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Core i9-12900K, tests en jeu vidéo !

15 octobre 2021 à 10:03

Core i9-12900K, plateforme de testDe nouvelles fuites publient des résultats de performance du Core i9-12900K Alder Lake. Nous avons un aperçu de ses possibilités en jeu vidéo

The post Core i9-12900K, tests en jeu vidéo ! appeared first on GinjFo.

A Guide to Rackmount NAS – Sorted by Size

25 août 2021 à 16:00

Choosing the Right Rackmount NAS – Understanding the Importance of Depth

There was once a time when owning any kind of rackmount based storage and/or computer equipment was squarely aimed at high-end business and data centres. Unlike the desktop PC, laptop keyboard or touch screen device that you are likely reading this on, a rackmount scale hardware device is HUGE, can be noisy and is designed for a 24×7 environment that we once considered business-only in both price and size. However, fast forward to 2020/2021 and we find that because of the advances in both the efficiency and capability of the hardware, that rackmounts are affordable to even the most modest of home user – often rivalling the suitability of a more commonplace desktop/tower device. However, rackmounts are generally very awkward in size – either too long, too wide or too deep for most normal deployment. Luckily most NAS hardware developers (Synology and QNAP more so than most) have provided a huge range of different scaled rackmount devices, that vary in capacity, power and (most important of all for today’s article) in physical size. They have produced so many options in fact, that there are now too many to choose from. So, today I want to look at all of the more compact rackmount NAS servers and help you choose the right one for your physical hardware environment.

Using the Rackmount Size Guide Below

Much like looking at any physical object, there are the typical parameters of measuring scale (generally measures in millimetres or inches), but in the case of rackmount NAS there are also more hardware-specific ways to measure the suitability of a rack mount NAS device. Here are the ones you need to focus on:

Height – This is a figure that is measured in two ways. First is the physical height that is increased as more and more bays are included for storage. Generally 44mm for a 4-Bay, the 88mm for an 8/12-Bay, 130mm for a 16-Bay and 175mm for a 24-Bay. However, they also use the measurement of 1U, 2U, 3U, etc. These correspond to the number of ‘slots’ in a rack cabinet.

Width – In most cases, this is largely identical on all NAS devices, as a rackmount is designed in rows of 4 bays horizontally, at 481mm – but there are exceptions as you will need to factor in rails and if some devices have handles and/or rails pre-attached.

Depth – This is incredibly important and one of the main driving forces behind how rackmount NAS has evolved. In most cases, the more powerful the NAS – the deeper it is (in order to fit in larger CPU+Heatsinks, Increased PSUs and larger internal cooling). The majority of half depth rackmounts on the market arrive with mid-range hardware inside, but recent years have provided quite a few 10Gbe and Large solutions from companies like QNAP and Synology.

Below is a breakdown of the available rackmount solutions that you can sort by their size.

BrandmodelFormHeight (mm)Width (mm)Depth (mm)Height (inch) Width (inch) Depth (inch)
SynologyFS201788430.5692 3.46 16.95 27.24
SynologyFS301788482724 3.46 18.98 28.5
SynologyFS3400884827243.46 18.98 28.5
SynologyFS3600884827243.46 18.98 28.5
SynologyFS6400884827243.46 18.98 28.5
SynologyRC18015xs+444805151.73 18.9 20.28
SynologyRS1219+88481.9306.63.46 18.97 12.07
SynologyRS1221+RS1221+ : 88482306.6 RS1221RP+ : 880 18.98 12.07
SynologyRS1221RP+RS1221+ : 88482306.6 RS1221RP+ : 880 18.98 12.07
SynologyRS1619xs+44480518.61.73 18.9 20.42
SynologyRS18016xs+88430692 3.46 16.93 27.24
SynologyRS18017xs+88482724 3.46 18.98 28.5
SynologyRS21744479.4295.51.73 18.87 11.63
SynologyRS2416+88430692 3.46 16.93 27.24
SynologyRS2418+88482696 883.46 18.98 27.4
SynologyRS2418RP+88482696 883.46 18.98 27.4
SynologyRS2421+RS2421+ : 88482552 RS2421RP+ : 880 18.98 21.73
SynologyRS2421RP+RS2421+ : 88482552 RS2421RP+ : 880 18.98 21.73
SynologyRS2818RP+132.3482656.55.21 18.98 25.85
SynologyRS2821RP+132.3482656.55.21 18.98 25.85
SynologyRS3617RPxs884827243.46 18.98 28.5
SynologyRS3617xs+884827243.46 18.98 28.5
SynologyRS3618xs884827243.46 18.98 28.5
SynologyRS3621RPxs884827243.46 18.98 28.5
SynologyRS3621xs+884827243.46 18.98 28.5
SynologyRS4017xs+132.3482656.55.21 18.98 25.85
SynologyRS4021xs+132.3482656.55.21 18.98 25.85
SynologyRS815+44430.5457.5 441.73 16.95 18.01
SynologyRS81644430.5295.5 1.73 16.95 11.63
SynologyRS818+44480492.6 441.73 18.9 19.39
SynologyRS818RP+44480492.6 441.73 18.9 19.39
SynologyRS81944478327.51.73 18.82 12.89
SynologyRS820+44480492.6 441.73 18.9 19.39
SynologyRS820RP+44480492.6 441.73 18.9 19.39
SynologySA3200D884827243.46 18.98 28.5
SynologySA3400884827243.46 18.98 28.5
SynologySA3600884827243.46 18.98 28.5
SynologyUC320088430.56923.46 16.95 27.24
Qnaptds-16489u r2130.81 443.99 743.97 5.15 17.48 29.29
Qnaptes-1885u87.88 442.47 530.61 3.46 17.42 20.89
Qnapts-1232pxu-rp88.9 482.09 533.91 3.5 18.98 21.02
Qnapts-1232xu88.9 482.09 533.91 3.5 18.98 21.02
Qnapts-1232xu-rp88.9 482.09 533.91 3.5 18.98 21.02
Qnapts-1253bu88.9 482.09 533.91 3.5 18.98 21.02
Qnapts-1253bu-rp88.9 482.09 533.91 3.5 18.98 21.02
Qnapts-1253du-rp88.65 482.09 423.93 3.49 18.98 16.69
Qnapts-1263xu88.9 482.09 533.91 3.5 18.98 21.02
Qnapts-1263xu-rp88.9 482.09 533.91 3.5 18.98 21.02
Qnapts-1273au-rp88.9 432.05 372.11 3.5 17.01 14.65
Qnapts-1273u88.9 482.09 533.91 3.5 18.98 21.02
Qnapts-1273u-rp88.9 482.09 533.91 3.5 18.98 21.02
Qnapts-1277xu-rp88.39 482.09 562.1 3.48 18.98 22.13
Qnapts-1283xu-rp88.39 482.09 562.1 3.48 18.98 22.13
Qnapts-1673au-rp132.08 432.05 372.11 5.2 17.01 14.65
Qnapts-1673u130.05 481.08 535.94 5.12 18.94 21.1
Qnapts-1673u-rp130.05 481.08 535.94 5.12 18.94 21.1
Qnapts-1677xu-rp130.05 481.08 573.53 5.12 18.94 22.58
Qnapts-1683xu-rp130.05 481.08 573.53 5.12 18.94 22.58
Qnapts-1886xu-rp88.39 482.09 549.66 3.48 18.98 21.64
Qnapts-2477xu-rp176.28 481.08 672.08 6.94 18.94 26.46
Qnapts-2483xu-rp176.28 481.08 672.08 6.94 18.94 26.46
Qnapts-431xeu43.94 438.91 291.08 1.73 17.28 11.46
Qnapts-432pxu43.94 438.91 499.11 1.73 17.28 19.65
Qnapts-432pxu-rp43.94 438.91 499.11 1.73 17.28 19.65
Qnapts-432xu43.94 438.91 499.11 1.73 17.28 19.65
Qnapts-432xu-rp43.94 438.91 499.11 1.73 17.28 19.65
Qnapts-451deu43.94 430.02 294.89 1.73 16.93 11.61
Qnapts-453bu43.94 438.91 499.11 1.73 17.28 19.65
Qnapts-453bu-rp43.94 438.91 499.11 1.73 17.28 19.65
Qnapts-453du43.18 482.6 483.87 1.7 19 19.05
Qnapts-453du-rp43.18 482.6 508.76 1.7 19 20.03
Qnapts-463xu43.94 438.91 499.11 1.73 17.28 19.65
Qnapts-463xu-rp43.94 438.91 499.11 1.73 17.28 19.65
Qnapts-832pxu88.9 482.09 533.91 3.5 18.98 21.02
Qnapts-832pxu-rp88.9 482.09 533.91 3.5 18.98 21.02
Qnapts-832xu88.9 482.09 533.91 3.5 18.98 21.02
Qnapts-832xu-rp88.9 482.09 533.91 3.5 18.98 21.02
Qnapts-853bu88.9 482.09 533.91 3.5 18.98 21.02
Qnapts-853bu-rp88.9 482.09 533.91 3.5 18.98 21.02
Qnapts-853du-rp88.65 482.09 423.93 3.49 18.98 16.69
Qnapts-863xu88.9 482.09 533.91 3.5 18.98 21.02
Qnapts-863xu-rp88.9 482.09 533.91 3.5 18.98 21.02
Qnapts-873au88.9 432.05 372.11 3.5 17.01 14.65
Qnapts-873au-rp88.9 432.05 372.11 3.5 17.01 14.65
Qnapts-873u88.9 482.09 533.91 3.5 18.98 21.02
Qnapts-873u-rp88.9 482.09 533.91 3.5 18.98 21.02
Qnapts-877xu88.39 482.09 562.1 3.48 18.98 22.13
Qnapts-877xu-rp88.39 482.09 562.1 3.48 18.98 22.13
Qnapts-883xu88.39 482.09 562.1 3.48 18.98 22.13
Qnapts-883xu-rp88.39 482.09 562.1 3.48 18.98 22.13
Qnapts-977xu43.18 482.6 484.12 1.7 19 19.06
Qnapts-977xu-rp43.18 482.6 505.46 1.7 19 19.9
Qnapts-983xu43.18 482.6 484.12 1.7 19 19.06
Qnapts-983xu-rp43.18 482.6 507.49 1.7 19 19.98
Qnapts-h1277xu-rp88.39 482.09 562.1 3.48 18.98 22.13
Qnapts-h1283xu-rp88.39 482.09 562.1 3.48 18.98 22.13
Qnapts-h1677xu-rp130.05 481.08 573.53 5.12 18.94 22.58
Qnapts-h1683xu-rp130.05 481.08 573.53 5.12 18.94 22.58
Qnapts-h1886xu-rp88.39 482.09 549.66 3.48 18.98 21.64
Qnapts-h2477xu-rp176.28 481.08 672.08 6.94 18.94 26.46
Qnapts-h2483xu-rp176.28 481.08 672.08 6.94 18.94 26.46
Qnapts-h2490fu88.39 481.08 510.29 3.48 18.94 20.09
Qnapts-h3088xu-rp88.39 481.08 515.11 3.48 18.94 20.28
Qnapts-h977xu-rp43.18 482.6 505.46 1.7 19 19.9
Qnaptvs-1272xu-rp88.39 482.09 562.1 3.48 18.98 22.13
Qnaptvs-1672xu-rp130.05 481.08 573.53 5.12 18.94 22.58
Qnaptvs-2472xu-rp176.28 481.08 672.08 6.94 18.94 26.46
Qnaptvs-872xu88.39 482.09 562.1 3.48 18.98 22.13
Qnaptvs-872xu-rp88.39 482.09 562.1 3.48 18.98 22.13
Qnaptvs-972xu43.18 482.6 484.12 1.7 19 19.06
Qnaptvs-972xu-rp43.18 482.6 507.49 1.7 19 19.98
Qnaptvs-ec1280u-sas-rp r287.88 442.47 530.61 3.46 17.42 20.89
Qnaptvs-ec1680u-sas-rp r2130.05 442.47 530.61 5.12 17.42 20.89
Qnaptvs-ec2480u-sas-rp r2176.28 442.47 530.61 6.94 17.42 20.89
BrandmodelFormHeight (mm)Width (mm)Depth (mm)Height (in) Width (in) Depth (in)

Still Need Help Choosing the Right Rackmount for you?

If you are still in doubt about the right sized rackmount NAS drive for your home to business needs or are worried about how accurate the size of the server will be in your chosen spot, why not contact me directly below for help.


Articles Get Updated Regularly - Get an alert every time something gets added to this page!


This description contains links to Amazon. These links will take you to some of the products mentioned in today's content. As an Amazon Associate, I earn from qualifying purchases. Visit the NASCompares Deal Finder to find the best place to buy this device in your region, based on Service, Support and Reputation - Just Search for your NAS Drive in the Box Below

 

SEARCH IN THE BOX BELOW FOR NAS DEALS

Need Advice on Data Storage from an Expert?

We want to keep the free advice on NASCompares FREE for as long as we can. Since this service started back in Jan '18, We have helped hundreds of users every month solve their storage woes, but we can only continue to do this with your support. So please do choose to buy at Amazon US and Amazon UK on the articles when buying to provide advert revenue support or to donate/support the site below. Finally, for free advice about your setup, just leave a message in the comments below here at NASCompares.com and we will get back to you. Need Help? Where possible (and where appropriate) please provide as much information about your requirements, as then I can arrange the best answer and solution to your needs. Do not worry about your e-mail address being required, it will NOT be used in a mailing list and will NOT be used in any way other than to respond to your enquiry. [contact-form-7] Terms and Conditions Alternatively, why not ask me on the ASK NASCompares forum, by clicking the button below. This is a community hub that serves as a place that I can answer your question, chew the fat, share new release information and even get corrections posted. I will always get around to answering ALL queries, but as a one-man operation, I cannot promise speed! So by sharing your query in the ASK NASCompares section below, you can get a better range of solutions and suggestions, alongside my own.   This description contains links to Amazon. These links will take you to some of the products mentioned in today’s video. As an Amazon Associate, I earn from qualifying purchases

 

Should You Buy a 2-Bay or 4-Bay NAS Drive in 2021?

26 juillet 2021 à 01:57

Choosing Between Buying a 2-Bay or 4 Bay NAS

For many users who decided to make the switch from subscription-based Cloud services and to their own private NAS server, it can be tricky to understand exactly what they need in terms of storage and power. Network-attached storage NAS has evolved rapidly over the years and now there is a tremendous range of solutions that vary in size and ability to choose from, often resulting in the most expensive servers not always being the most capable. One of the first hurdles that many users encounter when choosing their first NAS drive is choosing between a 2-bay NAS and 4-Bay. With the majority of NAS brands out there offering most standard solutions and across different hard drive scales, choosing between these different sized NAS is not as straightforward as one might think. So today I’m going to talk to you about the differences between each, which one is the best value, their advantages and hopefully help you decide which one best suits your storage needs. Let’s start.

2-Bay vs 4-Bay NAS – Storage, Expandability and Capacity

On the face of it, it seems pretty obvious that a 4-Bay NAS model with its increased storage bays will be the better storage option overall. How on earth can a NAS device that is 50% less in media bays possibly compete?!? Well, in recent years the largest available capacity in hard drives has massively increased and therefore the total potential terabytes available for each media bay has grown drastically. Yes, you could fully populate a four-Bay NAS with 4TB hard drives, but you could always just use a single 12TB hard drive at a lower price per TB in 2021 and regardless of whether you use RAID 0 or RAID1 with two disks, still have a huge capacity in a 2 Bay NAS. Additionally, these days a number of brands provide the same level of external enclosure expandability on both the 2-Bay and 4 Bay NAS systems (eg DS920+ / DS720+ and TS-253D / TS-453D), therefore 2-Bay NAS does not have the lower metaphorical glass ceiling that it once had in terms of additional storage down the line. Indeed, you can even expand a RAID 1 to a RAID 5 on a 2-bay but spreading it over both the NAS and expansion enclosure at once, to provide an excellent way to still increase the storage on your 2-Bay later on and not feel trapped within its dual media design architecture.

However, this is not quite as cut and dry as it appears. Despite the improvements in 2-Bay NAS architecture in recent years, there is always going to be one big day 1 advantage in the flexibility of 4 Bay NAS that 2-Bays cannot really match. That is that you do not necessarily need to fully populate a 4-bay on day one and many users go ahead with just putting two hard drives inside a 4-Bay NAS in a RAID 1 at the start. Not only does this give you exactly the same level of storage and performance that you would find in 2 Bay NAS, but it also allows you to add drives to this partially populated NAS and expand its storage pool from a RAID 1 to a RAID 5, increasing the total storage gradually throughout the lifespan of the system, WITHOUT buying a whole expansion chassis. This allows flexibility in how much storage you use now and how much you need to graduate to later at a minimal cost at the start. In summary, although 4 Bay NAS is still technically the better storage, flexibility and capacity option, a 2-Bay is not necessarily as inferior as it once was.

2-Bay vs 4-Bay NAS – Price and Value

This is an often underestimated factor in choosing between a 2-bay or 4-bay NAS system. Many people assume that a 4-Bay NAS costs more money to buy and even more money to populate. Although this is still technically true, it is hardly any more expensive to operate a 4-bay NAS 24×7 than a 2-bay. As far as actual day 1 costs go, notwithstanding the flexible storage installation mentioned in the previous subject, 4-Bay NAS systems allow you to use smaller capacity hard drives in order to match the same storage on larger hard drives. What this means is that a 4-ay NAS allows you to install four 4TB drives inside in a RAID5 and arrived at a lower price per terabyte than 2x 12TB drives. Depending on how you scale your storage and the number of drives you use, 2-Bay shares and 4-Bay NAS can retail at a similar price point and will differ only depending on the drive you choose and the RAID configuration you opt for.

Likewise, returning to the point of the cost of 4-bays as being more expensive than 2-bays, the newest generation NAS drives will often barely be more than $100-150 difference in their prices between 2 and 4 bays and are largely identical in CPU, Memory and ports in every other way. 4-Bays may seem like a bigger chunk of money (especially for those already feeling stretched on a prosumer 2-Bay) but if you are prepared to perhaps drop the capacity you have in mind 1-2TB  (i.e purchase 4TBs, not 6TBs)  to compensate this price difference, the result will be that your 4 Bay NAS can achieve much higher read and write speeds with more drives being accessed simultaneously, whilst also opening the door to dual-drive redundancy configurations (i.e RAID 6) and will ultimately provide a more responsive, higher performing and data safe NAS for all of your needs.

In summary, the savings available in choosing a two-bay over a four-bay can easily be countered in the grand scheme of things by scaling the capacity or architecture of the HDD you choose to put inside. The money saved in a 2 bay might well be money you need to spend a year or two down the line.

2-Bay vs 4-Bay NAS – Power, Performance and Speed

As mentioned, using 4 hard drives in a RAID 5 will likely provide better performance than two drives in a RAID 1 environment. This performance can be measured by traditional direct read and write activity between your client hardware and your NAS, or it can be measured by the performance of individual applications and services from within the network-attached storage drive itself (i.e the NAS software and services). When looking at buying your first NAS, many will overlook 2-Bay’s simply because of this performance boost available in the 4-Bay alternative models. However, enterprise-grade/Pro hard drives Seagate ironwolf Pro or EXOs) will often provide performance benefits in a RAID 1 environment that can surpass the use of standard hard drives in a RAID 5. Of course, Pro series drives cost $40-50 more per drive, but also have longer warranties, data recovery services, more onboard cache and faster rpm to increase that read and write speed, so you get more for your money ultimately. Additionally, if you plan on taking advantage of 10Gbe, either with a port already on your NAS or as an upgrade down the line via PCIe, then you are much, MUCH better off with a 4-Bay NAS, as a 2-Bay (even if populated with the latest generation SATA SSDs) cannot fully saturate 1,000MB/s.

Finally, it is worth discussing that a large number of modern 4-Bay NAS systems in 2021/2022 arrived with dedicated SSD caching bays. These bays do not replace the existing SATA hard drives and are parallel media bays that allow you to install M2 NVMe SSD to improve the internal performance of your NAS by copying more frequently accessed files partially or fully onto the SSD to reduced access time to these more popular pieces of data. Although a handful of 2 Bay NAS systems have arrived on the market with support of dedicated SSD caching bays (Lockerstor 2 and DS720+), the feature is still more available on foUr Bay solutions and for many users that want to graduate the utility of their NAS from home to prosumer and inevitably into business use, the ability to upgrade internal performance in this way can often sway buyers to opt for a 4-bay NAS.

2-Bay vs 4-Bay NAS – Power Use, Noise and Deployment

Unsurprisingly, the bigger the NAS drive, the more power it will consume. When comparing like-for-like deployments in similar architecture on 2-Bay and 4-Bay NAS, the latter will always use a little bit more. This is the reason that you will generally find that the PSU on a 4-Bay NAS is always of a higher what rating. However overall, unless you are pushing the system particularly hard, the simple act of adding two more SATA hard drives will generally make a minuscule difference and is hardly a reason to compare these two overall – A PSU power rating is the MAXIMUM draw it can make, not the amount it will be using constantly! However, in terms of vibration generated when the system is in operation and the rise in assisted fan operation as usage increases, generates more heat which makes a noticeable impact on the ambient noise generated when you are running a 2-Bay vs a 4-Bay.

The power difference will still remain rather small as these are still quite small components but if you are especially sensitive to noise then the increased drive and fan-based sound will annoy you. Additionally, this increase in ambient noise generation scales accordingly if you use larger capacity drives or more enterprise-level hard drive builds. So therefore if you are looking at a 2-Bay NAS with bigger capacity hard drives, it will still generate a comparable level of ambient noise that a 4-Bay would when populated with standard class NAS media or smaller capacities. Now that brands like Seagate and WD have reshaped their respective portfolios for NAS hard drive media in a way that ALL large capacity hard drive (eg 10TB and above) are Pro class (i.e noisier), it makes the lines increasingly blurry between 2-Bay and 4-Bay NAS noise levels. Below is an example of the noise difference between a standard class and pro class drive noise generation in just a single drive. It may seem a tad irrelevant, but it’s important if you are a user looking to go for a smaller NAS with BIGGER drives:

WD Red NAS Hard Drive Noise Test WD Red PRO NAS Hard Drive Noise Test

2-Bay vs 4-Bay NAS – Conclusion

So as you can see, the difference between a 2-Bay and a 4-Bay NAS is a great deal more than the number of available hard drives you can use. Each kind of NAS system can have its performance, capacity, ambient noise and power consumption scaled in a multitude of ways in order to facilitate the best possible network attached storage solution for you. Users on a tight budget might all too soon end up purchasing a 2 Bay NAS without realising that a 4-Bay has scalability that can save you money down the line. Likewise, users who like to invest a little bit more long term or prefer their NAS investment to be a little bit more spread over the lifespan of their product will tend to err towards a 4-Bay solution, without realising that a 2-Bay is still quite viable in the short term and modern scalability of NAS means taht a 2-Bay NAS is not quite the dead-end it once was! Below I have detailed some of the BEST examples of 2-Bay and 4-Bay NAS Synology, QNAP and Asustor that are great examples of margins between each tier has become spectacularly narrow.  If you are still unsure on how to proceed, be sure to take advantage of the free advice service here on NASComapres using the boxes at the bottom. We (me and Eddie the web guy!) answer every email and do it without profit in mind (i.e it’s absolutely free), so though it might take an extra day for us to reply, we will get back to you with recommendations on the best solution for you.

Synology DS720+ 2-Bay – $399+

Synology DS920+ 4-Bay – $559+

J4125 4-Core CPU – 2/6GB DDR4 – NVMe SSD – 2x1Gbe

 

J4125 4-Core CPU – 4/8GB DDR4 – NVMe SSD – 2x1Gbe

 

QNAP TS-253D 2-Bay – $389+

QNAP TS-453D 4-Bay – $549+

J4125 4-Core CPU – 4/8GB DDR4 – PCIe Slot – HDMI – 2×2.5Gbe

 

J4125 4-Core CPU – 4/8GB DDR4 – PCIe Slot – HDMI – 2×2.5Gbe

 

Asustor Lockerstor 2 2-Bay – $379+

Asustor Lockerstor 4 4-Bay – $499+

J4125 4-Core CPU – 4/8GB DDR4 – NVMe SSD – 2×2.5Gbe J4125 4-Core CPU – 4/8GB DDR4 – NVMe SSD – 2×2.5Gbe

 

 


Articles Get Updated Regularly - Get an alert every time something gets added to this page!


This description contains links to Amazon. These links will take you to some of the products mentioned in today's content. As an Amazon Associate, I earn from qualifying purchases. Visit the NASCompares Deal Finder to find the best place to buy this device in your region, based on Service, Support and Reputation - Just Search for your NAS Drive in the Box Below

 

SEARCH IN THE BOX BELOW FOR NAS DEALS

Need Advice on Data Storage from an Expert?

We want to keep the free advice on NASCompares FREE for as long as we can. Since this service started back in Jan '18, We have helped hundreds of users every month solve their storage woes, but we can only continue to do this with your support. So please do choose to buy at Amazon US and Amazon UK on the articles when buying to provide advert revenue support or to donate/support the site below. Finally, for free advice about your setup, just leave a message in the comments below here at NASCompares.com and we will get back to you. Need Help? Where possible (and where appropriate) please provide as much information about your requirements, as then I can arrange the best answer and solution to your needs. Do not worry about your e-mail address being required, it will NOT be used in a mailing list and will NOT be used in any way other than to respond to your enquiry. [contact-form-7] Terms and Conditions Alternatively, why not ask me on the ASK NASCompares forum, by clicking the button below. This is a community hub that serves as a place that I can answer your question, chew the fat, share new release information and even get corrections posted. I will always get around to answering ALL queries, but as a one-man operation, I cannot promise speed! So by sharing your query in the ASK NASCompares section below, you can get a better range of solutions and suggestions, alongside my own.  

ZFS vs EXT4 for NAS – What is the Difference in your File System?

21 juillet 2021 à 16:00

Choosing Between ZFS and EXT4 for your NAS Drive in 2020

If you have purchased or are thinking of buying a new NAS drive, it is becoming clear that setting it up in the perfect way is a little more complex than it used to be. You can go for the ‘recommended’ settings, but chances are that those ‘defaults’ won’t fit your storage needs. One of the first decisions you will need to make if you NAS is Intel/AMD powered is choosing your file system. This is non-reversible (without re-formatting all your storage) and therefore is a bit questionable. In 2020, the main file systems of choice in NAS are EXT4, ZFS and BTRFS. We will ignore BTRFS in this article today, as we have covered this alot here on the blog and YouTube (video 1 of 4 below), comparing it with EXT4 many times on the Synology NAS platform. However today with the growth of brands like QSAN and the release of the new QNAP QTS Hero ZFS powered platform, we want to help you make the choice between ZFS and EXT4 when setting up your NAS drive the first time.

ZFS may be the best-known enterprise-grade transactional file system to use storage pools to manage physical storage space. It is not the only one on the market, however. ZFS competes with ext4 for market share in the data management system world.  While both ZFS and ext4 can retain massive amounts of data in a secure, non-cloud storage pool system, the two products are not equal in capacity, management, or usability. Looking at ZFS vs. ext4, we see two distinct transactional file systems. ZFS supports advanced file systems and can manage data long term whereas ext4 cannot. 

ZFS and EXT4 for NAS – Advantages and Disadvantages

While ext4 comes embedded on Linux, it may not be the right choice for managing your data. Consider the strengths of each system in light of your needs.  On the face of it, ZFS seems better but arrives with much higher hardware requirements to run smoothly. Whereas EXT4 has much lower hardware running requirements but has it’s own limitations elsewhere. Let’s shine the spotlight on them both.

What is EXT4 and Why Should I use it on my NAS?

Linux created its original extended file system (ext) as early as 1992. It was the first to use a virtual file system (VFS) switch, which allowed Linux to support many file systems at the same time on the same system. Linux has released three updates since – ext2, ext3, and ext4. Today, ext4 – dating back to 2001 – is the default on the Linux System. EXT4 is also backwards compatible, meaning you can mount it on an ext3, ext2, or ext2 system. Since all these products were created before 2002, compatibility will not be important to most users, however. Ext4 also reduces file fragmentation, improves memory flash memory life through delayed allocation, and can handle larger volumes and files than its evolutionary predecessors. Since the beginning, it has used journaling, a system of logging changes, to the file to reduce file corruption. 

While these components of ext4 constitute an improvement over older extension file systems, the program remains limited in both capacity and engineering quality.  Because ext4 is a refurbishment of technology developed in the early 1990s, it has limited capacity to manage modern loads of data. Its once-helpful journaling system now slows down its processes as it stores more data. Plus, ext4 can support a file size no larger than 18 terabytes, making it a modest storage space for a contemporary data-driven, the digital company moving forward into 2020 (with commercial NAS hard drives from Seagate and WD now arriving at 16TB and growing).

EXT 4 and/or BTRFS NAS Drives
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What is the ZFS and Why Should I use it on my NAS?

Many people have heard of ZFS, but are unsure what it actually is. So, what is ZFS? The Zeta File System (ZOL on Linux) is an enterprise-grade transactional file system that uses the concept of storage pools to manage physical storage space. Sun Microsystems began work on the product in 2001 and released it in 2005 as part of OpenSolaris. Even after OpenSolaris was discontinued, ZFS gained popularity since it is a user-friendly, scalable, and powerful data management system. Its strength lies in its simple administration model.  As an enterprise-grade file system, ZFS allows users to create and manage file systems with ease since by eradicating the need to edit configuration files or issue multiple commands. Users can set a quota to limit the amount of disk space used or reserve disk space for a specific file system. 

ZFS uses a hierarchical system layout defined by location- and- conductor-specific sub-module ports each of which is restricted in the locality. Basically, it manages the physical storage of data through storage pools, which allow file systems to share disk space within the pool. When users need a larger storage pool, they add disks similar to adding memory to a computer. As users add storage space, the file systems automatically use the additional memory without the user needing to configure that memory or assign individual processes. This system limits human touch, making it not only easy to use but also highly reliable. 

Most users select ZFS because it offers a simple administration model. Creating and managing file systems becomes easy with no separate volume manager commands to learn. Plus, the system manages mount points automatically. The file system’s low costs let companies create new ones for each project and user, enabling finer data management. ZFS maintains a consistent state for the file system on the disk. Instead of overwriting data, which leaves the file system in an inconsistent state, ZFS manages data with a copy-on-write mechanism. This approach means that neither power losses nor system crashes can corrupt the file system.  A checksum algorithm can verify ZFS’ data and metadata in order to protect file integrity. Rather than performing checksum verification on a per-block basis, ZFS checksums work at a file systems level. The storage pools can self-heal data by detecting bad data blocks and replacing them with a redundant copy. Essentially, ZFS can silently check data and make repairs without user involvement. 

ZFS also offers a built-in snapshot, which can grab a picture of stored data at a precise instant. Users find snapshots quick and easy. Snapshots take up no extra disk space in the pool at first, but as data evolves, they reference old data and thus consume some space. These snapshots prevent old data from slipping back into the current storage pool. ZFS can also send and receive file system snapshots, a process which allows users to optimize their disk space. 

In Summary, ZFS, by contrast with EXT4, offers nearly unlimited capacity for data and metadata storage. It can hold up to 1 billion terabytes of data. To organize that data, ZFS uses a flexible tree in which each new system is a child file of a previous system. ZFS allows users to move these files anywhere and even to attach them to the ZFS on points outside the main point. Users can separate children from parent systems, manage disk space hierarchically, and view the entire tree with a single command.  Basically, ZFS lets data managers organize and control massive amounts of information effortlessly. With one command, users can relocate a sub-tree, backup or mirror a sub-tree, or snapshot a ZFS file system and all its children together. ZFS’ auto-mount feature means files get mounted as soon as they enter the system although users can override this command. Furthermore, it automatically tracks used file space, speeding up the system’s operations and giving users a near-instant update on what’s happening with stored data. 

ZFS NAS Drives
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EXT4 vs ZFS for NAS – Conclusion

Users who store massive amounts of data and those who prefer network-attached storage systems (NAS) need an enterprise-grade transactional file system . While ext4 can get the job done, it remains a re-engineered version of a long-outdated system. Ext4 is convenient because it’s the default on Linux, but it lacks the user-friendly, up-to-date approach of ZFS.  Additionally, ZFS has higher hardware requirements for operation and many devices will not have sufficient CPU and Memory available to run ZFS with it’s compression and deduplication advantages. QNAP and their newly revealed QTS Hero file system are combatting this and drastically reducing the amount of hardware needed for their new ZFS based file system platform (making some features like deduplication optional or streamlining other services as needed). However, for many users, you will have to stick with EXT4 and it’s lower hardware requirements.

However, for users with the choice between EXT4 and ZFS, by employing ZFS, users can get a system that automatically reconstructs data after detecting an error , seamlessly combines several physical media devices into one logical volume, has snapshot and mirror capabilities, and can quickly compress data. When considering ZFS vs. ext4, users choose ZFS to enjoy a user-friendly, high-volume storage system that doesn’t need an IT technician to hold its hand. 


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