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FragAttacks : des failles WiFi qui menacent des millions d’appareils !

18 mai 2021 à 09:09

De millions d'appareils se retrouvent vulnérables à des failles de sécurité liées au Wi-Fi et qui touchent tous les protocoles, autant le WEP que le WPA3.

Le chercheur en sécurité Mathy Vanhoef (Université de New York Abu Dhabi) a dévoilé cet ensemble de failles de sécurité qu'il a baptisé FragAttacks (fragmentation and aggregation attacks). Ces failles de sécurité rendent les terminaux vulnérables, que ce soit les smartphones, les PC portables, les points d'accès sans-fil, mais aussi tous les appareils connectés de l'Internet des objets que l'on a tous, ou presque, à la maison. Le protocole WEP est vulnérable depuis longtemps à diverses failles, et il est touché par ces failles une fois de plus, mais les versions plus récentes des protocoles comme le WPA3 sont également affectées.

Comment expliquer qu'autant d'appareils et de versions de protocoles soient concernés ? Toujours d'après Mathy Vanhoef, il y a trois vulnérabilités découvertes qui sont des défauts de conception au sein de la norme WiFi. Néanmoins, elles sont difficiles à exploiter. Sa plus grande inquiétude réside dans les failles liées à des défauts d'implémentations du WiFi dans les appareils, car là les appareils eux-mêmes sont exposés directement.

D'après Mathy Vanhoef, un attaquant qui se trouve à portée d'un appareil vulnérable peut exploiter ces failles de sécurité pour réaliser une attaque et voler des données. D'ailleurs, il a publié une vidéo sur YouTube où il montre trois exemples d'exploitation de ces failles FragAttacks.

  • Intercepter des informations sensibles comme l'identifiant et le mot de passe de la victime
  • Interagir à distance avec un appareil connecté (IoT), par exemple allumer et éteindre une prise connectée
  • Prise de contrôle d'une machine sous Windows 7 sur un réseau local

Au final, on obtient un bulletin d'alerte qui regroupe un ensemble de 12 CVE dont voici la liste : CVE-2020-24586, CVE-2020-24587, CVE-2020-24588, CVE-2020-26139, CVE-2020-26140, CVE-2020-26141, CVE-2020-26142, CVE-2020-26143, CVE-2020-26144, CVE-2020-26145, CVE-2020-26146, et CVE-2020-26147.

➡Pour en savoir plus sur ces CVE

Un site "FragAttacks" est en ligne, je vous invite à le consulter si vous souhaitez obtenir des détails techniques supplémentaires. Dans tous les cas, cela fait 9 mois qu'il a découvert ces vulnérabilités et que les différents acteurs sont au courant dans le but de préparer des correctifs de sécurité. Certains fabricants proposent déjà des correctifs depuis plusieurs mois, notamment Aruba, Cisco, Dell, Intel, Microsoft ou encore Juniper. Sur GitHub, Mathy Vanhoef a recensé les bulletins des éditeurs :

➡Bulletins liés à FragAttacks

The post FragAttacks : des failles WiFi qui menacent des millions d’appareils ! first appeared on IT-Connect.

Upgrading to 10Gb Network in 2021 – An Beginners Guide

17 mai 2021 à 01:45

How and Why Should You Upgrade to 10Gbe – An Idiots Guide

Let’s face facts, our data is getting bigger and we want it even faster. As selfish as it sounds, both home and business users alike demand faster and faster data transmission in 2021, despite the obvious fact that the average size of our photos, music and videos are getting unquestionably larger. Luckily, at the same time as all of this, 10 Gigabit Ethernet (10Gbe) networks become increasingly more affordable and despite their lofty business only focus a decade ago, have become accessible to even modest home users and their budgets. Deciding to switch your home or office network from one-gigabit ethernet (1Gbe) to 10Gbe can often be intimidating, however, with numerous more cost-effective solutions and much more user-friendly hardware on offer, you can switch up your network to 10-gigabit for just a few £100’s. Today I’m going to detail each of the necessary components that you will need to consider when upgrading towards 10G, discuss their advantages and disadvantages, and recommend the best piece of 10Gb hardware for each tier of your setup in 2021.

Disclaimer – it is important to understand that increasing your network from the default 1Gbe to 10Gbe will increase the bandwidth available to you and your connected devices. However, bandwidth does not automatically translate to speed and you will still need to ensure that both targets and source hardware in the 10Gbe network can deliver the potential 1,000MB per second possible. It is best to think of your network as a series of pipes filled with water. Upgrading to 10-gigabit ethernet merely provides a larger pipe to send the water down, but you still need storage media and active data connections that can push data fast enough. First lets discuss the individual components that make up a modern 10Gbe network.

Upgrading to a 10Gbe Network – What You Need to Buy

In order to understand how much work is required when upgrading your network, it is worth knowing just how many different pieces of equipment you may need to buy when upgrading your internal bandwidth potential. The first most obvious upgrade is your switch (otherwise known as a network switch) – and you will need to look at 10Gbe equipped switches that allow each connected user the full potential to 1,000MB/s bandwidth each (or at the very least a single 10Gbe port that allows 10 users a full 100MB/s each). Managed switches, although more expensive, will allow you to combine these connections via link aggregation and trunking 2 or more to multiply this performance significantly, however, there are numerous affordable unmanaged 10Gbe switches out there too that are priced quite closely to 1Gbe counterparts.

Next, you will need to upgrade the network connectivity of your client devices, such as PCs, laptops and servers. Some 2020/2021 Prosumer hardware releases have started arriving with 10Gbe connectivity by default (e.g. the newest generation of Mac Pro Tower Machine) and to meet this there is thunderbolt to 10Gbe adapters available from numerous brands (I personally use the QNAP QNA-T310G1T or Sonnet Solo 10G – both of which use system power, so no mains power needed). Otherwise, there are numerous 1-port and 2-port PCIe upgrades readily available to buy that are even cheaper than external alternatives.

Next up, you need to think about whether you will want to use copper or fibre cable-based ethernet. Copper-based 10Gbe, known as 10GBASE-T, uses near-identical cables to those used in your standard 1Gbe connections (known as RJ45) and is much better suited to distances of up to 20 metres when deployed. After that distance, you will be much better off choosing fibre-based 10Gbe (known as SFP+ in architecture). This can cover many, MANY more times to distance, but see more expensive fibre cables. SFP+ 10Gbe also requires dedicated port transceivers (these connect between the client device and the cable), which adds to the cost even more. That said, there are MANY cost effect SFP+ only 10Gbe switches and NAS systems out there, as well as there being transceiver-ready shorter cables (called DAC cables) that are up to 5-7M long. There are other Pros and Cons to RJ45 and 10GBASE-T, so I recommend you check out my guide below quickly to learn the difference before going any further:

Click Below for the SFP+ vs 10GBASE-T Guide

Finally, we can talk about routers (which are arguably optional for most in this setup and still not quite mainstream in 10G). Although some modern routers do feature a dedicated 10Gbe LAN connection, it is worth remembering that most internet connections worldwide will not really be able to saturate 1,000MB/s of data. When you look at the internet plan that you have with your ISP, the speed is generally provided in bits ( ie Mb = megabit, Gb = gigabit), not BYTES. Unless you are living somewhere with a decent fibre optic connection, or dedicated high-speed business line that promises speeds higher than 1 gigabit, a 10Gbe router will only be able to push as much internet/external packet data to a connected user as the internet service provider allows in your initial plan. so there is no need to spend money on a 10Gbe equipped router unless your ISP subscription is comfortably approaching 5-6 gigabits (5Gb+). Aside from those three areas, nothing else in your typical hardware environment should require an upgrade when making the switch to a 10Gbe network. Remember, 10Gbe over copper and typical 1Gbe use exactly the same cables for connectivity (RJ45 or Cat cables) so you can reuse your existing setup easily. So, now we know the hardware, however, 10Gbe is recommended to use at least Cat 6 or Cat 7 cables, whereas regular 1Gbe and 2.5Gbe can get away with Cat 5 or Cat 5e. Let’s discuss the Pros and Cons of 10Gbe.

Upgrading to a 10Gbe Network – Price

The affordability of 10Gbe as an alternative to traditional gigabit ethernet LAN is getting better than it was when first commercial in 2008 or so (when it cost thousands!). When hardware started embracing 10Gbe connections, it was priced at an arguably fairer 3-4x times that of a normal 1Gb connection. However, it soon became apparent that due to demand in network use alongside data growing more rapidly in both home and business, that 1Gbe was fast becoming unsuitable for most businesses. Therefore in more recent times, the cost of 10Gbe has begun to arrive at just a pinch above that of accepted 1Gbe hardware (with numerous 2.5Gbe options arriving on the market meaning that the price is getting even better). In fact, many hardware manufacturers consider 1Gbe a tad dead in the water and have embraced 2.5Gbe, 5Gbe and affordable SFP/Copper10Gbe connections as standard at no additional increase thanks to more cost-effective ARM processors on the market from Realtek, Annapurna and Marvell (in the NAS community, the heavy hitters on this are QNAP and Asustor).

The real cost of a 10Gbe setup as an upgrade to, or an alternative to a 1Gbe setup, is in the network upgrades for traditional client hardware and interfaces. I am of course talking about PCs, tower servers, Apple Macs and just general day to day devices. Upgrading a desktop device with 10Gbe is around £80-100 per connection, about 75% more than the same thing at 1Gbe. For portable and less easy to upgrade devices, such as Macbooks and laptops, a 10Gbe to Thunderbolt 2/3 external adapter upgrade will cost you around £175-200, which is about 80% more than a 1Gbe USB or Docking Station alternatives.

Upgrading to a 10Gbe Network – Internet Speeds

As mentioned, 10Gbe networks are largely concerned with internal network traffic within your home or business building. The effects of introducing 10Gbe into your router/modem system with the aims of improved internet speeds on your devices are hugely dependent on your ISP subscription service and in most cases will not fully saturate a 10Gbe connection. If you have an internet connection that surpasses 1 Gigabit bandwidth, then you can start to enjoy the benefits of 10Gbe connected devices exceeding 100MBs, just ensure that you are using a primary modem and router that features a 10Gbe port, otherwise connecting a 10Gbe switch or additional router via 1Gbe will create an instantaneous bottleneck. If you are using wireless devices and looking to exceed 1Gbe, then you should look into WiFi 6/6E/AX (which we will touch on later). In 2021 there are a few 10Gbe Routers on the market from brands like Netgear and their NightHawk series, Asus in their Gamer ranges and QNAP in their QHora-301W System.

Upgrading to a 10Gbe Network – Availability

10Gbe hardware is a great deal more accessible and available in 2021 than ever. Alongside numerous affordable network upgrades via USB and PCIe, lots of motherboard makers, NAS server manufacturers and network switch brands have released 10Gbe options. Additionally, home or business users that have a 10Gbe setup that is shared by multiple 1Gbe uses can often allow connection of 10Gbe devices on these copper ports, as the majority of 10GBASE-T ports are backwards compatible with 5G, 10G and 1G (otherwise known as auto-negotiation). As mentioned earlier, a lot of hardware that would have once featured gigabit ethernet now arrives with 10Gbe connectivity at no additional cost, allowing a more gradual and organic upgrade into this larger bandwidth connection as you upgrade standard hardware in your environment. Lastly, the majority of plug-n-play 10Gbe upgrades for clients are reusable/shareable with numerous devices.

Upgrading to a 10Gbe Network – WiFi 6 and WiFi 6E Support?

One of the most attractive reasons that many users consider upgrading their setup to 10Gbe is due to the evolution in Wi-Fi connectivity, most recently in Wi-Fi 6. Otherwise known as 802.11AX, Wi-Fi 6 allows wireless connectivity that exceeds that of traditional 1Gbe LAN. Although the bandwidth and Wi-Fi coverage in Wi-Fi 6 is spread across multiple bands and frequencies (5Ghz and 5Ghz air communication, not to be confused with Gb data networks of measurement), it still allows bandwidths of 2.4Gigabits and greater (i,e 240MB/s). Many users who have upgraded their Wi-Fi network to Wi-Fi 6 (or holding out for Wi-Fi 6E) also want to upgrade their wired network to keep up, which is where 10Gbe hardware has grown in popularity noticeably. Indeed, a number of new Wi-Fi 6 solutions have arrived on the market in the last 12-months that also factor in dedicated 10Gbe ports and even 10Gbe in some cases (such as the QNAP QHora-301W). If you intend to set up your home or business environment wire-free, with a NAS in the centre for backups/sharing and wish to connect wirelessly to this device over Wi-Fi 6, then upgrading your NAS to at least a single 10Gbe connection will be hugely desirable and convenient. Equally, if you use a more modern WiFi 6 solutions with larger AX ratings (AX3000, AX6000 or AX11000 for example), then this will translate very well into multiple connected users and a 10Gbe (1,000MB/s) connected NAS or Network for sharing.

Upgrading to a 10Gbe Network – Recommended Products in 2021

So now we have discussed at length a number of the advantages and disadvantages to upgrading to a 10Gbe network environment. As mentioned, there are many new 10Gbe pieces of hardware available as 2021 continues, making the ease of choosing the right network components evermore confusing. Below I have detailed my recommended 10Gbe switch, NAS, Router, Plug-n-play laptop upgrade and Desktop PCIe upgrades to ensure that you are ready to make the jump to 10Gbe networking.

Recommended 10Gbe Switches

Likely the most important part of the 10Gbe network upgrade, the switch is what manages traffic between your client devices.

Budget Unmanaged 10Gbe Switch

Budget Managed 10Gbe Switch

Best Budget Dedicated 10G

QNAP QSW-308S

$139

QNAP QSW-M408-4C

$329

TRENDnet 8x 10G TEG-7080ES

$529

Recommended 10Gbe Laptop Upgrades

If your network is populated with more compact and portable devices, then you can still use a range of Thunderbolt connected devices to interact with a 10Gbe network. Here are the ones I recommend:

 

Sonnet Solo 10G Adapter

QNAP QNA-T310G1S Adapter

ATTO TLN3-3102 Thunderlink 2x10G Adapter

Thunderbolt3-to-10G Copper

$209

Thunderbolt3-to-SFP+ Fibre

$179

2x Thunderbolt3-to-2x SFP+ Fibre

$999

Recommended 10Gbe Desktop PC Upgrades

If you are using a desktop PC/Mac/Linux system, then you are able to consider PCIe 10Gbe upgrades. Although these are more expensive than the plug n play alternatives, they do allow more connections per card. Here are the 10Gbe PCIe cards I recommend:

 

1 Port 10Gbe PCIe Card

2 Port 10Gbe PCIe Card

Fully Featured 10Gbe PCIe Card

TRENDnet 10Gbe TEG-10GECTX

$99

QNAP QXG-10G2T-107 2x 10G

$199

QNAP 10Gbe and 2x NVMe QM2-2P10G1T

$279

Recommended 10Gbe Routers

Once again, very much an ‘optional extra’, upgrading the router/modem in your network towards 10Gbe will only really be beneficial if your internet service is greater than 1Gbps. Never the less, there are some great 10Gbe, 5Gbe and 10Gbe routers out there, some of which even include WiFi 6 too. Here are the best 10Gbe routers right now in 2021:

 

Best Gamer 10Gbe Router

Best Prosumer 10Gbe Router

Best Business 10Gbe Router

ASUS AX11000

$389

ASUS AX6000 10G

$410

QNAP QHora-301W 10G & WiFi 6

$329

Recommended 10Gbe NAS Servers

When it comes to seeing the true value of an upgraded network environment, then a NAS that features greater than gigabit connectivity is a great way to show this. Whether you are feeding this NAS into a 10Gbe/10Gbe network switch shared environment, or directly interfacing (i.e network connection PC-to-NAS), greater than 1Gbe speeds will be abundantly clear. There are quite a large number of 10Gbe NAS systems available in the server market right now, but I have narrowed it down to three below based on how you want to interact with your data:

 

Best Budget 10Gbe NAS

Best Prosumer 10Gbe NAS

Best Business 10Gbe NAS

TS-431KX

$369

TS-h973AX

$999

TVS-872X

$1699

Thanks for reading. Do you still need help? Use the NASCompares Free Advice section here – https://nascompares.com/contact-us. It is my free, unbias community support system that allows you to ask me questions about your ideal setup. It is NOT a sales platform, NOT a way to push hardware you don’t need and, although it is just manned by me and might take a day or two for me to reply, I will help you any way I can.

 


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FragAttacks : 12 vulnérabilités dans les objets Wi-Fi provoquent un flot de mises à jour

13 mai 2021 à 16:12

Un chercheur a découvert un lot de 12 failles informatiques, qu'il a regroupées sous le nom FragAttacks. Relativement difficiles à exploiter, ces vulnérabilités sont tout de même dangereuses. C'est pourquoi il est grandement conseillé de faire les mises à jour sur tous les appareils Wi-Fi. [Lire la suite]

Voitures, vélos, scooters... : la mobilité de demain se lit sur Vroom ! https://www.numerama.com/vroom/vroom//

The post FragAttacks : 12 vulnérabilités dans les objets Wi-Fi provoquent un flot de mises à jour appeared first on Cyberguerre.

Unifi lance un nouveau point d’accès WiFi 6 (UniFi 6 Professional)

7 mai 2021 à 07:00
Par : Fx

UniFi 6 professionalLe fabricant Ubiquiti vient d’annoncer l’arrivée d’un nouveau point d’accès WiFi 6 : UniFi 6 Professional (U6-Pro). Derrière ce nom se cache un boîtier performant capable d’atteindre 5,3 Gb/s (en théorie). Il peut servir plus de 300 clients simultanément. Son prix : 119€ HT (soit 142,80€ TTC). Découvrons ce nouveau produit très prometteur, mais pas sans défaut… UniFi 6 Professional (nom de code U6-Pro) Sur le marché du réseau, il y a les acteurs traditionnels et il y a Ubiquiti […]

Cet article Unifi lance un nouveau point d’accès WiFi 6 (UniFi 6 Professional) est apparu en premier sur Cachem

A Guide to 2.5Gbe Networks – Should you Upgrade

30 avril 2021 à 01:13

Should you Upgrade to 2.5Gbe – An Idiots Guide

It is always an intimidating step when you upgrade from the safe and familiar territory of relying on your ISP router to make the jump towards more evolved LANs, switches and third party network equipment. The fact that the majority of routers only arrive with up to 4 ports and most of those are gone on day 1 is particularly galling, so the appeal of upgrading your network to allow more devices to communicate (for home or business use) is pretty understandable. In the last year or so, alongside the economical 1Gbe and business-targeted 10Gbe network solutions, a new middle ground has presented itself in the form of 2.5Gbe network hardware. This new tier of network protocol and bandwidth utilises identical-looking hardware to that of traditional ethernet (Copper/BASE-T/RJ45) that has been around commercially for a couple of decades, but arrives at 2.5x the potential performance, raising max speeds from 100MB/s to 250MB/s. 2.5Gbe networks are technically not new, previously referred to as 2.5GBASE-T, their inclusion in the network hardware market as a viable alternative to standard ethernet has only really existed for the last 18 months. With NAS manufacturers, PC network upgrade cards and router manufacturers starting to embrace 2.5Gbe as the network standard of their hardware, many are wondering if now is the time to make the jump to 2.5Gbe network setups in their home or business environment. Today I want to discuss the feasibility, price and suitability of 2.5Gbe as a choice for you and your data.

Upgrading to a 2.5Gbe Network – What You Need to Buy

In order to understand how much work is required when upgrading your network, it is worth knowing just how many different pieces of equipment you may need to buy when upgrading your internal bandwidth potential. The first most obvious upgrade is your switch – and you will need to look at 2.5Gbe equipped switches that allow each connected user the full potential to 250MB/s bandwidth each. Managed switches will allow you to combine these connections via link aggregation and trunking 2 or more to multiply this performance significantly, however, there are numerous affordable unmanaged 2.5Gbe switches out there too that are priced quite closely to 1Gbe counterparts.

Next, you will need to upgrade the network connectivity of your client devices, such as PCs, laptops and servers. Some 2020/2021 hardware releases have started arriving with 2.5Gbe connectivity by default and to meet this there are USB-to-2.5G and USB-to-5G adaptors out there for as little as £25. Otherwise, there are numerous 1-port and 2-port PCIe upgrades readily available to buy that are even cheaper than USB alternatives.

Finally, we can talk about routers (which are arguably optional for most in this setup and still not quite mainstream in 2.5G). Although some modern routers do feature a dedicated 2.5Gbe LAN connection, it is worth remembering that most internet connections worldwide will not really be able to saturate 250MB/s of data. When you look at the internet plan that you have with your ISP, the speed is generally provided in bits ( ie Mb = megabit, Gb = gigabit), not BYTES. Unless you are living somewhere with a decent fibre optic connection, or dedicated high-speed business line that promises speeds higher than 1 gigabit, a 2.5Gbe router will only be able to push as much internet/external packet data to a connected user as the internet service provider allows in your initial plan. so there is no need to spend money on a 2.5Gbe equipped router unless your ISP subscription is comfortably approaching 2.5 gigabits (2.5Gb). Aside from those three areas, nothing else in your typical hardware environment should require an upgrade when making the switch to a 2.5Gbe network. Remember, 2.5Gbe and typical 1Gbe use exactly the same cables for connectivity (RJ45 or Cat cables) so you can reuse your existing setup easily. So, now we know the hardware, let’s discuss the Pros and Cons of 2.5Gbe.

Upgrading to a 2.5Gbe Network – Price

The affordability of 2.5Gbe as an alternative to traditional gigabit ethernet LAN is getting better than it was at launch commercial in 2019. When hardware started embracing 2.5Gbe connections, it was priced at an arguably fair 2.5x times that of a normal 1Gb connection. However, it soon became apparent that due to demand in network use alongside data growing more rapidly in both home and business, that 1Gbe was fast becoming unsuitable for most businesses. Therefore in more recent times, the cost of 2.5Gbe has begun to arrive at simply the same as or just a pinch above that of accepted 1Gbe hardware. In fact, many hardware manufacturers consider 1Gbe dead in the water and have embraced 2.5Gbe connections as standard at no additional increase (in the NAS community, the heavy hitters on this are QNAP and Asustor).

The real cost of a 2.5Gbe setup as an upgrade to, or an alternative to a 1Gbe setup, is in the network upgrades for traditional client hardware and interfaces. I am of course talking about PCs, tower servers, Apple Macs and just general day to day devices. Upgrading a desktop device with 2.5Gbe is around £25 per connection, about £7 more than the same thing at 1Gbe. For portable and less easy to upgrade devices, such as Macbooks and laptops, a 2.5Gbe external adapter upgrade will cost you around £35, which is about £10-12 more than a 1Gbe alternative.

Upgrading to a 2.5Gbe Network – Internet Speeds

As mentioned, 2.5Gbe networks are largely concerned with internal network traffic within your home or business building. The effects of introducing 2.5Gbe into your router/modem system with the aims of improved internet speeds on your devices are hugely dependent on your ISP subscription service and in most cases will not fully saturate a 2.5Gbe connection. If you have an internet connection that surpasses 1 Gigabit bandwidth, then you can start to enjoy the benefits of 2.5Gbe connected devices exceeding 100MBs, just ensure that you are using a primary modem and router that features a 2.5Gbe port, otherwise connecting a 2.5Gbe switch or additional router via 1Gbe will create an instantaneous bottleneck. If you are using wireless devices and looking to exceed 1Gbe, then you should look into WiFi 6/6E/AX (which we will touch on later).

Upgrading to a 2.5Gbe Network – Availability

2.5Gbe hardware is a great deal more accessible and available in 2021 than ever. Alongside numerous affordable network upgrades via USB and PCIe, lots of motherboard makers, NAS server manufacturers and network switch brands have released 2.5Gbe options. Additionally, home or business users that have a 10Gbe setup that is shared by multiple 1Gbe uses can often allow connection of 2.5Gbe devices on these copper ports, as the majority of 10GBASE-T ports are backwards compatible with 5G, 2.5G and 1G (otherwise known as auto-negotiation). As mentioned earlier, a lot of hardware that would have once featured gigabit ethernet now arrives with 2.5Gbe connectivity at no additional cost, allowing a more gradual and organic upgrade into this larger bandwidth connection as you upgrade standard hardware in your environment. Lastly, the majority of plug-n-play 2.5Gbe upgrades for clients are reusable/shareable with numerous devices.

Upgrading to a 2.5Gbe Network – WiFi 6 and WiFi 6E Support?

One of the most attractive reasons that many users consider upgrading their setup to 2.5Gbe is due to the evolution in Wi-Fi connectivity, most recently in Wi-Fi 6. Otherwise known as 802.11AX, Wi-Fi 6 allows wireless connectivity that exceeds that of traditional 1Gbe LAN. Although the bandwidth and Wi-Fi coverage in Wi-Fi 6 is spread across multiple bands and frequencies (2.5Ghz and 5Ghz air communication, not to be confused with Gb data networks of measurement), it still allows bandwidths of 2.4Gigabits and greater (i,e 240MB/s). Many users who have upgraded their Wi-Fi network to Wi-Fi 6 (or holding out for Wi-Fi 6E) also want to upgrade their wired network to keep up, which is where 2.5Gbe hardware has grown in popularity noticeably. Indeed, a number of new Wi-Fi 6 solutions have arrived on the market in the last 12-months that also factor in dedicated 2.5Gbe ports and even 10Gbe in some cases (such as the QNAP QHora-301W). If you intend to set up your home or business environment wire-free, with a NAS in the centre for backups/sharing and wish to connect wirelessly to this device over Wi-Fi 6, then upgrading your NAS to at least a single 2.5Gbe connection will be hugely desirable and convenient.

Upgrading to a 2.5Gbe Network – Recommended Products in 2021

So now we have discussed at length a number of the advantages and disadvantages to upgrading to a 2.5Gbe network environment. As mentioned, there are many new 2.5Gbe pieces of hardware available as 2021 continues, making the ease of choosing the right network components evermore confusing. Below I have detailed my recommended 2.5Gbe switch, NAS, Router, Plug-n-play laptop upgrade and Desktop PCIe upgrades to ensure that you are ready to make the jump to 2.5Gbe networking.

Recommended 2.5Gbe Switches

Likely the most important part of the 2.5Gbe network upgrade, the switch is what manages traffic between your client devices.

Best Unmanaged 2.5Gbe Switch

Best Managed 2.5Gbe Switch

Best Business 2.5Gbe Switch

QNAP QSW-1105-5T

$209

QNAP QSW-M2108R-2C

$399

QNAP QGD-1602P

$999

Recommended 2.5Gbe Laptop Upgrades

If your network is populated with more compact and portable devices, then you can still use a range of USB connected devices to interact with a 2.5Gbe network. Here are the ones I recommend:

 

USB-to-2.5G Adapter

USB-to-5G Adapter

Thunderbolt3-to-10G Adapter

ASUSTOR AS-U2.5G

$40

QNAP QNA-UC5G1T

$55

Sonnet Solo 10G Adapter

$179

Recommended 2.5Gbe Desktop PC Upgrades

If you are using a desktop PC/Mac/Linux system, then you are able to consider PCIe 2.5Gbe upgrades. Although these are more expensive than the plug n play alternatives, they do allow more connections per card. Here are the 2.5Gbe PCIe cards I recommend:

 

1 Port 2.5Gbe PCIe Card

2 Port 2.5Gbe PCIe Card

Fully Featured 2.5Gbe PCIe Card

EDUP 2.5GBase-T Network Adapter

$29

QNAP QXG-2G2T-I225 2-Port

$49

QNAP QM2-2P2G2T NVMe+2-Port

$99

Recommended 2.5Gbe Routers

Once again, very much an ‘optional extra’, upgrading the router/modem in your network towards 2.5Gbe will only really be beneficial if your internet service is greater than 1Gbps. Never the less, there are some great 2.5Gbe, 5Gbe and 10Gbe routers out there, some of which even include WiFi 6 too. Here are the best 2.5Gbe routers right now in 2021:

 

Best Budget 2.5Gbe Router

Best Prosumer 2.5Gbe Router

Best Business 2.5Gbe Router

MOTOROLA MB8611 2.5G (Ant. Cable Connect)

$149

TP-Link AX6000 WiFi 6 & 2.5G Router

$269

QNAP QHora-301W 10G & WiFi 6

$329

Recommended 2.5Gbe NAS Servers

When it comes to seeing the true value of an upgraded network environment, then a NAS that features greater than gigabit connectivity is a great way to show this. Whether you are feeding this NAS into a 2.5Gbe/10Gbe network switch shared environment, or directly interfacing (i.e network connection PC-to-NAS), greater than 1Gbe speeds will be abundantly clear. There are quite a large number of 2.5Gbe NAS systems available in the server market right now, but I have narrowed it down to three below based on how you want to interact with your data:

 

Best Budget 2.5Gbe NAS

Best Prosumer 2.5Gbe NAS

Best Business 2.5Gbe NAS

Asustor Nimbustor 2

$429

QNAP TS-453D NAS

$869

QNAP TS-873A NAS

$1299

Thanks for reading. Do you still need help? Use the NASCompares Free Advice section here – https://nascompares.com/contact-us. It is my free, unbias community support system that allows you to ask me questions about your ideal setup. It is NOT a sales platform, NOT a way to push hardware you don’t need and, although it is just manned by me and might take a day or two for me to reply, I will help you any way I can.

 


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Need Advice on Data Storage from an Expert?

We want to keep the free advice on NASCompares FREE for as long as we can. Since this service started back in Jan '18, We have helped hundreds of users every month solve their storage woes, but we can only continue to do this with your support. So please do choose to buy at Amazon US and Amazon UK on the articles when buying to provide advert revenue support or to donate/support the site below. Finally, for free advice about your setup, just leave a message in the comments below here at NASCompares.com and we will get back to you. Need Help? Where possible (and where appropriate) please provide as much information about your requirements, as then I can arrange the best answer and solution to your needs. Do not worry about your e-mail address being required, it will NOT be used in a mailing list and will NOT be used in any way other than to respond to your enquiry. [contact-form-7] Terms and Conditions Alternatively, why not ask me on the ASK NASCompares forum, by clicking the button below. This is a community hub that serves as a place that I can answer your question, chew the fat, share new release information and even get corrections posted. I will always get around to answering ALL queries, but as a one-man operation, I cannot promise speed! So by sharing your query in the ASK NASCompares section below, you can get a better range of solutions and suggestions, alongside my own.  

 

Is the Synology Router Still Worth Buying in 2021?

20 avril 2021 à 01:30

The Synology MR2200ac and RT2600ac – Still Worth Buying?

Synology we have made quite a name for itself in the world of network-attached storage (NAS) for the last two decades, however in the last few years they made some impressive moves into the world of prosumer routers, with technically three generations of hardware in their RT1900ac, RT2600ac and MR2200ac routers. Of course, like most Synology products, the appeal of their routers is a lot more about the software than the hardware and each unit arrives with access to the latest version of Synology router manager (SRM). However, for all of the positive things I say about the range, Synology we haven’t actually released a new router in almost 2.5 years and although the SRM software has several updates since, the Synology Router physical product runs the risk of appearing out-of-date in terms of hardware. Today I want to answer the question of whether the Synology RT2600ac and MR2200ac router hardware is still worth buying in 2021? Mesh, stand-alone or separate networks in a single building, the points covered should be applicable to all end users. Below I have detailed several pros and cons, advantages and disadvantages and hopefully, they will help you decide whether the Synology router range still deserves your money.

Synology RT2600ac Router – $199

Dual core 1.7 GHz CPU / 512MB Memory

4×4 MIMO Omni-directional high-gain dipole (2.4GHz / 5GHz)

Gigabit (RJ-45) x 4 /  Gigabit (RJ-45) x 1 WAN

USB 3.0 x 1 / USB 2.0 x 1 

SD card reader x 1 (SDXC, SDHC)

IEEE 802.11a/b/g/n/ac

5GHz: 1.73Gbps /  2.4GHz: 800Mbps

Synology MR2200ac Mesh Router – $139

Quad core 717 MHz CPU / 256MB Memory

2×2 MIMO high-performance internal antenna (2.4 GHz / 5 GHz)

Multiple Mesh Node Deployment

Gigabit (RJ-45) x 1 /  Gigabit (RJ-45) x 1 WAN

USB 3.0 x 1

5GHz-1: 867Mbps / 5GHz-2: 867Mbps

2.4GHz: 400Mbps

 

The Synology MR2200ac and RT2600ac – 5 Reasons You Should Buy Them

First off, let’s keep things positive and talk about good reasons why you should buy the Synology MR2200ac and RT2600ac router for your network management needs in 2021.

Impressive User Control Options in Synology Router Manager (SRM)

The SRM software that all Synology routers arrived with is one of the most advanced yet user-friendly network management tools that I have ever used on a consumer accessible router. Most of the highlights of the system are related to SRM and it’s many unique features. One particularly interesting feature that has evolved beautifully in the products lifetime is that of the advanced client management control. Most routers have the simple ability to recognise or block individual IPS or MAC addresses, however, the Synology RT2600ac and MR2200ac router take things much, much further and creates a pictorial view of individual users in the network.

Within a few clicks, you are able to create individual profiles with photos and clusters of their network devices into manageable boxes. These individual uses, be they staff or family members, can then have their network connectivity, access privileges and intelligently managed site privileges beautifully scheduled automatically or manually. Great features such as allocating total internet access to a user, which is then shared across multiple devices to ensure that access time is not abused, as well as alert triggers for negative websites and reports on a users activity can all be produced and managed easily. You can even grant rewards and extensions easily via the mobile app or GUI on a web browser. It genuinely is an impressively detailed function that is presented in an incredibly intuitive and user-friendly way. Routers and general network management can be exceedingly intimidating for the less tech-savvy and Synology and its SRM platform on their routers make the management of the internet in your home or business incredibly straightforward.

The Newest Generations of Synology Router Feature Google Safe Search and WPA3

Carrying on with the subject of security, two more great additions to the Synology Router software working to keep your network safe is WPA3 security built-in, as well as the inclusion of Google SafeSearch. Now, of course, Synology did not develop either of these security and protection protocols, they nearly included them in their SRM platform. However, WPA3 despite being well established as the latest and best Wi-Fi data packet security protocol is still not widely available on most routers and is a great deal harder than you would think to include on your system without the price taking a notable increase or wait for a possible software update by the brand.

Additionally access to the Google Safe Search database to ensure that positive and negative websites for your security settings are accurate and up-to-date is not as easy as you might think and they are surprisingly few modern routers on the market that include access to this database. It is a hugely useful feature and one and alongside the support of WPA3, which mean that even in 2021, this 2018/19 released hardware is still very much up to date in terms of protection.

No Subscription Payment or Hidden Fees for Parental Control or Automated Network Safely Management

One of the earliest criticisms of the Synology router series was that it’s seemingly arrived around 20% higher in price than other similar router hardware at launch. However, one big reason for that is that a number of other prosumer and mesh enabled routers place a lot of the safety and parental controls behind subscription-based paywalls. When we first conducted our performance, coverage and software reviews of the Synology Router system back in 2018/19, we compared it with numerous alternatives from D-Link, TP-Link and even Google Wi-Fi. Most of these other platforms placed fundamental family protection and automated blocking measures behind 30-day and 12-month subscription services for around £8/10pm. This was especially present on the more affordable mesh router systems and over the course of 2 years would quickly consume any saving you might have made on Day 1.

Click to view slideshow.

The Synology router hardware and router management software include all of these features with the base price with no additional subscription fees in the product lifespan. This along with the profile and client network system mentioned in my previous point, show why despite its slightly higher price tag, the Synology router system still manages to provide a great deal more customisation, security and control to the home or business user network. That is even without the extended free Synology VPN Plus license still available till September 2021.

Excellent Range of Analytic Tools in Synology Router Manager SRM

Yes, I am still talking about the software, but it is really important that you understand where the bulk of the price tag of the RT2600ac and MR2200ac has been spent in Synology’ R&D. When you utilise the device for extended periods of time, can produce numerous impressive analytical reports that give you a better understanding of how much the network and internet are used, as well as recommendations on the best way to assign priorities in your wider network environment.

Click to view slideshow.

Of course, how much you intend to use this analytical information from your Synology router network is up to you and perhaps several uses will never really take advantage of it, but it is still a fantastic feature for those that like to keep an eye on things happening over the network and like most of the features of SRM, is accessible and viewable at any time via your browser or mobile DS router application for iOS and Android.

USB SIM Card and Mobile Phone Tethering Support with Easy Setup

Another cool little feature that I stumbled on by accident in a video last year, as well as something that Synology barely mention on their product pages, is that you can connect a mobile phone via USB tethering, or a USB mobile SIM broadband dongle, then use it as the live Internet connection on your router network. For those who take advantage of impressive 4 g or 5G mobile routers for work, the fact you can simply connect this router to the Synology RT2600ac or MR2200ac as your current Internet connection, or as an emergency failover, is hugely beneficial and is a feature that is weirdly absent from a number of other router releases in 2020/2021 and their manufacturer’s software.

The Synology MR2200ac and RT2600ac – 5 Reasons You Should Not Buy Them

Of course, and there are several reasons why you may not wish to invest your hard-earned money in a Synology router system. Not only is the latest system over 2 years old, but there have been numerous impressive developments in the world of network protocol and technology that may be absent in the Synology MR2200ac or RT2600ac router. Here are some reasons that might make you want to give the Synology router range a miss.

The Synology RT2600ac and MR2200ac are WiFi 5 Only (No WiFi 6)

Easily one of the most off-putting reasons for users looking at prosumer and premium price routers whilst moving away from their standard ISP modems is that since the release of the RT2600ac and MR2200ac, the improved bandwidths and performance Wi-Fi protocol known as Wi-Fi 6, or (802.11AX), has boomed in popularity. Although you will of course need to have Wi-Fi 6 supported client hardware around your home or office in order to capitalise on the new faster wireless protocol, a lot of more modern handheld and portable technology released in the last two years feature Wi-Fi 6 and even Wi-Fi 6E soon by default. So buying the Synology router system in its current form may reduce your potential performance in a Wi-Fi 6 populated environment.

The Synology RT2600ac and MR2200ac Only Feature 1Gbe Connectivity

Although most users are buying a router for its connection to the internet, it is important to remember that devices that share the network still needs to communicate and therefore the network switch abilities of a Synology router are important. Standard 1Gbe is featured on all Synology routers, which provides up to a maximum of 100-109 MB per second throughput. However in the last year or so we have seen numerous 2.5Gbe and 10Gbe routers appear on the market at a similar price point to the Synology RT2600ac and MR2200ac, which although difficult to fully saturate with your standard internet connection, is still hugely advantageous for sharing files between network devices.

The fact that the current generation of available Synology routers does not feature more than 1Gbe may well present a potential bottleneck that is hard for some to overlook

The Synology RT2600ac and MR2200ac Are More Expensive Than Similar Routers in Hardware

Although already mentioned earlier, the price tag of the Synology RT2600ac and MR2200ac router system is noticeably higher than other prosumer routers in the market of a similar hardware level. Yes, the Synology router range arrives with SRM and an enormous array of control, customisation and security options, but a lot of people will never really take advantage of these and therefore will be paying more for something they will potentially never use. Although I firmly believe the Synology router range provides excellent value for money, it’s still arrived at an intimidating price tag for some who just want a setup-and-forget style router.

There Might Be a New Synology Router Later in 2021/2022

Probably one of the biggest and most compelling reasons for some users to avoid buying the current generation of Synology router is that since the most recent release was in late 2018-early 2019 (depending on your region of the world), that there is hope that a new and improved model will arrive relatively soon. Whether it is because you want to wait and see if a new release has a number of the hardware options that are absent in the current RT2600ac or MR2200ac, or simply that when you buy something you want it to be the latest piece of kit, many users have held off purchasing the latest Synology hardware because they are waiting for a potential AX/WiFi6 Synology router or something with improved gigabit connectivity. Perhaps a WiFi 6 RT2600ax and MR2200ax, or something a tad beefier at RT3200ax and MR3000ax?!

And there you go, those are five reasons when you should consider buying the Synology Router Series, as well as five reasons why you might not want to. Thanks for reading. Do you still need help? Use the NASCompares Free Advice section here – https://nascompares.com/contact-us. It is my free, unbias community support system that allows you to ask me questions about your ideal setup. It is NOT a sales platform, NOT a way to push hardware you don’t need and, although it is just manned by me and might take a day or two for me to reply, I will help you any way I can.

 

 

Synology RT2600ac Router – $199

Dual core 1.7 GHz CPU / 512MB Memory

4×4 MIMO Omni-directional high-gain dipole (2.4GHz / 5GHz)

Gigabit (RJ-45) x 4 /  Gigabit (RJ-45) x 1 WAN

USB 3.0 x 1 / USB 2.0 x 1 

SD card reader x 1 (SDXC, SDHC)

IEEE 802.11a/b/g/n/ac

5GHz: 1.73Gbps /  2.4GHz: 800Mbps

Synology MR2200ac Mesh Router – $139

Quad core 717 MHz CPU / 256MB Memory

2×2 MIMO high-performance internal antenna (2.4 GHz / 5 GHz)

Multiple Mesh Node Deployment

Gigabit (RJ-45) x 1 /  Gigabit (RJ-45) x 1 WAN

USB 3.0 x 1

5GHz-1: 867Mbps / 5GHz-2: 867Mbps

2.4GHz: 400Mbps

 


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Need Advice on Data Storage from an Expert?

We want to keep the free advice on NASCompares FREE for as long as we can. Since this service started back in Jan '18, We have helped hundreds of users every month solve their storage woes, but we can only continue to do this with your support. So please do choose to buy at Amazon US and Amazon UK on the articles when buying to provide advert revenue support or to donate/support the site below. Finally, for free advice about your setup, just leave a message in the comments below here at NASCompares.com and we will get back to you. Need Help? Where possible (and where appropriate) please provide as much information about your requirements, as then I can arrange the best answer and solution to your needs. Do not worry about your e-mail address being required, it will NOT be used in a mailing list and will NOT be used in any way other than to respond to your enquiry. [contact-form-7] Terms and Conditions Alternatively, why not ask me on the ASK NASCompares forum, by clicking the button below. This is a community hub that serves as a place that I can answer your question, chew the fat, share new release information and even get corrections posted. I will always get around to answering ALL queries, but as a one-man operation, I cannot promise speed! So by sharing your query in the ASK NASCompares section below, you can get a better range of solutions and suggestions, alongside my own.  

D-Link DWR-2101 Review – The AX1800 WiFi 6 5G SIM Router

14 avril 2021 à 01:22

D-Link DWR-2101 5G Wifi 6 Router Review – Too Good To Be True?

Mobile routers are INCREDIBLY useful and on the face of it, the D-Link DWR-2101 WiFi 6 and 5G Network router is just insane! Whether you are on the commute, on a business trip, on holiday or simply just looking for a much more wire-free internet experience in your home/office, mobile routers have come a LONG way in 2021. Thanks to innovations in network technology and cellular data coverage worldwide, we have reached a point where a lot of these battery-powered portable routers are better than ALOT of desktop-wired routers. However, the majority of these mobile routers always seem to fall a little flat in their execution. Sometimes it is an efficiency issue (designed for battery power = gonna limit consumption), other times it is a connection issue (i.e RJ45 LAN as well as wireless), but in the case of the DLink DWR-2102 Mobile Router, it just seems almost too good to be true. Featuring the latest WiFi 6 (aka 802.11ax or WiFiAX) support for greater than gigabit wireless connectivity, 5G Mobile Data coverage (so 1.6Gb/s or 160MB/s data), physically LAN connectivity, more than half a day battery life and an LCD display – there is ALOT to like. However, where have their compromises fallen? Has this device had to cut corners? And is it as good as it sounds? Let’s find out in today’s DWR-2101 D-Link Mobile Router Review.

D-Link DWR-2101 5G Wifi 6 Router Review – Quick Conclusion

Certainly designed for Prosumers or working professionals that need fast internet on business trips (something that perhaps will return to form with more gusto in a post-pandemic world!), its hefty price tag will none the less still put some users off. Alongside this, those who are more used to the idea of a desktop router with its extendable/moveable antennae will be less enthused with the fixed internal antenna of the DWR-2101 – but THAT IS THE POINT. This is a mobile router for a mobile user. It is not designed to replace the router on your desk, but rather allow you to carry the internet in your pocket in a method and speed that has never really been possible till now. The design is a little plastic, but in terms of heat dissipation and portability, this is largely justified. In short – I am hugely impressed with the D-Link DWR-2101 mobile router.

 

Pros of the D-Link DWR-2101 5G Wifi 6 Router Cons of the D-Link DWR-2101 5G Wifi 6 Router
  • 5G SIM Router that can hit 160MB/s
  • Not SIM Locked
  • Portable WiFi 6 Support
  • Realtime Display on the Router is super handy and is touch screen
  • WPA3 Support
  • Features a VERY useful 1Gbe RJ45 LAN Port
  • USB-C Port can ALSO be used for Internet Pass-thru
  • Decent 5260 mAh of power (12-14hrs)
  • Supports up to 32 SSID shares (client devices)
  • In-built Internet Speed test via LCD screen
  • Port Forwarding, Firewall, DMZ and Mac Address Settings
  • Configuration can be access locally on screen, an App and via a desktop browser
  • Quite Expensive at $350-399 (though, HALF the price of the Netgear Mobile M5)
  • Internal Antenna aren’t quite as adaptable as external Antennae
  • The casing feels a little plastic’y

Check Availability and Prices on the D-Link DWR-2101 WiFi 6 & 5G Router Below

D-Link DWR-2101 5G Wifi 6 Router Review – Packaging

The retail box that the DWR-2101 arrives in is pretty compact (as you might expect from a portable item) and immediately highlights its core strengths and the fact it received an innovations award at CES 2020 last year. Despite its eventual release in late 2020/2021, it has to be said that there are very few WiFi 6 and 5G portable routers in the market, so they genuinely were one of the first to bring this kind of network solution to market

Inside we find everything pretty well structured (the DWR-2101 unit at the top, the accessories in a smaller panel underneath) and is pretty much everything you are going to need to use this device on Day 1. Of course, you are going to need a 5G Mobile Network Nano-SIM in order to use this particular feature, but the system can still be used as an offline private network and still enjoy the benefits of WiFi 6.

Inside we find the DWR-2101 mobile router itself (wrapped in anti-static/anti mark plastic, the desktop/table stand, a USB-A to USB-C (USB 3.2 Gen 1 class) cable and a quick start guide. Again, all fair standard stuff, though the lack of plug or even a single ethernet RJ45 cable is a bit of a shame. There is no mains plug adapter, which surprised me a little. I understand that this is a device that charges quickly via a USB port, but it does seem a bit of a cheap move to not include a plug adapter (even a standard USB-MAINS plug) on a device that arrives at over $399/£350. The cable is good quality though and of course, you can change this via pretty much any USB port available in your physical environment. The Quick Start Guide, though a little underwhelming too, still gives you more than though information for setting the device up for the first time. Mainly pictorial, you should not have any difficultly using the DWR-2101 router in minutes.

So, that’s what you get for your money in terms of kit. So let’s take a good look at the unit itself

D-Link DWR-2101 5G Wifi 6 Router Review – Design

The first thing that struck me when I held the D-Link DWR-2101 router is the weight. At 235 grams, it is small but weighty. Hardly noticeable in your bag of course, but if you are carrying the DWR-2101 in your pocket alongside a phone and wallet, it is much more noticeable. Aside from that, I do genuinely like the design and although it is a mostly plastic external chassis, it is still very rugged feeling and sturdy to hold.

The front plate of the DWR-2101 casing features an embossed series of lines and groves that are similar in look to that of a circuit board, which I quite like. There is just a single power button o nthe front of the device (as control is managed via a mobile app, a web browser GUI and the LCD touchscreen front panel. Aside from that, the system is a completely button-free design. 

When comparing the DWR-2101 with my Netgear Mobile M5, the D-Link 5G Router seems alot more compact (barely) and integrates the home and back buttons into the LCD screen display (rather than the physical button panels on the Netgear M5 5G ROUTER). Aside from that, both routers (currently the two best options for those looking at a mobile 5G and WiFi 6 router with a RJ45 Ethernet/LAN port) are near identical – however, the Netgear Nighthawk M5 5G Router is DOUBLE THE PRICE of the D-Link DWR-2101, and I am struggling to see where that extra money was spent! In terms of value, the Dlink DWR-2101 5G router is giving you so, SO much more.

Back to the physical LCD display of the DWR-2101. It’s nice, crisp and clear – providing pretty much all the information you need at a touch. We will go into more detail later on, but I genuinely have no complaints about the screen – although not quite as vibrant in colour as the older Netgear M1 Mobile Router (4G), it is still very clear and the GUI is as intuitive as you would want.

The power button feels a little ‘clicky’ but you won’t really be hammering it much. Also, the responsiveness of the touch screen is good too – I had concerns about its idle/screen-off timer (i.e would it wake up in my pocket and have options pressed as I walked) but there is lots of customization on this available in the settings menu, along with a screen lock feature when needed.

The rear of the D-Link DWR-2101 is a fairly plain affair, with lots of passive ventilation. The router is silent when in operation, but relies on strategically placed heatsinks to maintain workable temperatures and this rear ventilation (along with more o nthe sides) helps maintain that optimal efficiency.

Finally, the DWR-2101 arrives with a stand for the system to sit in when left in a neutral/regular location. I wish D-Link had integrated the charging of the system into the dock (as a few other lesser products have done) but unfortunately, this dock is just a plastic, rubberized mould. It should the LCD and information (rubberized at the base, so you can adjust options on the LCD without knocking the DWR-2101 over) but still a little basic.

Overall, the DWR-2101 is a smart and compact looking device and although the design is not going to knock anyone’s socks off, it still has a pretty sleek, rugged and sturdy build quality. Let’s discuss ports and connections

D-Link DWR-2101 5G Wifi 6 Router Review – Ports & Connections

Although OBVIOUSLY, the biggest reason that user will want to buy the D-Link DWR-2101 is the 5G Mobile Data and WiFi 6 (AX) support – the fact that it also has a physical gigabit (1Gbe) LAN/Ethernet port is also very important. There are ALOT of mobile routers on the market (you can easily hire one for 1-30 days at most airports with a basic data contract), having one with a physical 1Gbe LAN port is much rarer (especially when you include the DWR-2101’s support of 5G and 802.11ax). This LAN port will provide upto 100-109MB/s performance with a connected device which (although technically less than the MAXIMUM potential of 5G and WiFi 6, is still remarkably handy).

However, which is also extra useful is that the USB-C port on the device (primarily used for charging the internal battery of course) can also be used to create a wired-internet hotspot – technically another physical, wired network connection! Very handy indeed. The charging of the DWR-2101 is pretty fast, especially if you use a USB 3.2 Gen 1 (aka USB 3.0/USB 3.1 Gen 1) conneciton and correct cable.

There is a small cavity on the base of the casing on the DWR-2101 that allows you to remove the back panel (it does NOT come off easy) and access the NANO SIM sim slot, as well as the battery (the thing that is taking up all the room and making up the bulk of that weight inside).

As you can see, the battery takes up the bulk of the space immediately! The battery itself is a 5260mAh rechargeable Li-ion battery, that they report will last 12-14hrs. I am quite impressed by both the design of the battery, as well as its connection. For those familiar with mobile routers (especially premium/wired models) the battery is make-or-break alot of the time. It can expand (the tiniest bit) when hot and manufacturers have to allow a millimetre or two of space internally to allow for this. The result is that some mobile routers (that are jiggled around in transit) have their battery briefly disconnected from time to time and that is INFURIATING).

The D-Link DWR-2101 features a very comfortably positioned battery, a battery locking mechanism, alongside a downward-facing connector. The result is that rather than relying on the battery touching a horizontal connector, it is angled directly into the socket and cannot be shaken out. A little design touch like that goes a LONG way with me! Especially when I saw the Netgear Mobile M1 and M5 are still using the less stable battery style and even a casual glance online will show you people’s complaints about the Netgear nighthawk mobile battery.

The side of the open chassis shows the NANO sim slot for your 5G Mobile data card. I have been testing the D-Link DWR-2101 mobile 5G router with a O2 5G SIM card, an EE 5G Mobile sim card and an EE 4G Mobile sim card (all NANO of course) and all three connected easily and were immediately actioned and usable. The DWR-2101 5G router arrives unlocked (so sim-free) and supports a wide range of providers.

So, these are your main connections and interface slots of the D-Link 5G and WiFi 6 mobile router. Overall, pretty impressed with the internal design choices, as well as the level of control and access that you have available to you on this device. Connectivity is maintained through 4×4 internal antenna, 2 x internal WiFi antennas, so no external antennae that you can manually adjust, or connectors for attaching a larger external one. Let’s discuss the controls and operation of the device.

D-Link DWR-2101 5G Wifi 6 Router Review – Display & Control

As mentioned, the main control of the DWR-2101 is done via the on-device LCD touchscreen display, as well as via a mobile application (and also through a desktop web browser directly into the GUI). That said, the bulk of the control and customization of your 5G/WiFi 6 network on the DWR-2101 can be done with just the LCD panel alone. The additional mobile app and browser-based interface introduce a whole bunch of more network tool-specific features (will cover in a bit) but you can still control a bunch of things from the LCD.

There is a setup guide option for taking you step by step through the initialization (creating and naming your network/SSID, security credentials, frequency, etc), as well as power-saving settings and an on-the-fly wife network configuration option to change your settings or review existing ones as a reminder.

The fact you can create the two separate frequencies at 2.4Ghz (riding just over 500Mbps bandwidth) and the 5Ghz bandwidth (providing 1200Mbps bandwidth) is a useful extra and these can be set as completely separate SSIDs, with their own login and security settings. If you plan on using some devices more than others, or some older devices are mixed with newer ones, this is a useful way of separating them out neatly.

The is even a useful help guide built-in that explains a number of the core features, how to change them and helps to troubleshoot some features when the device is in use.  The settings are still a lot more varied in the mobile application (D-Link EZ-Five), as well as connecting via home (192.168.0.1 etc) on a web browser, but nevertheless, it is handy to be able to change a number of the core settings without a client device on the hardware screen. There is also a speed test option to check your 5G/4G Coverage and speed, which will touch on later.

The EZ-Five application for mobile phones is made by D-Link themselves and although seems to just be a gloried version of the web GUI, it still provides a wide range of configuration and customization options. Here are a few of the best ones (remember, this is a mobile router, so although these sound very ‘standard’, you have to remember that most mobile SIM routers are INCREDIBLY barebones):

(Video Below Live on 16/04/21)

  • Change SSID, Network Frequency and Security Settings
  • Adjust NAT settings, Firewall setup and Port Forwarding Rules
  • Change network address connectivity settings, as well as IP, Subnet etc
  • Send and Recieve SMS messages via the App/GUI and using the SIM Card
  • Adjust APN settings or use automatic defaults for your network provider
  • Firmware Update and Restore control
  • Adjust MAC filters and view SIM Information/Settings
  • WAN Settings and Statistical Information on Traffic over time

Here are a few screenshots of the mobile app and its features:

Click to view slideshow.

Likewise, ALL of the settings and features of the mobile app are completely available in the DWR-2101 desktop web browser-based GUI when accessed over the network. Although not quite as quickly accessed as the mobile app, the fact the DWR-2101 has 3 very clear and user-friendly means to configure the Mobile 5G and WiFi 6 router with ease is pretty impressive. Here is how the desktop browser GUI looks (Google Chrome was used):

Click to view slideshow.

Another important thing to note (and something that only the truly tech-savvy will appreciate) is that the D-Link DWR-2101 arrives WPA3 Security certified. This is a great deal rarer than you might think in 2021 and particularly in a device with no additional software or subscription costs. The majority of WiFi 6 routers that I have reviewed in 2020/2021 have been WPA2, which although still very secure, is still not as efficient yet secure across integrity checks as WPA3. That was a welcome surprise during setup.

So, although the configuration and control is pretty impressive for a mobile router (which all too often have far more streamlined and ‘default control’ that cannot be adjusted), the D-Link DWR-2101 WiFi 6 and 5G SIM router is pretty versatile, whilst still being pretty user friendly.

D-Link DWR-2101 5G Wifi 6 Router Review – Speed and Performance

In order to fully test the D-Link DWR-2101 performance, I have setup up numerous test environments in order to see the speed achieved in both Read and Write performance. These tests covered WiFi 6 connectivity, as well as 5G mobile data coverage and 4G mobile data coverage (tested in the UK in 4G/5G well-covered zones). I have made videos on each test below and will (soon) be making a far more detailed written review on my D-Link DWR-2101 performance tests here on NASCompares. For now, you can check the video below (being published a day or two after the review) to see how the DWR-2101 performed.

(Video Below Live on 15/04/21)

D-Link DWR-2101 5G SIM Mobile Router – SPEED TEST 5G

The first (and likely most popular test for many) was testing the speed and performance possible on the DWR-2101 over 5G connectivity:

(Click to Enlarge)

D-Link DWR-2101 5G SIM Mobile Router – LAN CONNECTION TEST

Finally, a much more straight forward test of the Ethernet/1Gbe/Gigabit. I did not expect anything more than the standard 100-109MB/s, but nevertheless, knowing that this ethernet port can still give the total bandwidth is always reassuring:

(Click to Enlarge)

D-Link DWR-2101 5G SIM Mobile Router – SPEED TEST 4G

Next, I switched to an active 4G Data SIM on the D-Link DWR-2101 for some comparative performance benchmarks to give the 5G results some relatively

(Click to Enlarge)

D-Link DWR-2101 5G SIM Mobile Router – In-Built Speed Test

Next, I moved to the 802.11ax/WiFi 6 connection of the DWR-2101 to see how well it would perform and what speed/bandwidth would be provided to a WiFi 6 client device:

D-Link DWR-2101 5G SIM Mobile Router Performance Conclusion

Across all the tests, the D-Link DWR-2101 performed very well and in some cases surpassed expectations. In a future test, I will be utilizing significantly more clients. But even in these tests using a handful of devices, this 5G mobile router performed very well. The speeds I achieved are not challenging or surpassing the theoretical maximums of 1.6Gbps and 1.8Gbps, however, these are BANDWIDTH measurements and not the same as speed. Think of Bandwidth as the width of the pipe and Soeed as the amount of water and its pressure through that pipe. Ultimately, Amore advanced and high performance 5G coverage location (perhaps far more geographically close to a mast) would likely yield higher results.

D-Link DWR-2101 5G Wifi 6 Router Review – Conclusion

Overall, I am genuinely struggling to find things I do not like about the D-Link DWR-2101 mobile router. This kind of technology (5G and WiFi 6) are still pretty new and therefore as much as I do not like the price tag, this is to be expected – and still 50% less than the Netgear Nighthawk M5 alternative. The DWR-2101 delivers on its rather big promises and as long as you are definitely going to take advantage of the 5G, WiFi 6, Ethernet connectivity and mobile deployment of the D-Link mobile router (or at the very least plan on doing so in the next 12 months), then this is easily one fo the best mobile routers I have ever used and certainly gave my desktop/wired office router and ISP home router a run for their money. 

Certainly designed for Prosumers or working professionals that need fast internet on business trips (something that perhaps will return to form with more gusto in a post-pandemic world!), its hefty price tag will none the less still put some users off. Alongside this, those who are more used to the idea of a desktop router with its extendable/moveable antennae will be less enthused with the fixed internal antenna of the DWR-2101 – but THAT IS THE POINT. This is a mobile router for a mobile user. It is not designed to replace the router on your desk, but rather allow you to carry the internet in your pocket in a method and speed that has never really been possible till now. The design is a little plastic, but in terms of heat dissipation and portability, this is largely justified. In short – I am hugely impressed with the D-Link DWR-2101 mobile router.

 

Pros of the D-Link DWR-2101 5G Wifi 6 Router Cons of the D-Link DWR-2101 5G Wifi 6 Router
  • 5G SIM Router that can hit 160MB/s
  • Not SIM Locked
  • Portable WiFi 6 Support
  • Realtime Display on the Router is super handy and is touch screen
  • WPA3 Support
  • Features a VERY useful 1Gbe RJ45 LAN Port
  • USB-C Port can ALSO be used for Internet Pass-thru
  • Decent 5260 mAh of power (12-14hrs)
  • Supports up to 32 SSID shares (client devices)
  • In-built Internet Speed test via LCD screen
  • Port Forwarding, Firewall, DMZ and Mac Address Settings
  • Configuration can be access locally on screen, an App and via a desktop browser
  • Quite Expensive at $350-399
  • Internal Antenna aren’t quite as adaptable as external Antennae
  • Casing feels a little plastic’y

Check Availability and Prices on the D-Link DWR-2101 WiFi 6 & 5G Router Below

Thanks for reading. Do you still need help? Use the NASCompares Free Advice section here – https://nascompares.com/contact-us. It is my free, unbias community support system that allows you to ask me questions about your ideal setup. It is NOT a sales platform, NOT a way to push hardware you don’t need and, although it is just manned by me and might take a day or two for me to reply, I will help you any way I can.

 

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Mon avis sur le TP-Link WiFi Mesh Deco M9 Plus

24 avril 2021 à 09:00
Par : Korben

Ceux qui suivent mes péripéties en ligne, notamment sur mes lives Twitch savent que j’ai changé de maison, toujours sur Clermont-Ferrand. Contrairement à mon ancienne maison dans laquelle j’avais de l’Ethernet dans quasiment toutes les pièces, ici ce n’est pas le cas. J’ai quand même tiré quelques câbles dans les bureaux, mais pour le reste, je suis repassé en wifi.

Seulement voilà, les murs sont épais et la maison n’est pas assez petite pour que le routeur wifi s’en sorte tout seul. J’ai donc investi dans quelques répéteurs wifi. Et après quelques semaines d’utilisation, je peux enfin vous faire un retour sur ce que j’ai choisi.

Il s’agit d’un pack de 3 répéteurs wifi DECO 9 Plus de la marque TP-Link qui fonctionnent en mesh. C’est-à-dire qu’ils établissent un maillage wifi dans la maison en se connectant les uns aux autres, ce qui permet de proposer un seul réseau wifi stable, peu importe l’endroit de la maison où vous vous trouvez.

D’après la doc, 3 boitiers permettent ainsi de couvrir jusqu’à 450 m2, ce qui est vrai si vous avez des murs en placo, mais comme chez moi, les murs sont un peu plus épais, je suis en dessous de cette surface si je veux garder de bonnes perfs. Et comme j’ai la fibre, et bien ça se passe plutôt bien puisque ces boîtiers proposent du débit pouvant aller jusqu’à 2200 Mbit/s sur du réseau 2,4 Ghz et 5 Ghz, ce qui est parfait pour tout ce qui est streaming par exemple.

TP Link Deco M9 Plu

Comme vous pouvez le voir sur la photo, les boîtiers sont circulaires, plutôt plats, blancs et nécessitent une seule prise de courant, sauf pour le boîtier principal qui devra être également relié à la fibre. Chaque boiter mesh dispose également de 2 prises Ethernet, ce qui permet de brancher également du matériel en filaire.

Concernant l’installation, il faut disposer d’un smartphone et donc installer l’application assistant de TP-Link. On connecte un premier boitier en filaire à sa box, puis il n’y a plus qu’à brancher ensuite les autres boîtiers sur une prise de courant aux endroits stratégiques de son domicile et voilà. Y’a rien à faire en configuration… C’est hyper simple.

Maintenant au niveau des options, l’application permet d’avoir une liste de tous les appareils connectés aux différentes bornes et de voir le débit en live de chaque appareil. L’application DECO propose également l’ajout et le pilotage d’appareils domotiques (zigbee et Bluetooth) comme des ampoules ou des interrupteurs et comme c’est compatible avec Amazon Alexa, vous pouvez ainsi tout piloter à la voix de manière centralisée sans passer par 36 apps. Personnellement, je n’utilise pas du tout ces fonctions pour le moment.

Maintenant si vous avez des enfants, sachez que TP Link intègre une option de contrôle parental et également des options de chiffrement et de sécurité notamment avec l’intégration de l’antivirus Trend Micro gratuit pendant 3 ans. Il est également possible de configurer un réseau invité pour ceux qui reçoivent encore du monde chez eux. Lol.

Mais personnellement, l’option que j’adore c’est celle qui permet de faire de la QoS basique sur la connexion, c’est-à-dire de décider si oui ou non tel ou tel appareil est prioritaire sur le réseau en termes de débit. J’ai donc mis full patate à mon Amazon Fire Stick et à mon smartphone sans évidemment le dire aux autres usagers de ma fibre. Niark niark !

Au total, ce genre de boîtier (en 3 exemplaires) m’a permis de remplacer mon bon vieux retour plus mis à jour depuis 2017 (aïe) pour un gain de place certain et surtout une excellente couverture wifi chez moi. Et d’après les specs, on peut monter jusqu’à 60 appareils connectés en simultanée. Ça parait beaucoup, mais quand on sait que la moindre petite merde technologique est équipée de wifi de nos jours, ça grimpe assez vite. Le pack de 3 Deco M9 est trouvable pour un peu plus de 300 balles.

Voilà pour le petit retour matos. J’en suis super content. Je n’ai pas pris le plus gros modèle de TP-Link parce que je n’en avais pas forcément besoin et je trouvais ceux-là plus jolis. Le seul truc qui lui manque ce sont des petits trous en dessous pour pouvoir le fixer directement au mur. Mais bon, en imprimant un petit support en 3D ou en mettant un peu de scotch double face, ça doit pouvoir le faire.

Autrement, pour ceux qui ont un peu plus d’argent et qui veulent passer directement en Wifi 6, pour plus de débit, TP-Link commercialise aussi les Deco X60. Il y a également des packs un peu moins chers pour couvrir des surfaces plus ou moindre grandes sur la boutique TP-Link pour ceux qui veulent creuser les comparatifs.

MacBook Air M1 : Avis après 1 mois

28 avril 2021 à 07:00
Par : Fx

Macbook air M1 300x225 - MacBook Air M1 : Avis après 1 moisCela fait maintenant un peu plus d’un mois que j’utilise le MacBook Air M1. J’avais besoin de remplacer mon ancien PC (low-cost de 2017) sous Linux. J’ai profité d’une promotion sur Amazon et je vous livre aujourd’hui mes impressions… MacBook Air M1 Je ne suis pas un fan inconditionnel d’Apple comme certains peuvent l’être. Bien sûr, je suis l’actualité de la marque à la pomme, mais je ne scrute pas chaque annonce ou fuite d’information. Je ne cours pas non […]

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