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PS5 SSD Comparison 2022 – Seagate Firecuda 530 vs WD Black SN850 vs Samsung 980 Pro vs Sabrent Rocket 4 Plus

28 février 2022 à 02:23

PS5 Loading Comparison of the WD Black SN850, Seagate Firecuda 530, Samsung 980 and Sabrent Rocket 4 Plus SSD


The Playstation 5 has had the support of SSD storage upgrades now for the better part of half a year and in that time, ALOT of different SSDs have arrived on the scene that make promises to be your PERFECT PS5 SSD upgrade. However, despite all of these more modern releases, there are still four SSDs that arrived on the scene BEFORE sony enabled the SSD expansion feature of the PS5 that are among the very best performing SSDs in the system right now. These are the Samsung 980 Pro (released in Autumn 2020), the WD Black SN850 (also released in Autumn 2020), the Sabrent Rocket 4 Plus (released in winter 2020/2021) and finally the Seagate Firecuda 530 (released in summer 2021). These four SSDs are not only easily the most popular SSDs for PS5 SSD upgrades among the majority of gamers, but they also bring different unique qualities each that make the stand out – Value, Price, Durability and IOPs (more understandable as the reactivity in practice). I have discussed these four SSDs several times on NASCompares and on the NC YouTube channel, but now in 2022 with so many different options in the market to choose from, do these SSDs still cut the mustard? And if they do, which one does the best job? Let’s compare these SSDs in PS5 performance.


Note – I compared these four SSDs last year when the PS5 SSD expansion option was enabled and you can find my first wave of tests below:


PS5 SSD Faceoff I (video)- WD Black SN850 vs Seagate Firecuda 530 vs Samsung 980 vs Sabrent Rocket 4 Plus SSD


PS5 SSD Faceoff II (video)- WD Black SN850 vs Seagate Firecuda 530 vs Samsung 980 vs Sabrent Rocket 4 Plus SSD


PS5 SSD Faceoff ALL (article)- WD Black SN850 vs Seagate Firecuda 530 vs Samsung 980 vs Sabrent Rocket 4 Plus SSD

Test 1 – Spiderman Miles Morales #1


A PS5 launch title, this test comprised of seeing which SSD loaded the game world (from the title screen) the fastest. The difference was INCREDIBLY small and came down to the frame!



Winner – Samsung 980 Pro, 03:966 Seconds

Test 2 – Spiderman Miles Morales #2


Sticking with Spiderman Miles Morales, the next test is an in-game world load, fast travelling to another part of the open world. Again, a very quick load and all four SSDs were incredibly close.



Winner – DRAW, Samsung 980 PRO / Seagate Firecuda 530, 04.166 Seconds (less than a single frame between them)

Test 3 – Lego Worlds


Switching back to a PS4 title, I selected Lego Worlds as it is a surprisingly long loading game for the previous generation that (despite the PS5’s increased power and NVMe SSD performance) is quite a demanding game to load into its open world, sandbox mode. Each test for a completely fresh, randomized sandbox mode without internet connectivity involved. I measured this (as it is a dynamic loading screen) at which SSD hit 100% asset loading first.



Winner – WD Black SN850, 25:087 Seconds (Seagate Firecuda 530 shortly afterwards)

Test 4 – Deathloop


Released in late 2021, Deathloop is a fast-paced game that is semi-open-world and prioritized its framerate and colourful assets. This test was direct from title screen load and into an early stage of the game. Loading was compared from the immediate load screen (as the title screen animation can vary)



Winner – WD Black SN850, 07.050 Seconds (Sabrent Rocket 4 Plus shortly after)

Test 5 – CALL OF DUTY WARZONE


A very popular game on all platforms, Call of Duty Warzone is a very tough game to test as it is ‘always-online’ and cannot be played without a server connection that is hit every time any action is performed at the title screen/menus. This test tried to remove as much of the server connection as possible, using bots only training match, but still had server connections that could not be avoided (so these should be taken into account). Loading was deemed ‘completed’ when you had character control (existing aircraft immediately as the option appeared for control)



Winner – Seagate Firecuda 530, 01:13:085 Minutes (WD Black Closely behind)

Test 6 – SPIDERMAN PS5 REMASTERED #1


The next test was very similar to tests 1 and 2, but this time with Spiderman, remastered for the PS5 using the Miles Morales engine upgrades, and the initial test was once again measuring the time it took the game to load into the world from the title screen. Once again, incredible close and came down to the frame and took less that 2-3 seconds across the four.



Winner – Seagate Firecuda 530, 01:854 Seconds

Test 7 – SPIDERMAN PS5 REMASTERED #2


Back to Spiderman Remaster for a 2nd test. A fast/travel test ‘in world’ much like the test with Spiderman M/M. Once again, lightning-fast loading was the order of the day.



Winner – Sabrent Rocket 4 Plus, 03.839 Seconds

Test 8 – Ghost of Tsushima: Legends #1


The next test was using the PS5 version (Directors cut) of Ghost of Tsushima. Using the Legends mode, I was able to set up two different instances of direct-to-game world loading from the main menu. Each test transition ALSO includes an opening world overview cut scene that includes in-world assets (i.e silent background loading with the player watching fixed views), so ‘full’ loading in both instances was judged at the point when the player was given character movement control (the fade-in-effect). The first test, focusing on a tightly knit but graphically detailed area, went like this:



Winner – TIE, Samsung 980 PRO and Sabrent Rocket 4 Plus, 27:774 Seconds

Test 9 – Ghost of Tsushima: Legends #2


Moving on to test two of Ghost of Tsushima, legends mode, this was another open-world area that has an enormous amount of NPCs to factor in and a larger area. Results were as follows:



Winner – Three-way Tie, Samsung 980 PRO, WD Black SN850 and Seagate Firecuda 530, 39:164 Seconds

Test 10 – ROCKET LEAGUE


Another popular multi-platform game, the next test used Rocket League. A single exhibition match test, using bots 4v4, this was never going to be a particularly taxing test but included because this is such a popular game for many.



Winner – Sabrent Rocket 4 Plus, 06:654 Seconds (but only a few frames ahead of all other SSDs)

Test 11 – LAST OF US PART 2 #1


Arriving at the tail end of the PS4 generation’s place as the top gen, Last of Us Part II is an incredibly hefty game (in terms of performance and graphics) and this is achieved with incredibly subtle use of silent/background loading throughout the game’s campaign and also a substantial title-screen to game loading time (one of the loading games of its generation with only the likes of GTA V and RDR2 in the same league). A massive combination of heavy chunks of data and a horrendously large number of smaller files. Put that all together and you have a bit of a loading nightmare for lesser SSDs! Two tests were conducted on Last of Us Part II with these SSDs. The first test featured an incredibly closed in area of the game that cannot afford the luxury of exchanging high-quality textures and assets in favour of lower ones (typically accessible via fixed camera work or distance management). Here is how it turned out in the SSD comparison.



Winner – Samsung 980 PRO, 46.654 Seconds (it loaded ALOT faster and although the difference was negligible in repeated tests, it still was the fastest each time)

Test 12 – LAST OF US PART 2 #2


The 2nd test of The Last of Us Part 2 was in a significantly more open area that on the one had afforded the game the luxury of loading out assets in favour of lesser ones that were unseen/far away, but also had a larger base level of assets to load in initially from the title screen load. Here is how the WD Black SN850, Seagate Firecuda 530, Samsung 980 Pro and Sabrent Rocket 4 Plus SSD compared:



Winner – TIE, Seagate Firecuda 530 and Sabrent Rocket 4 Plus, 01:36.638 Minutes


So, those were the tests, let’s tally up the results! No ‘half points’ in the case of a tie/draw, as even if two or more SSDs loaded at the same pace, it is still a win for both!


Note – If you want to check out the continuous testing of the WD Black SN850, Seagate Firecuda 530, Samsung 980 and Sabrent Rocket 4 Plus SSD for PS5, we have been testing these four SSDs (and many others) over on our YouTube Channel. If you want to check out the playlist for each SSD below, you can use one of the 4 links here.


Click to load the respective video playlist in another tab/window:


Seagate Firecuda 530 PS5 SSD Playlist


WD Black SN850 PS5 SSD Playlist


Samsung 980 Pro PS5 SSD Playlist


Sabrent Rocket 4 Plus PS5 SSD Playlist

WD Black SN850, Seagate Firecuda 530, Samsung 980 Pro and Sabrent Rocket 4 Plus SSD Comparison – The Results


Going through the results, we are able to see that the overall winners on points are the Seagate Firecuda 530 and Samsung 980 Pro SSDs. Also, they were notably similar in the games they succeeded at (a lot of ties/draws).



Samsung 980 Pro – 5


Seagate Firecuda 530 – 5


Sabrent Rocket 4 Plus – 4


WD Black SN850 – 3


 

TOP 4 Recommended PS5 Storage Expansion Compatible SSDs

WD Black SN850


Seagate Firecuda 530


Samsung 980 Pro


SABRENT Rocket 4 Plus


500GB – $169.99

1TB – $249.99


2TB – $549.99

500GB – $149.99

1TB – $239.99


2TB – $489.99


4TB – $949.99.

250GB – $69.99

500GB – $119.99


1TB – $199.99


2TB – $429.99

1TB – $200

2TB – $469.99


4TB – $999.99


If you are interested in learning more, I have reviewed all four of these SSDs here on NASCompares and a lot with a barrage of PS5 tests for this article, the reviews have all featured around 16 different PC benchmark tests via CrystalDisk, ATTO, AS SSD and AJA performance. Find out more below.

SPEED - 9/10
HARDWARE - 9/10
PERFORMANCE - 9/10
PRICE - 7/10
VALUE - 9/10


8.6
PROS
👍🏻Highest PCIe 4×4 M.2 Performance Right Now
👍🏻176 Layer 3D TLC NAND is Unparalleled right now
👍🏻
👍🏻Best Example of Phison E18 Performance
👍🏻
👍🏻Highest Endurance PCIe Gen 4×4 M.2 SSD Right Now
👍🏻
👍🏻Inclusive Data Recovery Services
👍🏻
👍🏻PS5 Compatibility Fully Confirmed
👍🏻
👍🏻Available in up to 4TB
CONS
👎🏻Costs more than most
👎🏻Heatsink is an Additional Purchase
SPEED - 8/10
HARDWARE - 8/10
PERFORMANCE - 8/10
PRICE - 9/10
VALUE - 9/10


8.4
PROS
👍🏻FINALLY, a first-party heatsink for the Samsung 980 Pro
👍🏻One of the first PS5 Expansion Compatibility confirmed SSDs
👍🏻
👍🏻Performance still stands up well in 2022 (almost 1.5yrs since original release)
👍🏻
👍🏻Impressively dense NAND for one of the earliest gen PCIe 4 SSDs still
👍🏻
👍🏻Still has some of the highest 4K Random IOPS in the market
👍🏻
👍🏻Very, VERY good temperature reports in PC use during sustained use
👍🏻
👍🏻Very Good Pricing Now
CONS
👎🏻Heat dissipation in a PS5 environment was not as good as I hoped (PS5 closed bay design at fault really)
👎🏻Traditional Write performance, even at 2TB, looks a little lacklustre against the competition in 2022
👎🏻
👎🏻Still no 4TB version commercially available
SPEED - 8/10
HARDWARE - 8/10
PERFORMANCE - 8/10
PRICE - 9/10
VALUE - 9/10


8.4
PROS
👍🏻High Availability Worldwide
👍🏻
👍🏻One of the first PS5 Expansion Compatibility confirmed SSDs
👍🏻
👍🏻Performance still stands up well in 2022 (almost 1.5yrs since original release)
👍🏻
👍🏻Impressively dense NAND for one of the earliest gen PCIe 4 SSDs still
👍🏻
👍🏻Still has some of the highest 4K Random IOPS in the market
👍🏻
👍🏻Very Good Pricing Now
👍🏻
👍🏻Regular Firmware updates
CONS
👎🏻Heat dissipation in a PS5 environment was not as good as I hoped (PS5 closed bay design at fault really)
👎🏻
👎🏻Traditional Write performance, even at 2TB, looks a little lacklustre against the competition in 2022
👎🏻
👎🏻Still no 4TB version commercially available
SPEED - 9/10
HARDWARE - 8/10
PERFORMANCE - 9/10
PRICE - 8/10
VALUE - 8/10


8.4
PROS
👍🏻Genuinely Impressive Performance
👍🏻One of the Affordable 7,000MB/s Drive on the Market
👍🏻
👍🏻PS5 Compatibility Confirmed
👍🏻
👍🏻Decent Amount of DDR4 Memory Cache
👍🏻
👍🏻96 Layer 3D TLC NAND Hugely Beneficial
👍🏻
👍🏻One of the Earliest Phison E18 SSDs
👍🏻
👍🏻Surpasses Samsung/WD PCIe 4 SSDs in some key areas
CONS
👎🏻IOPS rating is noticeably lower than most competitors
👎🏻Endurance (DWPD/TBW) has dipped noticeably since it’s predecessor
👎🏻
👎🏻Still Outperformed by the Firecuda 530
👎🏻
👎🏻Warranty (1yr unless registered) seems needlessly complex

 

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PNY XLR8 PS5 Designed SSD Heatsink Review – Cool Stuff?

2 janvier 2022 à 15:00

The PNY XLR8 PS5 SSD Heatsink Review

When PNY announced they were releasing a PS5 designed SSD heatsink for their gamer XLR8 range, they did so into a market that just half a year ago would have been completely devoid of competition! It has been quite an educational period for many PS5 owners in the last 6 months, as they begin to get to grips with understanding a new and high-performance tier of storage in M.2 NVMe SSDs. Indeed, the learning curve for some console gamers who chose this gaming platform for its ease of use has been notably higher than most and although the range of solutions available for PS5 compatible storage is pretty wide and easy, the necessity of purchasing a heatsink and understanding what makes one better than another is a different story entirely. These new PCIe NVMe SSDs get hot, quite worryingly hot (under excessive use) and it is for that reason that whether you are a PS5 or PC user, it is highly advised that you employ a means of removing the heat from the SSD in an as efficient way as possible – namely, heatsinks. These are metal plates (arriving in aluminium, copper and more) that draw the heat away from the SSD components and then release that heat into the surrounding air. So, what makes a PS5 specific designed one different? Well, that is largely down to the architecture of the console itself and internal cooling is conducted. In a PC, the M.2 SSD will be in a much larger area that has active fan cooling surrounding it, therefore a more modest and generic M.2 heatsink (for as little as $8-10) is sufficient for general use. However, with the PS5, the m.2 expansion storage bay is in a remarkably tight, close slot. This is done to ensure that the console can draw air through its vents (using negative pressure in a closed casing) and ensure highly efficient system cooling at all times. This all means that an SSD heatsink for the PS5 has a very different physical space and surrounding directional airflow to work around. And here is where the PNY XLR8 PS5 SSD heatsink arrives on the scene, designed around the physical spacing of the PS5 and it’s internal vents, it replaces the m.2 metal cover that the system features in favour of a full drive cover and heatsink combined. PNY is not the first company to release an m.2 SSD heatsink that is designed for the PS5 (we have reviewed several PS5 SSD heatsinks in 2021), but with already very popular PS5 SSD compatible SSD ranges in the CS3140 and CS3040, this heatsink presents a unique bundle/single purchase that only Sabrent currently offers. So, let’s review the PNY XLR8 PS5 SSD heatsink and see if it deserves your data.

PNY XLR8 PS5 SSD Heatsink – Quick Conclusion

The PNY XLR8 SSD heatsink for PS5 cannot really be faulted! There have been quite a few PS5 designed heatsinks released in the last few months and for the most part, they fall into two categories. There are the ‘overkill’ ones which sadly make up the bulk of them (such as the INEO, Graugear and ElecGear) that do the job, but at a high price tag, still require SSD research and unless you are an e-sports or heavy gaming streamer, as never going to even come close to their full utility (think of driving a Ferrari to pop to the corner shop for bread). The other PS5 designed SSD heatsinks like the Sabrent and the PNY XLR8 in this review very much fall into a smaller but much, MUCH more desirable category. The PNY XLR8 finds an impressive middle ground between keeping your PS5 SSD at an ideal ongoing usage temperature, whilst keeping a low profile and not interrupting the airflow/air temp that is running through the rest of the PS5 cooling system. Add to this the ease of buying in together with your PNY XLR8 PS5 compatible SSD and what you have here is an affordable and effective means to store more games, play for longer and maintain the lifespan of your SSD longterm. It may seem the pinch more expensive than a regular M.2 heatsink, but it’s about having the right tool for the job – have you ever tried spreading butter with a steak knife? Or stirring soup with a teaspoon? The same applies to comparing a PS5 designed heatsink with a PC designed one, they are both heatsinks, but for very different deployments. It get’s my vote!

EFFECTIVENESS - 10/10
HARDWARE - 9/10
PERFORMANCE - 9/10
PRICE - 8/10
VALUE - 8/10


8.8
PROS
👍🏻Very high-quality build
👍🏻VERY Easy Installation
👍🏻Option of SSD+Heatsink Bundle with the CS3140 Series
👍🏻Less potentially impactful on the system temp than the Elecgear or Copper Pipe Heatsinks
👍🏻On par with Sabrent H/S Price
👍🏻Full 22110 NVMe SSD Coverage
👍🏻High-Quality Thermal Padding pre-attached
CONS
👎🏻Quite pricey for a heatsink compared with PC designed m.2 models
👎🏻No spare thermal pads

PNY XLR8 PS5 SSD Heatsink – Packaging

The external packaging of the PNY XLR8 PS5 SSD Heatsink is noticeably larger than many of the heatsink’s that I have reviewed before, arriving in a chunky box that you would be excused for assuming also contains an SSD. Likely this is due to PNY having plans on bundled purchases down the link. The actual contents are only two items, but the retail box is quite pro-gamer centric.

Using the familiar livery of their XLR8 professional gaming brand, if we open up the retail box, we find that inside contains a rigid foam frame holds both the PNY XLR8 PS5 SSD Heatsink and an m.2 screw in place. There are no additional instruction manuals present, though details of installation are covered on the rear of the box.

The PNY XLR8 PS5 SSD Heatsink arrives with a preattached thermal pad on the base of the aluminium plate, which turns out is a pinch thicker than the typical pads we see with these heatsinks. It is a shame that this heatsink does not feature an additional thermal pad for the underside of an installed SSD, but given that the base of the SSD typically only has further NAND and perhaps 50% of the memory, these components can actually run better when they are a little warmer. Additionally, when deployed onto an SSD, the thermal pad made full contact with the SSD components (ink tested).

PNY XLR8 PS5 SSD Heatsink – Design

The design of the PNY XLR8 PS5 SSD Heatsink is something that I think puts it high above its competitors in terms of aesthetics and appeal. Given that this heatsink is going to be largely unseen when it is doing its job, it does look remarkably pretty! Arriving with the XLR8 gaming livery once again, it has a design that leans a little towards F1 racing cars and gaming laptop chic. With the logo highlight visible, as well arriving in a colour scheme that is a cut above the usual dull black or silver that 99% of other heatsinks arrive in. Again though, this is still a component that is going to only be seen during installation, then largely invisible afterwards.

One interesting thing to note though (and something that many will have missed when PNY first showed this heatsink off on its official site) is that although it looks like the top of the PNY XLR8 PS5 SSD Heatsink is ridged (appearing very similar in physical design to the Sabrent PS5 SSD heatsink), that top panel is actually flat/flush, without the logo being embossed/raised either.

In fact, it is only when you view the PNY XLR8 PS5 SSD Heatsink at an angle that you notice that the heatsink has many, many raised ridges to capture airflow through the PS5, BUT they are covered by that top panel. Now, this is an unusual move for a heatsink, given that the main advantage for a heatsink to occupy/sit-above the PS5 M.2 slot, is so it can capture the airflow of the console’s from vents, as the system pulls air in and then out the back of the chassis.

The PNY XLR8 PS5 SSD Heatsink certainly fully occupies the PS5 M.2 slot, as well as raises out of the available bay a few millimetres, so it is capturing that air to assist SSD dissipation as you would hope. Nevertheless, this is a very discrete bit of design/airflow that you would not expect and whether this is for reasons of avoiding introducing warm air into the console OR for reasons of patent/design uniqueness – it is hard to say. I will say that compared with the Sabrent H/S and Elecgear SSD heatsink‘s reviewed previously, the PNY XLR8 PS5 SSD Heatsink will almost certainly have the lowest impact on the system general temperature.

Another interesting element is that the PNY XLR8 PS5 SSD Heatsink occupies the full length of the PS5 22110 m.2 slot. The bulk of modern M.2 NVMe SSDs are 2280 in length, but the PS5 arrives with the longer 22110 SSD support (which is arguably a bit wasted, given the PS5 has a maximum capacity of 4TB supported in this m.2 slot) and if you were to install a longer SSD in this slot (perhaps so you could get an SSD with a better distribution of NAND chips on it’s physical PCB to improve performance and/or durability), then having a heatsink that can amply dissipate heat from even the larger SSDs in the market is going to be a good thing.

The PNY XLR8 PS5 SSD Heatsink fits on top of the SSD in a much similar way as the official M.2 expansion cover plate, with a lever hinge at its base that allows you to lower the heatsink over the SSD and the screw hole will perfectly align with the one on the PS5 (you will need to reuse the official screw that features the square, triangle, circle and cross symbol).

In short, it is very hard to get this wrong! The SSD cannot be damaged in this installation and the lower, protruding aluminium 22110 length area of the heatsink will always make contact with the SSD.

The heatsink, once installed, will make zero contact with the PS5 side plates and although the aesthetic design of the PNY XLR8 PS5 SSD Heatsink doesn’t quite look as uniform as the Sabrent H/S and Elecgear SSD heatsink, It still looks rather easy on the eye. Next up, we need to do some temperature testing of the PNY XLR8 PS5 SSD, see how it compares against budget $10 heatsinks for PC and whether it negatively impacts the ambient airflow of the PS5 when in use.

PNY XLR8 PS5 SSD Heatsink – Temperature Tests

IMPORTANT – Temperature Testing is still IN PROGRESS and although early testing clearly indicates that the PNY XLR8 PS5 SSD Heatsink works very well, the FULL details, readings and results in comparison with a generic M.2 SSD heatsink will be updated in this article in the next few days when the test stages are completed. Apologies for the delay.

Temperature testing for the PNY XLR8 PS5 Designed SSD heatsink has been broken down into several areas. The main aims here are to work out the following things:

  1. Does the PNY XLR8 Heatsink Keep the Temperature low on the SSD in sustained use?
  2. Does the PNY XLR8 Heatsink Interfere with the PS5 Internal System Temp negatively?
  3. Does the PNY XLR8 Heatsink provide a significant improvement over PC designed M.2 SSD heatsinks (eg the Eluteng M.2)

In order to do this, I have installed a temperature sensor on the M.2 SSD itself, UNDER the heatsink AND the thermal pad, directly on the controller chip of the SSD.

When the temp node is on the SSD Controller, I then place the thermal pad down, closed and screw down the heatsink, then attach the 2nd node just underneath the PS5 fan point, in the open air. This second temperature sensor will tell us the surrounding system temp that the internal fan will be used to cool the rest of the system.

The testing consisted of 6 different elements. 4 gameplay sessions of 25mins each, with 2 sessions focusing on the SSD temp and 2 focusing on the system temp (in that order, with 1-2 mins reboot between each, in order to see how the system temp is affected over the combined power-on time).

Then a sustained read and write activity of 350-380MB/s to/from the PS5 internal PS5 SSD and M.2 NVMe SSD (the tests were conducted with the PNY CS3140 2TB) and how it impacted the SSD controller only. We are NOT looking at performance/framerate/MB/s etc, ONLY temperatures. Below were the results (video will be published shortly).

Note – BOTH PS5 Side plates were on during the tests 

Test Type Starting Temp (C) Finishing Temp (C) Change (C)
Heavy Write (350GB) 18.7℃ 26℃ 7.3℃
Demon Souls 25min Play (Controller) 25.8℃ 29.9℃ 4.1℃
Demon Souls 25min Play (System Temp) 24.5℃ 25.5℃ 1℃
Matrix Unreal 5 25min Play (Controller) 27.9℃ 35.1℃ 7.2℃
Matrix Unreal 5 25min Play (System Temp) 27℃ 28.5℃ 1.5℃
Heavy Read (350GB) 25.2℃ 29.5℃ 4.3℃

As you can see, in almost all tests, the PNY XLR8 PS5 Designed SSD heatsink results in very, VERY small increases in temperature over time, much, MUCH lower than most of the other heatsinks that I have tested. To put that into perspective here is how this PS5 styled heatsink compared in those same tests versus the Eluteng M.2 at just $10 (at least $15 less than the PNY XLR8 H/S):

NOTE – There tests were performed on different days and ambient temp AND general environmental conditions can undermine these results. Watch the video published soon to see these results in much, MUCH greater detail)

Test Type Eluteng H/S Change PNY XLR8 H/S Change
Heavy Write (350GB) 15.1℃ 7.3℃
Demon Souls 25min Play (Controller) 23.3℃ 4.1℃
Demon Souls 25min Play (System Temp) 0.5℃ 1℃
Matrix Unreal 5 25min Play (Controller) 16.3℃ 7.2℃
Matrix Unreal 5 25min Play (System Temp) 1.8℃ 1.5℃
Heavy Read (350GB) 18.8℃ 4.3℃

So, as you can see, it certainly did a great job. These are still very small differences though and it is worth remembering that an NVMe SSD is designed to run perfectly well at between 30-50 degrees. Anything higher than that (headed towards 70 degrees) can result in throttling. Overall I still think the PNY XLR8 definitely does exactly what it says it will and does it very well – it is a question of whether you play your PS5 for long enough /regular periods that you need that level of protection/cooling. Let’s conclude the review and give my verdict.

NOTE – The FULL video of the Temperature tests for the PNY XLR8 PS5 Designed SSD Heatsink, as well as how it compares against the Eluteng M.2 Heatsink, the Sabrent PS5 heatsink and the PNY XLR8 Heatsink Heatsink is available soon.

When I previously compared the INEO / Graugear PS5 Hetasink against the Sabrent, Elecgear and Eluteng Heatsink, the main takeaway was that enterprise PS5 heatsink’s like these DEFINITELY keep the SSD/Controller much cooler, as well as have minimum impact on the system temperature too. The PNY XLR8 PS5 Heatsink can be compared easily against the Sabrent model and much like that model, unless you are a particularly hardcore gamer, the 3-4x price point of these prosumer copper pipe SSD heatsink’s are a little unnecessary.

PNY XLR8 PS5 SSD Heatsink – Conclusion & Verdict

The PNY XLR8 SSD heatsink for PS5 cannot really be faulted! There have been quite a few PS5 designed heatsinks released in the last few months and for the most part, they fall into two categories. There are the ‘overkill’ ones which sadly make up the bulk of them (such as the INEO, Graugear and ElecGear) that do the job, but at a high price tag, still require SSD research and unless you are an e-sports or heavy gaming streamer, as never going to even come close to their full utility (think of driving a Ferrari to pop to the corner shop for bread). The other PS5 designed SSD heatsinks like the Sabrent and the PNY XLR8 in this review very much fall into a smaller but much, MUCH more desirable category. The PNY XLR8 finds an impressive middle ground between keeping your PS5 SSD at an ideal ongoing usage temperature, whilst keeping a low profile and not interrupting the airflow/air temp that is running through the rest of the PS5 cooling system. Add to this the ease of buying in together with your PNY XLR8 PS5 compatible SSD and what you have here is an affordable and effective means to store more games, play for longer and maintain the lifespan of your SSD longterm. It may seem the pinch more expensive than a regular M.2 heatsink, but it’s about having the right tool for the job – have you ever tried spreading butter with a steak knife? Or stirring soup with a teaspoon? The same applies to comparing a PS5 designed heatsink with a PC designed one, they are both heatsinks, but for very different deployments. It get’s my vote!

PROS of the PNY XLR8 PS5 SSD Heatsink PROS of the PNY XLR8 PS5 SSD Heatsink
  • Very high-quality build
  • VERY Easy Installation
  • Option of SSD+Heatsink Bundle with the CS3140 Series
  • Less potentially impactful on the system temp than the Elecgear or Copper Pipe Heatsinks
  • On par with Sabrent H/S Price
  • Full 22110 NVMe SSD Coverage
  • High-Quality Thermal Padding pre-attached
  • Quite pricey for a heatsink compared with PC designed m.2 models
  • No spare thermal pads


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Sabrent Rocket Q4 SSD – PS5 EXPANSION GUIDE & TEST RESULTS

27 décembre 2021 à 01:22

PS5 SSD Expansion Testing with the Sabrent Rocket Q4 SSD

Modern SSD are not cheap! It’s super annoying that despite Solid State Drives being commercially available for more than a decade, that they are still expensive. Part of that is because the storage capacities have got bigger and another big reason is that they are getting faster all the time! However, occasionally a middle ground can be reached and the Sabrent Rocket Q4 SSD is a great example of that. Thanks to the use of more cost-effective NAND (the cells on the physically SSD board that hold the storage) modern PCIe NVMe M.2 SSDs have the potential to be cheaper, though this does lessen their performance and durability. The Sabrent Q4 SSD is technically lower than the recommended 5,500MB/s read speed needed for the PS5 SSD expansion bay, however, the drive IS still compatible and DOES still appear when installed in the latest software beta firmware release. Here is the PS5 internal Benchmark for the Sabrent Rocket Q4 SSD at the initialization of the system:

Whether you are looking at upgrading the SSD on your PS5 because you are running out of space or because you heard that some SSDs can increase load times for your favourite games, it is always going to be sensible to spend a few minutes researching before pulling the trigger and spending hundreds on the Sabrent Rocket Q4 to avoid finding out that the benefits are negligible or, worse still, actually slow your games down! Equally, you should always factor in that the PS5 is a relatively new console and games developers are still in the early stages of maximizing how much they can do with the CPU, Memory, GPU and (of course) super-fast NVMe M.2 SSD. Therefore the commitment you make on buying an SSD upgrade to your PS5 needs to also factor in that it will still perform well in the years to come. The Sabrent Rocket Q4 meets a number of the key specifications of the PS5 storage bay, but then again many, MANY SSDs do. So today I want to put this SSD through it’s paces with many games to see how well it compares against the internal PS5 SSD doing the same thing. NOTE – FULL Videos of the testing of the Sabrent Rocket Q4 that combined cover more than an hour can be found at the bottom of the article. This article primarily covers the load times of games and saves on the PS5 using the Sabrent Rocket Q4 SSD and how they compare with the internal PS5 loading the same game. If you want to watch the full videos that cover PS5 Sabrent Rocket Q4 use that feature frame rates, texture swapping, asset management and more, I recommend you watch those videos at the end of this article.

What Are the Specifications of the Sabrent Rocket Q4 SSD?

Before we go through the load time testing of the Sabrent Rocket Q4 on the PS5, it is worth taking a look at the hardware specifications. Unlike traditional Hard Drives and SSDs that were using the PS3 and PS4 that used SATA connectivity, this new generation of SSD storage using M.2 NVMe PCIe 4.0 architecture. This is a very, VERY big difference physically, in terms of maximum performance and opens up ALOT of specifications that you should keep an eye on. Aside from the capacity (i.e the amount of data the Sabrent Rocket Q4 can hold in gigabytes and terabytes) the key ones to factor in when buying an SSD are the following:

  • Controller & NAND – These are the brain of the SSD (handling the transfer of data as quickly and efficiently as possible) and the physical cells on the Sabrent Rocket Q4 SSD that hold the data.
  • Sequential Read – This is the reported maximum access speed that the data on the Sabrent Rocket Q4 SSD can be access when accessing large blocks of data
  • Sequential Write – This is the reported maximum speed that data can be written to the Sabrent Rocket Q4 SSD. As far as the PS5 architecture goes, this is much less important right now but could become important later in the system’s life as games, services and the level to which the Sabrent Rocket Q4 can be accessed changes.
  • IOPS – These represent the number of individual operations the Sabrent Rocket Q4 SSD can handle per second, based on the smallest size possible. Again, not strictly relevant in the PS5 right now because of the way data is largely front-loaded on modern games, but may well impact how larger and evolved worlds and multiplayer games are developed in future
  • TBW, MTBF & DWPD – Terabytes Written and Drive Writes Per Day, these indicate how much the drive is designed to withstand in activity over a 5 year or daily basis (respectively), Before the drive begins to deteriorate in performance or eventually fail. The PS5 will hardly be able to hit these kind of numbers daily BUT these figures will give you a good idea of the lifespan of the SSD beyond 5 years. Given the lifespan of some consoles can cross over a decade, the higher these numbers are, the better!

Here are the official specifications of the Sabrent Rocket Q4 SSD:

SABRENT Rocket 4 + SB-RKT4P-1TB

SB-RKT4P-2TB

SB-RKT4P-4TB

Price in $ and $ 1TB – $139 2TB – $299.99 4TB – $699.99
PCIe Generation PCIe Gen 4 PCIe Gen 4 PCIe Gen 4
NVMe Rev NVMe 1.3 NVMe 1.3 NVMe 1.3
NAND QLC NAND 96L QLC NAND 96L QLC NAND 96L
Capacity 1TB Single Sided 2TB Double Sided 4TB Double Sided
Controller Phison E16-PS5016 Phison E16-PS5016 Phison E16-PS5016


IMPORTANT – This article contains ALOT of gifs to demonstrate the loading times of the Sabrent Rocket Q4 SSD versus the internal PS5 SSD, so the page/gifs might take an extra minute to load. Please be patient OR watch the videos of the full testing at the bottom of the page.
So, now you know the hardware specifications of the Sabrent Rocket Q4 SSD and you also know that (at the time of writing!) the Sabrent Rocket Q4 is supported by the PS5 SSD expansion bay.

Testing the Sabrent Rocket Q4 SSD with the PS5 – Test Parameters

All of the tests of the Sabrent Rocket Q4 SSD on the PS5 were conducted in groups of 5 games at a time. In the event of a game arriving on a disc, the full disc data and all current updates were transferred over the Sabrent Rocket Q4 SSD. The disc might be present, but it is only for system verification and would be an identical setup to the PS5 internal SSD that it is being compared against. The SSD was tested using the latest PS5 Beta Firmware update (3.0 or 3.1 depending on the time of testing as a further update was made available during the widespread testing) and although the supported drives when the SSD expansion feature might change, the Sabrent Rocket Q4 SSD is fully functioning and supported on the PS5 at the time of writing. So, let’s get started on the testing of each game:

PS5 Sabrent Rocket Q4 SSD Testing – Demon Souls Nexus Loading Test

This test was loading from the title screen to the central hub world (Nexus) of Demon Souls, comparing the Sabrent Rocket Q4 vs the internal PS5 SSD:

PS5 Sabrent Rocket Q4 SSD Testing – Demon Souls Archstone 2 Test

This test was loading to the Smithing Grounds of Demon Souls, comparing the Sabrent Rocket Q4 vs the internal PS5 SSD:

PS5 Sabrent Rocket Q4 SSD Testing – Demon Souls Archstone 1 Test

This test was loading to the first main area of Demon Souls, comparing the Sabrent Rocket Q4 vs the internal PS5 SSD:

PS5 Sabrent Rocket Q4 SSD Testing – Ratchet & Clank World Loading Test I

This test was loading to the starting area of Ratchet & Clank Rifts Apart, comparing the Sabrent Rocket Q4 vs the internal PS5 SSD:

PS5 Sabrent Rocket Q4 SSD Testing – Ratchet & Clank World Loading Test II

This test was loading to the first main transitional area of Ratchet & Clank Rifts Apart, comparing the Sabrent Rocket Q4 vs the internal PS5 SSD:

PS5 Sabrent Rocket Q4 SSD Testing – Borderlands 3 Full Loading Test I

This test was loading Borderlands to the Title Screen fro the PS5 Main menu on Borderlands 3, comparing the Sabrent Rocket Q4 vs the internal PS5 SSD:

PS5 Sabrent Rocket Q4 SSD Testing – Borderlands 3 Level Load Test II

This test was loading a save game from the title screen to the Pandora World Area, comparing the Sabrent Rocket Q4 vs the internal PS5 SSD:

PS5 Sabrent Rocket Q4 SSD Testing – Resident Evil Village Castle Loading Test I

This test was loading the Castle Area of Resident Evil Village, comparing the Sabrent Rocket Q4 vs the internal PS5 SSD:

PS5 Sabrent Rocket Q4 SSD Testing – Resident Evil Village Stronghold Loading Test II

This test was loading the Stronghold of Resident Evil Village, comparing the Sabrent Rocket Q4 vs the internal PS5 SSD:

PS5 Sabrent Rocket Q4 SSD Testing – Hitman 3 Dartmoor Loading Test I

This test was loading the Dartmoor level on Hitman 3, comparing the Sabrent Rocket Q4 vs the internal PS5 SSD:

PS5 Sabrent Rocket Q4 SSD Testing – Hitman 3 Mendoza Loading Test II

This test was loading the Mendoza level on Hitman 3, comparing the Sabrent Rocket Q4 vs the internal PS5 SSD:

PS5 Sabrent Rocket Q4 SSD Testing – Oddworld SoulStorm Loading Test

This test was loading from the title screen to an early, lighting heavy area of the 2.5D platformer Oddworld Soulstorm for PS5, comparing the Sabrent Rocket Q4 vs the internal PS5 SSD:

PS5 Sabrent Rocket Q4 SSD Testing – Terminator Resistance Level Loading Test

This test was loading Terminator Resistance Infiltrator Mode, comparing the Sabrent Rocket Q4 vs the internal PS5 SSD:

PS5 Sabrent Rocket Q4 SSD Testing – GTA V Full Game Loading Test

This test was loading the Grand Theft Auto V from the PS5 menu to gameplay on the Single Player Mode, comparing the Sabrent Rocket Q4 vs the internal PS5 SSD:

PS5 Sabrent Rocket Q4 SSD Testing – Dead By Daylight Bots Test

This test was loading the tutorial Bots Mode on Dead By Daylight, comparing the Sabrent Rocket Q4 vs the internal PS5 SSD:

PS5 Sabrent Rocket Q4 SSD Testing – Red Dead Redemption II Campaign Loading Test

This test was loading the Blackwater Area of Red Dead Redemption II in single Player, comparing the Sabrent Rocket Q4 vs the internal PS5 SSD:

PS5 Sabrent Rocket Q4 SSD Testing – Subnautica Loading Test I

This test was loading from the title screen to a fresh creative mode save load on Subnautica, comparing the Sabrent Rocket Q4 vs the internal PS5 SSD:

PS5 Sabrent Rocket Q4 SSD Testing – No Man’s Sky Creative Mode Loading Test

This test was loading No Man’s Sky in Creative Mode from the Title screen, comparing the Sabrent Rocket Q4 vs the internal PS5 SSD:

PS5 Sabrent Rocket Q4 SSD Testing – In Rays of the Light Loading Test I, Outside

This test was loading the outside world area of In Rays of the Light, comparing the Sabrent Rocket Q4 vs the internal PS5 SSD:

PS5 Sabrent Rocket Q4 SSD Testing – In Rays of the Light Loading Test II, Inside

This test was loading the underground bunker area of In Rays of the Light, comparing the Sabrent Rocket Q4 vs the internal PS5 SSD:

PS5 Sabrent Rocket Q4 SSD Testing – Star Wars Fallen Order Level Loading Test I

This test was loading the Kashkykk area of Star Wars Fallen Order from the title screen, comparing the Sabrent Rocket Q4 vs the internal PS5 SSD:

PS5 Sabrent Rocket Q4 SSD Testing – Star Wars Fallen Order Trial Loading Test II

This test was loading a combat challenge, mid-game, of Star Wars Fallen Order from the title screen, comparing the Sabrent Rocket Q4 vs the internal PS5 SSD:

PS5 Sabrent Rocket Q4 SSD Testing – Doom Eternal Level Loading Test I

This test was loading a level in Doom Eternal from the title screen, comparing the Sabrent Rocket Q4 vs the internal PS5 SSD:

 

Full Sabrent Rocket Q4 SSD PS5 Test Videos

If you want to see the FULL testing of every PS5/PS4 game with the Sabrent Rocket Q4 SSD, you can watch the videos below. These tests have been grouped into 5 games per video, with each game being assessed on Loading Times, Frame Rate, Texture swapping, Asset Popping and compared against the exact game being loaded on the PS5 SSD. NOTE – These videos are being edited and published throughout September and October, so if a video is showing as ‘unavailable’ below, it might not be published yet, but should be up shortly!

 

SABRENT Rocket 4 + SB-RKT4P-1TB

SB-RKT4P-2TB

SB-RKT4P-4TB

Price in $ and $ 1TB – $139 2TB – $299.99 4TB – $699.99
PCIe Generation PCIe Gen 4 PCIe Gen 4 PCIe Gen 4
NVMe Rev NVMe 1.3 NVMe 1.3 NVMe 1.3
NAND QLC NAND 96L QLC NAND 96L QLC NAND 96L
Capacity 1TB Single Sided 2TB Double Sided 4TB Double Sided
Controller Phison E16-PS5016 Phison E16-PS5016 Phison E16-PS5016
Sabrent Rocket Q4 PS5 SSD Test 1

Sabrent Rocket Q4 PS5 SSD Test 2

Sabrent Rocket Q4 FULL Review

Sabrent PS5 Heatsink Revealed

 


Articles Get Updated Regularly - Get an alert every time something gets added to this page!


This description contains links to Amazon. These links will take you to some of the products mentioned in today's content. As an Amazon Associate, I earn from qualifying purchases. Visit the NASCompares Deal Finder to find the best place to buy this device in your region, based on Service, Support and Reputation - Just Search for your NAS Drive in the Box Below

 

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Need Advice on Data Storage from an Expert?

We want to keep the free advice on NASCompares FREE for as long as we can. Since this service started back in Jan '18, We have helped hundreds of users every month solve their storage woes, but we can only continue to do this with your support. So please do choose to buy at Amazon US and Amazon UK on the articles when buying to provide advert revenue support or to donate/support the site below. Finally, for free advice about your setup, just leave a message in the comments below here at NASCompares.com and we will get back to you. Need Help? Where possible (and where appropriate) please provide as much information about your requirements, as then I can arrange the best answer and solution to your needs. Do not worry about your e-mail address being required, it will NOT be used in a mailing list and will NOT be used in any way other than to respond to your enquiry. [contact-form-7] Terms and Conditions Alternatively, why not ask me on the ASK NASCompares forum, by clicking the button below. This is a community hub that serves as a place that I can answer your question, chew the fat, share new release information and even get corrections posted. I will always get around to answering ALL queries, but as a one-man operation, I cannot promise speed! So by sharing your query in the ASK NASCompares section below, you can get a better range of solutions and suggestions, alongside my own.  

 

INEO / Graugear PS5 SSD M13 Heat Pipe Heatsink Review & Temperature Testing

10 décembre 2021 à 01:37

Reviewing the INEO PS5 Designed Heatsink for SSD Upgrades

Ever since Sony enabled the storage upgrade feature of the PS5, the sudden need for understanding the architecture of M.2 SSDs has increased dramatically. The super-fast PCIe Gen 4 M.2 NVMe SSDs that are required to increase your PS5 storage differ wildly in shape, size and installation that the old SATA hard drives previously and one big new factor that most PS5 gamers are having to get their heads around is the subject of cooling and heat dissipation. These new M.2 SSDs get hot, as electricity is passed through them (no moving parts) and the faster they get, the generally hotter they become. If that heat creeps into the 50-70 degrees celsius zone, it can lead to the drive dropping in performance (know as throttling or bottlenecking) as the SSD’s brain (known as the SSD controller) does not want the heat to harm to long term usability or endurance of the SSD as a whole. Therefore this heat needs to go somewhere – and HERE is where SSD heatsinks come in. These aluminium, copper and even steel modules are connected to the SSD (generally with an additional thermal heat pad, silicon or paste component too) and the heat is then drawn away from the SSD, into the heatsink, then dissipated into the surrounding air. A neat idea, but then most heatsinks for M.2 NVM SSDs released before Summer 2022 was designed with PCs or Laptops in mind – devices with a lot more active airflow and space considerations in mind. The PS5 on the other hand has a small, confined M.2 slot that holds the SSD in place and this is done to make sure that it does not impact the temperature and running of the rest of the PS5 System. Therefore, heatsinks are starting to arrive on the market that is SPECIFICALLY designed for use in the Playstation 5 console system. Easily the most advanced and effective example of this is the INEO Heat Pipe PS5 SSD Heatsink (also known online as the GrauGear PS5 heatsink in Germany and some other regions). A fantastically over the top and overkill heatsink that is also about 4x more expensive than the bulk of regular M.2 NVMe SSD heatsinks on the market. So today I want to take a close look at this PS5 heating, see how effective it is and ultimately help you decide if it deserves your gaming data!

INEO PS5 Designed SSD Heatsink Review – Quick Conclusion

You 100% will have a cooler and more efficiently climate-based SSD in your PS5 if you choose to install the INEO/Graugear PS5 Heatsink – I cannot stress enough that this is true! The copper pipe design massively decreases the temperature of the SSD when in use, as well as dissipates the generated heat away from the SSD faster than any other PS5 SSD Heatsink I have ever tested. HOWEVER, the real question here is whether you are really going to need THAT MUCH heat dissipation on your PS5. Unless you are going to use your PS5 system for more than 6-7 hours a day (active gaming, not just media watching), the difference in heat dispersion of the INEO/Graugear PS5 Heatsink vs the Sabrent or Elecgear PS5 heatsinks is very small indeed (and this is around 20-25% more expensive than those). Compared with traditional ‘bog standard’ m.2 heatsinks at $10-15 that were originally designed for PC use, the INEO/Graugear Heatsink is EXCEPTIONALLY  better at keeping an SSD cool in your PS5. Ultimately, the INEO/Graugear Heatsink is being marketed as a prosumer/premium priced heatsink for an SSD in your PS5 and it provides exactly that level of quality – it just comes down to whether you need that level of performance – no one did the weekly grocery shop in a Lamborgini!

EFFECTIVENESS - 10/10
HARDWARE - 10/10
PERFORMANCE - 10/10
PRICE - 6/10
VALUE - 8/10


8.8
PROS
👍🏻Two-stage SSD cooling in the PS5
👍🏻Supports single and double-sided SSDs comfortably
👍🏻Very high-quality build
👍🏻Easy Installation
👍🏻Additional M.2 Screws and washers included
👍🏻The copper Pipe is ventilated to reduce air friction
CONS
👎🏻Quite pricey for a heatsink
👎🏻Cannot replace the PS5 M.2 SSD Panel
👎🏻Questions surrounding the impact of this H/S in conjunction with the PS5 components are still unanswered and unknown in the grand scheme of things

INEO PS5 Designed SSD Heatsink Review – Retail Packaging

The box that the INEO/Graugear PS5 Heatsink arrives in is significantly bigger than any other boxed heatsink I have ever received (and by a factor of about 10x when compared to budget $10 alternatives like the Eluteng or Warship m.2 H/S). Lovely printed design and plenty of pictures of it in high res on all sides, installed in a PS5 system.

Opening up the box reveals the heatsink itself in a custom mould, cardboard holder. It takes up the bulk of the retail box, but there are other bits inside that are worth highlighting.

Underneath the INEO/Graugear PS5 Heatsink itself, we find a first-time setup manual, thermal pads, screwdriver, 2 screw kits and information on the 1-year warranty that it arrives with.

Laying it all out, there is the same sort of thing that most SSD heatsink’s arrive with – just more of each thing and of higher quality in some places.

For example, an M.2 SSD heatsink can often arrive with a screw mount to fix the SSD in place, however, the INEO/Graugear PS5 Heatsink arrives with two sets AND also these are PS5 specific in length for the system’s rather deep screw holes (as well as inclusive washers of course). Even the thermal pads that it arrives with (four in total) are a step above the norm, with 2x at 7mm and 2x 1.2mm thickness, depending on whether you want to install at the top, bottom, or on more heavily populated SSDs in the PS5 M.2 bay.

Looking at the INEO/Graugear PS5 Heatsink top-down, show that it is a rather sturdy and fixed-size piece of kit. It is designed to fit the PS5 M.2 bay (NOT using the m.2 plate cover) and the copper heat pipe (I will cover this more in a bit) runs out of the available bay, along the front of the PS5 fan/vents, and then is curved to the shape of the PS5 chassis internally. Let’s take a much closer look a the build quality and design of the INEO/Graugear PS5 Heatsink.

INEO PS5 Designed SSD Heatsink Review – Design

Flipping this PS5 SSD Heatsink over shows that it is designed to surround and encase your SSD inside an aluminium main panel. The closed INEO/Graugear PS5 Heatsink box is held by 4 screws and there is space for up to a 2 sided SSD and thermal pads on top and bottom.

A close look at the physical design of the Ice Cold branded, vented INEO/Graugear PS5 Heatsink aluminium box shows that it is designed to capture all the cool air that will be immediately passing through it from the PS5 fan and vents. It is angled too and in a similar raised shape to the PS5 internal chassis too. This is clearly not accidental.

The four screws that hold the aluminium panel in place are micro-sized and quite soft – so I can imagine those threads getting ruined very quickly indeed!

Inside the main aluminium case of the INEO/Graugear PS5 Heatsink, we can see that the copper pipe attachment of the main body of this design is soldered into place and runs diagonally across the M.2 SSD  that you install inside. This is likely to cover bases on a wide variety of SSDs that could be installed in this heatsink and the PS5.

The thermal pads that are included with the INEO/Graugear PS5 Heatsink fill the entire casing on top and bottom and will be more than enough to cover ANY 2280 length SSD installed inside.

That copper pipeline that runs through the top of the aluminium panel of the INEO/Graugear PS5 Heatsink is incredibly unit and (at least for the PS5 system) has ONLY been featured on one other PS5 heatsink, the Elecgear Playstation Designed SSD heatsink, which we reviewed HERE. Its main use is to act as an additional and high conductive heat rod to draw heat from both the SSD and the aluminium heatsink, acting as a two-step cooling system and further decreasing the temp of the SSD and its controller. Given that the PS5 will be hitting this SSD much, MUCH less than a PC might, it does seem like tremendous overkill, however, for those that game for 6, 8 or 12 hours a day (kids, teens, gaming professionals and those that create games-related content for example), this might actually be something that could fit their heavy, sustained usage patterns.

One additional heat is transferred to the copper heat pipe, it is then fed into the elongated line and this is going to be receiving airflow from the PS5 front vents, thanks to the system’s negative cooling system (pulling air through the front and pushing it out the back. The top of the INEO/Graugear PS5 Heatsink is also not quite as dense as you think, arriving heavily vented itself.

The INEO/Graugear PS5 Heatsink (once an SSD is installed) fits precisely into the PS5 shape internally, levering into the M.2 slot (connecting to the m.2 slot first) and then simply lowering down into the PS5 internal chassis designed grooves.

The heatsink is fixed in place with a screw fixed latch/arm that sits on top of the screw hole that the PS5 uses for securing the m.2 SSD cover plate (which cannot be used in conjunction with the INEO/Graugear PS5 Heatsink). The actual metal clip is a little loose (for ease of initial installation I guess) but is the only thing about the design of the INEO/Graugear PS5 Heatsink that I don’t really like.

The screw that the PS5 already features for the M.2 slot (the cross, square, circle, triangle embossed one) is what you need to install the INEO/Graugear PS5 Heatsink in place.

Once in place, the placement of the copper heat pipe to dissipate heat into the airflow/vent is pretty clear and you can see how this heatsink is going to be able to offload all of that SSD generate heat exceptionally quickly.

Indeed, looking at the chassis of the PS5 on its side, you can see just how much of the direct airflow of the PS5 front vent is going to immediately heat the INEO/Graugear PS5 Heatsink. On the one hand, it will DEFINITELY mean that the SSD will be SUPER COOL, but I am a tiny pinch concerned about that ever so slightly hotter air going into the PS5 internal system. The difference will be very, very small indeed, but it’s worth thinking about in mammoth length sessions.

Additionally, the PS5 M.2 SSD cover plate cannot be applied, as the height of the ICE COLD heatsink cage is taller than the slot (in order to capture the airflow along the way). During the later testing of this heatsink, I do take time to test the ambient airflow on the PS5 when it is in operation, not just the SSD/Controller.

The tip of the copper pipe on the INEO/Graugear PS5 Heatsink features very fine vents throughout and this allows the airflow to pass directly through the fanned out tip. It is angled correctly with the PS5 front vent holes too, so it will certainly not block airflow internally whilst the system is in operation.

A top-down look for the PS5 with the INEO/Graugear PS5 Heatsink and m.2 SSD installed shows just how well designed in shape with the PS5 that this device is. No additional fan wires etc and when it does stand between the PS5 plate vents and the internal fan, it does so in the least obtrusive way it can. Let’s move over to the temperature testing of the INEO/Graugear PS5 Heatsink and also see how it compares with a domestic/PC grade SSD heatsink for $10.

INEO PS5 Designed SSD Heatsink Review – Temperature Testings

Temperature testing for the INEO PS5 Designed SSD heatsink has been broken down into several areas. The main aims here are to work out the following things:

  1. Does the INEO / GRAUGEAR Heatsink Keep the Temperature low on the SSD in sustained use?
  2. Does the INEO / GRAUGEAR  Heatsink Interfere with the PS5 Internal System Temp negatively?
  3. Does the INEO / Graugear Heatsink provide a significant improvement over PC designed M.2 SSD heatsinks (eg the Eluteng M.2)

In order to do this, I have installed a temperature sensor on the M.2 SSD itself, UNDER the heatsink AND the thermal pad, directly on the controller chip of the SSD. The SSD used in the testing was the TeamGroup T-Force Cardea A440, a Phison E18, 96L 3D TLC NAND SSD at 1TB – a good mid-range price point SSD that is single-sided and provides 6551MB/s on the PS5 internal benchmark.

When the temp node is on the SSD Controller, I then place the thermal pad down, closed and screw down the heatsink, then attach the 2nd node just underneath the PS5 fan point, in the open air. This second temperature sensor will tell us the surrounding system temp that the internal fan will be used to cool the rest of the system.

The testing consisted of 6 different elements. 4 gameplay sessions of 25mins each, with 2 sessions focusing on the SSD temp and 2 focusing on the system temp (in that order, with 1-2 mins reboot between each, in order to see how the system temp is affected over the combined power-on time).

Then a sustained read and write activity of 350-380MB/s to/from the PS5 internal PS5 SSD and M.2 NVMe SSD (the Cardea A440) and how it impacted the SSD controller only. We are NOT looking at performance/framerate/MB/s etc, ONLY temperatures. Below were the results (video will be published shortly).

Note – BOTH PS5 Side plates were on during the tests 

Test Type Starting Temp (C) Finishing Temp (C) Change (C)
Red Dead Redemption 25min Play (Controller) 33.8℃ 35.2℃ 1.4℃
Red Dead Redemption 25min Play (System Temp) 27.3℃ 27.7℃ 0.4℃
GTA V 25min Play (Controller) 34.8℃ 34.4℃ -0.4℃
GTA V 25min Play (System Temp) 29.3℃ 30.6℃ 0.9℃
Heavy Read (350GB) 26.1℃ 39.6℃ 13.5℃
Heavy Write (350GB) 34.5℃ 36.4℃ 1.9℃

As you can see, in almost all tests, the INEO PS5 Designed SSD heatsink results in very, VERY small increases in temperature over time, much, MUCH lower than most of the other heatsinks that I have tested. To put that into perspective, here is how thIS copper pipe styled heatsink compared in those same tests versus the Eluteng M.2 at just $10 (at least $25 less than the INEO / GRAUGEAR H/S):

NOTE – There tests were performed on different days and ambient temp AND general environmental conditions can undermine these results. Watch the video published soon to see these results in much, MUCH greater detail)

Test Type Eluteng H/S Change INEO-GRAUGEAR H/S Change
Red Dead Redemption 25min Play (Controller) 5.9℃ 1.4℃
Red Dead Redemption 25min Play (System Temp) 1.5℃ 0.4℃
GTA V 25min Play (Controller) 0.5℃ -0.4℃
GTA V 25min Play (System Temp) 0.3℃ 0.9℃
Heavy Read (350GB) 6.2℃ 13.5℃
Heavy Write (350GB) 15.4℃ 1.9℃

So, as you can see, it certainly did a great job. These are still very small differences though and it is worth remembering that an NVMe SSD is designed to run perfectly well at between 30-50 degrees. Anything higher than that (headed towards 70 degrees) can result in throttling. Overall I still think the INEO definitely does exactly what it says it will and does it very well – it is a question of whether you play your PS5 for long enough /regular periods that you need that level of protection/cooling. Let’s conclude the review and give my verdict.

NOTE – The FULL video of the Temperature tests for the INEO PS5 Designed SSD Heatsink, as well as how it compares against the Eluteng M.2 Heatsink, the Sabrent PS5 heatsink and the INEO Heatsink Heatsink is available below in two videos. The full INEO PS5 SSD Copper Pipe Heatsink Review and testing are in the first video, then a full comparison between the INEO Heatsink and the Sabrent and ElecGear PS5 designed Heatsinks is the next one.

When I compared the INEO PS5 Hetasink against the Sabrent, Elecgear and Eluteng Heatsink, the main takeaway was that enterprise PS5 heatsink’s like these DEFINITELY keep the SSD/Controller much cooler, as well as have minimum impact on the system temperature too. But unless you are a particularly hardcore gamer, the 3-4x price point o these prosumer SSD heatsink’s are a little unnecessary.

INEO PS5 Designed SSD Heatsink Review – Conclusion & Verdict

You 100% will have a cooler and more efficiently climate-based SSD in your PS5 if you choose to install the INEO/Graugear PS5 Heatsink – I cannot stress enough that this is true! The copper pipe design massively decreases the temperature of the SSD when in use, as well as dissipates the generated heat away from the SSD faster than any other PS5 SSD Heatsink I have ever tested. HOWEVER, the real question here is whether you are really going to need THAT MUCH heat dissipation on your PS5. Unless you are going to use your PS5 system for more than 6-7 hours a day (active gaming, not just media watching), the difference in heat dispersion of the INEO/Graugear PS5 Heatsink vs the Sabrent or Elecgear PS5 heatsinks is very small indeed (and this is around 20-25% more expensive than those). Compared with traditional ‘bog standard’ m.2 heatsinks at $10-15 that were originally designed for PC use, the INEO/Graugear Heatsink is EXCEPTIONALLY  better at keeping an SSD cool in your PS5. Ultimately, the INEO/Graugear Heatsink is being marketed as a prosumer/premium priced heatsink for an SSD in your PS5 and it provides exactly that level of quality – it just comes down to whether you need that level of performance – no one did the weekly grocery shop in a Lamborgini!

PROS of the INEO / Graugear PS5 SSD Heatsink PROS of the INEO / Graugear PS5 SSD Heatsink
  • Two-stage SSD cooling in the PS5
  • Supports single and double-sided SSDs comfortably
  • Very high-quality build
  • Easy Installation
  • Additional M.2 Screws and washers included
  • The copper Pipe is ventilated to reduce air friction
  • Quite pricey for a heatsink
  • Cannot replace the PS5 M.2 SSD Panel
  • Questions surrounding the impact of this H/S in conjunction with the PS5 components are still unanswered and unknown in the grand scheme of things


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