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Synology 2023 NAS – Confirmed Releases, Rumours & Predictions

22 août 2022 à 08:19

Which Synology NAS Drives will we see in 2023?

Synology has quite an extensive portfolio of hardware and software solutions, build over two decades of research and development in the NAS industry. Now, as these solutions grow in popularity, some ranges in their portfolio are more popular than others (whilst others die off – farewell DS213air wireless NAS – we miss you) and every few years, the brand will refresh these systems with a new version (eg DSx20 > DSx21 > DSx23 , etc). Alongside these refreshes, Synology also introduces new hardware and reveals prototypes in their new/press events and today I want to discuss everything we know about the ‘Synology 2023’ release period (typically measured as September ’22 to August ’23). The following list will be periodically updated as new information appears and you can add your email address at the bottom of the page if you want to get immediate alerts when these updates arrive (no need to make any account etc, it’s just a notification tool). At the time of writing, so far we know about alot of rumoured desktop hardware for the plus series, some new AMD EPYC powered rackmounts, new larger HDDs in the brand’s lineup and rumours that continue to circulate about a new AX router and Cameras.

UPDATED 22/08/22 

New Synology AMD EPYC SA6400 and SA6200 Rackstation NAS

Synology has really been hitting the business/enterprise button hard in 2022, with several very high-profile top-tier solutions introduced into their portfolio (with rackmount/rackstation solutions seemingly getting the lion’s share of attention). Today I want to discuss a couple of new entries into the arguably less familiar ‘SA’ series, the highly storage scalable range of solutions from the brand that have tended to arrive with excellent internal hardware that is combined with an unparalleled level of storage expandability – with the newly uncovered Synology SA6400 and SA6200 rackmount solutions seemingly pushing things further than ever! Both systems arrive in 12-bay rackmount form, supporting SAS and SATA drive media (with Synology’s own HAT5300 and HAS5300 drive media being the recommended drive of course) and full support of DSM 7.1.

Model ID Synology SA6400 Rackstation Synology SA6200 Rackstation
Number of Bays 12x 3.5″/2.5″ 12x 3.5″/2.5″
Storage Interface SATA / SAS SATA / SAS
Expandable Yes, 8x RX1223RP 12-Bay Yes, 8x RX1223RP 12-Bay
CPU Model ID AMD EPYC 7272 v
Core Count 12x 8x
CPU Threads 24x 16x
CPU Frequency 2.9Ghz (3.2Ghz Burst) 3.1Ghz (3.2Ghz Burst)
CPUBenchmark Rating 26,446 17,017
Default Memory 32GB DDR4 ECC RDIMM 32GB DDR4 ECC RDIMM
Memory Frequency 3200Mhz 3200Mhz
Number of Memory Slots x16 x16
Maximum Supported Memory 1024GB (64GB x 16) 1024GB (64GB x 16)
1GbE Ports TBC TBC
10GbE Ports x2 x2
25GbE Ports TBC TBC
USB Ports TBC TBC
PCIe Slots TBC (However, this CPU supports upto PCIe4) TBC (However, this CPU supports upto PCIe4)
Expansion Ports 8x MiniSAS HD 8x MiniSAS HD

The SA6400 and SA6200 have yet to be confirmed as to whether they are refreshes of the later 2019 released SA3400 and SA3600 (as they were the original releases in this product family and therefore there is little to no data on the upgrade cycle for this series), however with certain components worldwide being subject to continued shortages, there is every possibility that these new SAS rackmounts are in response to this. Let’s discuss the information we have on these new Synology solutions.

Find out more about the new Synology SA6400 and Synology SA6200 Rackstation NAS in the FULL ARTICLE HERE.


Synology increase its HDD Range with the 18TB HAT5300-18T and HAS5300-18T Hard Drives

Synology has been providing its own branded range of hard drives and SSDs for a little over 2 and a half years now and it is surprising how ‘normal’ it seems now. Originally when the SAT5200, SNV3400/SNV3500 and HAT5300 ranges were launched, many (myself included) wondered what the uptake would be when Seagate and WD hold such dominance in this area. Fast forward to MID 2022 and enterprise/high-scale-business NAS user base has started to take them on board (a little because of changes in device compatibility, but also that the HDDs themselves, firmware upgraded Toshiba MG Enterprise drives), with the only major criticisms being that the pricing seems a tad high and the available capacities somewhat limited. Now, that first criticism is tough to counter, given the current hardware shortages globally AND the fact that these enterprise (not Pro) series drives are not in-hosue built, so the Toshiba middle ground is something of a hurdle in the profit margin no doubt). However, Synology HAVE been working on the range of capacities and alongside the original HAT5300-8T, HAT5300-12T and HAT5300-16T capacities, they introduced a modest 4TB in the spring of 2022 and now, an 18TB HAT5300-18T (using the Toshiba MG09 Drive). Now, it is also worth highlighting that Toshiba has been working on making a 20TB (MG10) drive commercially available, so expect this to get Synology HAT5300-20T adaption in the near future too, but below is how the 18TB compares with the rest of the range

Hardware Specifications HAT5300-4T

HAT5310-8T

HAT5300-12T

HAT5300-16T

HAT5310-18T

General Capacity 4 TB 8 TB 12 TB 16 TB 18 TB
Form Factor 3.5″ 3.5″ 3.5″ 3.5″ 3.5″
Interface SATA 6 Gb/s SATA 6 Gb/s SATA 6 Gb/s SATA 6 Gb/s SATA 6 Gb/s
Sector Size 512e 512e 512e 512e 512e
Performance Rotational Speed 7,200 rpm 7,200 rpm 7,200 rpm 7,200 rpm 7,200 rpm
Interface Speed 6.0 Gb/s, 3.0 Gb/s, 1.5 Gb/s 6.0 Gb/s, 3.0 Gb/s, 1.5 Gb/s 6.0 Gb/s, 3.0 Gb/s, 1.5 Gb/s 6.0 Gb/s, 3.0 Gb/s, 1.5 Gb/s 6.0 Gb/s, 3.0 Gb/s, 1.5 Gb/s
Buffer Size 256 MiB 256 MiB 256 MiB 512 MiB 512 MiB
Maximum Sustained Data Transfer Speed (Typ.) 243 MiB/s 248 MiB/s 242 MiB/s 262 MiB/s 268 MiB/s
Reliability Mean Time to Failure (MTTF) 2 million hours 2 million hours 2.5 million hours 2.5 million hours 2.5 million hours
Workload Rating 550 TB Transferred per Year 550 TB Transferred per Year 550 TB Transferred per Year 550 TB Transferred per Year 550 TB Transferred per Year
Warranty 5 Years 5 Years 5 Years 5 Years 5 Years
Power Consumption Supply Voltage 12 V (± 10%) / 5 V (+10/-7%) 12 V (± 10%) / 5 V (+10/-7%) 12 V (± 10%) / 5 V (+10/-7%) 12 V (± 10%) / 5 V (+10/-7%) 12 V (± 10%) / 5 V (+10/-7%)
Active Idle (Typ.) 4.07 W 5.61 W 4.25 W 4.00 W 4.16 W
Random Read / Write (4KB Q1) (Typ.) 7.76 W 9.29 W 7.83 W 7.63 W 8.35 W

We discussed the Synology HAT5300-18T 18TB drive in further detail over on the NASCompares YouTube channel in a ‘Data News of the Week’ video HERE on YouTube.


New Synology DS920+, DS223+ and DS723+ Prosumer/Premium NAS Drives

Now, we need to discuss the big guns! In summer 2022 I was sent through some rather intriguing information regarding plans for the Synology plus series refresh/follow-up to the 2020 range of Diskstations. Up until this point, Synology had made a point of (mostly) refreshing the Plus series of 2/4-bay systems every 2 years (DSx16+ > DSx18+ > DSx20+) and many (myself included) assumed a DS222+, DS922+, etc was largely inevitable. However, I was sent through some information on specifically planned entries into the plus series with an x23 model ID. These Plus series entries were a DS923+ expandable 4-Bay, DS723+ expandable 2-Bay and a mid-range prosumer DS223+ 2-Bay. Now, at the time of writing, theonly information that could be confirmed via the source was that these systems were indeed in the pipeline. Now, with such a small mount of information provided, I strongly recommend treating this one with a grain of salt, as alongside the unusual move for Synology to break it’s typical release cycle on the 2/4-Bay plus series (though not unheard of, look at the DS713+ or DS415+), Synology have a history of occasionally holding back a release to a better window of the year (DS620SLIM, DS1620xs and RS1221+ are all NAS drives that first appeared under a different model ID, before being delayed and re named inline with the later release schedule). As more information emerges on the new Synology Diskstation, the page will be updated AND the links below to each NAS’ respective rumormill page will also be updated. Click below to learn more, alongside our predictions (originally published 18th July ’22):

Click below to learn more (it will open in a new tab)


New Synology DS223 and DS223j Value Series NAS Drives

Alongside the Plus series Diskstations mentioned above, there was also reference to two cost-effective/value series 2-Bay NAS drives – the Synology DS223j and DS223. These would be follow-ups to the DS220j released in 2020 and the much older DS218 that was released way back in 2017/2018. Although at the time of writing, there is no concrete information on the internal hardware, we can certainly make an educated guess that it will be built on an ARM 64bit architecture, and non-upgradable memory, as these have been a staple of these respective series since…well..ever. Once again, as more information emerges on the new Synology value/budget Diskstations, the page will be updated AND the links below to each NAS’ respective rumor mill page will also be updated. Click below to learn more, alongside our predictions (originally published 19th July ’22):

Click below to learn more (it will open in a new tab)


New Synology RX1223RP 12 Bay Rackmount Expansion Chassis

When the new SA6400 and SA6200 SAS/SATA expandable rackmounts first appeared on my radar, it also became apparent that these systems would also be taking advantage of a new 12-bay expansion chassis, the RX1223RP. Typically expansion enclosures are refreshed in the Synology lineup less frequently than other hardware, as they are much more rudimentary in their architecture (typically every 4-5 years) in order to reflect changes in the available components as years pass (interface hardware or PSU, eg the DX1215II). Judging by available information online, it looks like this new expansion will be largely the same in design as its predecessor, the RX1217​/​RX1217RP and although isn’t the most exciting release for the Synology 2023 line up, it makes sense to release this alongside the SA6400/SA6200, which have the capability to support EIGHT of these 12-Bay expansions each.


Possible New Synology RT3000ax in the Works

Synology in late spring 2022 released a popular WiFi 6 into their portfolio (the RT6600ax) and it was made clear by the brand that it did not serve to replace the current RT2600ac or MR2200ac that has been around for several years now. However, rumours and trackable IDs are still being thrown around in the background of another router in development over at Synology, with the model identification RT3000ax or MR3000ax. It is still way too early to make any estimation of the hardware on this router, what its intended audience is (affordable alternative to the RT6600ax, WiFi 6e solution or 802.11ax upgrade of the existing mesh router from the brand), but it has been becoming clear that the development cycle for the RT6600ax was remarkably long (much longer than when it was first revealed at the end of 2021 and likely down to negotiations of 5.9Ghz access, as well as choosing the right release time). I am including this regularly appearing rumour here as it still persists and was even being spoken about before the release of the new prosumer model.


New Synology Standard/Regular NAS Hard Drives

Another subject that has never seemingly gone away or categorically denied by Synology is the development of non-enterprise-grade HDDs. As mentioned much earlier in this article, Synology has released several different hard drives in the last 2-3 years that are enterprise-geared (550TBW, 7200RPM/512MB Cache, etc) in the HAT5300 and HAS5300 range, but these drives are priced and scaled much more towards the highest tier of their portfolio. With Synology continuing on a path towards providing complete single-party solutions with memory modules, SSDs, PCIe cards and routers (in efforts to create single ecosystems for their users), it makes alot of sense that a mid-range/Pro hard drive would be entered into their line up. Much like the references to a new router or cameras, a standard class NAS HDD from Synology (HAT3300 / HAT3310 ?) is not a concrete piece of information, but half prediction and half based on the moves by the brand when asked on this matter. Additionally, the way that HDD compatibility on their official pages has been approached in recent months on newer releases (DS1522+, RS422+, DS2422+, etc) have drawn attention to drive media classes being selected quite specifically for each system tier. Threads and information on a Synology mid-range and/or home user server tier has never really stopped as a subject and aside from being a logical move by the brand and its portfolio, seems to have enough indications to be something the brand would review and/or develop.


Synology Branded Surveillance Cameras for NAS Use

The last rumour that persists in circulating about Synology is regarding surveillance cameras. Synology NAS has included an impressive, enterprise-class CCTV/NVR software known as Surveillance Station (ver.9 currently) for many, many years and alongside using the server storage to achieve footage, you can attach a wide variety of supported network cameras (IP Cameras) and devices that can be monitoring and controlled from the single live feed of SS9. In all that time, Synology has always been somewhat restrained in recommending a camera brand directly for use in conjunction with their surveillance platform. Although the software supports thousands of cameras from a wide variety of brands (as well as ONVIF cameras to a lesser degree), they tend to resist actually highlighting a specific brand as the go-to camera for home and/or business use. The closest to such a camera recommendation would be AXIS (with the brand having plug-on support in the platforms add-on tools area. However, it has been discussed/addressed at tradeshows and at via industry exchanges about a Synology Surveillance camera range. For a long time, it has been discussed (as well as the possibility of a Synology network switch), as unlike conflicts of interest between Synology HDD/SSD media and giants such as Seagate/WD, IP camera brands are not quite as dominant a presence in the world of servers and a NAS brand having a 1st party/NAS-System designed focus would be hugely advantageous. Add to that the fact that a Synology firmware-focused IP Camera would likely be more efficient in Surveillance Station 9, perhaps allowing more system-efficient hardware use for AI-powered processes (Deep Video Analysis and Smart Recognition in general) and also could be linked with the Camera License architecture – the idea certainly has merit for the brand. Very little is known about this, however, it still continues to crop up. Perhaps Synology has/have looked into this and (much like the SG1000 Network Gateway devices with SNM software) it has been shelved/delayed – there is nothing to go on at this time.


Synology FS3410 24-Bay Flashstation Xeon Rackmount Server

Synology has really been on a roll recently with revealing their 2022/2023 solutions, with 7-8 different solutions being unveiled and (for the most part) released in the last 3 months or so. The Synology RS3410 NAS that today’s article covers is the latest addition to the brand’s quiet but steadily growing Flashstation server series. Started more than four years ago, Synology has gradually added several desktop and rackmount solutions to this area of their portfolio and the FS3410 is the SECOND entry into this product family this year (the other being the FS2500 affordable 1U rackmount released much earlier in 2022). Although very similar to the rest of the enterprise solutions from Synology in terms of software (all arriving with DSM 7.1 and supporting the full range of features and services), the flashstation series is specifically aimed at SSD populate, flash storage practical applications and has a few NAND durability considerations thrown in for this more high performing but endurance aware media. This new flashstation server is designed to sit in the middle of the existing pack of FS systems (so, FS2500 > FS3410 > FS3600 > FS6400 Flashstation, scaling upwards) and arrives with support of SATA SSD media in the Synology SAT5200 and SAT5210 media range. Let’s discuss the hardware, compatibility, availability and pricing we will expect from the new Synology FS3410 Flash Rackmount server. Here is how the rest of the specifications of the Synology FS3410 pan out. It’s quite a solid build, 2U in height, Redundant PSU equipped and full depth.

PROCESSOR
Processor model Intel Xeon D-1541
Number of CPUs 1
processor architecture 64-bit
processor clock 8-core 2.1 (base frequency) / 2.7 (max overclock) GHz
Hardware Encryption Engine (AES-NI) YES
MEMORY
system memory 16 GB DDR4 ECC RDIMMs
Pre-installed memory modules 16 GB (16 GB x 1)
Total number of memory slots 4
Maximum memory capacity 128GB (32GB x 4)
STORAGE DEVICE
number of disk slots twenty four
Compatible Disk Types* (See All Supported Disks) 2.5″ SATA SSD
Disk hot-plug support YES
Remark
  • Synology only guarantees the full functionality, reliability, and performance of Synology hard drives listed in the compatibility list . The use of unauthenticated components may limit certain functions and result in data loss and system instability.
  • Compatible disk type refers to the type of hard disk that is confirmed to be compatible with the product after actual measurement, not the maximum speed limit of the hard disk slot.
EXTERNAL PORT
RJ-45 1GbE port* 4 (Support Link Aggregation / Failover)
RJ-45 10GbE port 2 (Support Link Aggregation / Failover)
management port 1
Maximum number of LAN ports 15
USB 3.2 Gen 1 port* 2
PCIE
PCIe expansion 2 x Gen3 x8 slots (x8 link)

You can learn more about the Synology FS3410 Rackstation Server in our video over on YouTube HERE.


 


 

 

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Synology – Nouveau disque dur 18 To (HAT5310-18)

1 août 2022 à 07:00
Par : Fx
Synology HAT5310 18T 300x225 - Synology - Nouveau disque dur 18 To (HAT5310-18)En toute discrétion, le fabricant de NAS Synology vient de mettre en ligne une nouvelle référence. Il s’agit d’un disque dur. Ce dernier fait partie de la gamme SATA et se nomme HAT5310-18. Ce disque offre une capacité de stockage de 18 To et serait à même d’atteindre les 274 Mo/s dans les transferts. Son prix : 745€ TTC… Synology HAT5310-18 Lors du lancement de sa gamme de disques durs, Synology proposait 3 références de 8 To, 12 To et […]

Synology HAT5300 4 To, un nouveau disque pour entreprise

11 juillet 2022 à 07:00
Par : Fx
synology HAT5300 300x225 - Synology HAT5300 4 To, un nouveau disque pour entrepriseComme vous le savez peut-être déjà, le fabricant de NAS Synology propose également des disques durs et des SSD. La gamme de disques durs SATA au format 3,5 pouces est apparue en février 2021 avec trois capacités de stockage : 8, 12 et 16 To. Le constructeur a récemment lancé une nouvelle référence HAT5300-4T, un disque de 4To. Synology HAT5300-4T Pour rappel, Synology s’est associé avec le constructeur Toshiba pour co-construire des disques durs pour ses NAS. Il s’agit de […]

WD Red Pro vs Seagate Ironwolf Pro vs Synology HAT5300 Hard Drives – Which Should You Buy in 2022/2023?

6 juillet 2022 à 01:02

Seagate Ironwolf or WD Red or Synology HAT5300 HDDs – Best for your NAS?

Choosing the right hard drive media to go inside your Network Attached Storage (NAS) server can be a lot more complicated than you might think. A long time ago (about 20 years at least) buying hard drives was much easier, as the technology was significantly less evolved. The difference between one hard drive and another could be the capacity, physical, size or the interface – that is about it! But much like any other kind of technology, over time hardware designers were able to improve it, make it more efficient, increase the storage, speed up the access and all the while sticking with the same 3.5″ physical scale. The result of all this development was that tailored/designed drives arrived that were geared internally towards specific tasks (thereby allowing designers to focus the HDDs development towards one specialization more than others). Fast forward to 2022/2023 and you find that the HDD market is considerably more diverse and brands have much more layered portfolios of drives and one big, BIG area of hard disk development was with NAS/Server HDD media. These are drives that are designed to be on 24×7, be prepared to spin up very quickly with little notice, be better suited to being deployed in larger quantities together (i.e RAID configurations made up of many drives) and all the while combating vibration and increased temperatures to maintain a healthy and stable level of use at all times. Today I want to look at three hard drives that are designed for large-scale NAS deployment (such as 8-24-bay rackmount and 8-12+ bays desktop NAS systems), as all three are the current popular choice for this kind of NAS system. There are the long-established HDD vendor drives, the WD Red Pro series and Seagate Ironwolf Pro range, and there is the NAS-brand labelled Synology HAT5300 series (built on Toshiba MG06/06/08 Enterprise series, but with Synology firmware in services included). With a new generation of NAS Hardware arriving from Synology in 2022/2023, as well as a change in support and compatibility listings by the brand in several of their releases, now is a very good time to take a look at how these three NAS HDDs compare in design, utility, performance and value. With WD and Seagate having a considerable amount of history in their Red Pro and Ironwolf Pro ranges respectively in the NAS industry, many users are still unsure about the Synology HAT5300 and whether they should make the switch, design its shift in architecture towards a more enterprise build (arguable closer to Ultrastar and Seagate EXOs, than Red or Ironwolf). Let’s take a closer look at these three drives and hopefully help you decide which one deserves your data!

WD Red Pro vs Seagate Ironwolf Pro vs Synology HAT5300 – Capacity

Let’s be honest, next to ‘price’, the overall capacity of a hard drive is going to be of importance to the majority of NAS buyers. Yes, you can take advantage of RAID and multi-bay NAS systems in order to bolster the available capacity available to you (as well as the redundancy and performance of course), but you are still going to need to factor in the capacity on offer. The Synology HAT5300, WD Red Pro and Seagate Ironwolf Pro series all arrive in multiple capacity versions (with prices scaling appropriately of course) and you will find that as the drives increase in capacity, their internal hardware and design get decidedly beefier. That said, it would be remiss not to highlight that Synology and their HAT5300 (and HAS5300 SAS drives, which we will not really factor in this comparison) have not been in the market as long as WD/Seagate and although they have made a solid start in presenting a portfolio of HDD and SSD drives, the range of capacities on offer from the HA5300 range is pretty sparse. Just to give you a little perspective on this, here is how the three HDDs compare in available drives on offer:

Capacity Synology HAT5300

WD Red Pro

Seagate Ironwolf Pro

1TB
2TB
 ✔ ✔
4TB ✔  ✔ ✔
6TB  ✔ ✔
8TB ✔  ✔ ✔
10TB  ✔ ✔
12TB ✔  ✔ ✔
14TB  ✔ ✔
16TB ✔  ✔ ✔
18TB  ✔ ✔
20TB  ✔ ✔
22TB  ✔ (Revealed but release TBC) ✔ (Revealed but release TBC)

As you can see, the WD Red Pro and Seagate Ironwolf Pro drives current provide 10 different capacities from 2TB to 20TB for PRO NAS deployment (with the 22TB versions of their respective ranges announced and arriving soon). This does not include the non-pro versions of these series (won’t touch on these further, but worth highlighting) and with that, a NAS Buyer can scale their budget quite well across multiple bays and their budget. For example, a user could opt for 4x 10TBs in a RAID 5 and get 30TB of usable space, or instead opt for 8x 6TB drives in a RAID 6 and get 36TB – this allows a buyer to spend more of their budget towards the NAS hardware than the drive media, or visa-versa. Now, Synology only currently provide 4 different capacities (with the 4TB drive being added in mid-2022) and although it makes sense that the brand would want to develop in this area in a wave-by-wave release strategy (continuing to invest and develop as the series is embraced), for many the lack of smaller capacities AND the lack of the 18TB and 20TB tier is a little problematic. Toshiba recently unveiled their MG09 18TB Enterprise HDD and in a recent roadmap reveal, plans for 20TB and 22TB HDDs in the next 12 months, but right now it is impossible to ignore that in terms of available capacities, the WD Red Pro and Seagate Ironwolf Pro and considerably more fleshed out in their respective ranges.

WD Red Pro vs Seagate Ironwolf Pro vs Synology HAT5300 – Price

Alongside capacity, the price tag that the Synology HAT5300, WD Red Pro and Seagate Ironwolf Pro hard drives arrive with is going to be a big continuing factor on which one populates your large-scale NAS server. Although all three brands have their RRPs stated on their respective product pages, there have been several factors in the last 12-24 months (the pandemic, the rise and decline of chia crypto, semiconductor shortages, droughts in Taiwan, trade wars, actual wars and more) than have led to supply levels of large scale HDDs to be significantly reduced. Unsurprisingly, this has resulted in the price points for these hard disks to significantly increase (often a noticeable degree above the original RRP). As each HDD capacity in the WD, Seagate and Synology series’ have their own price based on the internal hardware to support that much data, comparing their price is a little tricky. Additionally, prices and availability differ quite wildly between countries, as stock levels and the ease of the supply chain are being affected differently by the factors mentioned earlier related to shortages. So, below I have listed the prices of each brand’s drives. Note – these prices are calculated at how much per Terabyte (TB) and in order to keep it fair, I have picked the newest/largest drive from each brand as the price average (as smaller drives have a typically less accurate series-wide price per TB overall). I picked Newegg, SCAN and Amazon.de for the prices, as they had pricing AND stock of all drive capacities on all brands in stock at the time of writing for each region and therefore gave a more accurate market pricing for comparison (14/06/22 – date of writing):

Region / eShop Synology HAT5300

WD Red Pro

Seagate Ironwolf Pro

Newegg (US) – avg price per TB $39 per TB $26 per TB $25.45 per TB
SCAN (UK) – avg price per TB £38 per TB £31.90 per TB £27.20 per TB
Amazon (DE) – avg price per TB €46.81 per TB €38.90 per TB €31.45 per TB

The price of the Seagate Ironwolf Pro series is noticeably lower than both the WD Red Pro and Synology HAT5300 (especially in Germany and other parts of Europe) and although these prices are an average based on the largest current available drive from each brand, if you look at the lower capacities you will find that this average price per TB is still pretty accurate throughout. The WD Red Pro is reasonably proved and on offer periodically (not quite as often as the Seagate admittedly) and in the US is much more competitively priced. The Synology HAT5300 series however is consistently the highest price of the three. Now, it needs to be factored in that the design and durability of the HAT5300 (as mentioned earlier) are much more comparable to that of the Seagate EXOs and WD Ultrastar series of HDDs for data centers, which no doubt affects the price. Equally, unlike Seagate and WD who produce their HDDs internally, the Synology HAT5300 is built on Toshiba MG06/MG07/MG08 and no doubt that results in Synology having to factor in an additional profit margin into their production and sale. We WILL be shortly discussing how this more enterprise design AND the Synology NAS universal selling points benefit this drive over the WD Red Pro and Seagate Ironwolf Pro drives, but when it comes to price point, it definitely goes Seagate 1st, WD 2nd and Synology in 3rd.

WD Red Pro vs Seagate Ironwolf Pro vs Synology HAT5300 – Hardware

As mentioned in the introduction, NAS hard drives are the result of HDD development improving over the years and then splintering into multiple specialised storage deployments (eg surveillance needing heavy write, cold storage needing endurance, laptops needing low power use and NAS servers needing 24×7 use). The Synology HAT5300, WD Red Pro and Seagate Ironwolf Pro drives are all very, VERY much designed with heavy-duty NAS deployment in mind and although you CAN use them in smaller systems and even desktop PCs, it would be a tremendous waste of their utility and design (like using a chainsaw to cut a slice of bread). Now all three branded drives have specialised internal hardware/firmware that maintains the drive in particularly vigorous and large-scale deployments (all the way up to 24 bays and higher), so I won’t really be giving any one brand an advantage for vibration, temperature, balance or spin up/spin down utility – all three of the Synology HAT5300, WD Red Pro and Seagate Ironwolf Pro have their own specialized components inside for this that it would be extremely difficult to compare one way or another here. The fact they have them is good enough for me. However, this is certainly going to be where the more enterprise design of the HAT5300 will stand out against the Pro design of the WD Red and Seagate Ironwolf:

Hardware Synology HAT5300

WD Red Pro

Seagate Ironwolf Pro

Balance Control ✔ ✔ ✔
Vibration Sensors & Control ✔ ✔ ✔
Max Transfer Speed (best of range) 272MB/s 272MB/s 285MB/s
CMR (y/n) ✔ ✔ ✔
Seal Method Helium Sealed Helium Sealed Helium Sealed
Platters 9x 9x 9x
RPM (max in range) 7200 7200 7200
Cache 512MB 512MB + OptiNAND Flash 256MB
Workload Rating/Durability 550TBW per yr 300TBW per yr 300TBW per yr
On/Off Cycles 600K 600K 600K
MTBF (hours) M=Million 2.5M 1M 1.2M
Warranty 5years 5years 5years

Now, the officially reported transfer speed of each drive is not something we are going to dwell on. 1) the difference is tiny, 2) different scale/power/RAID configs will result in varied transfer rates and 3) I have personally tested all three and even in sustained Read/Write activity, they ALL hit 260-207MB/s consistently. However, we DO need to discuss durability and on-board caching. The Synology HAT5300 arrives with a SIGNIFICANT increase in its durability rating, with almost DOUBLE the annual workload rating (eg how many Terabytes the drive can have written and re-written per year) compared with the Seagate and WD HDDs. This also means that the drive has a significantly higher mean time between failure (i.e expected failure rate between deployment>drive-dies>replacement) at more than double. Now, although a lot of durability and sustained use is why Synology seemingly opted for the Toshiba MG series as the base for their branded drive series, but the drive also has Synology specialised firmware onboard. This results in two key benefits to Synology NAS users. The first is that the drive can have it’s specific spin, cache, access and load cycles tailed to Synology NAS system operations, whereas Seagate and WD have to be a little more open in their firmware to suit ‘all’ NAS servers. Pretty much all modern NAS drives run on one form of Linux or another (as well as TrueNAS of course, let’s not overlook FreeBSD etc) but this more precise firmware gearing in the HAT5300 means it will likely always be the most efficient drive for Synology NAS of the bunch. The other benefit of the HAT5300 in Synology NAS deployment is that the drive’s onboard firmware can be updated via the Synology DSM user interface and storage manager (without powering the device down), whereas the WD and Seagate HDDs require you to remove drives individually from the system (and RAID Pool of course if already in use) and update the firmware via a PC/Docking station. Although HDD firmware updates are much, much less frequent than many other types of technology and typically very small improvements, this is still something that the more data storage savvy user will want to stay on top of.

The Seagate and WD Drives on the other hand are considerably similar, with both drives having 7200RPM, 300TB annual workload and quite comparable MTBF. However, the WD Red Pro drive pulls ahead thanks to its 512MB of memory on the largest capacities and (more importantly) its inclusion of WD’s new OptiNAND technology. This is a recently developed HDD design choice (being included in their larger tiers currently and likely continuing into the 22TB+ tier) where alongside the nine platters of storage, the drive also features a small area of flash storage on board that is designed to store metadata and other indexing data using by the connected client system. Not to be confused with hybrid drives (optical drives that featured a decent-sized chunk of SSD space for the likes of an OS for large-scale caching), OptiNAND means that important table and micro-associated data that the drive needs to consult when the bulk of the platter houses data is accessed is accessible much, much more quickly and when drives are getting to this large scale of 18-20TB of storage, these increases can make a small but important difference. The Seagate Ironwolf Pro SSD is still an excellent drive, but leases out to WD and Synology’s branded drive, as the other drives have a largely better hardware offering included.

WD Red Pro vs Seagate Ironwolf Pro vs Synology HAT5300 – Noise

If you have EVER worked with larger-scale HDDs and enterprise-grade drive media (not just these three HDDs, but the EXOS, Ultrastar and Gold series too), then you will know that these drives can be particularly noisy. This noise stems from the larger drive needing more horsepower under the bonnet to hit that expected Read/Write performance levels sporadically – something that is particularly important when it comes to large population NAS/Server use being 24×7. The result is that these Pro and Enterprise drives will vibrate more than most, hum loudly when in operation and continuously click with the rapid movement of the arm/actuator inside as it has to rapidly access a large number of internal platters. We have discussed this at length on NASCompares previously over on YouTube and you can check out examples embedded below of noise testing that was performed on all three HDDs (you can open them in a separate TAB if you click the title or watch in the browser:

Synology HAT5300 Noise Test WD Red Pro Nosie Testing Seagate Ironwolf Pro Noise Testing

Now, the impact of noise in your home or business NAS environment is tremendously subjective. As these three drives are all too often designed for deployment in 8-12 bay desktops and 16-24 bay rackmounts (both largely metal chassis), the result is that in most cases you will NOT be able to hear the NAS HDD, as it will be drowned out by the noise of the multiple high RPM fans on the NAS or their impact on the metal chassis. However, if you plan on deploying these Pro/Enterprise drives in systems with LESS than 8-Bays and plan on being in the same room as the system, then you will DEFINITELY hear them. In order to test these drives, I took a large-scale, 9-platter version of the Synology HAT5300, WD Red Pro and Seagate Ironwolf Pro, then installed them in a modest 4-Bay NAS (as this would largely eliminate the fan noise and multiplying factor of a metal chassis) and instead opted for the largely plastic DS920+ NAS. The noise level was recorded using a phone+microphone 20cm from the DS920+ The drives were recorded during a ‘Benchmark Test’ selected in the DSM 7.1 Storage Manager, over 25-30 seconds, Below were the results:

Synology HAT5300

WD Red Pro

Seagate Ironwolf Pro

As you can see, the difference between them was very, very small and the Seagate and Synology were similarly noisy (though even then at this db(A) range, this is still very small. Overall, I don’t think you can choose between the Synology HAT5300, Seagate Ironwolf Pro or WD Red Pro in terms of noise, as they are all ultimately very noisy drives when in single/RAID deployment regardless.

WD Red Pro vs Seagate Ironwolf Pro vs Synology HAT5300 – Verdict

Overall, the Synology HAT5300 is still the most enduring hard drive here (thanks to that enterprise tier design) and the one that will likely be the most useful in a Synology enterprise NAS drive deployment (factoring in that firmware, ease of update and potential for bundle deals). However, it is still a much, MUCH more expensive drive that is available in fewer capacities and still only hits 16TB at the time of recording. In terms of getting the job DONE, the WD Red might not be the lowest price, but with its onboard flash in the larger capacities, a larger amount of onboard cache, fastest reported warranty turnaround and larger variety of smaller capacities that cover both Pro and normal, the WD Red Pro is the middle ground choice that ticks all the boxes and will be the one you know will shut up and do the job! The Seagate Ironwolf is by FAR the best value for money, with the best price point in and out of special offers, as well as inclusive three YEARS of data recovery services thrown in, Health management software onboard and almost always releasing the biggest capacity drives first (and at the best price) – the Seagate Ironwolf Series is the most accessible and storage services choice in 2022.

Synology HAT5300

WD Red Pro

Seagate Ironwolf Pro

  • Synology NAS Firmware
  • Fewer Synology NAS Support tickets raised with the brand with HAT5300 drives vs 3rd Party Drive Setups
  • HDD/SSD Firmware Can be updated within Synology DSM without system power off or disconnecting HDD.
  • Bulk Buying & NAS+Media Business purchases are much more likely to get discounts or savings via Deal Registration with Synology Distributors
  • Warranty/Support/Officially Supported Use only in Synology Hardware
  • Higher Price Point per TB
  • Fewer Capacity Options
  • All modern/standard capacities are available
  • Non-Pro Drives are also available
  • Good Reputation online (aside from the SMR business)
  • Faster Warranty Replacement turnaround reported online
  • OptiNAND (onboard flash module) mean that vital metadata and microdata is available FASTER
  • Wide NAS Hardware Compatibility
  • Less Competitive Pricing outside of seasonal Promos (Black Friday, Prime Day etc)
  • WD Red Pro vs WD Gold vs Ultrastar overlap can be confusing without deep-diving into data sheets
  • Seagate Ironwolf Health Management onboard to add to existing drive health and S.M.A.R.T tests + Interface available in almost all NAS Brand GUI to config easily
  • 3yrs of free Rescue Data Recovery Services (fully featured with multiple data recovery  delivery options, forensic and mechanical recovery included)
  • Lower Price point on all capacities overall
  • Non-Pro drive options
  • Regularly on offer
  • Higher Power consumption on average
  • Noisiest overall (when you factor in ALL capacities) in operation

If you want to check the price and availability of HDDs in your region, you can visit one of the retailers listed below. Clicking these links will result in a small % of whatever you spend going back to NASCompares, which will allow us to keep making great content. Thank you



*Stats come from Synology themselves upon request, see this article on Synology HDDs in 2022 HERE

 

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