FreshRSS

🔒
❌ À propos de FreshRSS
Il y a de nouveaux articles disponibles, cliquez pour rafraîchir la page.
Aujourd’hui — 18 mai 2021Flux principal

Les Macs, iPhone et iPad ont-ils besoin d’un antivirus ?

18 mai 2021 à 15:06
Par : UnderNews

Si les appareils Apple sont classés depuis plusieurs décennies parmi les plus performants de leur catégorie, c’est effectivement grâce à leur qualité, leur esthétique et mais aussi et surtout leur invulnérabilité. La plupart le savent, les gammes Mac, iPhone et iPad sont insensibles aux virus. Ces appareils sont donc immunisés et parés à toute épreuve. […]

The post Les Macs, iPhone et iPad ont-ils besoin d’un antivirus ? first appeared on UnderNews.

Test de l’iMac 24 M1 (2021) : et le style vint à l’ordinateur

18 mai 2021 à 15:00

Pour son premier produit de 2021, Apple a choisi de décliner son processeur M1 dans un iMac. L'ordinateur, extrêmement plat, débarque dans une version colorée à l'esthétique léchée. [Lire la suite]

Abonnez-vous à notre chaîne YouTube pour ne manquer aucune vidéo !

L'article Test de l’iMac 24 M1 (2021) : et le style vint à l’ordinateur est apparu en premier sur Numerama.

Hier — 17 mai 2021Flux principal

Ford va aussi transformer ses voitures en consoles de jeux vidéo

17 mai 2021 à 11:59

Ford lance une série de mises à jour baptisées Power-Up. Le but ? Intégrer toujours plus de fonctionnalités à ses voitures, y compris des activités de divertissement. [Lire la suite]

Abonnez-vous à notre chaîne YouTube pour ne manquer aucune vidéo !

L'article Ford va aussi transformer ses voitures en consoles de jeux vidéo est apparu en premier sur Numerama.

Upgrading to 10Gb Network in 2021 – An Beginners Guide

17 mai 2021 à 01:45

How and Why Should You Upgrade to 10Gbe – An Idiots Guide

Let’s face facts, our data is getting bigger and we want it even faster. As selfish as it sounds, both home and business users alike demand faster and faster data transmission in 2021, despite the obvious fact that the average size of our photos, music and videos are getting unquestionably larger. Luckily, at the same time as all of this, 10 Gigabit Ethernet (10Gbe) networks become increasingly more affordable and despite their lofty business only focus a decade ago, have become accessible to even modest home users and their budgets. Deciding to switch your home or office network from one-gigabit ethernet (1Gbe) to 10Gbe can often be intimidating, however, with numerous more cost-effective solutions and much more user-friendly hardware on offer, you can switch up your network to 10-gigabit for just a few £100’s. Today I’m going to detail each of the necessary components that you will need to consider when upgrading towards 10G, discuss their advantages and disadvantages, and recommend the best piece of 10Gb hardware for each tier of your setup in 2021.

Disclaimer – it is important to understand that increasing your network from the default 1Gbe to 10Gbe will increase the bandwidth available to you and your connected devices. However, bandwidth does not automatically translate to speed and you will still need to ensure that both targets and source hardware in the 10Gbe network can deliver the potential 1,000MB per second possible. It is best to think of your network as a series of pipes filled with water. Upgrading to 10-gigabit ethernet merely provides a larger pipe to send the water down, but you still need storage media and active data connections that can push data fast enough. First lets discuss the individual components that make up a modern 10Gbe network.

Upgrading to a 10Gbe Network – What You Need to Buy

In order to understand how much work is required when upgrading your network, it is worth knowing just how many different pieces of equipment you may need to buy when upgrading your internal bandwidth potential. The first most obvious upgrade is your switch (otherwise known as a network switch) – and you will need to look at 10Gbe equipped switches that allow each connected user the full potential to 1,000MB/s bandwidth each (or at the very least a single 10Gbe port that allows 10 users a full 100MB/s each). Managed switches, although more expensive, will allow you to combine these connections via link aggregation and trunking 2 or more to multiply this performance significantly, however, there are numerous affordable unmanaged 10Gbe switches out there too that are priced quite closely to 1Gbe counterparts.

Next, you will need to upgrade the network connectivity of your client devices, such as PCs, laptops and servers. Some 2020/2021 Prosumer hardware releases have started arriving with 10Gbe connectivity by default (e.g. the newest generation of Mac Pro Tower Machine) and to meet this there is thunderbolt to 10Gbe adapters available from numerous brands (I personally use the QNAP QNA-T310G1T or Sonnet Solo 10G – both of which use system power, so no mains power needed). Otherwise, there are numerous 1-port and 2-port PCIe upgrades readily available to buy that are even cheaper than external alternatives.

Next up, you need to think about whether you will want to use copper or fibre cable-based ethernet. Copper-based 10Gbe, known as 10GBASE-T, uses near-identical cables to those used in your standard 1Gbe connections (known as RJ45) and is much better suited to distances of up to 20 metres when deployed. After that distance, you will be much better off choosing fibre-based 10Gbe (known as SFP+ in architecture). This can cover many, MANY more times to distance, but see more expensive fibre cables. SFP+ 10Gbe also requires dedicated port transceivers (these connect between the client device and the cable), which adds to the cost even more. That said, there are MANY cost effect SFP+ only 10Gbe switches and NAS systems out there, as well as there being transceiver-ready shorter cables (called DAC cables) that are up to 5-7M long. There are other Pros and Cons to RJ45 and 10GBASE-T, so I recommend you check out my guide below quickly to learn the difference before going any further:

Click Below for the SFP+ vs 10GBASE-T Guide

Finally, we can talk about routers (which are arguably optional for most in this setup and still not quite mainstream in 10G). Although some modern routers do feature a dedicated 10Gbe LAN connection, it is worth remembering that most internet connections worldwide will not really be able to saturate 1,000MB/s of data. When you look at the internet plan that you have with your ISP, the speed is generally provided in bits ( ie Mb = megabit, Gb = gigabit), not BYTES. Unless you are living somewhere with a decent fibre optic connection, or dedicated high-speed business line that promises speeds higher than 1 gigabit, a 10Gbe router will only be able to push as much internet/external packet data to a connected user as the internet service provider allows in your initial plan. so there is no need to spend money on a 10Gbe equipped router unless your ISP subscription is comfortably approaching 5-6 gigabits (5Gb+). Aside from those three areas, nothing else in your typical hardware environment should require an upgrade when making the switch to a 10Gbe network. Remember, 10Gbe over copper and typical 1Gbe use exactly the same cables for connectivity (RJ45 or Cat cables) so you can reuse your existing setup easily. So, now we know the hardware, however, 10Gbe is recommended to use at least Cat 6 or Cat 7 cables, whereas regular 1Gbe and 2.5Gbe can get away with Cat 5 or Cat 5e. Let’s discuss the Pros and Cons of 10Gbe.

Upgrading to a 10Gbe Network – Price

The affordability of 10Gbe as an alternative to traditional gigabit ethernet LAN is getting better than it was when first commercial in 2008 or so (when it cost thousands!). When hardware started embracing 10Gbe connections, it was priced at an arguably fairer 3-4x times that of a normal 1Gb connection. However, it soon became apparent that due to demand in network use alongside data growing more rapidly in both home and business, that 1Gbe was fast becoming unsuitable for most businesses. Therefore in more recent times, the cost of 10Gbe has begun to arrive at just a pinch above that of accepted 1Gbe hardware (with numerous 2.5Gbe options arriving on the market meaning that the price is getting even better). In fact, many hardware manufacturers consider 1Gbe a tad dead in the water and have embraced 2.5Gbe, 5Gbe and affordable SFP/Copper10Gbe connections as standard at no additional increase thanks to more cost-effective ARM processors on the market from Realtek, Annapurna and Marvell (in the NAS community, the heavy hitters on this are QNAP and Asustor).

The real cost of a 10Gbe setup as an upgrade to, or an alternative to a 1Gbe setup, is in the network upgrades for traditional client hardware and interfaces. I am of course talking about PCs, tower servers, Apple Macs and just general day to day devices. Upgrading a desktop device with 10Gbe is around £80-100 per connection, about 75% more than the same thing at 1Gbe. For portable and less easy to upgrade devices, such as Macbooks and laptops, a 10Gbe to Thunderbolt 2/3 external adapter upgrade will cost you around £175-200, which is about 80% more than a 1Gbe USB or Docking Station alternatives.

Upgrading to a 10Gbe Network – Internet Speeds

As mentioned, 10Gbe networks are largely concerned with internal network traffic within your home or business building. The effects of introducing 10Gbe into your router/modem system with the aims of improved internet speeds on your devices are hugely dependent on your ISP subscription service and in most cases will not fully saturate a 10Gbe connection. If you have an internet connection that surpasses 1 Gigabit bandwidth, then you can start to enjoy the benefits of 10Gbe connected devices exceeding 100MBs, just ensure that you are using a primary modem and router that features a 10Gbe port, otherwise connecting a 10Gbe switch or additional router via 1Gbe will create an instantaneous bottleneck. If you are using wireless devices and looking to exceed 1Gbe, then you should look into WiFi 6/6E/AX (which we will touch on later). In 2021 there are a few 10Gbe Routers on the market from brands like Netgear and their NightHawk series, Asus in their Gamer ranges and QNAP in their QHora-301W System.

Upgrading to a 10Gbe Network – Availability

10Gbe hardware is a great deal more accessible and available in 2021 than ever. Alongside numerous affordable network upgrades via USB and PCIe, lots of motherboard makers, NAS server manufacturers and network switch brands have released 10Gbe options. Additionally, home or business users that have a 10Gbe setup that is shared by multiple 1Gbe uses can often allow connection of 10Gbe devices on these copper ports, as the majority of 10GBASE-T ports are backwards compatible with 5G, 10G and 1G (otherwise known as auto-negotiation). As mentioned earlier, a lot of hardware that would have once featured gigabit ethernet now arrives with 10Gbe connectivity at no additional cost, allowing a more gradual and organic upgrade into this larger bandwidth connection as you upgrade standard hardware in your environment. Lastly, the majority of plug-n-play 10Gbe upgrades for clients are reusable/shareable with numerous devices.

Upgrading to a 10Gbe Network – WiFi 6 and WiFi 6E Support?

One of the most attractive reasons that many users consider upgrading their setup to 10Gbe is due to the evolution in Wi-Fi connectivity, most recently in Wi-Fi 6. Otherwise known as 802.11AX, Wi-Fi 6 allows wireless connectivity that exceeds that of traditional 1Gbe LAN. Although the bandwidth and Wi-Fi coverage in Wi-Fi 6 is spread across multiple bands and frequencies (5Ghz and 5Ghz air communication, not to be confused with Gb data networks of measurement), it still allows bandwidths of 2.4Gigabits and greater (i,e 240MB/s). Many users who have upgraded their Wi-Fi network to Wi-Fi 6 (or holding out for Wi-Fi 6E) also want to upgrade their wired network to keep up, which is where 10Gbe hardware has grown in popularity noticeably. Indeed, a number of new Wi-Fi 6 solutions have arrived on the market in the last 12-months that also factor in dedicated 10Gbe ports and even 10Gbe in some cases (such as the QNAP QHora-301W). If you intend to set up your home or business environment wire-free, with a NAS in the centre for backups/sharing and wish to connect wirelessly to this device over Wi-Fi 6, then upgrading your NAS to at least a single 10Gbe connection will be hugely desirable and convenient. Equally, if you use a more modern WiFi 6 solutions with larger AX ratings (AX3000, AX6000 or AX11000 for example), then this will translate very well into multiple connected users and a 10Gbe (1,000MB/s) connected NAS or Network for sharing.

Upgrading to a 10Gbe Network – Recommended Products in 2021

So now we have discussed at length a number of the advantages and disadvantages to upgrading to a 10Gbe network environment. As mentioned, there are many new 10Gbe pieces of hardware available as 2021 continues, making the ease of choosing the right network components evermore confusing. Below I have detailed my recommended 10Gbe switch, NAS, Router, Plug-n-play laptop upgrade and Desktop PCIe upgrades to ensure that you are ready to make the jump to 10Gbe networking.

Recommended 10Gbe Switches

Likely the most important part of the 10Gbe network upgrade, the switch is what manages traffic between your client devices.

Budget Unmanaged 10Gbe Switch

Budget Managed 10Gbe Switch

Best Budget Dedicated 10G

QNAP QSW-308S

$139

QNAP QSW-M408-4C

$329

TRENDnet 8x 10G TEG-7080ES

$529

Recommended 10Gbe Laptop Upgrades

If your network is populated with more compact and portable devices, then you can still use a range of Thunderbolt connected devices to interact with a 10Gbe network. Here are the ones I recommend:

 

Sonnet Solo 10G Adapter

QNAP QNA-T310G1S Adapter

ATTO TLN3-3102 Thunderlink 2x10G Adapter

Thunderbolt3-to-10G Copper

$209

Thunderbolt3-to-SFP+ Fibre

$179

2x Thunderbolt3-to-2x SFP+ Fibre

$999

Recommended 10Gbe Desktop PC Upgrades

If you are using a desktop PC/Mac/Linux system, then you are able to consider PCIe 10Gbe upgrades. Although these are more expensive than the plug n play alternatives, they do allow more connections per card. Here are the 10Gbe PCIe cards I recommend:

 

1 Port 10Gbe PCIe Card

2 Port 10Gbe PCIe Card

Fully Featured 10Gbe PCIe Card

TRENDnet 10Gbe TEG-10GECTX

$99

QNAP QXG-10G2T-107 2x 10G

$199

QNAP 10Gbe and 2x NVMe QM2-2P10G1T

$279

Recommended 10Gbe Routers

Once again, very much an ‘optional extra’, upgrading the router/modem in your network towards 10Gbe will only really be beneficial if your internet service is greater than 1Gbps. Never the less, there are some great 10Gbe, 5Gbe and 10Gbe routers out there, some of which even include WiFi 6 too. Here are the best 10Gbe routers right now in 2021:

 

Best Gamer 10Gbe Router

Best Prosumer 10Gbe Router

Best Business 10Gbe Router

ASUS AX11000

$389

ASUS AX6000 10G

$410

QNAP QHora-301W 10G & WiFi 6

$329

Recommended 10Gbe NAS Servers

When it comes to seeing the true value of an upgraded network environment, then a NAS that features greater than gigabit connectivity is a great way to show this. Whether you are feeding this NAS into a 10Gbe/10Gbe network switch shared environment, or directly interfacing (i.e network connection PC-to-NAS), greater than 1Gbe speeds will be abundantly clear. There are quite a large number of 10Gbe NAS systems available in the server market right now, but I have narrowed it down to three below based on how you want to interact with your data:

 

Best Budget 10Gbe NAS

Best Prosumer 10Gbe NAS

Best Business 10Gbe NAS

TS-431KX

$369

TS-h973AX

$999

TVS-872X

$1699

Thanks for reading. Do you still need help? Use the NASCompares Free Advice section here – https://nascompares.com/contact-us. It is my free, unbias community support system that allows you to ask me questions about your ideal setup. It is NOT a sales platform, NOT a way to push hardware you don’t need and, although it is just manned by me and might take a day or two for me to reply, I will help you any way I can.

 

[su_end_of_article_span]

 

À partir d’avant-hierFlux principal

Les plus beaux Magic Keyboard ne seront bientôt plus en vente

15 mai 2021 à 09:48

Ils coûtaient 24 € de plus pour avoir l'air chic. Les Magic Keyboard gris sidéral ne seront bientôt plus en vente. [Lire la suite]

Abonnez-vous à notre chaîne YouTube pour ne manquer aucune vidéo !

L'article Les plus beaux Magic Keyboard ne seront bientôt plus en vente est apparu en premier sur Numerama.

How to Connect Directly with a Synology NAS Without a Switch or Router

12 mai 2021 à 01:39

Connecting DIRECTLY With Your NAS without Using a Switch or Router

Let’s all be honest for a second about one of the biggest advantages and disadvantages of network-attached storage, namely the speed, external security and method with which you can access your data. Having secure yet unlimited access to the data locked in your NAS from anywhere in the world is all well and good, but often all you want is the quick and easy connectivity more often found in traditional DAS and USB style storage. You want to enjoy the benefits of the software, maybe have the option of remote access and even still share are all the lovely data inside your NAS with multiple users, but you want it via direct connectivity with the NAS over a single cable, not having to play around with routers and switches. Add to this that many users are now taking advantage of connectivity such as thunderbolt and 10Gbe, and you find that it is genuinely desirable to be able to access your NAS via a much more direct method. In today’s article, I am going to show you how to set up a direct, one cable connection between your NAS drive and your Windows PC. The majority of the steps can also be applied to other operating systems, such as Linux and Mac, but this guide should show you how to set up a direct-attached storage style of connection with your NAS, whether you want to access the NAS software GUI or see the NAS Drive storage within the file management tools of your operating system natively (Windows File Explorer, Finder, etc)

Important – This guide is based on the assumption that you have set up your NAS system storage already. This includes physically installing the disks, powering on, installing the system firmware, creating an account, created and completed your RAID storage pool, created at least one volume and created at least 1 shared folder. I appreciate that this is alot of the first-time setup stuff, but don’t worry. Below are video guides for the first time setup of Synology, QNAP, Asustor and Terramaster NAS.

Additionally, it is worth remembering that the speed at which you can interact with the NAS will be heavily dictated by the connection you choose to use. If you connect with the default network interface connection on a NAS and desktop PC of 1Gbe, you will reach speeds of a little over 100MB/s. However, speeds in the thousands of megabytes are possible if you take advantage of 10Gbe, thunderbolt and more recent high-bandwidth card upgrades. Practically no NAS in the market today allows direct data access over USB (a couple of exceptions from QNAP in the TS-x51A series).

Directly Connecting to a NAS – What Do You Need?

In order to take advantage of this guide, you will need the following items:

  • A NAS system set up and ready, including volumes and at least one shared folder (for Drive Mapping)

  • At least one available network interface port available on the NAS, so keep this in mind if you want to maintain network and internet connectivity for others at the same time (so, that needs 2 LAN connections)
  • A client computer, in this case, a Windows machine with an available ethernet port. If your client computer does not feature a physical ethernet LAN port, there are numerous USB to network adaptors available on the market TN for less than £30
  • An additional RJ45 ethernet cable. It is recommended that this method described today it’s not used with a cable more than 20M long, which is still a huge amount of length anyway and should not be a problem
  • The network management and first-time setup tool available for free from your NAS brand manufacturer, such as the Synology Assistant, Qfinder Pro and Asustor Control Panel

Let’s begin.

The first thing you need to do is connect the Ethernet cable to the rear of the NAS via an available network port. Remember, if you want to maintain network and internet connectivity between the NAS and other users, you will need to ensure that you use a second available network port instead.

Next, you need to connect the other end of that Ethernet cable to your computer. You will know that both systems are able to see each other, as any available LED lights on either port will light up green and/or orange, depending on the type of connectivity.

Next head over to the network connections area of your Windows PC to ensure that this connection between the NAS and your computer has been acknowledged. You can reach this area either by clicking network connections in your start menu on the bottom left, or typing network connections into the search bar. The connection should be a different one to your internet connection.

Next, you need to open the NAS brand’s proprietary application that you used when setting up your NAS drive for the first time (ie Synology Assistant or Qfinder Pro). Once you open the application, use the search or scan option and it will then check the network connections available to your computer for the NAS. If your NAS is connected to the internet still and your computer also has a secondary connection with the internet, your NAS will likely be listed twice. One connection, likely starting with IP 192. is your NAS listed on the internet, and the second connection that likely starts with 169. or 10. by default, will be the NAS connected directly via the cable you just attached.

From here you can now interact with your NAS via a direct means of connection, rather than relying on an available network or the internet. Much like traditional connectivity, you have numerous means to interact with the device. If you double click the listed NAS drive on the client software, it will open up the GUI and NAS software in your browser window in a new tab and allows you to interact with the software just as you would via more remote connectivity. Once again though, bear in mind that unless your NAS has a secondary ethernet connection that is linked to an available internet service, your NAS will remain offline (as in no-internet) and features such as automatic firmware updates and new apps will not be possible to download.

Alternatively, many users who connect via this method do it so that they can interact with them with their native, proprietary file management applications, such as Mac Finder or Windows File Explorer. Predominantly, there are two main ways that people do this. The easier but slightly lower performance option is known as creating a Mapped Network Drive. This creates an additional visible storage drive on your computer, but some client software will not allow interaction with mapped network drives. The other way to make your NAS appear via your native file management tools in a far more usable, higher-performing but slightly more complicated way is via the use of iSCSI Targets and LUNs. These utilise a system of creating container areas of storage on the NAS server that are then connected to your computer and visible like any other connected drive with all of the connectivity and usability of localised storage in your PC software.  

How to Map A Network Drive to Directly Connect With Your NAS

First up, let’s go through how to create a mapped network drive. First, you need to right-click on the NAS that appears on the NAS brand client software you used earlier. Then click the option labelled ‘map network drive‘, or simply ‘map drive‘.

Once you click it, a new window will appear inviting you to enter the login credentials of your NAS system, these will need to be the login details of an account that has access to the shared folder you want to mount on your computer. It is recommended that you do not use the Admin account for your NAS to do this.

If your login details are correct, the NAS will then ask you to select which one of your available shared folders on the NAS you want to connect via mapped network storage. If you have multiple shared folders, you can connect multiple by repeating this process. Otherwise, simply select the shared folder that you want to interact with locally and click next/ok.

Next, you will need to assign a drive letter to this mapped network drive. The reason for this is so the computer system can assign an identity to the NAS storage that you are connecting with. For example, predominantly the main storage drive in any computer that houses the files for the operating system will typically be labelled as C: drive, whereas an optical drive (CDs, DVDs, etc) is generally labelled D:. So you simply need to select a letter that you want this NAS drive to be identified as. Once you’ve done that, click next

You may be asked to confirm or verify the network settings of this drive. Generally, the settings displayed will be correct as these were used to find the NAS in the first place but double-check the settings nonetheless. After this, you simply need to confirm the settings and it will then add this mapped network drive straight away, allowing you to interact locally with your computer’s file management software (no need to format or sync, it will just appear).

And there you go, that is how to assign your NAS as a mapped network drive locally. From there you can save this drive to favourites or create a shortcut as you see fit.

However, if you want to connect with your NAS in a more native and universally software supported way, then you will need to look into iSCSI targets and LUNS. Below I will take you through each step in creating a LUN on your NAS in order to better connect with your PC file management software and applications. These steps are from a Synology NAS, but the steps are quite universal across most known NAS brands and should be easy to adapt as needed.

How to Connect An iSCSI LUN Drive to Directly Connect With Your NAS

First, you need to head into the iSCSI manager, also known as SAN manager on Synology DSM 7.0

This tool is the one you will need to use in order to create a container of storage that can be interacted with in a more native way on your OS. The process of creating a target (the funnel with which your storage will be visible) and a LUN (the actual container of storage) has simplified considerably over the years and in modern NAS can be done quite easily and by even the most novice of users. If you are going to create a business class setup, or want to create a very unique iSCSI Target identity, you should go ahead and select the target option and then create. However, if you just want to set up your LUN quickly and easily, you can skip this and select the LUN tab and then click create, as the system will create a default target during this process.

After you click create LUN, you will be asked to name the area of storage, which storage area on the NAS you wish to use (if you have multiple) and give an available capacity (based on provisioning, you can exceed the total available NAS storage if you choose, to expand it later), otherwise just leave the other setting as their defaults.

Next, you will be asked which iSCSI target you wish to attach this LUN to. As mentioned, but default the system will create one during the LUN creation process (listed as default), so go ahead and choose this or any other target you have previously set up.

Next, you can choose which user(s) has access to this LUN and their respective iSCSI tool equipped systems. If you are going to be the only one using this NAS directly, you can leave this at defaults. However, maybe check that your default account (not just admin) has access privileges)

On the last screen, you will simply need to confirm that all the settings you have created are correct and then click confirm. The system will quickly create your iSCSI LUN (though larger capacity LUNs might take longer)

The LUN is now created and you can use the SAN Manager / iSCSI manager to edit and change the settings and access to this whenever you need.

Next, on your Windows PC, you need to head to the Start menu of your computer and then look for/type iSCSI Initiator (which should be available by default in recent windows updates, otherwise is free and available from the Microsoft update center), then run the application/service.

When the iSCSI initiator is open, click the Discovery tab at the top and get ready to configure your PC to see the Target you create on the NAS.

From the Discovery window, select the Discover button and then you will need the IP Address of your NAS (those numbers in the URL window when interacting with the NAS in the web browser)

I the next window, you have several options and things to do. First, you need to enter the IP of your NAS (do not include https://), add the port number of your NAS (if you have not manually changed this, you can leave it as the default one on your screen) and if you are concerned about people on your local area network access the iSCSI target and the LUN(s), you can head into the security options in order to add an additional login security layer (CHAPS).

You also have the choice of selecting different network adapters (if you have more than one on your PC, along with further security settings and defaults you can change). It is advised not to change these unless you know what you are doing or have an experienced IT/Networking person on site.

Next, on the iSCSI initiator window, click back to Targets and your newly available iSCSI target (the pathway) to your NAS will be available, but shown as ‘inactive’. In order to activate and use this iSCSI target, you need to click the connect button and from there a pop-up window will appear.

You can enable/chaps again here, but you can also enable multi-path usage here. If you plan on multiple users or services interacting with this iSCSI target, it is advised to tick this box. Then click ok/confirm

The iSCSI target and the LUN will now be accessible and connected. Next, you need to head back to the My Computer / This PC / My PC window and from there select the ‘Manage’  tab at the top

An administrative window will appear. From here you need to double click the Storage choice

Next you need to double click Disk Management and then you will be shown a list of the connected drives on your PC, as well as available drives (like the iSCSI LUN) that are yet to be connected

If you have followed these steps correctly, there should immediately be a pop-up window to acknowledge that the iSCSI LUN is found and if you want to add it. It is important that you DO NOT SELECT MBR as a drive choice, as this is generally a drive for a system operating system and will stop your PC booting correctly. So select the other one and click ok/confirm

After confirming this, you will need to begin in adding the drive to your system. Right-click the newly appeared drive (likely in black as it is not formatted or connected yet) and select New Simple Volume

You are now in the initialization and storage setup wizard. You will be asked to confirm the storage space (you can leave this as default if you do not know what you are doing). Then you will need to select a drive letter for this LUN to be identified as. On.y available drive letters will be selectable.

Next, you will need to give the drive a name (it can be left as the default New Volume if you like). you can choose the file system (this can be default for most users) and if you want to use this area of storage straight away, yo ucan format it. Do not format this drive if it already has data on it that you want to access (ie you are connecting a 2nd user to an existing LUN). Then click Next

Finally, you will be asked to confirm the settings you have created and click confirm. If you selected to format the drive, this may take extra time (depending on if you selected quick format or not)

Now the iSCSI LUN is visible to your Windows PC and in a much, MUCH more user-friendly way for your file manager and PC software to interact with (i.e Video Editing, Steam Gaming, VM files, etc)

And there you go, that is how to add an iSCSi LUN to your Windows PC from a NAS (in this case a Synology NAS). It is with highlighting that this will work almost identically with a QNAP NAS with the iSCSI manager on QTS and QuTS Hero.

Still need help? Feel free to use the NASCompares free advice section below for completely free, unbias and unpaid support for your data storage needs. It is managed by me (Robbie) and Eddie, so replies might take an extra day or so – but it’s free and we just want to help! Thanks for reading and don’t forget to subscribe.

 

[su_end_of_article_span]

Quels sont les meilleurs ordinateurs portables en 2021 ?

8 mai 2021 à 10:30

Depuis plus d’un an, l’ordinateur portable est quasiment devenu une extension de notre organisme. Entre le chill sur Netflix, le gaming sauvage ou les réunions en visio qui n’en finissent plus, s’équiper d’un bon PC ou Mac n’a jamais été si important. C’est pourquoi nous vous proposons un guide aux petits oignons pour que vous puissiez trouver l’ordinateur de vos rêves. [Lire la suite]

Abonnez-vous à notre chaîne YouTube pour ne manquer aucune vidéo !

L'article Quels sont les meilleurs ordinateurs portables en 2021 ? est apparu en premier sur Numerama.

Synology NAS – Recommended Backup, Redundancy and Data Recovery for Beginners

7 mai 2021 à 01:41

The Best Methods of Backup, Redundancy and Data Recovery on Synology NAS for Dummies

Backup, backup, BACKUP! It’s something I am prone to say at the beginning and end of my videos whenever I talk about NAS Drives and integrating them into your home and business environment. Most people THINK they have a robust and secure data storage solution, yet only a fraction of them actually do. Most people will be happy/convinced their data is perfectly safe when they buy a Synology NAS drive, that they have a rugged, intelligent and reliable backup solution in place! They then start to back up their phones to the NAS, their PC’s and Macbooks to the NAS, their home media, their photo albums, their precious and irreplaceable memories! All of that data is sent to the Synology NAS to be kept safe as a ‘backup’. HOWEVER, they then start to delete the photos from their phone, delete those files from their laptop, Free up room on that USB drive by moving the data over to the NAS – Congratulations, your NAS is NO-LONGER A BACKUP! The minute the data is deleted from any other device, the NAS becomes the ONLY place that data exists and is now JUST as unsafe and prone to loss/damage as it was when it stayed on your phone, computer or USB drive. It is incredibly important that people practice comprehensive and intelligent backup strategies that feature multiple tiers, multiple locations and/or failsafe/safety nets along the way that can give you at least a little warning before the worst can happy. Today I want to go through all the different ways in which you can backup, protect, failover and ultimately SAVE the DATA on your Synology NAS server. Let’s go through all of them and find out which ones best suit your Synology NAS storage setup.

Important – Below I detail 10x methods to provide redundancy (eg a failover), backups, data recovery and/or time managed versioning (so you can recover a file to a specific point) that can ALL be done on a Synology NAS with DSM 6.2 or DSM 7 in 2021 onwards. However, some are free and included in your Synology NAS by default, whereas others can arrive with a small, medium or very large price tag. It is important to remember when setting a price tag on your Data Storage Solution that you think of how much it would cost to LOSE your data. NOT the cost of storing it, but the cost to you/your business if the data in your Synology NAS was gone. So, whether it is photos of your child when they were mere months old, your entire business portfolio or the customer accounts for 2021/2022 – you need to FOCUS on the cost of LOSING your data when deciding how much you will spend!

Creating or Increasing Your RAID Level and Redundancy

The Hard drives or SSD inside your Synology NAS are typically bunched together in a RAID group, each of which provides a different level of safety net and overall storage. This RAID will typically form a storage pool and this is the basis on which your data (in one of more volumes) lives inside your Synology NAS. Storage pools can be changed from one RAID type to another without losing existing data. For example, you can create a RAID 1 storage pool on your Synology NAS and later change it to RAID 5 if you install more drives. This article provides instructions on changing the RAID type of existing storage pools on your Synology NAS. Before you start changing the RAID type of a storage pool, please refer to the Drive Requirements and RAID Type Requirements and Limitations sections below for details on the relevant requirements and limitations.

Before you start:

Before changing the RAID type, please note the following:

  • Make sure the status of your storage pool is Healthy.
  • When adding new drives to a storage pool, the new drives must be larger than or equal to the smallest drive in the storage pool and all drives must be of the same drive type.
  • The RAID type of RAID Arrays in a RAID Group cannot be changed. The RAID Group feature is available on specific models only.

To change the RAID type of a storage pool:

  1. Launch Storage Manager.
  2. Go to Storage Pool.
  3. Select the storage pool that you want to change its RAID type, and click Change RAID Type from the Action drop-down menu.
  4. Select the RAID type that you want to change to. Click Next.
  5. Select the drives to add to the existing storage pool. Click Next.
    Note: All data on the newly added drives will be erased. Please make sure to back up your data in advance.
  6. Follow the wizard to finish.

Below is a video guide on how to set your Synology NAS RAID Storage Pool for the first time, as well as Create a Volume:

To add a drive to a storage pool:

Before you start, make sure the status of the storage pool you intend to expand is Healthy. If the storage pool status is not healthy, please follow the recommended actions shown beneath the status to fix drive issues. Afterward, follow the steps below to add a drive to a storage pool:

  1. Power off your Synology NAS. Note: Skip this step if your Synology NAS supports hot-swapping.
  2. Insert a new drive into an empty drive slot.
  3. Power on your Synology NAS and launch Storage Manager.
  4. Go to the Storage Pool page and select the storage pool you want to expand. Click Add Drive from the Action drop-down menu.
  5. Select the drive you want to add from the list. Only drives that meet the type and capacity requirements will be listed.
  6. Follow the wizard to finish the process.

To expand the volume size:

Once a storage pool contains sufficient capacity, the size of its corresponding volume can be expanded either automatically or manually, depending on the storage pool type.

  • Single-volume storage pool: For a storage pool that supports a single volume, the volume size will be expanded automatically once the storage pool capacity has been expanded.
  • Multiple-volume storage pool: For a storage pool that supports multiple volumes, the volume size can be expanded manually once the storage pool contains sufficient capacity.

Make Sure You Check Your Synology NAS RAID and Storage Health Periodically

You can learn more about each drive’s information and health condition by going to Storage Manager > HDD/SSD. Each drive is color-coded to indicate its overall status:

  • Green: The drive is in good condition, or its warning status has been suppressed or disabled.
  • Orange: The drive is in abnormal status. Please pay attention to the drive’s health status and allocation status.
  • Red: Critical issues have been detected on the drive. Please replace the drive immediately.
  • Blue: The drive is processing one or multiple tasks.
  • Gray: The drive is disabled.

A drive’s overall status shows the relatively more serious status between the drive’s Allocation status (i.e., the condition of the storage pool that the drive is assigned to) and its Health status (i.e., the condition of the drive itself). For example, if a drive’s allocation status is Not Initialized and its health status is Warning, its overall status will be Warning as this is the more serious status.

To learn about health statuses:

The health status indicates the drive condition.

Health Status Definition
Healthy The drive is in good condition, or its warning has been suppressed or disabled.
Warning The system has detected issues or an increase in bad sectors on the drive. We recommend monitoring the drive even though it may still be working properly.
Critical The system has detected one or more critical issues on the drive. Please replace the drive immediately.
Failing The system has detected severe issues on the drive. Drive integrity may not be guaranteed. Please replace the drive immediately.
Access Error The system has detected severe issues on the drive. Drive communication errors may have caused the drive to disconnect from the system, or these errors have resulted in severe read-write failure. Please replace the drive immediately.

To learn about allocation statuses:

The allocation status indicates the status of the storage pool where the drive is assigned to.

Allocation Status Definition
Not Initialized The drive can be assigned to a storage pool. DSM is not installed on the drive.
Initialized The drive can be assigned to a storage pool. DSM is installed on the drive.
Normal The drive is assigned to a storage pool. DSM is installed on the drive.
Hot Spare The drive is assigned as a hot spare drive.
System Partition Failed The system cannot access the partitions of this drive.
Crashed The system has removed the drive from the storage pool. To continue using the drive, please do the following:
  1. Select a drive.
  2. Go to Action > Deactivate to deactivate the drive.
  3. Restart your Synology NAS or remove and reinsert the drive.
Deactivated The drive is deactivated.

To view a drive’s general information:

  1. Go to the HDD/SSD page.
  2. Select a drive and click its upper-right icon to expand the drive information.
  3. Here you can learn information regarding drive location, storage pool, allocation status, health status, temperature, serial number, firmware version, and more.

To view a drive’s health information:

  1. Go to the HDD/SSD page.
  2. Select a drive and click Health Info.
  3. Go to the Overview tab to find out how many hours the drive has been powered on, and to view its current temperature, reconnection/re-identification count, and bad sector count.
  4. Go to the S.M.A.R.T. tab to perform diagnostic tests on the supported drive and view the S.M.A.R.T. attributes. In the S.M.A.R.T. Test section, you can run an S.M.A.R.T. test immediately and view the test results and schedules; in the S.M.A.R.T. Attribute section, you can view the details of the S.M.A.R.T. attribute values.
  5. Go to the IronWolf Health tab to perform diagnostic tests on the supported drive.
  6. Go to the History tab to view and export the health diagnosis results and to view the history of the major S.M.A.R.T. attributes.

The S.M.A.R.T. test and the IronWolf Health test can be scheduled to run automatically on drives. Please note that these tests are supported only on certain models.  Below is a video guide on how to check your RAID and Drive Health:

Setup Snapshots on Your Synology NAS as Soon as Possible

Snapshot Replication is an expert of data backup and recovery. Businesses need data protection to prevent data loss from accidental deletion, application crashes, data corruption, and viruses.

Note:

  • The “snapshot” feature is a point-in-time copy stored in the same volume used to record the whole data status at the time upon being taken. Snapshots use only a small amount of additional storage space, and do not have a performance impact.
    With the snapshots, if a user accidentally modifies or deletes data on a volume with snapshots, you are able to quickly restore the data back to the previous time at which the snapshot was taken. In addition, it allows users to recover their own deleted or modified files in shared folders without assistance from the administrator.
  • The “replication” feature is a mechanism to sync the taken snapshots of shared folders or iSCSI LUNs between the sources and destinations. If the replication source fails to run normal service, you can perform a failover and protect your data with the replicated snapshots.

Snapshot Replication helps you manage and monitor the snapshots and replication tasks on your Synology NAS.

Depending on the functions supported by your Synology NAS, Snapshot Replication helps you accomplish the following tasks:

  • Take and manage snapshots of shared folders and iSCSI LUNs.
  • Configure scheduled snapshots and retention settings. These settings will determine when and how the snapshots should be taken, retained, and/or removed.
  • Create and manage replication tasks for shared folders and iSCSI LUNs.
  • Configure scheduled replication to periodically run the syncing for your replication tasks.
  • Restore data from snapshots, and perform failover/switchover of replication tasks between the source and destination.
  • View the logs of the events related to snapshots and replications.

Note:

  • The snapshot and replication features are available for the following targets only:
    • Shared folders located in volumes using the Btrfs file system
    • iSCSI LUNs created as Standard LUNs with storage acceleration or Advanced LUNs
  • Snapshot Replication has defined the limits of the following maximum numbers of retainable snapshots:
    • 1024 snapshots for each shared folder (or 256 on certain Synology NAS models)
    • 256 snapshots for each iSCSI LUN
    • 65536 snapshots in total in the system (or 4096 on certain Synology NAS models)

    For more information on the maximum snapshot number, please refer to the specifications of your purchased Synology NAS models.

  • To improve replication performance, you can go to Storage Manager > Volume to select a Btrfs volume containing replicated targets, and set Record File Access Time Frequency to Monthly or Never in the Edit window.
  • Features related to iSCSI LUNs have been moved to iSCSI Manager since DSM 6.2. Corresponding features in previous DSM versions can be found at Storage Manager > iSCSI LUN.

Below is another video guide, which covers a large number of backup options, but will also show you how to set snapshots on your Synology NAS, as well as adjust retention and versions long term:

Create a Routine of Local USB Backups on your Synology NAS

USB Copy helps you copy files between your Synology NAS and external USB/SD storage devices. This package comes with multiple copy and file organization strategies to ensure efficient storage usage and easy location of files.

Note:

  • Only USB/SD devices with file systems recognized by your Synology NAS (e.g., FAT32, NTFS, ext3, ext4, and exFAT) are allowed for data copy.
  • Not all Synology NAS models support the HFS+ file system. USB Copy will not be able to export data to a USB/SD device using this format if the external device is inserted into a Synology NAS which does not support HFS+: the external device may enter read-only mode in such a situation.
  • Only the admin and the users belonging to the administrators group can access this package.

Create USB/SD Copy Tasks

You can customize each copy task for an external USB/SD storage device, and import/export files between your Synology NAS and the USB/SD device. When the USB/SD device is inserted again for copy, your Synology NAS will recognize the matched device and apply the same copy settings.

  1. Insert an external USB/SD storage device to your Synology NAS.
  2. Click Create (the plus icon) on the upper left corner.
  3. Select the desired task type: Photo/Video ImportData Import, or Data Export.
  4. Specify basic task information and select a copy mode:
    • Multi-versioned: Each time the task runs, a folder will be created and named with the run time. All source files will be fully copied to the destination.
    • Mirroring: Each time the task runs, all changes made in the source folder will be copied to the destination, making the destination folder a complete mirror copy of the source.
    • Incremental: Each time the task runs, newly added and modified source files will be copied to the destination.
  5. When you choose the Multi-versioned copy mode, you can set up rotation policies to delete older versions:
    • Enable backup rotation: Select to rotate versions by the following conditions:
      • Rotate from the earliest version: Delete the earliest versions when stored versions exceed the maximum limit.
      • Smart Recycle: Select to start rotation when the maximum limit is exceeded. The system will rotate versions that do not meet any of the conditions below; when remaining versions still exceed the limit, the system will rotate the earliest versions:
        • Hourly versions from the past 24 hours: Keep the earliest version created each hour.
        • Daily versions from the past 1 day to 1 month: Keep the earliest version created each day.
        • Weekly versions older than 1 month: Keep the earliest version created each week.
      • Number of versions: Specify the maximum number (between 1 and 65535) of versions to keep.
  6. When you choose the Incremental copy mode, three more settings will be available:
    • Remove original file structure (i.e. flatten all files) in the destination folder: Select to copy files without copying the source file structure, and to further sort out the files according to the selected file organization or renaming policy.
    • File conflict policy: Choose Rename or Overwrite to deal with the situation when files with the same names are copied to the destination.
    • Delete source files after copy completes: Select to have files in the source folders deleted after they are copied to the destination.
  7. Configure execution settings:
    • Copy data whenever the USB/SD storage device is plugged in: Select to auto-perform this copy task when the matched USB/SD device is inserted to your Synology NAS.
    • Eject the USB/SD storage device when copy completes: Select to auto-eject the USB/SD drive when this copy task completes.
    • Enable schedule: Select to run the copy task based on specified conditions.
  8. Deselect unwanted file types and extensions to copy only needed files. You can also create filters through the text field:
    • Specify the full filename (Template: NAME.FILE_EXTENSION).
    • Specify the file extension (Template: *.FILE_EXTENSION).
  9. Click Apply to finish the setup.
  10. To run the task, do one of the following:
    • Click Run on the management interface.
    • Press the Copy button (for models with the hardware Copy button).
    • Plug in the USB/SD device to your Synology NAS (with Copy data whenever the USB/SD storage device is plugged in enabled).

Note:

  • Photo/Video Import tasks only run in the incremental copy mode. The imported photos and videos will be renamed with modification time and sorted into folders by modification date.
  • You can manage scheduled copy tasks at Control Panel > Task Scheduler.
  • When a copy task is scheduled for multiple runs, keep the storage device mounted to your Synology NAS and do not select Eject the USB/SD storage device when the copy completes. The device will be ejected when there are no more pertaining tasks in progress.
  • Files and folders should follow the naming rules below for successful copying:
    • Filenames should not start with “._” or “.SYNOPPSDB”.
    • Filenames and folder names should not be or contain any of the following: “@eaDir”, “#recycle”, “desktop.ini”, “.ds_store”, “Icon\r”, “thumbs.db”, “$Recycle.Bin”, “@sharebin”, and “#snapshot”.
  • A partition on a USB device can only support multiple copy tasks with, however, certain limitations on the destination path:
    • Tasks cannot share the same destination path.
    • A task cannot use a destination path if a part of that destination path is already set as the destination path of another task.
    • A task cannot have its destination path be included in the destination paths of other tasks.
  • If the file system of your backup destination is exFAT/FAT32, a file with filename containing the following characters might overwrite other files with the same filename during automatic renaming: \ / | : < > ” * ? \r \n. This is because the characters are considered to be invalid characters and the system will automatically replace them with a random character that’s recognizable by the system. For example, a file named A|A might overwrite files named A>A or A?A after they all are renamed to A-A.
  • When you run a copy task, the hardware Copy button of your Synology NAS (for models without this button, see the Power LED indicator instead) will continue to blink until the task ends. You will also hear a short beep and a normal beep at the beginning and end of the task.

Set up Tasks for Hardware Copy Button

If your Synology NAS comes with a hardware Copy button, through Copy Button (associated with the frontal USB port) and SD Copy Button (associated with the SD slot) you can copy data between your Synology NAS and any external USB/SD storage devices inserted into the frontal ports.

To enable a task for hardware Copy button:

  1. Sign in to your Synology NAS and open USB Copy.
  2. Select Copy Button or SD Copy Button on the left panel, depending on the device type.
  3. Go to Overview to enable the Copy-button task, and then go to Task Settings and File Filter to specify relevant settings.

Note: The Copy Button tab only works with USB devices inserted into the frontal USB port.

If you still need help, use the Video Guide below to walk you through the steps on how to setup a USB backup routine on your Synology NAS:

Backup and/or Sync Your Synology NAS to Google Drive, DropBox and OneDrive

With Cloud Synchronization, you can seamlessly sync and share files among your Synology NAS and multiple public cloud services.

Create New Connections

To sync files among your Synology NAS and public cloud services, you need to create connections on Cloud Sync to link to the service provider by using your user credentials.

To create a new connection:

  1. On the Cloud Sync user interface, click on the Create icon at the bottom-left corner to start the wizard.
  2. Choose one of the following public cloud services to sync files with and click Next.
    • Dropbox, Baidu Cloud, Google Drive, Box, OneDrive, Amazon Drive, MegaFon MegaDisk, and HiDrive: Sign in with your user credentials.
    • WebDAV: Input the server address, your account and password. Server address should follow the formats specified below:
        • Input http or https URLs of the intended WebDAV server, with custom port number after the colon (optional), e.g. http://mywebdavserver.synology.me:5005 or https://mywebdavserver.synology.me:5006

      Note: Please note that the entered address cannot contain “.” or “..“.

      • Cloud Sync will connect to the server via http if the URL does not imply http or https.
      • If port number is not specified in the URL, Cloud Sync will access port 80 in http connections, and port 443 in https connections.
      • Path can be appended to the URL, e.g. https://mywebdavserver.synology.me:5006/webdav/folder
    • Yandex: Input your account and password.
    • Google Cloud Storage: Sign in with your user credentials, then Project ID and Bucket name.
    • IBM SoftLayer: Input username and API Key, and choose location and Container in the next page.
    • RackSpace: Input username and API Key, and choose location and Container in the next page.
    • OpenStack Swift compatible cloud services: Input the identity server address and choose the KeyStone protocol version which the server supports:
      • Version 1.0: Input username and API Key
      • Version 2.0: Input username, password, Tenant ID or Tenant name (optional).
      • Version 3.0: Input username, password, Tenant ID or Tenant name (optional), and Domain ID or Domain name (optional).
      • You can choose the location and Container on the next page after passing the identity service
    • S3 storage: Select a server (Amazon S3, Amazon S3 China, or input a server address directly), then input the Access key, Secret key and Bucket name. If users want to enter user-specified S3 service hosts, they should enter something like “s3.amazonaws.com”, or “api.suite-stockage-cloud.sfrbusinessteam.fr” in the S3 Server Address field.
    • hicloud S3: Input Access key, Secret key, and Bucket name.
    • SFR NAS Backup: Input Access key, Secret key, and Bucket name.
    • Microsoft Azure: Select a server, input the Blob Storage Access key, and select a Blob container.
    • Backblaze B2: Input keyID and application key, and select a Bucket.
    • Alibaba Cloud OSS: Input Access key and Secret key, and select a Bucket.
    • Tencent Cloud COS: Input Secret ID and Secret key, and select a Bucket.
    • JD Cloud OSS: Select region, input Access key and Secret key, and select a Bucket.
  3. Once authentication has been successful, fill in the following fields and then click Next.
    • Task name: This name will show on the connection list.
    • Local path: Select a local folder. All directories and files within this folder will be synced to the remote folder.
    • Remote path: Select a remote folder. All directories and files within this folder will be synced to the local folder.
    • Sync direction: Select whether you want the sync to be Bidirectional,Download remote changes only, or Upload local changes only.
    • Check the box next to Data encryption to enable client-side data encryption.
    • Check the box next to Don’t remove files in the destination folder when they are removed in the source folder. if needed.
    • Schedule settings: Go to this section to enable your schedule for file syncing.
  4. To further adjust your sync settings, click Advanced settings.
    • You can prevent certain files from being synced by unchecking any folders you don’t want synced, by setting a max file size limit, or filtering out certain file names or file extensions:
      • By folder: Uncheck any sub-folders you don’t want synced.
      • By maximum file size: If a file is bigger than your specified size, it will not be synced.
      • By file name: Any file with the designated file name will not be synced.
      • File extension: Any designated file extension will not be synced. Add *.[extension] to the table, e.g. *.iso.
  5. Click Apply to save your settings.

Here is another brief Video Guide that will walk you through how to backup/sync your Synology NAS with a cloud storage provider:

Stay 1st Party and Connect Your Synology NAS to Synology C2 with Cloud Synchronization

You may already be aware, but Synology has its own premium cloud platform/service in the form of Synology C2, which can be synchronized with your NAS using the same steps as those detailed above with Cloud Sync and/or Hyper Backup. Synology C2 Storage plans are tailored to different users with features, storage and prices to match their size and needs. Whether you are a home user looking for an easy-to-use cloud backup plan, or a system administrator in search of secure cloud storage with optimized space utilization, Synology’s pricing plans can meet your needs. In order to start using the Synology C2 Cloud service for backups and Syncing, sign in to DSM with administrator privileges and install Synology Hyper Backup. Create a backup task and select Synology C2 Storage as the cloud destination. You will be asked to sign in with the Synology Account you wish to use to manage C2 Storage for Hyper Backup. After login, you may start the 30-day free trial if eligible or purchase a C2 Storage plan.

Back up data on your Synology NAS to Synology C2 Storage

  1. In Hyper Backup, click on the + icon in the bottom left corner and select Data backup task.
  2. Choose Synology C2 Storage as your backup destination.
  3. Enter your Synology Account and password. Then, follow the instructions to finish creating your backup task.
  4. If you have not used Synology C2 Storage before, you will receive a 30-day free trial so you can try it out.
  5. Select a region and plan.
  6. A credit card is required for creating a backup plan. You will not be charged during the free trial period.
  7. Confirm your subscription to start using C2 Storage.

Monitor backup tasks and browse data on the C2 Storage portal

  1. After you have created a backup task, you can sign in to the C2 Storage portal to monitor your task and browse the data stored there. You can see the storage usage, the top five tasks that take up the most space, and all of the tasks backed up to Synology C2 Storage.
  2. To browse your data and retrieve them directly to your computer, click on the “browse” icon to launch the C2 Storage web explorer.
  3. In the web explorer, click on the “download” icon to download a file.
  • Plan I
    Plan I protects your data through daily backups with a default retention policy. C2 Storage for Hyper Backup will retain 11 backup versions (one latest, 7 daily, 3 weekly) going back 30 days. Regardless of the cumulative size of your backup versions, only the source data size on your Synology NAS is counted toward your C2 Storage usage.
  • Plan II
    Plan II lets you customize your backup schedules and retention policies. All your backup versions count toward your total C2 Storage usage. However, Plan II-exclusive deduplication helps you cut back storage use by reducing duplicate data across different versions.

Each Synology Account can activate a one-time 30-day free trial. Try all the great features that C2 Storage offers before deciding whether it is the solution for you. Backup storage on C2 Storage can be purchased using one Synology Account and shared with multiple Synology NAS, increasing the flexibility of storage use. You can upgrade your backup plan at any time if more space is needed. Use the Video guide below for a view of the Synology C2 User Interface and see how to create a sync/backup with a Synology NAS, as well as see how versioning is handled:

Setup a 2nd NAS and Connect Both Devices for NAS to NAS Backups

Here is a Synology guide, or you can read it also from their web site.

Also, you don’t need RAID on a old NAS any more because it will not be your main point of access any more.

1. Install Hyper Backup

If Hyper Backup has not been installed on your Synology NAS yet, please follow the below steps:

  1. Log in to DSM and go to Package center. Search for Hyper Backup and download the package.
  2. Make sure your Synology NAS is running DSM 6.0 or above. For users of older DSM versions, Hyper Backup is not supported.

2. Create a backup task

This section shows you how to create a backup task to a remote Synology NAS or file server.

    1. Open Hyper Backup.
    2. Click the + icon on the bottom left corner, and select Data backup task.
    3. On the Backup Destination page, select Remote NAS device if you would like to back up to another Synology NAS. To back up to file servers, please select one of the options in the File Server section. (Please note that rsync copy only supports single-version backup.) Click Next after choosing your destination.

    1. On the Backup Destination Settings page, select Create backup task and enter the information required to connect with the other NAS device or file server. As the procedures of backing up to both the aforementioned destinations are similar, only the step-by-step screenshots of remote Synology NAS backup are provided here for your reference. Enter the IP address and account information of the remote NAS to connect with it, and select a shared folder as the backup destination. You can also change the name of the Directory under which you can find your backed up data.

If the backup destination you selected is an encrypted shared folder, please make sure it has been mounted already. Otherwise, it won’t be displayed in the shared folder list.

    1. Select any source folder(s) to back up the contained data. Encrypted shared folders, if selected, must stay mounted during the backup process. In cases where the source and destination are in the same volume, the system will mark such source folders with orange exclamation marks.

    1. Select the application(s) you would like to back up.

    1. Specify the backup settings below to fit your needs:
      • Task: Name the backup task.
      • Enable task notification: Select to have you informed of the task status via email, SMS, or push service.
      • Enable configuration backup: Back up the system configurations (e.g. user credentials). This setting is enforced on all backup tasks by default.
      • Compress backup data: Compress backup data to reduce the usage of destination storage. More backup time is needed if this option is selected.
      • Enable backup schedule: Select to schedule when the system should automatically perform the backup task.
      • Enable integrity check: Select to schedule an automatic integrity check, which examines stored data and detects corruption, to run at a specific time to ensure data reliability. Index check is enabled by default, while you may set a limit on the time spent on data check.
      • Enable client-side encryption: Select to protect the backup data with password from unwanted access on the destination side. Please note that the password used for encryption here will be required for restoring the data backed up in this task. Therefore, losing this password will cause permanent data loss.

    1. Select Enable backup rotation to set up the rotation scheme:
      • From the earliest versions: Delete the earliest existing backup versions once the specified Number of versions is exceeded.
      • Smart Recycle: The system will retain every backup version until the specified number of versions is exceeded. When rotation is triggered, the system will first rotate the versions that do not meet any of the conditions; if all the existing versions meet the conditions below, the system will rotate the earliest version:
        • Hourly versions from the past 24 hours: The system keeps the earliest version that is created each hour.
        • Daily versions from the past 1 day to 1 month: The system keeps the earliest version that is created each day.
        • Weekly versions older than 1 month: The system keeps the earliest version that is created each week.
      • Number of versions: Set the upper limit of possible retained backup versions.
      • Timeline: Display the possible result of backup retention according to your backup schedule and rotation scheme.

  1. Click Apply to complete the setup.
  2. To perform the backup task immediately, follow the Backup Wizard’s instructions and click Yes.

 

If you want to create a synchronized backup between your Synology NAS and a NAS from another brand, you can use the video guide below to walk you through the steps easily:

Connect 2 Identical NAS Setup for Failover Using a Dual Controller/SHA on your Synology NAS

The term “high-availability” refers to a server layout solution designed to reduce service interruptions caused by server malfunctions. Synology High Availability (SHA) employs two hosts to form a “high-availability cluster” in which one host assumes the role of “active server” and the other host acts as a standby “passive server.”

In a high-availability cluster, data on the active server is continuously replicated to the passive server, so mirrored copies of all files will exist on both hosts. Therefore, in the event the active server crashes or malfunctions, the passive server can take over all services, minimizing system downtime.

Before you start

Please read the following sections carefully before trying to create a high-availability cluster.

Hardware Requirements:

  • SHA requires two identical Synology NAS to act as active and passive servers.
  • Two different Synology NAS can act as active and passive servers, but with limitations.

System Requirements:

  • The active and passive servers must be identical models and both support Synology High Availability.
  • The same version of DSM and package must be installed on both hosts.

1.png

The illustration above is for reference only. Your model and DSM version may differ.

Volume and Disk:

  • The drive capacity of both hosts must be identical to avoid data inconsistencies.
  • The active and passive servers must have the same number of drives. In addition, drive position must be identical.
  • The hosts cannot contain any SHR format volumes. Go to Storage Manager > Volume to make sure no SHR volumes exist.

2.png

The illustration above is for reference only. The number and size of disks in your environment may differ.

Network Environment:

  • Both hosts must be assigned static IP addresses as the cluster connection. Make sure that the IP addresses of both hosts are accessible and belong to the same subnet; otherwise, errors might occur when performing a switchover to the passive server. To change network settings, log in to each host and go to Control Panel > Network > Network Interface, select the network interface and click Edit.
  • Both hosts must have the same number of LAN ports. If the hosts are equipped with additional network interface cards, these network cards will also count as additional LAN ports.
  • Synology High Availability does not support the following: DHCP, DHCP server, IPv6, PPPoE, and Wi-Fi. Please ensure that the above are all switched off before creating a high-availability cluster.

Cable the hosts

In this section, we’ll explain how to connect both hosts so that a high-availability cluster can be created. Please see the following steps:

  1. Use a network cable to connect the two hosts to each other. This connection shall serve as the Heartbeat connection between the two hosts, facilitating communication and allowing data to be replicated from the active server to the passive server. This connection must meet the following criteria:
    • Use the same network interface on both hosts. For example, if one end is connected to LAN 1 on one host, then the other end must be connected to LAN 1 on the other host.
    • Use the fastest network interface on both hosts. If the hosts are equipped with 10GbE add-on network interface cards, this connection must use them.
    • Connect the two hosts directly, without passing through any switches or routers.

    3.png

  2. Use network cables to connect the two hosts to the network using the remaining network interfaces. Make sure these connections are active and belong to the same network. In order to prevent service interruptions caused by network failure, we recommend deploying multiple switches in your network environment so that each host in the high-availability cluster can be connected to a separate switch.
    4.png
  3. The hosts are now ready to create a high-availability cluster. Please continue with the steps below.

Create a high-availability cluster with the hosts

Once the two hosts are connected properly, you can follow the steps below to create a high-availability cluster.

  1. Log into the host that you want to assume the role of the active server with an account belonging to the administrators group.
  2. Open Synology High Availability.
    5.png
  3. Click Create high-availability cluster to start the cluster creation wizard.
  4. Click Next.
    6.png
    7.png
  5. Select which network interfaces to use for the high-availability cluster’s cluster connection and Heartbeat connection. Then click Next.
  6. Enter the credentials of an account belonging to the administrators group on the passive server. Then click Next.
  7. Specify a name for the high-availability cluster and the IP address with which you’ll be able to access the cluster resources. The wizard will display the available IP range; please select an IP address that has not been used by other services in the network. Then click Next.
  8. The wizard will check if the system meets all the requirements. Click Next when the verification is done.
  9. If there are existing data, volume or LUN detected on the active server, you can choose to keep the data or erase it all. Click Next to continue.
  10. Confirm the settings you previously made. Then click Apply.
  11. Tick the checkbox after reading the instructions and then click Yes.
  12. The wizard will start to create the high-availability cluster. Creation time varies depending on your environment.
  13. Once finished, you’ll see the cluster status on the Cluster page.

Below I set up an SHA Environment on two Synology DS920+ NAS Systems. Take a look to see how using a high availability environment can allow your storage to withstand a whole system failure:

Use Seagate Ironwolf NAS Hard Drives with FREE Data Recovery Services Included

Most Seagate drives now include Rescue Data Recovery Services matching the duration of your warranty — helping you defend against power outages, natural disasters, user error, viruses and more. With an industry-leading 95% success rate against unexpected data loss and access to world-class data recovery experts, you can focus on what’s important and rest easy knowing your files are safer. Not available in all countries.

Below is an EXTREME demonstration of me causing exceedingly large amounts of damage to a Seagate Ironwolf NAS Hard Drive and how the Rescue Recovery service was able to assist:

 

[su_end_of_article_span]

A Guide to 2.5Gbe Networks – Should you Upgrade

30 avril 2021 à 01:13

Should you Upgrade to 2.5Gbe – An Idiots Guide

It is always an intimidating step when you upgrade from the safe and familiar territory of relying on your ISP router to make the jump towards more evolved LANs, switches and third party network equipment. The fact that the majority of routers only arrive with up to 4 ports and most of those are gone on day 1 is particularly galling, so the appeal of upgrading your network to allow more devices to communicate (for home or business use) is pretty understandable. In the last year or so, alongside the economical 1Gbe and business-targeted 10Gbe network solutions, a new middle ground has presented itself in the form of 2.5Gbe network hardware. This new tier of network protocol and bandwidth utilises identical-looking hardware to that of traditional ethernet (Copper/BASE-T/RJ45) that has been around commercially for a couple of decades, but arrives at 2.5x the potential performance, raising max speeds from 100MB/s to 250MB/s. 2.5Gbe networks are technically not new, previously referred to as 2.5GBASE-T, their inclusion in the network hardware market as a viable alternative to standard ethernet has only really existed for the last 18 months. With NAS manufacturers, PC network upgrade cards and router manufacturers starting to embrace 2.5Gbe as the network standard of their hardware, many are wondering if now is the time to make the jump to 2.5Gbe network setups in their home or business environment. Today I want to discuss the feasibility, price and suitability of 2.5Gbe as a choice for you and your data.

Upgrading to a 2.5Gbe Network – What You Need to Buy

In order to understand how much work is required when upgrading your network, it is worth knowing just how many different pieces of equipment you may need to buy when upgrading your internal bandwidth potential. The first most obvious upgrade is your switch – and you will need to look at 2.5Gbe equipped switches that allow each connected user the full potential to 250MB/s bandwidth each. Managed switches will allow you to combine these connections via link aggregation and trunking 2 or more to multiply this performance significantly, however, there are numerous affordable unmanaged 2.5Gbe switches out there too that are priced quite closely to 1Gbe counterparts.

Next, you will need to upgrade the network connectivity of your client devices, such as PCs, laptops and servers. Some 2020/2021 hardware releases have started arriving with 2.5Gbe connectivity by default and to meet this there are USB-to-2.5G and USB-to-5G adaptors out there for as little as £25. Otherwise, there are numerous 1-port and 2-port PCIe upgrades readily available to buy that are even cheaper than USB alternatives.

Finally, we can talk about routers (which are arguably optional for most in this setup and still not quite mainstream in 2.5G). Although some modern routers do feature a dedicated 2.5Gbe LAN connection, it is worth remembering that most internet connections worldwide will not really be able to saturate 250MB/s of data. When you look at the internet plan that you have with your ISP, the speed is generally provided in bits ( ie Mb = megabit, Gb = gigabit), not BYTES. Unless you are living somewhere with a decent fibre optic connection, or dedicated high-speed business line that promises speeds higher than 1 gigabit, a 2.5Gbe router will only be able to push as much internet/external packet data to a connected user as the internet service provider allows in your initial plan. so there is no need to spend money on a 2.5Gbe equipped router unless your ISP subscription is comfortably approaching 2.5 gigabits (2.5Gb). Aside from those three areas, nothing else in your typical hardware environment should require an upgrade when making the switch to a 2.5Gbe network. Remember, 2.5Gbe and typical 1Gbe use exactly the same cables for connectivity (RJ45 or Cat cables) so you can reuse your existing setup easily. So, now we know the hardware, let’s discuss the Pros and Cons of 2.5Gbe.

Upgrading to a 2.5Gbe Network – Price

The affordability of 2.5Gbe as an alternative to traditional gigabit ethernet LAN is getting better than it was at launch commercial in 2019. When hardware started embracing 2.5Gbe connections, it was priced at an arguably fair 2.5x times that of a normal 1Gb connection. However, it soon became apparent that due to demand in network use alongside data growing more rapidly in both home and business, that 1Gbe was fast becoming unsuitable for most businesses. Therefore in more recent times, the cost of 2.5Gbe has begun to arrive at simply the same as or just a pinch above that of accepted 1Gbe hardware. In fact, many hardware manufacturers consider 1Gbe dead in the water and have embraced 2.5Gbe connections as standard at no additional increase (in the NAS community, the heavy hitters on this are QNAP and Asustor).

The real cost of a 2.5Gbe setup as an upgrade to, or an alternative to a 1Gbe setup, is in the network upgrades for traditional client hardware and interfaces. I am of course talking about PCs, tower servers, Apple Macs and just general day to day devices. Upgrading a desktop device with 2.5Gbe is around £25 per connection, about £7 more than the same thing at 1Gbe. For portable and less easy to upgrade devices, such as Macbooks and laptops, a 2.5Gbe external adapter upgrade will cost you around £35, which is about £10-12 more than a 1Gbe alternative.

Upgrading to a 2.5Gbe Network – Internet Speeds

As mentioned, 2.5Gbe networks are largely concerned with internal network traffic within your home or business building. The effects of introducing 2.5Gbe into your router/modem system with the aims of improved internet speeds on your devices are hugely dependent on your ISP subscription service and in most cases will not fully saturate a 2.5Gbe connection. If you have an internet connection that surpasses 1 Gigabit bandwidth, then you can start to enjoy the benefits of 2.5Gbe connected devices exceeding 100MBs, just ensure that you are using a primary modem and router that features a 2.5Gbe port, otherwise connecting a 2.5Gbe switch or additional router via 1Gbe will create an instantaneous bottleneck. If you are using wireless devices and looking to exceed 1Gbe, then you should look into WiFi 6/6E/AX (which we will touch on later).

Upgrading to a 2.5Gbe Network – Availability

2.5Gbe hardware is a great deal more accessible and available in 2021 than ever. Alongside numerous affordable network upgrades via USB and PCIe, lots of motherboard makers, NAS server manufacturers and network switch brands have released 2.5Gbe options. Additionally, home or business users that have a 10Gbe setup that is shared by multiple 1Gbe uses can often allow connection of 2.5Gbe devices on these copper ports, as the majority of 10GBASE-T ports are backwards compatible with 5G, 2.5G and 1G (otherwise known as auto-negotiation). As mentioned earlier, a lot of hardware that would have once featured gigabit ethernet now arrives with 2.5Gbe connectivity at no additional cost, allowing a more gradual and organic upgrade into this larger bandwidth connection as you upgrade standard hardware in your environment. Lastly, the majority of plug-n-play 2.5Gbe upgrades for clients are reusable/shareable with numerous devices.

Upgrading to a 2.5Gbe Network – WiFi 6 and WiFi 6E Support?

One of the most attractive reasons that many users consider upgrading their setup to 2.5Gbe is due to the evolution in Wi-Fi connectivity, most recently in Wi-Fi 6. Otherwise known as 802.11AX, Wi-Fi 6 allows wireless connectivity that exceeds that of traditional 1Gbe LAN. Although the bandwidth and Wi-Fi coverage in Wi-Fi 6 is spread across multiple bands and frequencies (2.5Ghz and 5Ghz air communication, not to be confused with Gb data networks of measurement), it still allows bandwidths of 2.4Gigabits and greater (i,e 240MB/s). Many users who have upgraded their Wi-Fi network to Wi-Fi 6 (or holding out for Wi-Fi 6E) also want to upgrade their wired network to keep up, which is where 2.5Gbe hardware has grown in popularity noticeably. Indeed, a number of new Wi-Fi 6 solutions have arrived on the market in the last 12-months that also factor in dedicated 2.5Gbe ports and even 10Gbe in some cases (such as the QNAP QHora-301W). If you intend to set up your home or business environment wire-free, with a NAS in the centre for backups/sharing and wish to connect wirelessly to this device over Wi-Fi 6, then upgrading your NAS to at least a single 2.5Gbe connection will be hugely desirable and convenient.

Upgrading to a 2.5Gbe Network – Recommended Products in 2021

So now we have discussed at length a number of the advantages and disadvantages to upgrading to a 2.5Gbe network environment. As mentioned, there are many new 2.5Gbe pieces of hardware available as 2021 continues, making the ease of choosing the right network components evermore confusing. Below I have detailed my recommended 2.5Gbe switch, NAS, Router, Plug-n-play laptop upgrade and Desktop PCIe upgrades to ensure that you are ready to make the jump to 2.5Gbe networking.

Recommended 2.5Gbe Switches

Likely the most important part of the 2.5Gbe network upgrade, the switch is what manages traffic between your client devices.

Best Unmanaged 2.5Gbe Switch

Best Managed 2.5Gbe Switch

Best Business 2.5Gbe Switch

QNAP QSW-1105-5T

$209

QNAP QSW-M2108R-2C

$399

QNAP QGD-1602P

$999

Recommended 2.5Gbe Laptop Upgrades

If your network is populated with more compact and portable devices, then you can still use a range of USB connected devices to interact with a 2.5Gbe network. Here are the ones I recommend:

 

USB-to-2.5G Adapter

USB-to-5G Adapter

Thunderbolt3-to-10G Adapter

ASUSTOR AS-U2.5G

$40

QNAP QNA-UC5G1T

$55

Sonnet Solo 10G Adapter

$179

Recommended 2.5Gbe Desktop PC Upgrades

If you are using a desktop PC/Mac/Linux system, then you are able to consider PCIe 2.5Gbe upgrades. Although these are more expensive than the plug n play alternatives, they do allow more connections per card. Here are the 2.5Gbe PCIe cards I recommend:

 

1 Port 2.5Gbe PCIe Card

2 Port 2.5Gbe PCIe Card

Fully Featured 2.5Gbe PCIe Card

EDUP 2.5GBase-T Network Adapter

$29

QNAP QXG-2G2T-I225 2-Port

$49

QNAP QM2-2P2G2T NVMe+2-Port

$99

Recommended 2.5Gbe Routers

Once again, very much an ‘optional extra’, upgrading the router/modem in your network towards 2.5Gbe will only really be beneficial if your internet service is greater than 1Gbps. Never the less, there are some great 2.5Gbe, 5Gbe and 10Gbe routers out there, some of which even include WiFi 6 too. Here are the best 2.5Gbe routers right now in 2021:

 

Best Budget 2.5Gbe Router

Best Prosumer 2.5Gbe Router

Best Business 2.5Gbe Router

MOTOROLA MB8611 2.5G (Ant. Cable Connect)

$149

TP-Link AX6000 WiFi 6 & 2.5G Router

$269

QNAP QHora-301W 10G & WiFi 6

$329

Recommended 2.5Gbe NAS Servers

When it comes to seeing the true value of an upgraded network environment, then a NAS that features greater than gigabit connectivity is a great way to show this. Whether you are feeding this NAS into a 2.5Gbe/10Gbe network switch shared environment, or directly interfacing (i.e network connection PC-to-NAS), greater than 1Gbe speeds will be abundantly clear. There are quite a large number of 2.5Gbe NAS systems available in the server market right now, but I have narrowed it down to three below based on how you want to interact with your data:

 

Best Budget 2.5Gbe NAS

Best Prosumer 2.5Gbe NAS

Best Business 2.5Gbe NAS

Asustor Nimbustor 2

$429

QNAP TS-453D NAS

$869

QNAP TS-873A NAS

$1299

Thanks for reading. Do you still need help? Use the NASCompares Free Advice section here – https://nascompares.com/contact-us. It is my free, unbias community support system that allows you to ask me questions about your ideal setup. It is NOT a sales platform, NOT a way to push hardware you don’t need and, although it is just manned by me and might take a day or two for me to reply, I will help you any way I can.

 

[su_end_of_article_span]

 

NAS Drives Vs DAS Drives – Choosing the Right External Drive for You

18 avril 2021 à 01:35

NAS Drives Vs External DAS Drive – Which Should You Use?

How much data have you generated over the last few years? Whether in your personal life or professional life, you have almost certainly generated hundreds of Gigabytes of data in one form or another, some of it essential and some of it pointless. Having an efficient, safe and reliable means of storing your data, as well as maintaining an appropriate backup strategy, is incredibly important. Most people will admit to having collections of USB keys dotted around their home or office over the years, but for the more long term storage and more integral data storage, many users favour the use of Cloud Storage, network-attached storage (NAS) and/or the use of larger external drives (DAS). Today I want to focus on the differences between using a NAS and an external storage drive, what are the advantages and disadvantages of each and ultimately which one is best for you and your data.

What is an External Drive (DAS)?

External hard drives come in many forms, big and small, and although easily the oldest storage method of the two, DAS (Direct Attached Storage) is still by far the easiest and most affordable option. An external drive is one or more media drives (HDD, SSD, M.2, etc) that are contained in an external enclosure. Is connected to your PC, Mac or other OS directly via a single cable such as USB or thunderbolt. The majority of external hard drives that use DAS are quite low in software ability, can only be accessed by a single user at a time I’m and for the most part, cannot have their internal storage increased overtime (i.e an expansion). An external drive that uses DAS can also take advantage of RAID (redundant array of independent disks) in order to provide larger total storage capacity, as well as improved access speeds and even allow safety nets for if one or more of your drives fails. External drives are simple, affordable, quite portable (in smaller examples) and can be powered by the connected computer.

What is a Network Attached Storage Drive (NAS)?

A network-attached storage device, or NAS, is similar to an external drive in a number of ways. It is an external enclosure that is used to store large amounts of data, takes advantage of performance and failover benefits with RAID and can be used for live access and backups. However, unlike a simple USB external drive or RAID equipped DAS system, a NAS allows remote access without being directly point-to-point connected with the storage system. That means that the data on a NAS can be accessed virtually anywhere in the world, as well as providing numerous security and credential methods to ensure that access is easy yet safe. Another big benefit of NAS is that it can be accessed by multiple users at once, in the hundreds or thousands of simultaneous users depending on the NAS you buy. Often compared with cloud storage services such as Dropbox and Google Drive, a NAS is a centralised network storage alternative that does not require a monthly subscription, is not shared by unauthorised users and is completely controlled and configured by you.

NAS Drives Vs External DAS Drives – Price and Value

Easily one of the earliest stumbling blocks for those looking at improving and upgraded storage for backups and day-to-day access, the price tag of NAS and external drive DAS systems is surprisingly vast. Though this needs to be examined as two separate things – PRICE and VALUE. The arguably more simplistic and more diverse range of external drives in DAS enclosures results in a wider range of budget options, as well as a smaller overall cost when compared with like-for-like NAS systems of similar terabyte storage and scale. External drives can retail 4 pennies per gigabyte less than a NAS and such differences scale further as capacity options rise. Therefore the PRICE of DAS storage is much more palatable for home/single users.

However, in terms of VALUE, the NAS is the better option of the 2. This is because of the features and functionality available in a NAS, with dedicated backup tools, integrated software, a manageable GUI over apps and the web browser and a tremendous fluidity and customisation in its deployment, the NAS just gives you more for your money compared with external DAS drives. Additionally, the NAS can still be interfaced and accessed using your local file system/file manager thanks to support in the majority of OS’ of Mapped Network drives, Live Sync software and iSCSI – You just have to remember that all of these extras still bump up the price and a potential steep.

NAS Drives Vs External DAS Drives – Speed

Understanding the speed difference between direct-attached storage (DAS) systems and NAS systems is a lot more complex than it seems. At a casual glance, the faster of the two is clearly direct-attached storage, thanks to connections like USB and thunderbolt allowing tremendous direct performance benchmarks in the hundreds/thousands of Megabytes per second (MB/s). Whereas NAS systems will typically be connected via gigabit network ethernet and in their lowest states, will only provide the performance of around 100 and 109 Megabytes per second. The keyword there though is the lowest state. As there are numerous factors that affect the total potential performance of a DAS or NAS system.

The first big factor is the number of storage media bays that the enclosure has. With larger enclosures that support multiple drives whilst utilising RAID configurations, both systems can provide quite an impressive internal performance benchmark. This internal performance will likewise increase for both NAS and DAS if you move away from hard drives and into solid-state drives. Internally, both systems will provide a similar level of performance. however, it is that external performance and the interface used by either the DAS or NAS system that largely dictates the overall speed enjoyed by the end-user.

I mentioned earlier that DAS takes advantage of numerous connections with two of the most popular in 2021 being USB and Thunderbolt. However only in the last few years have both home and business users being enjoying a larger array of external connection options that NAS offers. Although a single standard ethernet connection on a NAS, s previously mentioned, will only offer just over 100 Megabytes per second, this can be doubled or quadrupled via the use of link aggregation available on numerous affordable NAS system. The network interfaces themselves can be upgraded from 1Gbe LAN/Ethernet to 2.5Gbe, 10Ge and greater via remarkably affordable upgrade cards and adaptors, meaning a NAS can then perform thousands of Megabytes per second, that can be shared by multiple users at once. Finally there is more modern NAS system releases that take advantage of 25Gbe, 40Gbe, 100Gbe and even Thunderbolt3 for your NAS. You may need to upgrade the default connections on your client devices or switch, but ultimately the result is that NAS is able to provide performance rivalling and exceeding that of DAS. It just costs a wee bit more sadly.

NAS Drives Vs External DAS Drives – Complexity and Difficulty

There is no question that direct-attached storage (DAS) is infinitely easier to use than that of network-attached storage (NAS). The almost entirely plug-and-play nature of USB drives and even RAID equipped enclosures when connected directly with a PC or Mac system is painfully simple and has largely been this way for over 20-years commercially (especially with systems that feature RAID controllers internally – AKA ‘SoC RAID or Hardware RAID). Network-attached storage on the other hand does require a pinch more I.T knowledge at the initial set up stages. That said, setting up a NAS for use in the home or business is considerably easier than it has ever been, often on a similar level to DAS boxes that require the connected system to create/support the RAID (known as JBOD DAS enclosures), but it will never be as straightforward as a DAS.

If You Are Still Unsure about RAID – Use the Guide Below more to learn more (or watch my 4 min video HERE):

That said, when it comes to creating a backup strategy that is semi or completely automated, as well as sharing larger files with remote users easily, a DAS solution requires several additional pieces of third-party software or the inclusion of third-party cloud platforms integrated into the software environment (unless you want to post the drive to a colleague). You cannot simply attach a file to your email (10-25MB limit) and although cloud based software service platforms like GSuite and Office365 try to meld storage and sharing with less complexity (i.e instead of sharing the file, you share the link to the file on the cloud storage), it does this with an unavoidable degree of set up and subscription fees too. Whereas a NAS, when it has been initially set up, allows you to share files safely, securely and easily within two clicks. You can even create multiple shared folders that appear on your connected devices but are visible and accessible remotely, giving NAS based storage the appearance of local DAS devices. 

If you are interested in learning more about how how to make a NAS drive have the appearance to Windows File Manager and Mac OS Finder of a locally connected drive, there are some guides below

How To Map Network Drive Accessible Over Internet – https://nascompares.com/how-to-map-network-drive-accessible-over-internet

 

NAS Drives Vs External DAS Drives – Home or Business

Although NAS and DAS have their own advantages and disadvantages, whether you are a home or business user also makes a big difference too. Some creative professionals who work independently or simply require fast and easy access to their data for editing will likely prefer direct-attached storage, particularly thunderbolt for 4K video editing and high-risk photography work. Likewise, users with large but frequently accessed collections of data that does not need to be updated or retrieved remotely will see little benefit in a network-attached storage system. Finally, users who just need up to 1-2TB of data for one person access will find direct-attached storage infinitely more useful than NAS.

That said, pretty much everyone else will be able to make more use of NAS and to a greater level of volume than simple DAS. If your home or business environment contains multiple client hardware devices ranging from phones, tablets, laptops to desktop Windows PCs and Macs, the ability to create a multi-tier backup and sharing solution in a NAS cannot be understated. Additionally, home users that want to create their own personally owned version of Netflix and Disney Plus, will find streaming to local and remote client players an absolute joy compared with having to constantly move around the same dumb external drive full of movies. Add to that the software, GUI and numerous applications that allow your devices to enjoy media remotely in a tailored fashion from the NAS (DLNA, Plex Media Server, UPNP, etc), plus those ranging from surveillance, office tools, virtual machine files and more, it will be clear that the flexibility of a NAS to prosumers and businesses is first class. Just make sure that you know that will actually use all these features before spending your money. Treat a NAS as an investment that needs to grow its usefulness and a DAS as a singular fast storage purchase that has a day 1 glass ceiling.

 

If you are looking to buy the right NAS – Use my guide below:

Thanks for reading. Do you still need help? Use the NASCompares Free Advice section here – https://nascompares.com/contact-us. It is my free, unbias community support system that allows you to ask me questions about your ideal setup. It is NOT a sales platform, NOT a way to push hardware you don’t need and, although it is just manned by me and might take a day or two for me to reply, I will help you any way I can.

 

[su_end_of_article_span]

Understanding SSD NAND Chips – SLC vs MLC vs TLC vs QLC

6 avril 2021 à 02:00

What are NAND Flash Chips in SSD?

NAND flash memory is built up of many cells that hold bits, and those bits are either turned on or off through an electric charge. How those on/off cells are organized represents the data stored on the SSD. The number of bits in those cells also determine the naming of the flash, for example, Single Level Cell (SLC) flash contains a single bit in each cell. The reason behind SLC only being available at lower capacities is down to the physical real estate the NAND flash occupies on the Printed Circuit Board (PCB). Don’t forget that the circuit board has to have the controller, DDR memory, and flash built to standard dimensions to fit inside your computer. MLC doubles the number of bits per cell, whereas TLC triples, and this opens up for higher capacity SSDs.There are particular reasons manufacturers build flash memory with a single bit per cell-like SLC. SLC has the advantage of being the fastest, most durable but has the cons of being more expensive, and is not available in higher gigabyte storage capacity. That is why SLC is preferred for heavy enterprise usage.  MLC and TLC flash in comparison to SLC, is cheaper to produce, available in higher storage capacities, but at the tradeoff of relatively shorter life spans and slower read/write speeds. MLC and TLC are preferred for everyday consumer computer usage.

Understanding your own needs for computing and NAND flash basics will not only help you pick the right SSD, but will also help you figure out factors such as the price behind the product.

What is SLC NAND Flash and Which SSD use it?

Available in smaller flash modules and simple storage, the Single Level Cell flash is so-called for its single bit that can either be on or off when charged. This type of flash has the advantage of being the most accurate when reading and writing data, and also has the benefit of lasting the longest data read and write cycles. Program read/write life cycle is expected to be between 90,000 and 100,000. This type of flash has done exceptionally well in the enterprise market because of it’s life span, accuracy and overall performance. You won’t see too many home computers with this type of NAND due to its high cost and low storage capacities.

Best for SMALL CAPACITY but LOW CAPACITY NEEDS

Pros:

  • Has the longest lifespan and charge cycles over any other type of flash
  • More reliable smaller room for read/write error
  • Can operate in a broader temperature range

Cons:

  • The most expensive type of NAND flash on the market
  • Often only available in smaller capacities

Recommended for:

  • Industrial use and workloads that require heavy read/write cycles such as servers

SLC NAND Focused SSDs



What is MLC NAND Flash and Which SSD use it?

Used in most early business and high-end prosumer grade storage and in an enterprise (eMLC) version, MLC flash as it’s name suggests stores multi bits of data on one cell. The big advantage of this is the lower cost of manufacturing versus manufacturing SLC flash. The lower cost in flash production is generally passed onto you as the consumer, and for that reason is very popular among many brands. MLC flash is preferred for consumer SSDs for it’s lower costs but the data read/write life is less in comparison to SLC at around 10,000 per cell.

Best for GENERAL USE and BUDGET NEEDS

Pros:

  • Lower production costs are passed onto you the consumer
  • Is more reliable than TLC flash

Cons:

  • Not as durable and reliable as SLC or enterprise SSDs

Recommended for:

  • Everyday consumer use, gamers, and enthusiasts

MLC NAND Focused SSDs



What is eMLC NAND Flash and Which SSD use it?

Enterprise Multi-Level Cell, or eMLC, is MLC flash, but optimized for the enterprise sector and has better performance and lastability. Read/write data life cycles are expected between 20,000 and 30,000. eMLC provides a lower-cost alternative to SLC, yet maintains some of the pros of SLC.

Best for ENTERPRISE USE ON A BUDGET

Pros:

  • Cheaper alternative than SLC for an enterprise SSD
  • Has better performance and endurance over standard MLC

Cons:

  • Does not match SLC NAND flash SSDs in performance

Recommended for:

  • Industrial use and workloads that require heavy read/write cycles such as servers

eMLC NAND Focused SSDs



What is TLC NAND Flash and Which SSD use it?

Themost common these days, also available in an enterprise eTLC and 3D TLC version, Storing 3 bits per cell, TLC (Triple Level Cell) flash is the cheapest form of flash to manufacture. The biggest disadvantage to this type of flash is that it is only suitable for consumer usage, and would not be able to meet the standards for industrial use. Read/write life cycles are considerably shorter at 3,000 to 5,000 cycles per cell. This and MLC are heavily used in 2020 onwards in conjunction with 3D NAND building, where data bits are stacked vertically to improve space utilization and access times.

Best for DAY TO DAY USE in KEY DEVICES

Pros:

  • Cheapest to manufacture which in turn leads to cheaper to market SSDs

Cons:

  • Cells will survive considerably less read/write cycles compared to MLC NAND. This means that TLC flash is good for consumer use only

Recommended for:

  • Everyday consumer use, web/email machines, netbooks, and tablets

TLC NAND Focused SSDs



What is QLC NAND Flash and Which SSD use it?

In a bid to make solid-state drives (SSDs) as capacious as traditional hard drives, storage suppliers have looked to insert ever more bits and bytes into NAND flash. Quad-level cell (QLC) drives are the latest development of flash storage technology. As the name suggests, the technology stores four bits per cell. The way QLC flash and all other NAND flash stores data is essentially the same, using an electrical charge to determine whether each cell is a “0” or a “1”. There are billions of such cells on a silicon substrate and they can be used to store terabytes of information. QLC can store four bits of data using 16 states, which means using 16 different voltage levels. This sounds great, but there are issues. Penta-level cell (PLC) has now also appeared on the horizon, but that’s another story.

Best for HIGH CAPACITY AT AN IMPROVED PRICE POINT

Pros:

  • By FAR the larger availability capacity potential
  • Best Price vs storage capacity price point
  • Bigger storage potential on smaller physical circuit space on drives

Cons:

  • Questionable durability in comparison with more dense layered NAND like MLC and eMLC
  • Needs a decent controller on the board to get the most from it

Recommended for:

  • Storage devices and pre-built SSD Flash storage that prioritizes Capacity over all else

QLC NAND Focused SSDs



SLC vs MLC vs TLC vs QLC – What Difference Does SSD Life Cycle Make?

Like all good things, an SSD does not last forever. As noted above, a solid-state drive’s life cycle can be directly attributed to the NAND flash it comes with. SLC flash, for example, will last longer than MLC or TLC flash but that comes at a hefty price tag. With MLC and TLC flash commonly used/found in consumer SSDs, the real question is how long will they last? Backblaze has tested several available consumer-grade SSDs over the years, most of which were MLC NAND with one being TLC NAND, and the results are promising. All of the devices tested lasted at least 700 terabytes (TB) of writes before failing, and a couple even pushed passed a petabyte (PB). This is a lot of data, but let’s put that into perspective in writing 1 PB to an SSD.

1 petabyte (PB) = 1,000 terabytes (TB) / 1,000,000 gigabytes (GB) / 1,000,000,000 (MB)

That 1 PB could net you:

  • 222,222 movie DVDs at 4.5GB a DVD
  • 333,333,333 mp3 songs at 3MB a song
  • 500,000,000 jpg photos at 2MB an image
  • 15,384 installs of the game Grand Theft Auto V at 65GB an install

Looking at those numbers should really put to rest any doubts about your SSD failing in any short amount of time. If you are considering an MLC or TLC SSD for everyday consumer use like; storing music, photos, software, personal documents or play games then you should feel assured that your SSD should last several years. This kind of usage is considered light compared to the ongoing heavy read/write usage of enterprise servers and computers as outlined in the next section below. Note: For anyone worried about the lifespan of their SSD, features such as Self-Monitoring Analysis and Reporting Technology, or S.M.A.R.T. for short, can help you better keep track of your SSD’s longevity.

SLC vs MLC vs TLC Compared – What is the Ultimate Difference?

At this point, you probably have a good idea on the difference between SLC, MLC, and TLC NAND flash. The basics we discussed here, with insight into why some cost more than others, should clear up any confusion as to what type of flash best fits your needs.

NAND Type

SLC

Single Level Cell

eMLC

Enterprise
Multi-Level Cell

MLC

Multi-Level Cell

TLC

Triple-Level Cell

Read/Write Cycles 90,000-100,000 20,000-30,000 8,000-10,000 3,000-5,000
Bit Per Cell 1 2 2 3
Write Speed ★★★★★ ★★★★☆ ★★★☆☆ ★★☆☆☆
Endurance ★★★★★ ★★★★☆ ★★★☆☆ ★★☆☆☆
Cost ★★★★★ ★★★★☆ ★★★☆☆ ★★☆☆☆
Usage Industrial/Enterprise

Industrial/Enterprise

Consumer/Gaming

Consumer

The important thing to take away from this guide is that modern SSDs are built to last a considerable amount of time. While their life-cycle should be taken into account, it should by no means prevent you from buying faster and more efficient storage.


Articles Get Updated Regularly - Get an alert every time something gets added to this page!


 

Visit the NASCompares Deal Finder to find the best place to buy this device in your region, based on Service, Support and Reputation - Just Search for your NAS Drive in the Box Below

 

SEARCH IN THE BOX BELOW FOR NAS DEALS

Need Advice on Data Storage from an Expert?

We want to keep the free advice on NASCompares FREE for as long as we can. Since this service started back in Jan '18, We have helped hundreds of users every month solve their storage woes, but we can only continue to do this with your support. So please do choose to buy at Amazon US and Amazon UK on the articles when buying to provide advert revenue support or to donate/support the site below. Finally, for free advice about your setup, just leave a message in the comments below here at NASCompares.com and we will get back to you. Need Help? Where possible (and where appropriate) please provide as much information about your requirements, as then I can arrange the best answer and solution to your needs. Do not worry about your e-mail address being required, it will NOT be used in a mailing list and will NOT be used in any way other than to respond to your enquiry. [contact-form-7] Terms and Conditions Alternatively, why not ask me on the ASK NASCompares forum, by clicking the button below. This is a community hub that serves as a place that I can answer your question, chew the fat, share new release information and even get corrections posted. I will always get around to answering ALL queries, but as a one-man operation, I cannot promise speed! So by sharing your query in the ASK NASCompares section below, you can get a better range of solutions and suggestions, alongside my own.  

Mettez à jour vos iPhone, Mac et iPad : Apple prévient que des failles sont peut-être exploitées

4 mai 2021 à 10:29

Apple diffuse une série de correctifs pour iOS 14.5, mais aussi pour macOS Big Sur et l'Apple Watch, que ses clients devraient installer sans tarder. Des vulnérabilités ont été repérées et seraient déjà utilisées à des fins malveillantes. [Lire la suite]

Voitures, vélos, scooters... : la mobilité de demain se lit sur Vroom ! https://www.numerama.com/vroom/vroom//

The post Mettez à jour vos iPhone, Mac et iPad : Apple prévient que des failles sont peut-être exploitées appeared first on Cyberguerre.

Qu’est-ce qu’un système de détection d’intrusion de nouvelle génération ?

29 avril 2021 à 14:16
Par : UnderNews

Tout ce qui est qualifié de « nouvelle génération » (NG) implique l’existence d’un aspect important qui avait besoin d’être amélioré. L’IDS (Intrusion Detection Systems), conçu comme une source fiable pour le réseau, répond à ce critère.

The post Qu’est-ce qu’un système de détection d’intrusion de nouvelle génération ? first appeared on UnderNews.

Comment le malware Shlayer a contourné les protections des Mac pendant 2 mois

27 avril 2021 à 12:42

Apple vient de corriger une faille critique dans Gatekeeper, un des logiciels qui protègent les Mac contre les malwares. Pendant près de 2 mois, le gang Shlayer a exploité la vulnérabilité de sorte que son logiciel malveillant se déployait après un simple double clic de la victime. [Lire la suite]

Voitures, vélos, scooters... : la mobilité de demain se lit sur Vroom ! https://www.numerama.com/vroom/vroom//

The post Comment le malware Shlayer a contourné les protections des Mac pendant 2 mois appeared first on Cyberguerre.

Les Mac Mini M1 profitent d’une réduction jusqu’à 150 euros

30 avril 2021 à 14:22

[Le Deal du Jour] Le Mac Mini est l'ordinateur de bureau miniature d'Apple. Il est équipé de la puissante puce M1, ce qui lui apporte un boost de performance. Les prix de trois configurations chutent en ce moment : le modèle doté d'un SSD de 256 Go passe de 1 029 euros à 926 euros, celui avec un SSD de 512 Go est affiché à 1 133 euros au lieu de 1 259 euros, et celui avec un SSD de 1 To est disponible à 1 340 euros au lieu de 1 489 euros, le tout à la Fnac et chez Darty. [Lire la suite]

Abonnez-vous à notre chaîne YouTube pour ne manquer aucune vidéo !

L'article Les Mac Mini M1 profitent d’une réduction jusqu’à 150 euros est apparu en premier sur Numerama.

Comment lancer la même commande sur plusieurs machines en même temps ?

23 avril 2021 à 09:00
Par : Korben

Si vous gérez un cluster de machines, que ce soit pour cracker des mots de passe, ou pour exploiter tout le potentiel de vos Raspberry Pi, ou si vous avez simplement plusieurs serveurs sur lesquels vous lancez exactement les mêmes commandes (en cas de mise à jour par exemple), voici un outil qui va vous intéresser.

Ça s’appelle Cluster SSH et c’est un outil basé sur xTerm qui permet de configurer différents clusters auquels se connecter via SSH pour ensuite pouvoir entrer ensuite une ligne de commande qui est alors répliquée sur toutes les machines. Ainsi l’exécution de la commande se fait de manière simultanée sur toutes les machines, offrant une synchronisation parfaite des nœuds du cluster.

Je parle de clusters mais vous pouvez également mettre comme ça à jour des serveurs différents que vous administrez de la même manière (pour les updates par exemple).

Pour installer Cluster SSH :

sudo apt-get install clusterssh

Pour configurer un groupe de machines, éditez le fichier /etc/clusters puis configurez vos cluster comme ceci :

cluster1 = machine1 machine2
cluster2 = machine3 machine4
all = cluster1 cluster2

Comme vous pouvez le voir, il est totalement possible de créer des meta cluster regroupant plusieurs clusters.

Ensuite pour s’y connecter, il suffit d’utiliser la commande cssh suivi du nom du cluster ou des noms des machines ou des clusters sur lesquels se connecter.

cssh -l <username> <clustername>

Attention toutefois quand vous éditez des fichiers avec ClusterSSH car les fichiers pourraient ne pas être identiques entre toutes les machines et donc entraîner des erreurs dans la config de vos bécanes. Soyez donc très prudent avec cet outil !

Les sources et la doc sont ici.

Mac Pro d’Apple, une inédite Radeon Pro X6900X fait son apparition, performance

26 avril 2021 à 11:05

Le Mac Pro va s’équiper d’une nouvelle solution graphique basée sur l’architecture RDNA 2 d’AMD. Une entrée dans la base de données d’un benchmark populaire précise la référence, la Radeon Pro X6900X. C’est découverte n’est pas vraiment étonnante. Pourquoi ?  Appel a récemment mis à jour son système d’exploitation afin de prendre en charge l’architecture ...

The post Mac Pro d’Apple, une inédite Radeon Pro X6900X fait son apparition, performance appeared first on GinjFo.

Mac Mini (version M1), Apple propose en option de l’Ethernet 10 GbE

23 avril 2021 à 14:43
Par : Pascal P.

Le Mac Mini d’Apple est désormais disponible avec une nouvelle configuration réseau. Il n’y a pas de révolution mais la marque à la pomme décide de passer à la vitesse supérieure. L’opération passe par une nouvelle option. Il s’agit d’une mise à jour optionnelle facturée 100 dollars. Elle permet de passer d’une connectique réseau filaire ...

The post Mac Mini (version M1), Apple propose en option de l’Ethernet 10 GbE appeared first on GinjFo.

MacBook Air M1 : Avis après 1 mois

28 avril 2021 à 07:00
Par : Fx

Macbook air M1 300x225 - MacBook Air M1 : Avis après 1 moisCela fait maintenant un peu plus d’un mois que j’utilise le MacBook Air M1. J’avais besoin de remplacer mon ancien PC (low-cost de 2017) sous Linux. J’ai profité d’une promotion sur Amazon et je vous livre aujourd’hui mes impressions… MacBook Air M1 Je ne suis pas un fan inconditionnel d’Apple comme certains peuvent l’être. Bien sûr, je suis l’actualité de la marque à la pomme, mais je ne scrute pas chaque annonce ou fuite d’information. Je ne cours pas non […]

Cet article MacBook Air M1 : Avis après 1 mois est apparu en premier sur Cachem

❌