID 6 are using much, much larger bay configurations and you generally find RAID 6 in homes/businesses where the data on the drives is mission critical, priceless or utterly impossible to recreate (from company accounts to photos of your children growing up!). Now, alongside the expected drop in capacity being 2 drives lower (so in the case of this configuration of 4x 22TB HDDs, you have 44TB available to storage data), the system’s overhead in creating parity/blueprints of the current data in efforts to maintain that two disk redundancy/safety net is twice as much, so performance will decrease further. So, let’s see how the QNAP TS-464 and the WD Red Pro 22TBs faired in performance over 10GbE in a RAID 6 set up:

ATTO DiskBenchmark 64MB File Test, 512B-to-64MB I/O Size

Peak Write Performance – 809MB/s  /  Peak Read Performance – 780MB/s


ATTO DiskBenchmark 256MB File Test, 512B-to-64MB I/O Size

Peak Write Performance – 399MB/s  /  Peak Read Performance – 781MB/s


ATTO DiskBenchmark 1GB File Test, 512B-to-64MB I/O Size

Peak Write Performance – 430MB/s  /  Peak Read Performance – 781MB/s


ATTO DiskBenchmark 4GB File Test, 512B-to-64MB I/O Size

Peak Write Performance – 444MB/s  /  Peak Read Performance – 625MB/s


ATTO DiskBenchmark 16GB File Test, 512B-to-64MB I/O Size

Peak Write Performance – 422MB/s  /  Peak Read Performance – 623MB/s


QNAP TS-464 NAS + WD Red 22TB RAID 6 Tests – Verdict & Conclusion

Overall, the performance that the QNAP TS-464 NAS and those 22TB WD Red Pro HDDs provided in each RAID configuration was pretty much what I would have expected. The Celeron CPU inside this NAS is a much more middle-of-the-road processor compared to more ‘file system’ and ‘general throughput-focused’ alternatives in the AMD-embedded Ryzen, Xeon or Atom that are found on other bulkier NAS systems, so it was always unlikely to saturate a full 10GbE connection with just four drives, even in a RAID 0 with an Intel Celeron processor. However, the RAID 5 configuration regularly hit the 600-700MB/s mark in this 4 disk RAID 5 configuration which, considering we are still talking about mechanical HDDs (even at 22TB and 265MB/s per drive) is pretty impressive! The RAID 6 performance clearly took the wind out of the sales of this 4-Bay though and unless you were using a larger 6-8 Bay configuration (such as the TS-664 or higher), this NAS hardware configuration struggled at the double parity level. Overall, the WD Red Pro 22TB hard drives perform exceptionally well and were consistent in their operation and the QNAP TS-464 NAS did exactly what it promised! If you are looking for a huge amount of capacity in a compact package, this potential 88TB 4-Bay desktop NAS combo is pretty incredible!

 

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This description contains links to Amazon. These links will take you to some of the products mentioned in today's content. As an Amazon Associate, I earn from qualifying purchases. Visit the NASCompares Deal Finder to find the best place to buy this device in your region, based on Service, Support and Reputation - Just Search for your NAS Drive in the Box Below

Need Advice on Data Storage from an Expert?

We want to keep the free advice on NASCompares FREE for as long as we can. Since this service started back in Jan '18, We have helped hundreds of users every month solve their storage woes, but we can only continue to do this with your support. So please do choose to buy at Amazon US and Amazon UK on the articles when buying to provide advert revenue support or to donate/support the site below. Finally, for free advice about your setup, just leave a message in the comments below here at NASCompares.com and we will get back to you. Need Help? Where possible (and where appropriate) please provide as much information about your requirements, as then I can arrange the best answer and solution to your needs. Do not worry about your e-mail address being required, it will NOT be used in a mailing list and will NOT be used in any way other than to respond to your enquiry. [contact-form-7]     Terms and Conditions Alternatively, why not ask me on the ASK NASCompares forum, by clicking the button below. This is a community hub that serves as a place that I can answer your question, chew the fat, share new release information and even get corrections posted. I will always get around to answering ALL queries, but as a one-man operation, I cannot promise speed! So by sharing your query in the ASK NASCompares section below, you can get a better range of solutions and suggestions, alongside my own.  

How to install the PfSense firewall on a virtual machine

22 septembre 2022 à 17:41
Par : Imran Khan

PfSense is a free open-source network firewall and router based on FreeBSD. PfSense is known for its reliability and comes with many features that only commercial firewalls offer. PfSense is included in many third-party free software packages. You can install PfSense on both physical and virtual machines. Appliances are also available.

The post How to install the PfSense firewall on a virtual machine first appeared on 4sysops.

New Synology RT3000ax Router

14 septembre 2022 à 17:30

Synology Planning on a New RT3000ax WiFi 6 and 2.5GbE Router for 2022/2023

Yes, Synology is working on a new WiFi 6 and 2.5G router – The Synology RT3000ax. Before I go any further though,a little bit of background. I think it would be safe to say that Synology has been quite successful in their range of prosumer routers. When they first introduced the RT1900ac 6 years ago, it was seen as something of an experiment to see if they could bring the same level of software, design and experience that they had learned in network attached storage to one of the most common devices in all our homes and offices worldwide. Fast forward to now and they are on the 3rd Generation (technically, a little bit of overlap) and we have seen both the standard of Synology Router and the functionality of Synology Router Manager (SRM) evolve considerably – with the router arm of their portfolio getting stronger all the time. Which brings us to the newly revealed RT3000ax router, a more compact 802.11ax router that seems destined to serve as the refresh for the MR2200ac or (more likely) the RT2600ac at some point in the future. With a new and intriguing design (definitely looks like what the most recent star wars trilogy did to stormtrooper helmets, but ok) and borrowed elements of the recently released RT6600ax router, the RT3000ax would appear to be designed to be in a tier of their router portfolio serving as the middle-ground (when the OTT RT6600ax seems a bit pie in the sky). Let’s discuss this new router, the hardware we know about, the software and whether this device is worth waiting for.

Hardware Specifications of the Synology RT3000ax Router

The Synology RT3000ax router is quite comparable to the RT6600ax in a number of ways when it comes to it’s general hardware specifications (those the details on the qualcomm processor and on board RAM remain a mystery at the time of writing), with the system supporting 2.5GbE on a WAN/LAN port (as well as 4 more 1GbE LAN ports, with one being dedicated WAN), failover support, WiFi 6 support and USB storage compatibility that allows the use of applications (modified Synology DSM NAS apps) to be used on the system with SRM. However, there is always clear build choices here that show that the RT3000ax is designed for slightly more modest deployments. It’s a dual-band (2.4/5G design), uses internal antennae, is more verticle in it’s shape, is wall mountable and I have yet to hear if mesh support is available (assume yes, but still TBC). Here are the specifications that I know about so far:

Synology RT3000ax Router

Wireless Standards 2.4GHz: 802.11 b/g/n/ax

5GHz: 802.11 a/n/ac/ax

Frequency/Bandwidth 802.11ax (2.4GHz): Up to 600 Mbps

802.11ax (5GHz): Up to 2400 Mbps

5.9Ghz Support TBC
WAN Gigabit WAN x 1

2.5G WAN / LANx 1 (Dual WAN)

LAN Gigabit LAN x 3 and 2.5G LAN x 1
USB USB 3.2 Gen 1 (Type-A) x 1
File System EXT4, EXT3, FAT, NTFS, HFS+ (Ext Drive)
Physical Buttons/Switches • Power • WPS • Wi-Fi On/Off • Reset
Wireless Modes Wireless Router

Wireless AP (Access Point)

Antenna Internal 2T2R Omni-directional high-gain dipole (2.4GHz)

Internal 4T4R Omni-directional high-gain dipole (5GHz)

Size 233 x 194 x 66mm

Setup of the Synology RT3000ax router is largely the same as that of the rest of the RT and MR series from the brand, with it being usable as a primary router point or as an additional access point. The dual WAN design allows users to connect their ingoing/outgoing internet connection to an upto 1GbE (1000Mb/100MMB) connection, or use the 2.5GbE connection for greater than gigabit external connections. This also means that the support of failover is available, with the option to connect more two internet connections to the system (either both via WAN connection and/or with use of a 4G/5G LTE SIM connection via a supported USB device). Something I tested (along with other recovery features of SRM and the RT6600ax) in the video lower in the article.

These are still questions surrounding some SRM supported features and recent Synology router services that are available on the RT6600ax router and whether they will be available on the RT3000ax, such as:

  • Will the RT3000ax Router use/access the 5.9Ghz Band, allowing larger 160Mhz connections? Almost certainly yes, but still TBC
  • Will Mesh connectivity with other Synology Routers (RT6600ax, RT2600ax, MR2200ac) be available, and at launch? Again, almost certainly yes, but still TBC

We will update this article and the larger Synology 2023 Hardware Page as soon as we know more. You can visit the BIG Synology 2023 Page HERE

How Does the Synology RT3000ax Compare with the RT6600ax Router?

Many users who are considering buying the Synology RT6600ax right now in Autumn 2022 might hear the news of a new RT3000ax WiFi6 router coming at some point in the future and be thinking about whether to buy now or wait. It’s a very good question! However, the more you look into the specifications (even based on the few we know right now comparatively) it is clear that the RT6600ax router is the more powerful and capable price. So, if you were already about to buy the RT6600ax as it sounded ideal for your needs, then waiting for the release of the RT3000ax will not be worth it for you. However, if you were only considering the RT6600ax for its WiFi 6 and 2.5G capabilities and you were not looking to upgrade your setup until the end of 2022 or the first quarter of 2023 (when this new outer is likely to arrive realistically), then here are how the Synology RT3000ax and RT6600ax compare:

Model Synology RT3000ax

Synology RT6600ax

Price TBC $309 – £260 – €299
Wireless Standards 2.4GHz: 802.11 b/g/n/ax

5GHz: 802.11 a/n/ac/ax

2.4GHz: 802.11 b/g/n/ax

5GHz: 802.11 a/n/ac/ax

Frequency/Bandwidth 802.11ax (2.4GHz): Up to 600 Mbps

802.11ax (5GHz): Up to 2400 Mbps

802.11ax (2.4GHz): Up to 600 Mbps

802.11ax (5GHz-1): Up to 1200 Mbps

802.11ax (5GHz-2): Up to 4800 Mbps

5.9Ghz Support TBC YES
WAN Gigabit WAN x 1

2.5G WAN / LANx 1 (Dual WAN)

Gigabit WAN x 1

2.5G WAN / LANx 1 (Dual WAN)

LAN Gigabit LAN x 3 and 2.5G LAN x 1 Gigabit LAN x 3 and 2.5G LAN x 1
USB USB 3.2 Gen 1 (Type-A) x 1 USB 3.2 Gen 1 (Type-A) x 1
File System EXT4, EXT3, FAT, NTFS, HFS+ (Ext Drive) EXT4, EXT3, FAT, NTFS, HFS+ (Ext Drive)
Physical Buttons/Switches • Power • WPS • Wi-Fi On/Off • Reset • Power • WPS • Wi-Fi On/Off • Reset
Wireless Modes Wireless Router

Wireless AP (Access Point)

Wireless Router

Wireless AP (Access Point)

Antenna Internal 2T2R Omni-directional high-gain dipole (2.4GHz)

Internal 4T4R Omni-directional high-gain dipole (5GHz)

2T2R Omni-directional high-gain dipole (2.4GHz/5GHz-1)

4T4R Omni-directional high-gain dipole (5GHz-2)

Size 233 x 194 x 66mm 65 x 280 x 180 MM

So, as you can see, the main difference here is the scope of bandwidth, coverage and distance that is covered between the RT6600ax and RT3000ax – with the RT6600ax clearly being the larger (thanks to that tri-band support and larger external antenna coverage. But if you are looking for a smaller deployment and are not in a big rush right now, the RT3000ax router will provide most of the other features on offer!

Software and Security of the Synology RT3000ax Router

The Synology RT3000ax router will arrive with Synology Router Manager (SRM), as well as a range of client applications, Synology DSM-built tools that have been modified to work on their router platform and compatibility/support of all the usual OS’. You can find out more on the latest release of SRM (version 1.3) in my FULL SRM REVIEW HERE on YouTube and in my long written review of SRM1.3 here on NASCompares, but the highlights are:

SRM Features LAN/WAN management

– Port forwarding
– Network segmentation
– Traffic Control
– IPv4/IPv6 Dual Stack
– Smart/Auto WAN Switching
– Failover and load balancing
– Policy routing
– IPTV & VoIP Support
– MAC address filtering
– Set up web filtering
– Router Bridge Mode Support

Monitoring

– Live view per device
– Application statistics
– Bandwidth Device Control
– Client Application QoS
– User QoS
– Detailed Report Generation (PDF,CSV,HTML etc)

Synology Safe Access

– User & network profiles
– Access Time management
– User Internet schedule & Time quota
– Highly-customizable Web filters
– Site Access Schedules
– Safe Search integration (YouTube, Google, Bing and more)
– User Unblock/Access Request and Control GUI
– DNS over HTTPS Available
– Let’s Encrypt integration
– Dual-stack firewall
– Automatic blocking and two-factor authentication
– 5 Network and 15 SSID Creation for Network Layers
– Automatic security database updates
– DNS & IP threat intelligence Database
– Google Safe Browsing
– VPN Plus Application Service
– Site-to-Site VPN
– Access your network without VPN client
– TLS 1.2/1.3 support
– Supports the ChaCha cipher
– Validated by Microsoft Azure
– Bandwidth control & block list
– Active Directory and LDAP support

Add On Apps (Requires a USB Drive)

– VPN Plus Server
– Download Station
– Media Server
– DNS Server
– RADIUS Server
– Threat Prevention

QuickConnect and DDNS for Encrypted/Secure Remote Management

Supported Clients (for SRM) Windows 7 onwards, Mac OS 10.12 onwards
Security WPA2-Personal, WPA/WPA2-Personal, WPA2-Enterprise, WPA/WPA2-Enterprise, Opportunistic Wireless Encryption (OWE), WPA3-Personal, WPA3-Enterprise, WPA2/WPA3-Persona

Find out more on the automated recovery of connectivity in wired/wireless configuration, how the system handles failover, mesh self healing and more in my Synology Router Experiments video below:

When Will the Synology RT3000ax Router Be Released?

Right now, the information we have on the RT3000ax router is a long way from complete and that, combined with the relatively recent release of the Synology RT6600ax, likely means that this new router will not see release particularly soon (though I would expect it to be highlighted at the Synology 2023 digital event). More likely, the Synology RT3000ax will be looking at a VERY later 2022 release or (more likely) a Q1 2023 release. As more information on this device becomes available, I will update this article, the Synology 2023 SUPER ARTICLE and comparisons with the current generation of Synology Routers as information arrives. Subscribe to the NASCompares blog OR just chuck your email in the notification box below (no sign-up needed, you just get the alerts to updates to this article) to stay informed on the Synology RT3000ax router Have a great week!

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This description contains links to Amazon. These links will take you to some of the products mentioned in today's content. As an Amazon Associate, I earn from qualifying purchases. Visit the NASCompares Deal Finder to find the best place to buy this device in your region, based on Service, Support and Reputation - Just Search for your NAS Drive in the Box Below

Need Advice on Data Storage from an Expert?

We want to keep the free advice on NASCompares FREE for as long as we can. Since this service started back in Jan '18, We have helped hundreds of users every month solve their storage woes, but we can only continue to do this with your support. So please do choose to buy at Amazon US and Amazon UK on the articles when buying to provide advert revenue support or to donate/support the site below. Finally, for free advice about your setup, just leave a message in the comments below here at NASCompares.com and we will get back to you. Need Help? Where possible (and where appropriate) please provide as much information about your requirements, as then I can arrange the best answer and solution to your needs. Do not worry about your e-mail address being required, it will NOT be used in a mailing list and will NOT be used in any way other than to respond to your enquiry. [contact-form-7]     Terms and Conditions Alternatively, why not ask me on the ASK NASCompares forum, by clicking the button below. This is a community hub that serves as a place that I can answer your question, chew the fat, share new release information and even get corrections posted. I will always get around to answering ALL queries, but as a one-man operation, I cannot promise speed! So by sharing your query in the ASK NASCompares section below, you can get a better range of solutions and suggestions, alongside my own.  

 

 

Free network speed test tools

30 août 2022 à 18:07

Running a simple network speed test is often a good start when troubleshooting or verifying network performance. Such a test may measure speeds between two computers or the Internet download speed from an ISP. Many free network performance test tools are readily available for testing network performance.

The post Free network speed test tools first appeared on 4sysops.

Install Windows Fax Server in Windows Server 2022

25 août 2022 à 18:10

Windows Fax Server has been around for quite some time and is still part of Windows Server 2022. So what does it take to install and configure Windows Fax Server in Windows Server 2022?

The post Install Windows Fax Server in Windows Server 2022 first appeared on 4sysops.
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