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PS5 SSD Comparison 2022 – Seagate Firecuda 530 vs WD Black SN850 vs Samsung 980 Pro vs Sabrent Rocket 4 Plus

28 février 2022 à 02:23

PS5 Loading Comparison of the WD Black SN850, Seagate Firecuda 530, Samsung 980 and Sabrent Rocket 4 Plus SSD


The Playstation 5 has had the support of SSD storage upgrades now for the better part of half a year and in that time, ALOT of different SSDs have arrived on the scene that make promises to be your PERFECT PS5 SSD upgrade. However, despite all of these more modern releases, there are still four SSDs that arrived on the scene BEFORE sony enabled the SSD expansion feature of the PS5 that are among the very best performing SSDs in the system right now. These are the Samsung 980 Pro (released in Autumn 2020), the WD Black SN850 (also released in Autumn 2020), the Sabrent Rocket 4 Plus (released in winter 2020/2021) and finally the Seagate Firecuda 530 (released in summer 2021). These four SSDs are not only easily the most popular SSDs for PS5 SSD upgrades among the majority of gamers, but they also bring different unique qualities each that make the stand out – Value, Price, Durability and IOPs (more understandable as the reactivity in practice). I have discussed these four SSDs several times on NASCompares and on the NC YouTube channel, but now in 2022 with so many different options in the market to choose from, do these SSDs still cut the mustard? And if they do, which one does the best job? Let’s compare these SSDs in PS5 performance.


Note – I compared these four SSDs last year when the PS5 SSD expansion option was enabled and you can find my first wave of tests below:


PS5 SSD Faceoff I (video)- WD Black SN850 vs Seagate Firecuda 530 vs Samsung 980 vs Sabrent Rocket 4 Plus SSD


PS5 SSD Faceoff II (video)- WD Black SN850 vs Seagate Firecuda 530 vs Samsung 980 vs Sabrent Rocket 4 Plus SSD


PS5 SSD Faceoff ALL (article)- WD Black SN850 vs Seagate Firecuda 530 vs Samsung 980 vs Sabrent Rocket 4 Plus SSD

Test 1 – Spiderman Miles Morales #1


A PS5 launch title, this test comprised of seeing which SSD loaded the game world (from the title screen) the fastest. The difference was INCREDIBLY small and came down to the frame!



Winner – Samsung 980 Pro, 03:966 Seconds

Test 2 – Spiderman Miles Morales #2


Sticking with Spiderman Miles Morales, the next test is an in-game world load, fast travelling to another part of the open world. Again, a very quick load and all four SSDs were incredibly close.



Winner – DRAW, Samsung 980 PRO / Seagate Firecuda 530, 04.166 Seconds (less than a single frame between them)

Test 3 – Lego Worlds


Switching back to a PS4 title, I selected Lego Worlds as it is a surprisingly long loading game for the previous generation that (despite the PS5’s increased power and NVMe SSD performance) is quite a demanding game to load into its open world, sandbox mode. Each test for a completely fresh, randomized sandbox mode without internet connectivity involved. I measured this (as it is a dynamic loading screen) at which SSD hit 100% asset loading first.



Winner – WD Black SN850, 25:087 Seconds (Seagate Firecuda 530 shortly afterwards)

Test 4 – Deathloop


Released in late 2021, Deathloop is a fast-paced game that is semi-open-world and prioritized its framerate and colourful assets. This test was direct from title screen load and into an early stage of the game. Loading was compared from the immediate load screen (as the title screen animation can vary)



Winner – WD Black SN850, 07.050 Seconds (Sabrent Rocket 4 Plus shortly after)

Test 5 – CALL OF DUTY WARZONE


A very popular game on all platforms, Call of Duty Warzone is a very tough game to test as it is ‘always-online’ and cannot be played without a server connection that is hit every time any action is performed at the title screen/menus. This test tried to remove as much of the server connection as possible, using bots only training match, but still had server connections that could not be avoided (so these should be taken into account). Loading was deemed ‘completed’ when you had character control (existing aircraft immediately as the option appeared for control)



Winner – Seagate Firecuda 530, 01:13:085 Minutes (WD Black Closely behind)

Test 6 – SPIDERMAN PS5 REMASTERED #1


The next test was very similar to tests 1 and 2, but this time with Spiderman, remastered for the PS5 using the Miles Morales engine upgrades, and the initial test was once again measuring the time it took the game to load into the world from the title screen. Once again, incredible close and came down to the frame and took less that 2-3 seconds across the four.



Winner – Seagate Firecuda 530, 01:854 Seconds

Test 7 – SPIDERMAN PS5 REMASTERED #2


Back to Spiderman Remaster for a 2nd test. A fast/travel test ‘in world’ much like the test with Spiderman M/M. Once again, lightning-fast loading was the order of the day.



Winner – Sabrent Rocket 4 Plus, 03.839 Seconds

Test 8 – Ghost of Tsushima: Legends #1


The next test was using the PS5 version (Directors cut) of Ghost of Tsushima. Using the Legends mode, I was able to set up two different instances of direct-to-game world loading from the main menu. Each test transition ALSO includes an opening world overview cut scene that includes in-world assets (i.e silent background loading with the player watching fixed views), so ‘full’ loading in both instances was judged at the point when the player was given character movement control (the fade-in-effect). The first test, focusing on a tightly knit but graphically detailed area, went like this:



Winner – TIE, Samsung 980 PRO and Sabrent Rocket 4 Plus, 27:774 Seconds

Test 9 – Ghost of Tsushima: Legends #2


Moving on to test two of Ghost of Tsushima, legends mode, this was another open-world area that has an enormous amount of NPCs to factor in and a larger area. Results were as follows:



Winner – Three-way Tie, Samsung 980 PRO, WD Black SN850 and Seagate Firecuda 530, 39:164 Seconds

Test 10 – ROCKET LEAGUE


Another popular multi-platform game, the next test used Rocket League. A single exhibition match test, using bots 4v4, this was never going to be a particularly taxing test but included because this is such a popular game for many.



Winner – Sabrent Rocket 4 Plus, 06:654 Seconds (but only a few frames ahead of all other SSDs)

Test 11 – LAST OF US PART 2 #1


Arriving at the tail end of the PS4 generation’s place as the top gen, Last of Us Part II is an incredibly hefty game (in terms of performance and graphics) and this is achieved with incredibly subtle use of silent/background loading throughout the game’s campaign and also a substantial title-screen to game loading time (one of the loading games of its generation with only the likes of GTA V and RDR2 in the same league). A massive combination of heavy chunks of data and a horrendously large number of smaller files. Put that all together and you have a bit of a loading nightmare for lesser SSDs! Two tests were conducted on Last of Us Part II with these SSDs. The first test featured an incredibly closed in area of the game that cannot afford the luxury of exchanging high-quality textures and assets in favour of lower ones (typically accessible via fixed camera work or distance management). Here is how it turned out in the SSD comparison.



Winner – Samsung 980 PRO, 46.654 Seconds (it loaded ALOT faster and although the difference was negligible in repeated tests, it still was the fastest each time)

Test 12 – LAST OF US PART 2 #2


The 2nd test of The Last of Us Part 2 was in a significantly more open area that on the one had afforded the game the luxury of loading out assets in favour of lesser ones that were unseen/far away, but also had a larger base level of assets to load in initially from the title screen load. Here is how the WD Black SN850, Seagate Firecuda 530, Samsung 980 Pro and Sabrent Rocket 4 Plus SSD compared:



Winner – TIE, Seagate Firecuda 530 and Sabrent Rocket 4 Plus, 01:36.638 Minutes


So, those were the tests, let’s tally up the results! No ‘half points’ in the case of a tie/draw, as even if two or more SSDs loaded at the same pace, it is still a win for both!


Note – If you want to check out the continuous testing of the WD Black SN850, Seagate Firecuda 530, Samsung 980 and Sabrent Rocket 4 Plus SSD for PS5, we have been testing these four SSDs (and many others) over on our YouTube Channel. If you want to check out the playlist for each SSD below, you can use one of the 4 links here.


Click to load the respective video playlist in another tab/window:


Seagate Firecuda 530 PS5 SSD Playlist


WD Black SN850 PS5 SSD Playlist


Samsung 980 Pro PS5 SSD Playlist


Sabrent Rocket 4 Plus PS5 SSD Playlist

WD Black SN850, Seagate Firecuda 530, Samsung 980 Pro and Sabrent Rocket 4 Plus SSD Comparison – The Results


Going through the results, we are able to see that the overall winners on points are the Seagate Firecuda 530 and Samsung 980 Pro SSDs. Also, they were notably similar in the games they succeeded at (a lot of ties/draws).



Samsung 980 Pro – 5


Seagate Firecuda 530 – 5


Sabrent Rocket 4 Plus – 4


WD Black SN850 – 3


 

TOP 4 Recommended PS5 Storage Expansion Compatible SSDs

WD Black SN850


Seagate Firecuda 530


Samsung 980 Pro


SABRENT Rocket 4 Plus


500GB – $169.99

1TB – $249.99


2TB – $549.99

500GB – $149.99

1TB – $239.99


2TB – $489.99


4TB – $949.99.

250GB – $69.99

500GB – $119.99


1TB – $199.99


2TB – $429.99

1TB – $200

2TB – $469.99


4TB – $999.99


If you are interested in learning more, I have reviewed all four of these SSDs here on NASCompares and a lot with a barrage of PS5 tests for this article, the reviews have all featured around 16 different PC benchmark tests via CrystalDisk, ATTO, AS SSD and AJA performance. Find out more below.

SPEED - 9/10
HARDWARE - 9/10
PERFORMANCE - 9/10
PRICE - 7/10
VALUE - 9/10


8.6
PROS
👍🏻Highest PCIe 4×4 M.2 Performance Right Now
👍🏻176 Layer 3D TLC NAND is Unparalleled right now
👍🏻
👍🏻Best Example of Phison E18 Performance
👍🏻
👍🏻Highest Endurance PCIe Gen 4×4 M.2 SSD Right Now
👍🏻
👍🏻Inclusive Data Recovery Services
👍🏻
👍🏻PS5 Compatibility Fully Confirmed
👍🏻
👍🏻Available in up to 4TB
CONS
👎🏻Costs more than most
👎🏻Heatsink is an Additional Purchase
SPEED - 8/10
HARDWARE - 8/10
PERFORMANCE - 8/10
PRICE - 9/10
VALUE - 9/10


8.4
PROS
👍🏻FINALLY, a first-party heatsink for the Samsung 980 Pro
👍🏻One of the first PS5 Expansion Compatibility confirmed SSDs
👍🏻
👍🏻Performance still stands up well in 2022 (almost 1.5yrs since original release)
👍🏻
👍🏻Impressively dense NAND for one of the earliest gen PCIe 4 SSDs still
👍🏻
👍🏻Still has some of the highest 4K Random IOPS in the market
👍🏻
👍🏻Very, VERY good temperature reports in PC use during sustained use
👍🏻
👍🏻Very Good Pricing Now
CONS
👎🏻Heat dissipation in a PS5 environment was not as good as I hoped (PS5 closed bay design at fault really)
👎🏻Traditional Write performance, even at 2TB, looks a little lacklustre against the competition in 2022
👎🏻
👎🏻Still no 4TB version commercially available
SPEED - 8/10
HARDWARE - 8/10
PERFORMANCE - 8/10
PRICE - 9/10
VALUE - 9/10


8.4
PROS
👍🏻High Availability Worldwide
👍🏻
👍🏻One of the first PS5 Expansion Compatibility confirmed SSDs
👍🏻
👍🏻Performance still stands up well in 2022 (almost 1.5yrs since original release)
👍🏻
👍🏻Impressively dense NAND for one of the earliest gen PCIe 4 SSDs still
👍🏻
👍🏻Still has some of the highest 4K Random IOPS in the market
👍🏻
👍🏻Very Good Pricing Now
👍🏻
👍🏻Regular Firmware updates
CONS
👎🏻Heat dissipation in a PS5 environment was not as good as I hoped (PS5 closed bay design at fault really)
👎🏻
👎🏻Traditional Write performance, even at 2TB, looks a little lacklustre against the competition in 2022
👎🏻
👎🏻Still no 4TB version commercially available
SPEED - 9/10
HARDWARE - 8/10
PERFORMANCE - 9/10
PRICE - 8/10
VALUE - 8/10


8.4
PROS
👍🏻Genuinely Impressive Performance
👍🏻One of the Affordable 7,000MB/s Drive on the Market
👍🏻
👍🏻PS5 Compatibility Confirmed
👍🏻
👍🏻Decent Amount of DDR4 Memory Cache
👍🏻
👍🏻96 Layer 3D TLC NAND Hugely Beneficial
👍🏻
👍🏻One of the Earliest Phison E18 SSDs
👍🏻
👍🏻Surpasses Samsung/WD PCIe 4 SSDs in some key areas
CONS
👎🏻IOPS rating is noticeably lower than most competitors
👎🏻Endurance (DWPD/TBW) has dipped noticeably since it’s predecessor
👎🏻
👎🏻Still Outperformed by the Firecuda 530
👎🏻
👎🏻Warranty (1yr unless registered) seems needlessly complex

 

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Nextorage NEM-PA NVMe SSD Review & Benchmark – THE Sony & Phison Choice?

26 janvier 2022 à 01:41

Review of the Nextorage NEM-PA PCIe Gen 4 NVMe SSD

Why should you care about the Nextorage NEM-PA SSD? It is a reasonable question at the start of 2022, as it is fair to say that there are now quite a lot of SSDs available in the market that promise upwards and over 7,000MB/s. The hardware architecture and components needed for a brand to piece together a PCIe SSD for the home or business market is now nowhere near as difficult or restrictive as it once was and therefore alongside big names that we in the west have got used to seeing (such as Seagate, WD and Samsung), we have started seeing a myriad of brands arriving in the prosumer SSD market crop up. Now, with this in mind, many users home/domestic US/UK/EU users might see the brand name ‘Nextorage’ and think, who? Well, this Japanese brand was a Sony (yes, as in Sony Playstation) own company first launched in 2019 and made up of SSD specialist teams from the past 20yrs of development in the storage medium. Then 2 weeks ago it was announced that Phison (yes, as in Phison E18, the biggest and most popular PCIe 4 SSD controller in the world right now) acquired shares of its joint-venture company Nextorage Corporation (hereinafter referred to as “Nextorage”) from its joint-venture partner, Sony Storage Media Solutions Corporation (hereinafter referred to as “SSMS”; SSMS is a wholly-owned subsidiary of Sony Group Corporation). So what does all that actually mean? Japan is an enormous eSports country and alongside demanding the fastest and more durable gaming components in their setups, the priority of a drive that is so closely linked with the developer of the gaming machine AND invested in by the controller manufacturer themselves means that this SSD Brand is in a fantastically unique position to ensure the slickest performance across the board, as well as access to building resources that ensure taht the price point can be better maintained (see WD and Samsung with their pricing thanks to in-house development/hardware). These are all very lofty words of course and boasts of quality and performance do not always translate to delivering it in reality, so let’s review the Nextorage NEM-PA SSD, take a closer look at that hardware and get some testing done to see how well it fulfil on its promises. Let’s start. 

Update 25/01/22 – Nextorage got in touch to highlight that although the NEM-PA 1TB and 2TB is only available in Japan & China at the time of this review, they will be releasing this series at a competitive price in Spring 2022 in the U.S, with the launch in Europe (UK, Germany, France, etc) in the first half of 2022. I (Robbie @nascompares ) will be revisiting this SSD then to see if any firmware updates that have arrived improve/change the results of this review and benchmark and make suitable updates as appropriate.

Nextorage NEM-PA SSD Review – Quick Conclusion

Put simply, this IS an unquestionable good SSD for a PS5 upgrade. That is clearly what the brand has been going for when promoting and presenting the NEM-PA SSD and Nextorage clearly succeeded. There are hurdles to overcome at the time of writing (such as availability outside of Japan right now) that the brand say will be resolved in Spring of 2022, but if you are looking for a long term storage upgrade for your PS5, this is one of the best examples out there. The performance stands up well in both PS5 and PC testing, the architecture holds nothing back (the NAND choice and inclusive heatsink particularly add value) and the presentation (though unimportant really) go the extra mile to assure the buyer of its pedigree. I am less sure of its price point being competitive enough to stand against the WD Black SN850 (a drive with long enough in the market and first-party manufacturer to arrive at incredibly compelling pricing), but if price is not a barrier to you and you are looking for a solid PS5 upgrade for your PS5, this SSD sits comfortably in the top 5 and maybe even top 3 in the market right now. Recommended.

SPEED - 8/10
HARDWARE - 9/10
PERFORMANCE - 9/10
PRICE - 8/10
VALUE - 8/10


8.4
PROS
👍🏻Inclusive Heatsink that is radioactive black Alumite coated
👍🏻176L 3D TLC NAND is always good
👍🏻Backed by Phison AND Sony
👍🏻Solid Controller and Memory Combo
👍🏻Expertly applied heatsink
👍🏻Dynamic SLC caching stores cache size up to 1/3 of the total storage area of ​​SSD
👍🏻Exceptionally High Write Performance
👍🏻Impressive overall team control during sustained tests
CONS
👎🏻Currently only available in Japan (worldwide availability assured for Spring 2022)
👎🏻Price less competitive than the WD Black SN850

Nextorage NEM-PA SSD Review – Packaging

The retail packaging of this Japanese SSD is surprisingly well thought out. I have checked into previous Sony (or Sony connected) SSD releases and although previous releases have been a little more understated/basic-box for the most part, this is very much targeted to PS5 owners who want to upgrade this storage, first and foremost!  The affiliations with Sony are very clear here, from the official Playstation Logo and PS5 system images used on the packaging (something practically no other SSD that I have reviewed in 2021/2022 has ever featured) along with tailored instructions on PS5 installation, the synergy between all this is remarkably clear! Even the colour palette of the box is dripping in PS5 design (placement, colour scheme, layout, etc).

Opening the box reveals only a couple of bits inside, held in a cardboard outer frame. This isn’t hugely surprising, but it DID answer one of my earliest concerns when it comes to any SSD that includes a heatsink – does it come pre-attached (at the factory level) as that normally means it was applied significantly more efficiently and in a dust-free environment, and indeed, that is the case here. The only things inside are the Nextorage NEM-PA SSD + Heatsink combo and the instruction manual.

However, I do want to take the tiniest pause to look at the instructions manual. Although I generally ignore this paper leaflet/pamphlet style documents with an SSD (as they tend to be just related to warranty and regional material disposal regulations – sexy stuff I know), in the case of the Nextorage NEM-PA SSD things have a slight change that we should look at. Once again, much like the packaging being very PS5 focused with official livery, the included document is specifically tailored to installing this SSD in a PS5 console and is surprisingly detailed. Installing an SSD inside the PlayStation 5 is not exactly rocket science, however for technical newbies, m.2 NVMe SSD storage is quite intimidating compared with domestic storage from gaming past such as Memory cards, USB and SD Cards. I definitely liked this tiny little presentational extra and although it bears little importance in the grand scheme of things, I did think it worthy of note.

Removing the Nextorage NEM-PA SSD from it’s antistatic bag, we find quite a chunky looking SSD+heatsink combo. Measuring 23 mm×11.2 mm×80.4 mm, it fits in the PS5 M.2 SSD upgrade slot at the 2280 mark (more detail later) and definitely feels like a sturdy build piece of kit. The logo for the brand is printed in an understated fashion on it’s side and base, but clearly, the heatsink takes up the bulk of its physical architecture.

Flipping the SSD over shows us that this heatsink is a completely surrounding cage design. The 2TB model of the NEM-PA is a double-sided SSD (1TB single-sided) and once again, the understated branding is pretty slick. Indeed, the heatsink at a casual glance looks quite generic, but when you get up close you definitely see a few little tweaks of uniqueness.

For a start, the heatsink does not COMPLETELY cover the SSD, it holds the 2280 M.2 SSD in a tray/bay and allows a little air/heat escape at the tail end. The main body of the heatsink top is a few millimetres further along and allows any airflow through the dips/valleys of the length of it to open out quite neatly.

The top of the heatsink is held in place at 6 individual screw points and although this seems a little overkill, it makes a lot of sense when you see how the thermal pads have been distributed on the SSD to balance pressure against the SSD but not crunch it.

Another lovely bonus of getting a pre-attached heatsink+SSD combo that is applied at the factory level is just how slick the unit is applied. The heatsink is in perfect alignment with the furthermore NAND chip and leaves amply room for the m.2 connectors to connect with the host system. Again, this is a rather minor point BUT you would be staggered how badly this can be done and results in inefficient heat dissipation and airflow.

The heatsink’s 6 screw attachment was held in place remarkably tightly (likely to increase contact and assist heat transference as much as possible) and although I went ahead and removed them (VERY carefully, as they were very soft-headed screws) Netorage is pretty clear that removing this heatsink will largely invalidate their warranty support. Reasons for this became clear as soon as I managed to remove it.

The SSD features a layer of thermal padding on either side of the drive, however, it is much more comparable to paste (think of the silicon gel and paste you use with a CPU) and once removed, flaked and completely lost cohesion (fortunately Nextorage supplied two review samples).  I was able to remove the heatsink top and base with little difficulty, but the pressure of those 6 screws around the heatsink assembly meant that removal from the SSD components themselves was much messier!

The surrounding heatsink casing around the SSD is remarkably well spaced and the heatsink itself is aluminium in core material, however (as highlighted in my video review) it is also coated with a highly thermal radioactive black alumite, for assisted heat pass through.

Indeed, throughout our 18 stage test period, with 1 minute cool down time between and sustained Read and/or Write activity, the Nextorage only peaked at 44 degrees celsius – very impressive indeed!

However, PC benchmarking is less of a current subject for the Nextorage NEM-PA SSD, as this drive has PS5 users squarely in its sights. So, how did this SSD perform i nthe PS5?

If you install the Nextorage SSD into a PS5 storage expansion bay, the heatsink sits in perfectly, as well as looking quite in-line with the rest of the hardware inside the PS5 chassis. The next question of course is whether this rather chunky SSD heatsink of the Nextorage NEM-PA will actually allow the metal cover plate of the PS5 M.2 expansion bay to close?

And yes, it closed with zero issue/contact. The jury is still out on whether you should use the aluminium m.2 cover plate on the PS5, but nevertheless, this SSD definitely fits neatly and without issue.

Unlike PC benchmarks that are typically advertised on all SSD product pages that point at CrystalDisk, AJA, ATTO and more (we will cover those later), the PS5 has it’s own very unique internal benchmark system (which has been updated since it was first available last autumn). Although the key points of what an SSD scores on are not provided, we can make some educated guesses based on results from other drives tested. High sequential Read and Write are always going to contribute, however the IOPS performance of an SSD seems to be a big factor and on-drive cache performance/flushing too seems to help. In the case of this SSD, the benchmark (the 1TB version was tested) was 6,539MB/s, which for a 1TB SSD is very impressive! I performed this benchmark 3 more times and scores of 6300, 6100 and 6500MB/s were reached (factoring in repeated benchmarks can oversaturate the cache a bit). All in all, very good numbers.

As you might expect, the SSD storage immediately appears on your PS5 Storage manager (2TB shown below as ref) and is available for games storage immediately. It’s a minor point (raised by the less PS5 storage awareness) but do remember that installing an SSD in your PS5 does NOT replace the internal PS5 SSD, it simply adds it as another area of available storage.

So, lets take a look at how that benchmark compares with over similar architecture and priced drives in the market for PS5.

Nextorage NEM-PA SSD Review – PS5 Benchmark

To put the Nextorage NEM-PA SSD PS5 Performance Benchmark into a little perspective, here is how it compares against the Addlink A95, Adata XPG Gammix S70, Sabrent Rocket 4 Plus and Gigabyte Aorus 7000s – four SSDs that are all PS5 supported and VERY similar architecture very little difference between the others in this tier, it is a solid benchmark.

Addlink A95 PS5 Benchmark – 6556MB/s XPG GAMMIX S70 PS5 Benchmark – 6235MB/s
Sabrent Rocket 4 Plus – 6557MB/s Gigabyte Aorus 7000s PS5 Benchmark6557MB/s

Full PS5 Testing of the Nextorage NEM-PA PCIe 4 NVMe SSD will be live on the NASCompares YouTube channel soon. When they are, you will find them below.

So that is the physical design of the Nextorage NEM-PA SSD. But what about the hardware components themselves? Does the Nextorage NEM-PA cut the mustard in terms of current generation hardware and protocols? Let’s find out.

Nextorage NEM-PA SSD Review – Hardware Specifications

As you might expect from an M.2 NVMe SSD that boldly promises performance of over 7,000MB/s sequential read (ie BIG data), the hardware specifications and architecture of the Nextorage NEM-PA are quite modern. Indeed, for all the big talk of the Seagate Firecuda 530 hardware (still currently the ‘score to beat’ PCIE Gen4 m.2 NVMe right now) being top tier, the Nextorage NEM-PA is pretty darn similar on the spec sheet! Below is how it looks:

Nextorage NEM-PA

1TB – $TBC, 2TB – $TBC

PCIe Generation PCIe Gen 4
NVMe Rev NVMe Rev 1.4
NAND 176L 3D TLC NAND
Max Capacity 2TB
Controller Phison E18
Warranty 5yr

I know a lot of the above will seem needlessly technical, so below we can bring the most important considerations into sharper focus.

Hardware Focus of the Nextorage NEM-PA SSD Series

Once you remove the heatsink and brush off the thermal gel/paste, you have a regular designed PCIe 4 SSD as you would expect. The controller is located in the middle, alongside the 2666Mhz DDR4 memory (scaled) and the 2TB SSD has NAND on either side of the PCB. Although Nextorage are rather quite about the specifications of the SSD components on their official pages, they really do not need to be, as a brief look up of the part numbers shows that a couple are top-notch indeed.

As you might expect from NeXtorage and its NEM-PA being heavily invested in by Phison themselves, the controller of this SSD is the Phison PS5018-E18. Although the NEM-PA is by no means the first commercially available SSD to use this PCIe4 controller, it is worth highlighting that this component was given additional thermal padding (as visible by the circle on the chip in the image) to further increase conductivity for heat passing to the heatsink. Also, this SSD controller has a high precision error correction algorithm “4th Gen LDPC (Low Density Parity Check)”, which has advanced detection and correction technology for random bit errors that occur during reading and largely protects the data from corruption.

The Netsorage NEM-PA features 1/2GB of DDR4 memory (depending on the capacity of the SSD) and alongside that being pretty much the best-performing memory at PCIe4 SSD level you can get at this time, the drive also features Dynamic SLC, which mean provides cache size up to 1/3 of the total storage area of ​​SSD, which accelerates frequently accessed data and extends the life of TLC NAND. Lovely stuff.

The NAND on the Nextorage NEM-PA (where the data lives!) is an area I am surprised that the brand is not louder about, as even a quick investigation shows that it is 176L 3D TLC NAND (ID -IA7BG94AYA). Currently there are only about 4-5 other SSDs in the market at this tier that uses 176L NAND and given the inclusive heatsink, E18 controller and top tier brand backing, that makes this a very nice bonus as 176L NAND means better performance, IOPS, durability and general usability in numerous ways (with the bulk of other SSDs in the market at 96L).

Overall, the building blocks of the Nextorage NEM-PA NVMe SSD are all pretty darn good and make it clearly stand on ar with similar SSDs such as the Seagate Firecuda 530 in terms of build, but challenge the performance of lower priced alternatives like the Samsung 980 Pro and WD Black SN850. Let’s have a look at how they compare on the datasheets!

Overall, you really cannot fault the hardware inside/onboard the Nextorage NEM-PA, as it is still promising higher performing in sequential Read and Write than many other M.2 NVMe PCIe 4 SSDs released in that time. Before we go into the full testing, however, it is worth taking a moment to look closely at the reported performance benchmarks of the Nextorage NEM-PA, as although the performance seems stellar, there are areas such as IOPS and endurance when compared with its main rivals that are worth taking into consideration.

Nextorage NEM-PA SSD Review – Official Stats First

Taking a deep dive into the specifications of the Nextorage NEM-PA and how they compare with the Seagate Firecuda 530 and WD Black SN850, we can see that in terms of architecture, it is extremely close to the Firecuda build. These two SSDs arrived on the market around 5 months apart, unlike the WD Black which arrived almost 1.5yrs before! So, lets take a closer look:

Brand/Series Nextorage NEM-PA

1TB – $TBC, 2TB – $TBC

Seagate Firecuda 530

500GB – $149.99, 1TB – $239.99, 2TB – $489.99, 4TB – $949.99

WD Black SN850

500GB – $169.99, 1TB – $249.99, 2TB – $549.99

PCIe Generation PCIe Gen 4 PCIe Gen 4 PCIe Gen 4
NVMe Rev NVMe 1.4 NVMe 1.4 NVMe 1.4
NAND 176L 3D TLC NAND 3D TLC Micron B47R 176L BiCS4 96L TLC
Max Capacity 2TB – Double Sided 4TB – Double Sided 2TB
Controller Phison E18-PS5018 Phison E18-PS5018 WD_BLACK G2
Warranty 5yr 5yr 5yr
500GB Model N/A ZP500GM3A013 WDS500G1X0E-00AFY0
Price in $ and $ N/A $139 / £119 $119 / £99
1TB Model NEM-PA1TB ZP1000GM3A013 WDS100T1X0E-00AFY0
Price in $ and $ $TBC / £TBC $239 / £199 $249 / £169
2TB Model NEM-PA2TB ZP2000GM3A013 WDS200T1X0E-00AFY0
Price in $ and $ $TBC / £TBC $419 / £379 $399 / £339
4TB Model N/A ZP4000GM3A013 N/A
Price in $ and $ N/A $949 / £789 N/A
500GB Model N/A ZP500GM3A013 WDS500G1X0E-00AFY0
Total Terabytes Written (TBW) N/A 640TB 300TB
Mean Time Between Failures (MTBF, hours) N/A 1,800,000 1,750,000
DWPD N/A 0.7DWPD 0.3DWPD
1TB Model NEM-PA1TB ZP1000GM3A013 WDS100T1X0E-00AFY0
Total Terabytes Written (TBW) 700TB 1275TB 600TB
Mean Time Between Failures (MTBF, hours) 1,600,000 1,800,000 1,750,000
DWPD 0.38DWPD 0.7DWPD 0.3DWPD
2TB Model NEM-PA2TB ZP2000GM3A013 WDS200T1X0E-00AFY0
Total Terabytes Written (TBW) 1400TB 2550TB 1200TB
Mean Time Between Failures (MTBF, hours) 1,600,000 1,800,000 1,750,000
DWPD 0.38DWPD 0.7DWPD 0.3DWPD
4TB Model N/A ZP4000GM3A013 N/A
Total Terabytes Written (TBW) N/A 5100TB N/A
Mean Time Between Failures (MTBF, hours) N/A 1,800,000 N/A
DWPD N/A 0.7DWPD N/A

The durability in terms of Terabytes written in the 5 year warranty period (also the drive writes per day) put the Nextorage NEM-PA in the middle of the three (despite the slightly outmoded MTBF figure). Pricing at the month is tough to compare, given that the NEM-PA is only available in Japan (with plans for global availability in Spring 2022. For a better understanding of the specifications and terms of these SSDs, here is a video that breaks down the terminology of modern SSDs:

Now, let’s break down the performance of these three SSDs in terms of throughput (i.e Read and Write speeds at the top end sequentially) and IOPS (individual commands of the smallest size that can be delivered to the SSD per second at the 4k level randomly. Here is the result of that comparison:

Brand/Series Nextorage NEM-PA

1TB – $TBC, 2TB – $TBC

Seagate Firecuda 530

500GB – $149.99, 1TB – $239.99, 2TB – $489.99, 4TB – $949.99

WD Black SN850

500GB – $169.99, 1TB – $249.99, 2TB – $549.99

500GB Model N/A ZP500GM3A013 WDS500G1X0E-00AFY0
Sequential Read (Max, MB/s), 128 KB N/A 7000MB 7000MB
Sequential Write (Max, MB/s), 128 KB N/A 3000MB 4100MB
1TB Model NEM-PA1TB ZP1000GM3A013 WDS100T1X0E-00AFY0
Sequential Read (Max, MB/s), 128 KB 7300MB 7300MB 7000MB
Sequential Write (Max, MB/s), 128 KB 6000MB 6000MB 5300MB
2TB Model NEM-PA2TB ZP2000GM3A013 WDS200T1X0E-00AFY0
Sequential Read (Max, MB/s), 128 KB 7300MB 7300MB 7000MB
Sequential Write (Max, MB/s), 128 KB 6900MB 6900MB 5100MB
4TB Model N/A ZP4000GM3A013  
Sequential Read (Max, MB/s), 128 KB N/A 7300MB N/A
Sequential Write (Max, MB/s), 128 KB N/A 6900MB N/A
Brand/Series Seagate Firecuda 530 WD Black SN850
500GB Model N/A ZP500GM3A013 WDS500G1X0E-00AFY0
Random Read (Max, IOPS), 4 KB QD32 N/A 400,000 1,000,000
Random Write (Max, IOPS), 4 KB QD32 N/A 700,000 680,000
1TB Model NEM-PA1TB ZP1000GM3A013 WDS100T1X0E-00AFY0
Random Read (Max, IOPS), 4 KB QD32 750000 800000 1,000,000
Random Write (Max, IOPS), 4 KB QD32 1000000 1000000 720,000
2TB Model NEM-PA2TB ZP2000GM3A013 WDS200T1X0E-00AFY0
Random Read (Max, IOPS), 4 KB QD32 1000000 1,000,000 1,000,000
Random Write (Max, IOPS), 4 KB QD32 1000000 1,000,000 710,000
4TB Model N/A ZP4000GM3A013  
Random Read (Max, IOPS), 4 KB QD32 N/A 1,000,000 N/A
Random Write (Max, IOPS), 4 KB QD32 N/A 1,000,000 N/A

The Nextorage NEM-PA is RIGHT BEHIND the Seagate Firecuda in IOPS and on the same level on throughput. The WD Black, released much, much earlier carries similar numbers on IOPS but write performance (less key to PS5 users of course) is noticeably lower. Overall, the NEM-PA definitely stands up well against these two popular PS5 choices and even surpasses them in a few areas. Let’s get this SSD in the test machine and begin the benchmarks!

Testing the Nextorage NEM-PA m.2 PCIE4 NVMe SSD

The Nextorage NEM-PA was selected for this test and it was tested using multiple benchmark tools, from a cold boot, in the 2nd storage slot (i.e not the OS drive). Each test was conducted three times (full details of this are shown in the YouTube Review of the Nextorage NEM-PA over on NASCompares):

Test Machine:

  • Windows 10 Pro Desktop System
  • Intel i5 11400 Rocket Lake – 6-Core 2.6/4.4Ghz
  • 16GB DDR4 2666MHz Memory
  • Intel B560M mATX Motherboard
  • OS Storage, Seagate Firecuda 120 SSD
  • Test SSD connected to Secondary PCIe Gen 4 M.2 Slot

Using CrystalDisk, we got a good measure of the drive and verified that this PCIe Gen 4 x4 SSD was indeed using the 4×4 lane. Additionally, the temp averaged out around 41C between each test being conducted.

The first tests were conducted using the ATTO disk benchmark software. The first was a 256MB test file size and below is a breakdown of the transfer rates and IOPS. The 2nd Test was a 1GB test file and finally, the last test was with a 4GB test file. The system was given 1-minute cool downtime between tests, no screen recording software was used (remove overhead) and a heatsink was used throughout (no reboots)

ATTO Disk Benchmark Test #1

256MB File PEAK Read Throughput  = 6.61GB/s

256MB File PEAK Write Throughput = 6.33GB/s

 


 

ATTO Disk Benchmark Test #2

1GB File PEAK Read Throughput  = 6.61GB/s

1GB File PEAK Write Throughput = 6.32GB/s

 


 

ATTO Disk Benchmark Test #3

4GB File PEAK Read Throughput  = 6.59GB/s

4GB File PEAK Write Throughput = 6.47GB/s

 


 

Next, although the ATTO tests were quite good, but not what I would have hoped from this SSD, so I moved on to the Crystal Disk Mark testing to see how well it would handle our last barrage of tests. The first test was the 1GB file testing, which measured both sequential and random, as well as the read and write IOPS. Test were conducted on a 1GB, 4GB and 16GB Test File. I also included a mixed 70/30 read and write task to give a little bit more of a realistic balanced workload. These tests were conducted with a 1-minute cooling break in between

CRYSTALDISK MARK 1GB TEST


CRYSTALDISK MARK 4GB TEST


CRYSTALDISK MARK 16GB TEST

 

Next, I switched to AS SSD benchmark. A much more thorough test through, I used 1GB, 3GB and 5GB test files. Each test includes throughput benchmarks and IOPS that are respective to the larger file sizes (important, if you are reading this and trying to compare against the reported 4K IOPS from the manufacturer).

AS SSD Benchmark Test #1

 


AS SSD Benchmark Test #2

 


AS SSD Benchmark Test #3

 

Ordinarily, I would introduce tests like BlackMagic and AJA into the mix here, but even a short burst of testing on an NVMe like this would over saturate the cache memory on board. Nevertheless, in the short term we still could ascertain the reported performance on 1GB, 4GB and 16GB file testing was:

1GB AJA File Test Results (Peak) = 5920MB/s Read & 5703MB/s Write

4GB AJA File Test Results (Peak) = 5861MB/s Read & 5678MB/s Write

16GB AJA File Test Results (Peak) = 5829MB/s Read & 5553MB/s Write

Overall, the Nextorage NEM-PA was certainly able to provide some solid performance, as well as potentially exceed the test figures here on a more powerful machine. Given the reported Read and Write statistics that the brand has stated publically, I think there is enough evidence here to back up those claims. IOPs were a little lower than I expected, but again, we were testing very large file types, so this would have to be taken in context.

Nextorage NEM-PA SSD Review – Conclusion

Put simply, this IS an unquestionable good SSD for a PS5 upgrade. That is clearly what the brand has been going for when promoting and presenting the NEM-PA SSD and Nextorage clearly succeeded. There are hurdles to overcome at the time of writing (such as availability outside of Japan right now) that the brand say will be resolved in Spring of 2022, but if you are looking for a long term storage upgrade for your PS5, this is one of the best examples out there. The performance stands up well in both PS5 and PC testing, the architecture holds nothing back (the NAND choice and inclusive heatsink particularly add value) and the presentation (though unimportant really) go the extra mile to assure the buyer of its pedigree. I am less sure of its price point being competitive enough to stand against the WD Black SN850 (a drive with long enough in the market and first-party manufacturer to arrive at incredibly compelling pricing), but if price is not a barrier to you and you are looking for a solid PS5 upgrade for your PS5, this SSD sits comfortably in the top 5 and maybe even top 3 in the market right now. Recommended

PROs of the Nextorage NEM-PA CONs of the Nextorage NEM-PA
  • Inclusive Heatsink that is radioactive black Alumite coated
  • 176L 3D TLC NAND is always good
  • Backed by Phison AND Sony
  • Solid Controller and Memory Combo
  • Expertly applied heatsink
  • Dynamic SLC caching stores cache size up to 1/3 of the total storage area of ​​SSD
  • Exceptionally High Write Performance
  • Impressive overall team control during sustained tests
  • Currently only available in Japan (worldwide availability assured for Spring 2022)
  • Price less competitive than the WD Black SN850

 


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Eagle PS5 Designed SSD Heatsink Review – Cheap & Cheerful? Both? Neither?

24 janvier 2022 à 01:10

Reviewing the Eagle PS5 Designed Heatsink for SSD Upgrades

Technology moves fast! What was once considered fantastically unique and ‘one-off’ can all too soon become remarkably mainstream. Which is how we find the Eagle PS5 SSD Heatsink and its appearance on the console market. When Sony enabled SSD upgrades on the Playstation 5, the need for a heatsink to use alongside your SSD of choice was recommended by them (and all storage professionals) almost immediately. The newest commercially available generation of SSD storage (M.2 NVMe PCIe 4 x4 SSD), although fantastically fast, can get rather HOT when its optimal 7,000MB/s performance gets reached (and surpassed), so many users went ahead and ordered m.2 heatsinks for as little as $10 to allow the SSD to transfer that performance/durability negating heat out of the drive, into the heatsink and then allow it to be dispersed into the air. HOWEVER, it soon became apparent to many that these $10 M.2 SSD heatsinks that were designed for big, open PC cases were much, MUCH less effective in the more restrictive m.2 SSD slot of the PS5 (which even came with an m.2 cover plate to stop the heat of the heatsink entering the PS5 central cooling system BUT which in turn means that the SSD+Heatsink is encased in a small slot and all that heat has nowhere to go). So, shortly after the PS5 enabled the SSD expansion slot, some brands set to work designing heatsinks that were made AROUND the internal PS5 design, finding a balance between dissipating the heat of the SSD and ensuring the system remains cool. The first was the Sabrent PS5 Heatsink, launched at $25 on Sept 2021 (now available in bundles and at a more reasonable $20). Closely followed by more PS5 designed heatsinks that all evolved in different directions. The INEO, Graugear & Elecgear PS5  Heatsink (all launched in Nov 2021 at $30-35) was a much more aggressive and copper pipe fused heatsink for professional gamers and streamers. The PNY, a much thicker but prosumer designed model that used closed funnelling (arriving on Dec 2021 and at $25) came next and as you can already see, the releases become more frequent and the prices diverge. So, fast forward to NOW and you have a rather  ‘out of nowhere’ heat dissipation solution for the console, the Eagle PS5 Designed SSD heatsink. The Eagle Heatsink represents the first real ‘unbranded style’ heatsink that has arrived on the scene available on the likes of Aliexpress, uBuy, eBay etc that seems to be a cheaper alternative (depending on where you look) to all of those other PS5 heatsinks that have arrived since. But does this means that this rather unknown release is a bit cheap and nasty, or a diamond in the rough? Let’s find out in today’s review of the Eagle PS5 SSD heatsink.

Eagle PS5 SSD Heatsink Review – Quick Conclusion

I genuinely WANTED to like the Eagle PS5 SSD heatsink, I really, REALLY did. The problem here is that it is another very familiar case of ‘you get what you pay for’ when shopping online and this heatsink somewhat dies the death of a thousand cuts – i.e there are so, so many small/niggling factors that undermine the whole thing. If you are looking for the best BUDGET PS5 heatsink to buy in 2022/2023, then I can definitely recommend the Eagle Heatsink for your PS5. But only to those that understand that a low price (as little as $7.99 in some places, e.g Aliexpress) comes with a notable degree of compromise. Does it work? Yes. Does it do a better job than a $10 PC designed m.2 SSD heatsink? Yes. Is it worth under $10? Yes. HOWEVER, the presentation of the heatsink and logic of the accessories at the retail level is horrendous, the pricing available online is completely bonkers, the physical/industrial cutting of the aluminium is pretty sub-par, the weight/quality of the heatsink seems underwhelming for its ultimate use, it clips the edge of the PS5 internal casing in a way that seems ill-thought and the whole product leaves you with a feeling that this heatsink is a bit of a quick cash-grab for budget eTailers! Of all the heatsinks that I have tested, I would put this very much at the bottom of all of them in terms of quality, but I still cannot fault that it does exactly what it says it can do and if you need a low-cost PS5 designed heatsink for your PS5 storage expansion upgrades, you will NOT get a better budget option right now.

EFFECTIVENESS - 4/10
HARDWARE - 5/10
PERFORMANCE - 5/10
PRICE - 4/10
VALUE - 5/10


4.6
PROS
👍🏻If you search around, you can get it surprisingly cheap
👍🏻Works better than a standard PC designed M.2 SSD Heatsink
👍🏻Plenty of thermal pads and two different thicknesses
👍🏻Not complicated to install
👍🏻No restriction to a single SSD vendor (i.e WD Heatsink is only available with a WD SSD etc)
CONS
👎🏻Feels a bit cheap and lighter than other heatsinks designed for PS5
👎🏻The quality of the cut/shape feels a bit rushed
👎🏻Very poor presentation/shipping kit

Eagle PS5 SSD Heatsink Review – Retail Packaging

Ok, so I hate to start any review negatively, but my impressions of the Eagle PS5 SSD heatsink from purchasing it online to when the item first arrived with me were not great. First off, when the heatsink first arrived online, I owed it to my subscribers to get this featured and tested ASAP, so I went ahead and paid £32 for the heatsink on uBuy and an additional £17 shipping (so, that’s £59, or $81 US). Now, I was cool with that. However, within 48 hours of purchasing, I started seeing the same heatsink appearing online under differing names at 7-8 different budget component outlets. Prices ranged from as little as £7.99, to £23 and even as high as £41 and all of them seemed to ship from the same warehouse district of China, with specifications that differed wildly (some weigh specs and size around 20-25% different). So, even before the unit arrived a week later, I was already thinking “Yep – SCAM!”.

Click to view slideshow.

However, I was pleased to receive the unit from uBuy within the week promised. Now, I know uBuy is a massively budget eShop based business, but even then a think there is a fine line of difference between ‘cheap’ and ‘value’ that needed to be considered. Do remember that I have spent £32 on the SSD heatsink ($44) and that is more than the Sabrent, PNY and Elecgear . So, when the heatsink arrived in a basic padded envelope, no retail packaging and poorly printed/cut photocopies of instructions, I was less than impressed.

The full contents of the Eagle PS5 heatsink package were pretty underwhelming. Obviously, the key consideration for ANY heatsink is going to be how well it does the job, but I think most buyers who spend this kind of money as an alternative to a $10 M.2 heatsinks are going to have expectations that are going to be somewhat tarnished by this package.

A close up of the key two main parts of the retail package shows you that what you have is kinda the bare minimum for the most part. It is also worth noting that the Eagle PS5 heatsink does not include any additional screws. The PS5 already has this in your console, but ALL the other PS5 designed heatsinks on the market include these and in the case of the Eagle PS5 heatsink they would be especially helpful later on (I will get to that).

The included instructions are fantastically basic, leaving out important steps that the true novice will not be aware of (such as how to remove the PS5 side plates safely without damage or the m.2 Plate) which I admit are not exactly brain-surgery, but still important. There are numerous grammatical and capitalization errors which, although unimportant in the grand scheme of things) still undermine the whole product presentation.

Then you have the main heatsink and accessories kit. In a plastic package, it contains an odd mix of the bare minimum required, yet unnecessary extras. Before we get onto the Eagle PS5 heatsink itself, let’s talk about those ‘extras’.

So, first, there are the thermal pads, with the Eagle PS5 heatsink arriving with 4 thick heat pads and 3 thinner pads. Why would you need x4 and x3? It’s nice to have spares, but you cannot help but feel like these have been thrown in arbitrarily and the excess is almost certainly down to them being stuck together. The inclusion of different thicknesses of the thermal pad is genuinely appreciated, but you are still left feeling that this is a bit ‘just lob them in there!’. Also, there is an inclusive heatsink that is fantastically poor quality and I would NOT recommend using this for your PS5 M.2/Main screw heads! The cross/Phillips head is too small for the main PS5 head screw and will likely tear it up and is too soft for the m.2 screw head and will likely just tear itself up and leave filament in the m.2 screws. So yeah, do not use it.

That said, I am still going to give them kudos/good marks for including the varied thickness of thermal pads. Very few heatsinks include two different thermal pads of thickness.

But that is enough for the packaging. Let’s discuss the build quality of the JEYI Eagle PS5 SSD Heatsink and see if it is worth the price.

Eagle PS5 SSD Heatsink Review – Design

The design and shape of the JEYI Eagle PS5 Designed heatsink are actually quite unique, looking a little like the claw/talon/beak of the bird the heatsink is named after. It is designed to live outside of the PS5 M.2 SSD bay partially and completely replace the existing PS5 M.2 expansion silver plate – though it still requires the use of the default PS5 m.2 screw and PS symbol embossed m.2 slot cover screw. The design is a little comparable to a couple of other SSD heatsinks for PS5 in the market from Sabrent and Elecgear , but is different enough that any legal questions of copying design are largely avoidable.

The most popular PS5 designed heatsink right now is the Sabrent SSD Heatsink, released in autumn 2021. Unlike the larger/wider spread of the JEYI Eagle heatsink, the Sabrent is content to jsut occupy the full M.2 SSD expansion slot of the PS5, featuring the same angular top design to capture the air as it passes through the PS5 front vents. Although it seems smaller in size, it does mean that the Sabrent will have much less of a potential impact on the PS5 ambient temperature. The Eagle is a pinch taller and makes a firmer connection with the SSD, but the Sabrent benefits from being available to buy as an SSD+Heatsink bundle (with larger capacity SSDs effectively including the heatsink at no additional cost). However, the Eagle PS5 heatsink is a lot more comparable to the Elecgear Heatsink in shape and method of dissipation.

JEYI Eagle PS5 SSD Heatsink

Larger and a fraction taller

Sabrent PS5 Designed SSD Heatsink

Review of the Sabrent PS5 SSD Heatsink HERE

Comparing the Eagle with the Elecgear PS5 SSD heatsink makes a little more sense, as both of these expand their design outside of the PS5 M.2 SSD slot and much greater into the ventilation path of the PS5’s internal fan. Though one of the biggest design differences is that the Elecgear is ventilated throughout to allow the collected heat to be directed into the raised fins. This means that the heat will be controlled into these standout points and cooled by the fans a great deal more efficiently. The Elecgear also has an internal, base located copper pipe design that funnels the heat into much more conductive material, adding the 2nd stage to the dissipation of the SSD controller, etc. The Eagle by comparison here really shows it’s rather more affordable design choices here and whereas it seemed to be a great heat dissipating design when compared with the Sabrent, here it looks a lot more pedestrian.

JEYI Eagle PS5 SSD Heatsink

Less ventilated but a similar shape

Elecgear PS5 Designed SSD Heatsink

Review of the Elecgear PS5 SSD Heatsink HERE

Much like other PS5 SSD heatsinks, the Eagle H/S has a slight base lip to allow the heatsink to hinge into the PS5 M.2 panel for easier installation.

As mentioned earlier, the Eagle PS5 Heatsink does not include any additional screws and requires the use of the triangle, square, cross, circle screw that is normally used to keep the m.2 late cover in place, which is perfectly fine really. However, the screw-hole on the Eagle PS5 SSD H/S is quite poorly cut and a bit scratchy. Again, not really a big deal, but it is another small thing that gives you a vibe that these have been bashed out in a hurry.

The top of the Eagle heatsink has grooves in it to funnel the air flowing through the PS5 internal fan assembly which is exactly what you would expect, as well as angled in alignment with the vents of the PS5 itself. They seem a little low but will certainly still be effective.

Flipping the heatsink over shows that the main SSD connecting portion of the build is a full 22110 length to occupy the full m.2 slot. I won’t complain about the lack of a thermal pad being pre-applied, as some users will want to use particular thicknesses, as well as the heatsink including a whole bunch of them. Also, it is certainly a deeper plate than the likes of the Sabrent, but it does still feel a little light compared with others.

Let’s go through the act of installing the Eagle SSD Heatsink in the PS5.

Eagle PS5 SSD Heatsink Review – Installation

A Full walkthrough guide on the physical installation of an SSD in the PS5 SSD slot can be found here (don;t reinstall the m.2 cover plate if you intend on installing a custom/designed PS5 Heatsink – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qbpyX6GGGIQ

Once you have installed the SSD in the PS5 SSD expansion slot, as well as applied a thermal pad (ignore the wire shown in the picture, that is from my temperature testing of the EAGLE heatsink), you just need to place the Eagle Heatsink in alignment with the slit/hinge near the m.2 connector.

You will know that the Eagle PS5 heatsink is inserted correctly as it should lever down neatly with the screw hole in alignment with the m.2 SSD cover screw hole. One thing I did notice was that the heatsink does click the shape of the PS5 internal chassis frame a tiny bit when lowered. Not a massive issue, but never seen any other PS5 designed heatsinks have this small physical shape tap.

Before you screw the Eagle PS5 heatsink down on top of the SSD, make sure the base of the heatsink (when the eagle JEYI logo is) is in straight alignment with the slot. Else the heatsink will not be fully/evenly installed and then have limited connectivity with the SSD chips under the thermal pad.

Then you can just go ahead and use the M.2 Expansion slot cover screw in the available hole of the Eagle PS5 SSD heatsink. No need to go in too heavy-handed, just screw till you feel moderate resistance. The heatsink is thicker than the typical M.2 Aluminimum cover plate, so it will not go into the screw-hole as far – overdoing it might tear the threads of the screw hole unnecessarily.

And that is about it. That single screw will hold the plate in place (thanks to that lever lip design on the other side) and as you can see from the finished image of the PS5 below, the grooves on top of the Eagle heatsink are completely parallel with the angled vent slots on the console.

If you look at the front of the PS5, you are able to see how close and raised the grooves of the Eagle SSD heatsink are visible. The Eagle heatsink certainly doesn’t block the vent but is definitely one of the more chunky heatsink’s that I have installed till now. As soon as your PS5 side plates are reapplied, then the heatsink will be near enough invisible, but I am still the tiniest bit concerned with how much of the ventilation it appears to be in front of.

So, that is how the heatsink looks when installed and how easy it is. But how about how well it works? Let’s run some temperature testing to see how well it does it’s job in heavy read, heavy write and gameplay instances.

Eagle PS5 SSD Heatsink Review – Temperature Testings

Temperature testing for the Eagle PS5 SSD heatsink has been broken down into several areas. The main aims here are to work out the following things:

  1. Does the Eagle Heatsink Keep the Temperature low on the SSD in sustained use?
  2. Does the Eagle Heatsink Interfere with the PS5 Internal System Temp negatively?
  3. Is the Eagle Heatsink provide a significant improvement over PC designed M.2 SSD heatsinks (eg the Eluteng M.2)

In order to do this, I have installed a temperature sensor on the M.2 SSD itself, UNDER the heatsink AND the thermal pad, directly on the controller chip of the SSD. The SSD used in the testing was the PNY XLR8 CS3140, a Phison E18, 96L 3D TLC NAND SSD at 1TB – a good mid-range price point SSD that is single-sided and provides 6551MB/s on the PS5 internal benchmark.

When the temp node is on the SSD Controller, I then place the thermal pad down, closed and screw down the heatsink, then attach the 2nd node just underneath the PS5 fan point, in the open air. This second temperature sensor will tell us the surrounding system temp that the internal fan will be using to cool the rest of the system. The testing consisted of 6 different elements. 4 gameplay sessions of 25mins each, with 2 sessions focusing on the SSD temp and 2 focusing on the system temp (in that order, with 1-2 mins reboot between each, in order to see how the system temp is affected over the combined power-on time). Then a sustained read and write activity of 360MB/s to/from the PS5 internal PS5 SSD and M.2 NVMe SSD (the PNY XLR8 CS3140) and how it impacted the SSD controller only. We are NOT looking at performance/framerate/MB/s etc, ONLY temperatures. Below were the results (video will be published shortly).

Note – BOTH PS5 Side plates were on during the tests 

Test Type Starting Temp (C) Finishing Temp (C) Change (C)
Heavy Write (350GB) 27.9℃ 43.5℃ 15.6℃
Demon Souls 25min Play (Controller) 26.3℃ 40.1℃ 13.8℃
Demon Souls 25min Play (System Temp) 27.0℃ 28.2℃ 1.2℃
Matrix Unreal 5 25min Play (Controller) 36.9℃ 42.2℃ 5.3℃
Matrix Unreal 5 25min Play (System Temp) 27.6℃ 27.7℃ 0.1℃
Heavy Read (350GB) 34.0℃ 38.1℃ 4.1℃

So, taking a closer look at the results above, we can work out a few things. First off, there is no denying that the Eagle PS5 Designed SSD heatsink works. Had an SSD been installed inside a PS5 without a heatsink, these temperatures would have easily doubled and (in the case of the heavy write activity) likely exceeded the 70℃ maximum of an SSD before it throttles it’s own performance in efforts to maintain the lifespan of the drive. However, these are still not great temps for this SSD to have after 4x relatively short gameplay sessions (and the data migration instances). To put these stats into a little perspective, below is the exact same tests being conducted with a basic $10 m.2 heat sink that is designed for more general PC use:

NOTE – There tests were performed on different days and ambient temp AND general environmental conditions can undermine these results. Watch the video published soon to see these results in much, MUCH greater detail)

Test Type Eluteng H/S Change Eagle H/S Change
Heavy Write (350GB) 15.1℃ 15.6℃
Demon Souls 25min Play (Controller) 23.3℃ 13.8℃
Demon Souls 25min Play (System Temp) 0.5℃ 1.2℃
Matrix Unreal 5 25min Play (Controller) 16.3℃ 5.3℃
Matrix Unreal 5 25min Play (System Temp) 1.8℃ 0.1℃
Heavy Write (350GB) 18.8℃ 4.1℃

So, YES the Eagle heatsink certainly resulted in a lower overall increase, but the numbers in some cases were a lot closer than I would have expected (especially when you compare these results against that of the Sabrent PS5 Heatsink, the INEO, Graugear & Elecgear PS5  Heatsink (all of which were drastically better). These tests still firmly showed that this heatsink was able to dissipate more heat away from the SSD than a generic alternative, but also still show that the difference is negociable at this pricepoint when there are $20 alternatives doing it better.

NOTE – The FULL video of the Temperature tests for the Eagle PS5 SSD Heatsink, as well as how it compares against the Eluteng M.2 Heatsink, the Sabrent PS5 heatsink and the INEO Heatsink Heatsink will be live soon and in a2-Part Series.

Eagle PS5 SSD Heatsink Review – Conclusion & Verdict

I genuinely WANTED to like the Eagle PS5 SSD heatsink, I really, REALLY did. The problem here is that it is another very familiar case of ‘you get what you pay for’ when shopping online and this heatsink somewhat dies the death of a thousand cuts – i.e there are so, so many small/niggling factors that undermine the whole thing. If you are looking for the best BUDGET PS5 heatsink to buy in 2022/2023, then I can definitely recommend the Eagle Heatsink for your PS5. But only to those that understand that a low price (as little as $7.99 in some places, e.g Aliexpress) comes with a notable degree of compromise. Does it work? Yes. Does it do a better job than a $10 PC designed m.2 SSD heatsink? Yes. Is it worth under $10? Yes. HOWEVER, the presentation of the heatsink and logic of the accessories at the retail level is horrendous, the pricing available online is completely bonkers, the physical/industrial cutting of the aluminium is pretty sub-par, the weight/quality of the heatsink seems underwhelming for its ultimate use, it clips the edge of the PS5 internal casing in a way that seems ill-thought and the whole product leaves you with a feeling that this heatsink is a bit of a quick cash-grab for budget eTailers! Of all the heatsinks that I have tested, I would put this very much at the bottom of all of them in terms of quality, but I still cannot fault that it does exactly what it says it can do and if you need a low-cost PS5 designed heatsink for your PS5 storage expansion upgrades, you will NOT get a better budget option right now.

PROS of the Eagle PS5 SSD Heatsink PROS of the Eagle PS5 SSD Heatsink
  • If you search around, you can get it surprisingly cheap
  • Works better than a standard PC designed M.2 SSD Heatsink
  • Plenty of thermal pads and two different thicknesses
  • Not complicated to install
  • No restriction to a single SSD vendor (i.e WD Heatsink is only available with a WD SSD etc)
  • Feels a bit cheap and lighter than other heatsinks designed for PS5
  • The quality of the cut/shape feels a bit rushed
  • Very poor presentation/shipping kit


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FULL List Of PS5 Compatible SSDs & Heatsinks In 2022

6 janvier 2022 à 16:00

FULL Current PS5 Compatible SSDs to Upgrade Your Storage

Please find below the full list of SSDs that have been tested/mid-testing for PS5. If the official/inclusive heatsink from the brand (eg the WD Black SN850 and its in-house SSD heatsink) fit inside the PS5 SSD expansion slot comfortably, it will be highlighted as such. Additionally, the nature of the drive’s current confirmation of support will be updated below as appropriate. Since this PS5 SSD Storage update beta was released by Sony, many of the well known SSDs have gone out of stock but will be restocked shortly. Additionally, I strongly recommend using the links in the table to check stock availability. You don’t have to buy them, but it will give you a better understanding of what SSDs are available, pre-order or even on offer. Links are affiliated and any purchases made will result in a small commission heading back to this site. Let’s take a look below to see which SSDs are compatible with PS5 right now. If you are considering a particular SSD brand for your PS5 SSD upgrade and want to see video testing of that SSD in the PS5 system on my YouTube channel, click one of the logos below to be taken to the full list of video tests (currently spanning over 30 top tier games, as well as numerous direct SSD comparisons and Heatink tests):

SSD Tests on YouTube

(Click the Brand Logo to see the full Video Testing)

All PS5 Compatible SSDs in 2021/2022 – UPDATED

Although Sony enabled the Playstation 5 SSD expansion slot in Summer 2021, they have yet to issue a FULL compatibility list of ALL drives that can be used. I have been testing a huge number of M.2 NVMe SSDs with PS5 in the last 6 months in order to create a master list of all the drives that work (here on the blog, as well as over on YouTube in my PS5 SSD Test Series HERE). Below is a breakdown of all the currently available and supported SSDs that are compatible with PS5 (with help on Reddit, Twitter and others).

BLUE = COMPATIBLE

GREY = UNCONFIRMED

BRAND MODEL ID SIZES CONTROLLER NAND R/W SPEED CHECK AMAZON
Acer Predator GM7000 512, 1TB, 2TB Innogrit 1G5236 Micron3D TLC 7,400 / 6,700 MB/s
ADATA XPG Gammix S70 Blade 1TB, 2TB Innogrit IG5236 3D Nand 7.4K / 6.4K MB/s
ADATA XPG Gammix S70 1TB, 2TB Innogrit Rainer IG5236 Micron 3D TLC 7.4K / 6.4K MB/s
ADATA XPG Gammix S50 Lite 1TB, 2TB Silicon MotionSM22 67 Micron 3D TLC 3.9K / 3.2K MB/s
ADATA XPG Gammix S50 1TB, 2TB Phison PS5016-E16 Toshiba 3D TLC 5.0K / 4.4K MB/s
Addlink A95 1TB, 2TB Phison PS5018-E18 Micron3D TLC 7.1K /6.8K MB/s
Addlink A92 1TB, 2TB, 4TB Phison PS5016-E16 Micron QLC 4.9K / 3.6K MB/s
Addlink A90 1TB, 2TB N/A 3D TLC 5.0K / 4.4K MB/s
Addlink H90 with heatsink 1TB, 2TB N/A  3D TLC 5.0K / 4,4K MB/s
Addlink S90 no heatsink 1TB, 2TB N/A 3D TLC 5.0K / 4,4K MB/s
Apacer AS2280Q4 500, 1TB, 2TB Phison PS5016-E16 3D TLC 5.0K / 4.4K MB/s
Asgard AN4 512, 1TB, 2TB Innogrit IG5236 YNTC 3D TLC 7.5K / 5.5K MB/s
Corsair MP600 Pro XT Hydro X 2TB, 4TB Phison PS5018-E18 Micron3D TLC 7.1K / 6.8K MB/s
Corsair MP600 Pro XT 1TB, 2TB, 4TB Phison PS5018-E18 Micron3D TLC 7.1K / 6.8K MB/s
Corsair MP600 Pro Hydro X 2TB Phison PS5018-E18-41 3D TLC 7.0K / 6.55K MB/s
Corsair MP600 Pro Standard 1TB, 2TB, 4TB Phison PS5018-E18-41 Micron3D TLC 7.0K / 6.55K MB/s
Corsair MP600 Core 1TB, 2TB, 4TB Phison PS5016-E16 3D QLC 4.95K / 3.95K MB/s
Corsair MP600 1TB, 2TB Phison PS5016-E16 Toshiba 3D TLC 4.95K / 4.25K MB/s
Crucial P5 Plus 500, 1TB, 2TB Crucial NVMe Micron TLC 6.6K / 5.0K MB/s
Galax HOF Pro 1TB, 2TB Phison PS5016-E16 Toshiba 3D TLC 5.0K / 4.4K MB/s
Gigabyte Aorus 7000S 1TB, 2TB Phison E18 Micron TLC 7.0K / 6.85K MB/s
Gigabyte Aorus 1TB, 2TB Phison PS5016-E16 Toshiba 3D TLC 5.0K / 4.0K MB/S
Goodram IRDM Ultimate X 500, 1TB, 2TB Phison PS5016-E16 Toshiba 3D TLC 5.0 / 4.5K MB/s
Inland Performance Plus 1TB, 2TB Phison PS5018-E18 Micron3D TLC 7.0 / 6.85 GB/s
Integral Ultima Pro X3 500, 1TB, 2TB N/A  3D TLC 5.0 / 4,4K MB/s
Intel DC P5800X 400, 800, 1.6TB Intel InteL Optane 2nd Gen 7.4 GB/s / 7.4
Kingmax PX4480 500, 1TB, 2TB Phison PS5016-E16 3D Nand 5.0 / 4.4K MB/s
Klevv CRAS C920 1TB, 2TB Phison PS5018-E18 3D TLC 7.0K / 7.0K MB/s
Lexar NM800 500, 1,000 GB InnoGrit IG5236 3D TLC 5.8K / 7.4K MB/s
Micron 3400 512, 1TB, 2TB Micron Based Micron 3D TLC N/A 
Micron 2450 256, 512, 1TB N/A Micron 3D TLC N/A 
MSI Spatium M480 500, 1TB, 2TB PhisonPS5018-E18 Micron 3D TLC 7.0K /6.85K MB/s
MSI Spatium M470 1TB, 2TB Phison PS5016-E16 Kioxia 3D TLC 5.0K / 4.4K MB/s
Mushkin Gamma 1TB, 2TB Phison PS5018 E18 Micron 3D TLC 7.1 / 6.8 MB/s
Mushkin Delta 1TB, 2TB, 4TB Phison PS5016-E16 Micron 3D TLC 4.9 / 3.9 MB/s
Patriot Viper VP4300 1TB, 2TB Innogrit Rainier IG5236 Micron 3D TLC 7.4K / 6.8K MB/s
Patriot Viper VP4100 1TB, 2TB Phison PS5016-E16 Toshiba 3D TLC 5.0K / 4.4K MB/s
Plextor M10P Series 512, 1TB, 2TB Innogrit Rainier IG5236 Kioxia TLC 7.0K / 5.0K MB/s
PNY XLR8 CS3140 1TB, 2TB Phison PS5016-E18-41 Micron 3D TLC 7.5K / 6.85K MB/s
PNY XLR8 CS3040 500GB, 1TB, 2TB Phison PS5016-E16-32 Toshiba 3D TLC 5.6K / 4.3K MB/s
Sabrent Rocket 4 Plus 500, 1TB, 2TB, 4TB Phison PS5018-E18 Micron 3D TLC 7.2K / 6.9K MB/s
Sabrent Rocket Q4 1TB, 2TB, 4TB Phison PS5016-E16 Micron 96L QLC 4.9K / 6.85K MB/s
Sabrent Rocket NVMe 4.0 1TB, 2TB Phison PS5016-E16 Toshiba 3D TLC 5.0K / 4.4K MB/s
Samsung PA9A1 (OEM) 250, 500, 1TB, 2TB Samsung Elpis Samsung 3D TLC 7.0K / 5.2K MB/s
Samsung 980 Pro 250, 500, 1TB, 2TB Samsung Elpis Samsung 3D TLC 7.0K / 5.0K MB/s
Seagate FireCuda 530 500, 1TB, 2TB, 4TB Phison PS5018-E18 Micron 3D TLC 7.0K / 6.9K MB/s
Seagate FireCuda 520
1TB Phison PS5016-E16 Toshiba 3D TLC 5.0K / 4.4K MB/s
Seagate FireCuda 520 500, 1TB, 2TB Phison PS5016-E16 Toshiba 3D TLC 5.0K / 4.4K MB/s
Silicon Power US70 1TB, 2TB Phison PS5016-E16 3D Nand 5.0K / 4.4K MB/s
Smartbuy Stream E19T 500, 1TB Phison PS5016-E19-35 Toshiba 3D TLC 3.3K / 3.0K MB/s
Smartbuy Impact E16 500, 1TB, 2TB Phison PS5016-E16 3D TLC 5.0K / 4.4K MB/s
Team Force Cardea Z44Q 2TB, 4TB Phison PS5012-E161 Micron 3D QLC 5.0K /4.0K MB/s
Team Force T Create Classic 1TB, 2TB Phison PS5016-E16 Kioxia 3D TLC 5.0K / 4.4K MB/s
Team Force Cardea Ceramic A440 1TB, 2TB Phison PS5086-E18 Micron TLC 7.0K / 6.9K MB/s
Team Force Cardea Ceramic C440 1TB, 2TB Phison PS5016-E16 Toshiba 3D TLC 5.0K / 4.4K MB/s
Team Force Cardea Zero Z440 256, 512, 1TB PhisonPS5016-E16 Toshiba 3D TLC 5.0K / 4.4K MB/s
Transcend MTE240S 512, 1TB N/A 3D TLC 3.8K / 3.2K MB/s
Western Digital Black SN850 500, 1TB, 2TB SanDisk 8-Channel 96L Bics4 7.0K / 5.1K MB/s

 

What is the Best PS5 SSD Heatsink – The Do’s and Don’ts

Most M.2 NVMe SSD that you might look at for your PS5 will NOT arrive with a heatsink. Some brands do include optional heatsinks for $20-40, but there will likely be PC-Grade gamer heatsinks and much, much too tall for the allocated PS5 Expansion storage slot for upgrades. Sony provided a handy upgrade guide for how big the NVMe SSD needs to be, alongside details of the type that is recommended.

Now, there are ALOT of M.2 NVMe SSD Heatsinks on the market – THOUSANDS! So it is important to know which ones are compatible and which ones you should completely avoid. Heatsink AND SSD together should NOT exceed in millimeters 110mm (L) x 25mm (W) x 11.25mm (H) and in inches 4.33in (L) x 0.984 in (W) x 0.442in (H). Another big thing to remember is that some SSD heatsinks use rubber bands to hold the M.2 NVMe SSD and the HEATSINK together. I would strongly recommend avoiding these kinds of heatsinks as they have a tendency not to last vast amounts of time and the silicon rubber bands (if produced poorly) can wear away. I strongly recommend a met surrounding heatsink case/enclosure like the one below, as it has 2 layers of internal thermal padding, the metal surrounding the whole SSD (assisting heat dissipation) and is screwed in place. Last point. The majority of NVMe M.2 PCIe Gen 4×4 SSDs right now are going to be 2280 (that is the length of the SSD), as this tier of SSD have only JUST been released in the last 6-9 months. However, they WILL get longer (to accommodate more storage cells and bigger capacity) so the fact the PS5 supports up to 22110 lengths SSDs is quite handy. If you are reading this guide much later in 2021/2022, then DO CHECK that the SSD  you are installing in your PS5 is 2280 or 22110, as the heatsink will also need to be this length too (as the screw holds an SSD Board mount need to match). This is much, MUCH less of a concern in 2021 however, so you can ignore this right now. So,  there you have it, those are the do’s and don’ts for buying a heatsink for your PS5 SSD upgrade. Below are 5 great examples of M.2 NVMe SSD Heatsinks that will fit in your PS5 Expansion slot. They vary in price, design, height, colour and density. Take a look:

 

 

UPDATED – The Recommended Ones Below Keep Selling out, so I have added more!

Sabrent PS5 SSD Designed Heatsink – $19.99

  • DESIGNED FOR PS5: Engineered to fit perfectly and easily into the PS5 SSD expansion slot. The installation has never been easier on the PS5
  • REVOLUTIONARY COOLING: Made from High-Quality CNC’d aluminium, the Sabrent PS5 Heatsink was specifically designed to maximize cooling performance and simplify the installation
  • UPGRADE YOUR PS5! Rather than creating a heatsink that would only trap the heat in the metal cover, we designed a heatsink that replaces the native PS5 cover. This allows for better cooling using the native fan as well as being a larger heatsink
  • INDUSTRIAL QUALITY: This SSD heatsink method also uses Sabrent’s “Sandwich Design” which ensures even pressure throughout the SSD for efficient and consistent heat transfer unlike methods used by other brands
  • CONVENIENCE: Comes with an installation guide as well as screws and thermal tape for easy convenient installation

ElecGear PS5 SSD Designed Heatsink – $34.99

  • [PS5 NVMe Heatsink] – The patent-pending cooler is exclusively designed for PlayStation 5 internal NVMe SSD. It features a heat pipe and a huge solid aluminum heatsink. The high performance comes from the numerous cooling fins and the delicate utilization of air circulation sucked by PS5 main cooling fan. The streamlined profile is a snag fit with the middle frame of PS5 chassis. The heatsink is the ultimate cooling solution to the heat management of extreme Gen4 gaming SSD
  • [Heat Pipe and Thermal Pads] – A 5mm heatpipe seamlessly embedded in the lower aluminum deck. The passive design with no cooling fan is aiming for being totally silent. The heat produced by SSD will be absorbed by the heat pipe and effectively conducted to the extensive aluminum fins. Two pieces pre-divided thermal pads are included for excellent heat connection. 0.8mm and 1.5mm thickness option adapts to any PCIe NVMe M.2 SSD
  • [Improved Mounting Post] – It seems the leading maker Sony does not belong to M.2 SSD industry. We don’t think that the stock screws mount M.2 SSD appropriately in the memory compartment. ElecGear did it better with a re-designed fixing structure for your gaming SSD. The modified guide post, standard M.2 screw and even a copper washer to adjust the height of SSD are included in the box
  • [Compatibility Note] – The cooler fits both PS5 Ultra HD and Digital editions. In terms of hardware, it’s compatible with any standard NVMe M.2 solid state drive. Fully tested with WD Black SN850, Samsung 980 Pro and Sabrent Rocket NVMe 4.0. It supports 2230, 2242, 2260, 2280 form factor and also works with 22110 in the future. Please be noticed: The SSD maker’s thin heatsink should be removed before installing, for example, Corsair-Force MP600 and ADATA XPG

 

PNY XLR8 Gaming PS5 SSD Designed Heatsink – $24.99

PNY XLR8 PS5 SSD Heatsink is designed for PS5, integrating the original PS5 SSD cover, PNY offers a brilliant design, combined the cover with heatsink which provides extreme cooling performance, taking your extra upgraded PS5 NVMe SSD to the extreme. Not only can you destroy the competition, and play more games, but your system can look good while doing so.

  • Part No : M22110PSVHS-XR-RB
  • Design to integrate PS5 SSD cover & heatsink
  • Greatly improves cooling efficiency
  • Included spare screws x1 + Thermal pads
  • Compare to no heatsink, cools downs the SSD over 40%*
  • Recommended SSD: XLR8 CS3140 Gen 4×4

INEO / GRAUGEAR PS5 SSD Designed Heatsink G-PS5HS01 – $34.99

The new GRAUGEAR/INEO heat pipe cooler G-PS5HS01 reduces the temperature of your M.2 NVMe SSDs in the PlayStation®5 by up to 50% and thus contributes to a longer lifetime of your SSDs. The performance of your M.2 NVMe SSDs is also positively influenced by the GRAUGEAR/INEO heat pipe cooler G-PS5HS01. The Ø7mm copper heat pipe and the copper fins and aluminium heat sink ensure maximum performance.

  • Heat Pipe from Copper maximum performance
  • The reduced temperature of M.2 NVMe SSD up to 50%
  • Designed for PlayStation®5
  • Compatible with Single/Double-sided M.2 2280 SSDs
  • 1 x G-PS5HS01, 4 x Thermal Pads
  • 1 x Screwdriver1 x SSD mounting screw
  • 1x Screws, 1 x Manual, 1 x Warranty card

 

QIVYNSRY M.2 heatsink 2280 SSD Double-Sided Heat Sink

  • Designed for desktop computers, but works with PS5
  • Aluminum body, Anodic Oxidation Surface Treatment;
  • with 10°C – 30°C cooling effect;
  • Compatible with Singel/Double sided M.2 NVME NGFF SSD;
  • Easy to install, and not damage the hard disk.

Includes:

  • 1* EZ NVMe Heatsink-Silver
  • 2* Thermal pads
  • 5* Screws.
  • 1* Installation guide.

 

 

SUPER BUDGET OPTION – Akuoly M.2 SSD Heatsink 4 Pack Aluminum Heatsink Cooler Cooling

 

  • To Save Your Device from Fail Prematurely–Reduce the risk of hardware failure due to overheating. The gap of these Akuoly heatsinks between the larger fins increases the area of the board and thus provides for greater heat transfer
  • Made of High Quality Aluminum–Made of high quality aluminum, great thermal conductivity. An aluminum heatsink is a passive heat exchanger that efficiently transfers heat through electronic signal or mechanical signal with device, thus keeping a regulation of the temperature of the device at an optimal level
  • Suitable for Various Devices–Suitable for heating elements on Wi-Fi routers, M.2 SSD, AC adapters, chargers, high power amplifier transistor semiconductor devices and so on
  • Cheerful 4 Pack Heatsink & Thermal Pads– 4 pieces x aluminum heatsink Cooling Fin (each 70mm x 22mm x 6mm), large surface area and great fins; with 4 pieces of double-sided thermal tape whose thermal conductivity: about 1.3 W / (m·K).
  • Material: Aluminum
  • Size: 70mm (L) x 22mm (W) x 6mm (H)
  • Package: 4 Pack x Aluminum Heatsink Cooling Fins
  • 4 Pieces Double-sides Thermal Tape whose thermal conductivity: about 1.3 W / (m·K).

 

SGTKJSJS M.2 Heatsink SSD Cooler for PCIE NVME

Excellent little kit. Comes with: A screwdriver, a cleaning and drying towelette(not needed if the m.2 is new and/or not dusty) and it has two dark blue(.5mm) for the bottom(U bracket) and two light blue(1mm) for the top(heatsink) for 2 m.2 drives. There is a protective film on BOTH sides of each of the thermal tape piece. Remove BOTH pieces of film of EACH of the thermal tape pieces and apply them. Once the thermal tape is on both sides(1 blue-bottom, 1 light blue-heatsink) place the bottom of your m.2 drive into the U bracket/bottom of the thermal unit. Next make sure that the top piece(heatsink) has the open spot for the screw for your motherboard facing the back to leave space to attach. Next, line up the holes and gently drop the top heatsink into the U bracket/bottom.

Package list

  • M.2 SSD heatSink  X2
  • Silicone thermal pad   X4

  • Fixing screw  X8

  • screwdriver  X1

 

EZDIY-FAB M.2 2280 SSD heatsink

Double-Sided Heat Sink, High-Performance SSD Cooler for PCIE NVME M.2 SSD or SATA M.2 SSD- Red or Black – $15

  • Designed for desktop computers, but works inside PS5
  • Aluminum material for best heat dissipation and maximum performance.
  • Compatible with Singel/Double sided M.2 2280 SSDs.
  • Easy to install.
  • Beautiful metal surface treatment, installed in the chassis to form a beautiful landscape.

Includes:

  • 1* EZ NVMe Heatsink-Silver
  • 2* Thermal pads
  • 5* Screws.
  • 1* Installation guide.

 

 


MHQJRH M.2 2280 SSD heatsink – SINGLE SIDE SSD USE ONLY – VERY TIGHT FIT!!

Double-Sided Heat Sink, Matching Thermal Silicone pad for PCIE NVME M.2 SSD or SATA M.2 SSD – $9.99

  • Designed for Compact M.2 NVMe SSD Installation
  • Aluminum body, Anodic Oxidation Surface Treatment.
  • Aluminum alloy-Groove design, greatly increase the heat dissipation area, with 10°C – 30°C cooling effect.
  • Compatible with Singel/Double-sided M.2 2280 SSDs.
  • Easy to install, and not damage the SSD
  • Advancing Gene thermal pad is made from Nano Silicon Grease Material, with good thermal conductivity ability. Soft enough and good ductility, compatible with uneven surfaces of the M.2 SSD. Low viscosity, with no damage to the SSD label.

Includes:

  • M.2 SSD heatSink X1
  • Silicone thermal pad X3
  • Fixing screw X6
  • Screwdriver X1

 

 


 

Ice Cold Ineo M.2 heatsink 2280 SSD

Thermal Silicone pad for M.2 PCIE NVMe SSD – $10.99

  • The NVMe heatsink are able to support the NVMe SSD type 70x20mm
  • Please place the silicone cooling pad between the heatsink and the SSD to prevent damage to the SSD and protect the particles of the SSD, which can effectively extend the life of your SSD.
  • Package including: 1 NVMe Aluminum heatsink, 2 silicone thermal pad, 1 user manual, 1 screw driver , 1 guarantee card, 1 screw
  • Each product has strict tested before We sent it to you and offer 1 Year Limited Warranty, Life-time free technical support by ineo.

Includes:

  • 1 NVMe Aluminum heatsink
  • 2 silicone thermal pad
  • 1 user manual
  • 1 screw driver
  • 1 1 screw

 


 

WARSHIP Pro M.2 2280 SSD Heatsink

PCIE NVME or SATA m2 2280 SSD Double-Sided Heat Sink – Black – $8.99

  • Suports PCIE NVME M.2 2280 size SSD or SATA M2 2280 size SSD
  • Aluminium alloy, silver plating , anodic oxidation surface treatment
  • Easy to install, NO damage to the SSD.
  • Aluminum alloy-Groove design with 10°C – 30°C cooling effect

Includes:

  • HeatSink X2
  • Big Silicone thermal pad X 2
  • Small Silicone thermal pad X 10
  • Screws X 6
  • Screwdriver X1

 

 


 

Best Budget Choice – Nankui SSD Heatsink Surround – SINGLE SIDE SSD USE ONLY – VERY TIGHT FIT!!

NVMe Heatsink for m.2 2280 SSD,Double-Sided Cooling – $5.99

  • Originally designed for desktop computers, This M.2 SSD heatsink compatible with all single sided Type.
  • Simple Lock design, easy to install
  • Double Aluminum alloy-Groove design, greatly increase the heat dissipation area, with 7°C – 30°C cooling effect (Varies depending on the environments), Ensure the high-speed and long-lasting performance of SSD, continuous high-speed reading and writing and long-term game performance are still strong
  • Main body material: Aluminum alloy, anodic oxidation surface treatment. Dimensions: 76.5*24.*12mm , Nano Silicon Grease Material Dimensions:70*20*T.4 ,Thermal conductivity:3W/m-k

Includes:

  • M.2 SSD heatSink X1
  • Silicone thermal pad X3
  • No Screws – Clicks Shut

 

 

 

How Do the Six Most Popular PS5 SSDs Compare?

Many users will choose one of the first 6-7 SSDs in the above list, as these are the most commonly available, recommended by performance or best price per GB/TB. However not all M.2 NVMe SSDs are created equally and in the case of PS5 compatible SSDs, there is actually a wide range of performance benchmarks to choose between, maximum/minmum capacities to choose from and a variety of endurance and handling specifications that make each of the more mainstream compatible PS5 supported SSDs quite distinct. Below is a breakdown of how they compare. The choices below are the Seagate Firecuda 530, the WD Black SN850, the Samsung 980 PRO, the Sabrent Rocket 4 Plus, the MSI SPATIUM M480 and the Gigabyte Aorus 7000s.

SSD Architecture and Specifications

Brand/Series Seagate Firecuda 530 WD Black SN850 Samsung 980 Pro Sabrent Rocket Plus MSI SPATIUM M480 AORUS Gen4 7000s
PCIe Generation PCIe Gen 4 PCIe Gen 4 PCIe Gen 4 PCIe Gen 4 PCIe Gen 4 PCIe Gen 4
NVMe Rev NVMe 1.4 NVMe 1.4 NVMe 1.3c NVMe 1.4 NVMe 1.4 NVMe 1.4
NAND 3D TLC Micron B47R 176L BiCS4 96L TLC 3D TLC B27 3D NAND 96L B27 3D NAND 96L B27 3D NAND 96L
Max Capacity 4TB – Double Sided 2TB 2TB 4TB Double Sided 2TB 2TB
Controller Phison E18-PS5018 WD_BLACK G2 Custom Elpis Phison E18-PS5018 Phison E18-PS5018 Phison E18-PS5018
Warranty 5yr 5yr 5yr 5yr 5yr 5yr

SSD Price Comparison

Brand/Series Seagate Firecuda 530 WD Black SN850 Samsung 980 Pro Sabrent Rocket Plus MSI SPATIUM M480 AORUS Gen4 7000s
500GB Model ZP500GM3A013 WDS500G1X0E-00AFY0 MZ-V8P500BW   M480-500GB  
Price in $ and $ $139 / £119 $119 / £99 $119 / £109   $119 / £105 (TBC)  
1TB Model ZP1000GM3A013 WDS100T1X0E-00AFY0 MZ-V8P1T0BW SB-RKT4P-1TB M480-1000GB GP-AG70S1TB
Price in $ and $ $239 / £199 $249 / £169 $209 / £179 $199 / £180 $239 / £189 (TBC) $199 / £189
2TB Model ZP2000GM3A013 WDS200T1X0E-00AFY0 MZ-V8P2T0BW SB-RKT4P-2TB M480-2000GB GP-AG70S2TB
Price in $ and $ $419 / £379 $399 / £339 $390 / £369 $469 / £419 $399 / £369 (TBC) $359 / £399
4TB Model ZP4000GM3A013   N/A SB-RKT4P-4TB N/A N/A
Price in $ and $ $949 / £769 N/A N/A $1099 / £999  

SSD Performance Comparison

Brand/Series Seagate Firecuda 530 WD Black SN850 Samsung 980 Pro Sabrent Rocket 4 Plus MSI SPATIUM M480 AORUS Gen4 7000s
500GB Model ZP500GM3A013 WDS500G1X0E-00AFY0 MZ-V8P500BW N/A M480-500GB N/A
Sequential Read (Max, MB/s), 128 KB 7000MB 7000MB 6900MB   6500MB  
Sequential Write (Max, MB/s), 128 KB 3000MB 4100MB 5000MB   2850MB  
1TB Model ZP1000GM3A013 WDS100T1X0E-00AFY0 MZ-V8P1T0BW SB-RKT4P-1TB M480-1000GB GP-AG70S1TB
Sequential Read (Max, MB/s), 128 KB 7300MB 7000MB 7000MB 7000MB 7000MB 7000MB
Sequential Write (Max, MB/s), 128 KB 6000MB 5300MB 5000MB 5500MB 5500MB 5500MB
2TB Model ZP2000GM3A013 WDS200T1X0E-00AFY0 MZ-V8P2T0BW SB-RKT4P-2TB M480-2000GB GP-AG70S2TB
Sequential Read (Max, MB/s), 128 KB 7300MB 7000MB 7000MB 7100MB 7000MB 7000MB
Sequential Write (Max, MB/s), 128 KB 6900MB 5100MB 5100MB 6850MB 6850MB 6850MB
4TB Model ZP4000GM3A013   N/A SB-RKT4P-4TB N/A N/A
Sequential Read (Max, MB/s), 128 KB 7300MB N/A N/A 7100MB    
Sequential Write (Max, MB/s), 128 KB 6900MB N/A N/A 6850MB  

SSD Endurance Comparion

Brand/Series Seagate Firecuda 530 WD Black SN850 Samsung 980 Pro Sabrent Rocket Plus MSI SPATIUM M480 AORUS Gen4 7000s
500GB Model ZP500GM3A013 WDS500G1X0E-00AFY0 MZ-V8P500BW   M480-500GB N/A
Total Terabytes Written (TBW) 640TB 300TB 300TB   350TB  
Mean Time Between Failures (MTBF, hours) 1,800,000 1,750,000 1,500,000   1,600,000  
DWPD 0.7DWPD 0.3DWPD 0.3DWPD   0.38DWPD  
1TB Model ZP1000GM3A013 WDS100T1X0E-00AFY0 MZ-V8P1T0BW SB-RKT4P-1TB M480-1000GB GP-AG70S1TB
Total Terabytes Written (TBW) 1275TB 600TB 600TB 700TB 700TB 700TB
Mean Time Between Failures (MTBF, hours) 1,800,000 1,750,000 1,500,000 1600000 1,600,000 1,600,000
DWPD 0.7DWPD 0.3DWPD 0.3DWPD 0.4DWPD 0.38DWPD 0.38DWPD
2TB Model ZP2000GM3A013 WDS200T1X0E-00AFY0 MZ-V8P2T0BW SB-RKT4P-2TB M480-2000GB GP-AG70S2TB
Total Terabytes Written (TBW) 2550TB 1200TB 1200TB 1400TB 1400TB 1400TB
Mean Time Between Failures (MTBF, hours) 1,800,000 1,750,000 1,500,000 1600000 1,600,000 1,600,000
DWPD 0.7DWPD 0.3DWPD 0.3DWPD 0.38DWPD 0.38DWPD 0.38DWPD
4TB Model ZP4000GM3A013   N/A SB-RKT4P-4TB N/A N/A
Total Terabytes Written (TBW) 5100TB N/A N/A 3000TB    
Mean Time Between Failures (MTBF, hours) 1,800,000 N/A N/A 1600000    
DWPD 0.7DWPD N/A 0.3DWPD 0.4DWPD  

 


Articles Get Updated Regularly - Get an alert every time something gets added to this page!


This description contains links to Amazon. These links will take you to some of the products mentioned in today's content. As an Amazon Associate, I earn from qualifying purchases. Visit the NASCompares Deal Finder to find the best place to buy this device in your region, based on Service, Support and Reputation - Just Search for your NAS Drive in the Box Below

 

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Need Advice on Data Storage from an Expert?

We want to keep the free advice on NASCompares FREE for as long as we can. Since this service started back in Jan '18, We have helped hundreds of users every month solve their storage woes, but we can only continue to do this with your support. So please do choose to buy at Amazon US and Amazon UK on the articles when buying to provide advert revenue support or to donate/support the site below. Finally, for free advice about your setup, just leave a message in the comments below here at NASCompares.com and we will get back to you. Need Help? Where possible (and where appropriate) please provide as much information about your requirements, as then I can arrange the best answer and solution to your needs. Do not worry about your e-mail address being required, it will NOT be used in a mailing list and will NOT be used in any way other than to respond to your enquiry. [contact-form-7] Terms and Conditions Alternatively, why not ask me on the ASK NASCompares forum, by clicking the button below. This is a community hub that serves as a place that I can answer your question, chew the fat, share new release information and even get corrections posted. I will always get around to answering ALL queries, but as a one-man operation, I cannot promise speed! So by sharing your query in the ASK NASCompares section below, you can get a better range of solutions and suggestions, alongside my own.  

 

PNY XLR8 PS5 Designed SSD Heatsink Review – Cool Stuff?

2 janvier 2022 à 15:00

The PNY XLR8 PS5 SSD Heatsink Review

When PNY announced they were releasing a PS5 designed SSD heatsink for their gamer XLR8 range, they did so into a market that just half a year ago would have been completely devoid of competition! It has been quite an educational period for many PS5 owners in the last 6 months, as they begin to get to grips with understanding a new and high-performance tier of storage in M.2 NVMe SSDs. Indeed, the learning curve for some console gamers who chose this gaming platform for its ease of use has been notably higher than most and although the range of solutions available for PS5 compatible storage is pretty wide and easy, the necessity of purchasing a heatsink and understanding what makes one better than another is a different story entirely. These new PCIe NVMe SSDs get hot, quite worryingly hot (under excessive use) and it is for that reason that whether you are a PS5 or PC user, it is highly advised that you employ a means of removing the heat from the SSD in an as efficient way as possible – namely, heatsinks. These are metal plates (arriving in aluminium, copper and more) that draw the heat away from the SSD components and then release that heat into the surrounding air. So, what makes a PS5 specific designed one different? Well, that is largely down to the architecture of the console itself and internal cooling is conducted. In a PC, the M.2 SSD will be in a much larger area that has active fan cooling surrounding it, therefore a more modest and generic M.2 heatsink (for as little as $8-10) is sufficient for general use. However, with the PS5, the m.2 expansion storage bay is in a remarkably tight, close slot. This is done to ensure that the console can draw air through its vents (using negative pressure in a closed casing) and ensure highly efficient system cooling at all times. This all means that an SSD heatsink for the PS5 has a very different physical space and surrounding directional airflow to work around. And here is where the PNY XLR8 PS5 SSD heatsink arrives on the scene, designed around the physical spacing of the PS5 and it’s internal vents, it replaces the m.2 metal cover that the system features in favour of a full drive cover and heatsink combined. PNY is not the first company to release an m.2 SSD heatsink that is designed for the PS5 (we have reviewed several PS5 SSD heatsinks in 2021), but with already very popular PS5 SSD compatible SSD ranges in the CS3140 and CS3040, this heatsink presents a unique bundle/single purchase that only Sabrent currently offers. So, let’s review the PNY XLR8 PS5 SSD heatsink and see if it deserves your data.

PNY XLR8 PS5 SSD Heatsink – Quick Conclusion

The PNY XLR8 SSD heatsink for PS5 cannot really be faulted! There have been quite a few PS5 designed heatsinks released in the last few months and for the most part, they fall into two categories. There are the ‘overkill’ ones which sadly make up the bulk of them (such as the INEO, Graugear and ElecGear) that do the job, but at a high price tag, still require SSD research and unless you are an e-sports or heavy gaming streamer, as never going to even come close to their full utility (think of driving a Ferrari to pop to the corner shop for bread). The other PS5 designed SSD heatsinks like the Sabrent and the PNY XLR8 in this review very much fall into a smaller but much, MUCH more desirable category. The PNY XLR8 finds an impressive middle ground between keeping your PS5 SSD at an ideal ongoing usage temperature, whilst keeping a low profile and not interrupting the airflow/air temp that is running through the rest of the PS5 cooling system. Add to this the ease of buying in together with your PNY XLR8 PS5 compatible SSD and what you have here is an affordable and effective means to store more games, play for longer and maintain the lifespan of your SSD longterm. It may seem the pinch more expensive than a regular M.2 heatsink, but it’s about having the right tool for the job – have you ever tried spreading butter with a steak knife? Or stirring soup with a teaspoon? The same applies to comparing a PS5 designed heatsink with a PC designed one, they are both heatsinks, but for very different deployments. It get’s my vote!

EFFECTIVENESS - 10/10
HARDWARE - 9/10
PERFORMANCE - 9/10
PRICE - 8/10
VALUE - 8/10


8.8
PROS
👍🏻Very high-quality build
👍🏻VERY Easy Installation
👍🏻Option of SSD+Heatsink Bundle with the CS3140 Series
👍🏻Less potentially impactful on the system temp than the Elecgear or Copper Pipe Heatsinks
👍🏻On par with Sabrent H/S Price
👍🏻Full 22110 NVMe SSD Coverage
👍🏻High-Quality Thermal Padding pre-attached
CONS
👎🏻Quite pricey for a heatsink compared with PC designed m.2 models
👎🏻No spare thermal pads

PNY XLR8 PS5 SSD Heatsink – Packaging

The external packaging of the PNY XLR8 PS5 SSD Heatsink is noticeably larger than many of the heatsink’s that I have reviewed before, arriving in a chunky box that you would be excused for assuming also contains an SSD. Likely this is due to PNY having plans on bundled purchases down the link. The actual contents are only two items, but the retail box is quite pro-gamer centric.

Using the familiar livery of their XLR8 professional gaming brand, if we open up the retail box, we find that inside contains a rigid foam frame holds both the PNY XLR8 PS5 SSD Heatsink and an m.2 screw in place. There are no additional instruction manuals present, though details of installation are covered on the rear of the box.

The PNY XLR8 PS5 SSD Heatsink arrives with a preattached thermal pad on the base of the aluminium plate, which turns out is a pinch thicker than the typical pads we see with these heatsinks. It is a shame that this heatsink does not feature an additional thermal pad for the underside of an installed SSD, but given that the base of the SSD typically only has further NAND and perhaps 50% of the memory, these components can actually run better when they are a little warmer. Additionally, when deployed onto an SSD, the thermal pad made full contact with the SSD components (ink tested).

PNY XLR8 PS5 SSD Heatsink – Design

The design of the PNY XLR8 PS5 SSD Heatsink is something that I think puts it high above its competitors in terms of aesthetics and appeal. Given that this heatsink is going to be largely unseen when it is doing its job, it does look remarkably pretty! Arriving with the XLR8 gaming livery once again, it has a design that leans a little towards F1 racing cars and gaming laptop chic. With the logo highlight visible, as well arriving in a colour scheme that is a cut above the usual dull black or silver that 99% of other heatsinks arrive in. Again though, this is still a component that is going to only be seen during installation, then largely invisible afterwards.

One interesting thing to note though (and something that many will have missed when PNY first showed this heatsink off on its official site) is that although it looks like the top of the PNY XLR8 PS5 SSD Heatsink is ridged (appearing very similar in physical design to the Sabrent PS5 SSD heatsink), that top panel is actually flat/flush, without the logo being embossed/raised either.

In fact, it is only when you view the PNY XLR8 PS5 SSD Heatsink at an angle that you notice that the heatsink has many, many raised ridges to capture airflow through the PS5, BUT they are covered by that top panel. Now, this is an unusual move for a heatsink, given that the main advantage for a heatsink to occupy/sit-above the PS5 M.2 slot, is so it can capture the airflow of the console’s from vents, as the system pulls air in and then out the back of the chassis.

The PNY XLR8 PS5 SSD Heatsink certainly fully occupies the PS5 M.2 slot, as well as raises out of the available bay a few millimetres, so it is capturing that air to assist SSD dissipation as you would hope. Nevertheless, this is a very discrete bit of design/airflow that you would not expect and whether this is for reasons of avoiding introducing warm air into the console OR for reasons of patent/design uniqueness – it is hard to say. I will say that compared with the Sabrent H/S and Elecgear SSD heatsink‘s reviewed previously, the PNY XLR8 PS5 SSD Heatsink will almost certainly have the lowest impact on the system general temperature.

Another interesting element is that the PNY XLR8 PS5 SSD Heatsink occupies the full length of the PS5 22110 m.2 slot. The bulk of modern M.2 NVMe SSDs are 2280 in length, but the PS5 arrives with the longer 22110 SSD support (which is arguably a bit wasted, given the PS5 has a maximum capacity of 4TB supported in this m.2 slot) and if you were to install a longer SSD in this slot (perhaps so you could get an SSD with a better distribution of NAND chips on it’s physical PCB to improve performance and/or durability), then having a heatsink that can amply dissipate heat from even the larger SSDs in the market is going to be a good thing.

The PNY XLR8 PS5 SSD Heatsink fits on top of the SSD in a much similar way as the official M.2 expansion cover plate, with a lever hinge at its base that allows you to lower the heatsink over the SSD and the screw hole will perfectly align with the one on the PS5 (you will need to reuse the official screw that features the square, triangle, circle and cross symbol).

In short, it is very hard to get this wrong! The SSD cannot be damaged in this installation and the lower, protruding aluminium 22110 length area of the heatsink will always make contact with the SSD.

The heatsink, once installed, will make zero contact with the PS5 side plates and although the aesthetic design of the PNY XLR8 PS5 SSD Heatsink doesn’t quite look as uniform as the Sabrent H/S and Elecgear SSD heatsink, It still looks rather easy on the eye. Next up, we need to do some temperature testing of the PNY XLR8 PS5 SSD, see how it compares against budget $10 heatsinks for PC and whether it negatively impacts the ambient airflow of the PS5 when in use.

PNY XLR8 PS5 SSD Heatsink – Temperature Tests

IMPORTANT – Temperature Testing is still IN PROGRESS and although early testing clearly indicates that the PNY XLR8 PS5 SSD Heatsink works very well, the FULL details, readings and results in comparison with a generic M.2 SSD heatsink will be updated in this article in the next few days when the test stages are completed. Apologies for the delay.

Temperature testing for the PNY XLR8 PS5 Designed SSD heatsink has been broken down into several areas. The main aims here are to work out the following things:

  1. Does the PNY XLR8 Heatsink Keep the Temperature low on the SSD in sustained use?
  2. Does the PNY XLR8 Heatsink Interfere with the PS5 Internal System Temp negatively?
  3. Does the PNY XLR8 Heatsink provide a significant improvement over PC designed M.2 SSD heatsinks (eg the Eluteng M.2)

In order to do this, I have installed a temperature sensor on the M.2 SSD itself, UNDER the heatsink AND the thermal pad, directly on the controller chip of the SSD.

When the temp node is on the SSD Controller, I then place the thermal pad down, closed and screw down the heatsink, then attach the 2nd node just underneath the PS5 fan point, in the open air. This second temperature sensor will tell us the surrounding system temp that the internal fan will be used to cool the rest of the system.

The testing consisted of 6 different elements. 4 gameplay sessions of 25mins each, with 2 sessions focusing on the SSD temp and 2 focusing on the system temp (in that order, with 1-2 mins reboot between each, in order to see how the system temp is affected over the combined power-on time).

Then a sustained read and write activity of 350-380MB/s to/from the PS5 internal PS5 SSD and M.2 NVMe SSD (the tests were conducted with the PNY CS3140 2TB) and how it impacted the SSD controller only. We are NOT looking at performance/framerate/MB/s etc, ONLY temperatures. Below were the results (video will be published shortly).

Note – BOTH PS5 Side plates were on during the tests 

Test Type Starting Temp (C) Finishing Temp (C) Change (C)
Heavy Write (350GB) 18.7℃ 26℃ 7.3℃
Demon Souls 25min Play (Controller) 25.8℃ 29.9℃ 4.1℃
Demon Souls 25min Play (System Temp) 24.5℃ 25.5℃ 1℃
Matrix Unreal 5 25min Play (Controller) 27.9℃ 35.1℃ 7.2℃
Matrix Unreal 5 25min Play (System Temp) 27℃ 28.5℃ 1.5℃
Heavy Read (350GB) 25.2℃ 29.5℃ 4.3℃

As you can see, in almost all tests, the PNY XLR8 PS5 Designed SSD heatsink results in very, VERY small increases in temperature over time, much, MUCH lower than most of the other heatsinks that I have tested. To put that into perspective here is how this PS5 styled heatsink compared in those same tests versus the Eluteng M.2 at just $10 (at least $15 less than the PNY XLR8 H/S):

NOTE – There tests were performed on different days and ambient temp AND general environmental conditions can undermine these results. Watch the video published soon to see these results in much, MUCH greater detail)

Test Type Eluteng H/S Change PNY XLR8 H/S Change
Heavy Write (350GB) 15.1℃ 7.3℃
Demon Souls 25min Play (Controller) 23.3℃ 4.1℃
Demon Souls 25min Play (System Temp) 0.5℃ 1℃
Matrix Unreal 5 25min Play (Controller) 16.3℃ 7.2℃
Matrix Unreal 5 25min Play (System Temp) 1.8℃ 1.5℃
Heavy Read (350GB) 18.8℃ 4.3℃

So, as you can see, it certainly did a great job. These are still very small differences though and it is worth remembering that an NVMe SSD is designed to run perfectly well at between 30-50 degrees. Anything higher than that (headed towards 70 degrees) can result in throttling. Overall I still think the PNY XLR8 definitely does exactly what it says it will and does it very well – it is a question of whether you play your PS5 for long enough /regular periods that you need that level of protection/cooling. Let’s conclude the review and give my verdict.

NOTE – The FULL video of the Temperature tests for the PNY XLR8 PS5 Designed SSD Heatsink, as well as how it compares against the Eluteng M.2 Heatsink, the Sabrent PS5 heatsink and the PNY XLR8 Heatsink Heatsink is available soon.

When I previously compared the INEO / Graugear PS5 Hetasink against the Sabrent, Elecgear and Eluteng Heatsink, the main takeaway was that enterprise PS5 heatsink’s like these DEFINITELY keep the SSD/Controller much cooler, as well as have minimum impact on the system temperature too. The PNY XLR8 PS5 Heatsink can be compared easily against the Sabrent model and much like that model, unless you are a particularly hardcore gamer, the 3-4x price point of these prosumer copper pipe SSD heatsink’s are a little unnecessary.

PNY XLR8 PS5 SSD Heatsink – Conclusion & Verdict

The PNY XLR8 SSD heatsink for PS5 cannot really be faulted! There have been quite a few PS5 designed heatsinks released in the last few months and for the most part, they fall into two categories. There are the ‘overkill’ ones which sadly make up the bulk of them (such as the INEO, Graugear and ElecGear) that do the job, but at a high price tag, still require SSD research and unless you are an e-sports or heavy gaming streamer, as never going to even come close to their full utility (think of driving a Ferrari to pop to the corner shop for bread). The other PS5 designed SSD heatsinks like the Sabrent and the PNY XLR8 in this review very much fall into a smaller but much, MUCH more desirable category. The PNY XLR8 finds an impressive middle ground between keeping your PS5 SSD at an ideal ongoing usage temperature, whilst keeping a low profile and not interrupting the airflow/air temp that is running through the rest of the PS5 cooling system. Add to this the ease of buying in together with your PNY XLR8 PS5 compatible SSD and what you have here is an affordable and effective means to store more games, play for longer and maintain the lifespan of your SSD longterm. It may seem the pinch more expensive than a regular M.2 heatsink, but it’s about having the right tool for the job – have you ever tried spreading butter with a steak knife? Or stirring soup with a teaspoon? The same applies to comparing a PS5 designed heatsink with a PC designed one, they are both heatsinks, but for very different deployments. It get’s my vote!

PROS of the PNY XLR8 PS5 SSD Heatsink PROS of the PNY XLR8 PS5 SSD Heatsink
  • Very high-quality build
  • VERY Easy Installation
  • Option of SSD+Heatsink Bundle with the CS3140 Series
  • Less potentially impactful on the system temp than the Elecgear or Copper Pipe Heatsinks
  • On par with Sabrent H/S Price
  • Full 22110 NVMe SSD Coverage
  • High-Quality Thermal Padding pre-attached
  • Quite pricey for a heatsink compared with PC designed m.2 models
  • No spare thermal pads


Articles Get Updated Regularly - Get an alert every time something gets added to this page!


This description contains links to Amazon. These links will take you to some of the products mentioned in today's content. As an Amazon Associate, I earn from qualifying purchases. Visit the NASCompares Deal Finder to find the best place to buy this device in your region, based on Service, Support and Reputation - Just Search for your NAS Drive in the Box Below

 

SEARCH IN THE BOX BELOW FOR NAS DEALS

Need Advice on Data Storage from an Expert?

We want to keep the free advice on NASCompares FREE for as long as we can. Since this service started back in Jan '18, We have helped hundreds of users every month solve their storage woes, but we can only continue to do this with your support. So please do choose to buy at Amazon US and Amazon UK on the articles when buying to provide advert revenue support or to donate/support the site below. Finally, for free advice about your setup, just leave a message in the comments below here at NASCompares.com and we will get back to you. Need Help? Where possible (and where appropriate) please provide as much information about your requirements, as then I can arrange the best answer and solution to your needs. Do not worry about your e-mail address being required, it will NOT be used in a mailing list and will NOT be used in any way other than to respond to your enquiry. [contact-form-7] Terms and Conditions Alternatively, why not ask me on the ASK NASCompares forum, by clicking the button below. This is a community hub that serves as a place that I can answer your question, chew the fat, share new release information and even get corrections posted. I will always get around to answering ALL queries, but as a one-man operation, I cannot promise speed! So by sharing your query in the ASK NASCompares section below, you can get a better range of solutions and suggestions, alongside my own.  

Addlink A92 SSD Review – The Lowest Priced PS5 SSD You Can Buy?

13 décembre 2021 à 01:35

Review of the Addlink A92 PCIe Gen 4 NVMe SSD

I think it would be fair to say that NVMe SSDs that take advantage of QLC NAND in order to provide a much lower price point get a bit of a bad RAP. The Addlink A92 SSD from Addlink is the 3rd and lowest priced entry into their PS5 A-Series of SSDs for expanding your console storage and a lot of that affordability stems from the use of more low priced NAND. For those that are not away, an SSD is made of several internal components – a controller (the brains of the outfit), the memory (keeps things moving) and the NAND (where the data actually lives). The NAND on an SSD can dictate many things, that include the total storage, speed and durability of the SSD as it is regularly written to. In the world of SSD, the least enduring and performing NAND you can use typically is QLC NAND (quad-layer cell) but what you lose, you then gain in being able to get a lot more storage space for your money. The A92 NVMe SSD for PS5 however is something a pinch different. Arriving with PCIe Gen 4 M.2 connectivity, a controller that is used by many of the big-name SSD brands, same DDR 4 memory as many and arriving with PS5 compatibility, this QLC SSD might actually be quite a sensible move for a considerably more closed system like the PS5 – given that most typically users are going to Read data from the SSD 95% over 5% Writing games when downloading etc. Even the on-paper benchmarks which appear lower than the PS5 recommended minimum benchmark are then countered by the PS5 itself clocking it OVER the recommended 5,500MB/s minimum needed for PS5 compatibility. So, today I want to fully review the Addlink A92 NVMe SSD for PC and PC gaming, benchmark it on PS5, performance test it on a PC and hopefully help you decide whether the Addlink A92 is an SSD worthy of your gaming system? Let’s begin.

Interested in the Addlink A95 SSD? Here is the Addlink A95 Prosumer PS5 SSD Review herehttps://nascompares.com/2021/10/15/addlink-a95-ps5-ssd-review-bringing-its-a-game

Alternatively, there is the mid-range Addlink A90 NVMe SSD for PS5 Here – https://nascompares.com/2021/10/15/addlink-a95-ps5-ssd-review-bringing-its-a-game

Addlink A92 SSD Review – Quick Conclusion

Fairplay to Addlink – the A92 SSD DEFINITELY works on the PS5. From its confirmed benchmarks to like for like performance comparisons on PS5 (Full tests HERE), it cannot be said that this rather modest QLC M.2 NVMe SSD is not suitable for PS5. Arriving as easily one of the best value SSDs for the PS5 storage expansion upgrade, as well as being one of the highest performing QLC SSDs I have yet to feature on the channel in 2021, I have almost nothing but praise for it. My professional ‘hat’ will tell you that QLC NAND SSD is always to be avoided, as they lack the long term endurance and performance of their TLC alternatives in the market. However, it has to be acknowledged that their utility is much more closed gaming systems like the PS5, where the end user cannot push these SSDs in particularly hard or any unconventional ways. Therefore there is an argument that QLC NAND SSDs might have finally found their ideal use for most day-to-day users. Of course, the performance of the Addlink A92 in the PS5 seems great now, but we have no idea how much devs are going to push the PS5 hardware in years to come and if the A92 has the staying power in your system to still be a reliable storage upgrade to run your games in 2023-2024. That said, at this price tag, with it’s the inclusive heatsink and arriving at almost half the price of some other brands at the 4TB level, those looking for a much more affordable PS5 SSD upgrade have little to complain about here.

SPEED - 6/10
HARDWARE - 7/10
DURABILITY - 3/10
PRICE - 7/10
VALUE - 7/10


6.0
PROS
👍🏻Genuinely Impressive Performance on a Phison E16 SSD in PS5 & PC
👍🏻First Time QLC NAND SSDs might have found a home
👍🏻
👍🏻Inclusive Heatsink and STILL lower in price than the Sabrent Rocket Q4 by around 10%
👍🏻
👍🏻PS5 Benchmark rated at 5,600MB/s+
👍🏻
👍🏻Lowest Prices 4TB 2280 PCIe4 SSD in the Market
CONS
👎🏻QLC NAND SSD’s are always a bit of an industry negative and durability is very low
👎🏻Low Sustained Write Performance

Addlink A92 SSD Review – Packaging

Shiny. Very, VERY Shiny! That is how I would begin in describing the packaging here. Arriving in somewhat holographic packaging, the retail box of the Addlink S95 pulls no punches here when it comes to aiming at the gamers, with most of the focus going to performance stats and highlighting their A Game gamer series (the A92, A92 and A92).

The rear of the box makes a point of not only highlighting that this SSD is PS5 compatible, but also it’s one of the first SSDs I have had in for review that actually features the official PS5 logo. Along with that, there is a little nod to the heatsink and rather unique (at least as far as other M.2 SSDs on the market) application of the heatsink, using a much more malleable substance (we will go into more detail later) they are keen to highlight that this does an improved job of maintaining the SSD temperature. This will be covered at the last 3rd of this review in the testing and benchmarking.

The contents of the box are a little small, but not in a bad way. A first-time setup guide and warranty information is included in a booklet (as well as the usual web/3D-Barcode links), as well as the SSD itself (with heating pre-applied).

The Heatsink on the Addlink A92 is an interesting mix of elements that include aesthetical design, air efficiency and professional application. Addlink have an impressive range of m.2 NVMe solutions in their catalogue, many using modified versions of this heatsink (depending on the product series), so the need to add the Add AGame logo and PCIe4.0 architecture makes sense.

Looking at the A92 heatsink directly, it is a sweet looking design. Comprised of 3 main elements, a pre-cute metal plate with air channel grooves, a secondary metal clip that surrounds it and finally the thermal silica gel pad that connected the Heatsink to the SSD.

Looking at the Addlink A92 at an angle shows that, despite the aggressive nature of the heatsink, it is actually not very tall. In fact, the Low-Profile designed heatsink is only has a 9.1 mm height, with the total Heatsink+silica+SSD coming to just under 11.25mm. With space being at a premium in the PS5 M.2 SSD slot (and users wanting a little space around/above their SSD+HS to promote any airflow, this is particularly impressive.

Likewise, the heatsink is fractionally raised from the SSD a degree higher than most SSD+HS combos on the Adddlink A92, as the silica gel between them is particularly thick and envelopes the chips underneath a tad (on purpose). This means that is a surrounding around that can capture passing airflow around the SSD, that is not obstructed by a surrounding casing.

Removing the Addlink A92 Heatsink was NOT easy. I cannot stress enough how well attached this heatsink was! I nearly snapped the SSD in two trying to remove it. The SSD uses an adhesive coated silica gel that covered the entirety of the M.2 NVMe SSD, but also slightly envelopes each chip on the drive. It doesn’t smother them (so no touching the PCB) but it does surround the edges of each component to cover a greater physical density, whilst still remaining tidy.

A closer look a the heatsink base shows you just how well it surrounds each chip (with clear indications of where each was placed from imprints). Additionally, you can see that the consistency of the silica gel pad is not the same as the reusable pads in other heatsinks, with this substance having more in common with thermal paste found on CPUs. The slightly porous nature of it definitely seemed to ensure that the components were adequately covered and it does leave you with a distinct feeling of quality and professional application.

Taking the time to clean a little of the silica gel away, you can see that the A92’s controller is much lower on the board than many other SSDs (where it will more often be located directly beneath the m.2 key connector.

As mentioned, the Addlink A92 NVMe SSD fits very neatly into the PS5 SSD upgrade slot, with a clear few millimetres between the heatsink and the m.2 slot cover. Although it is worth highlighting that this heatsink was originally designed for a gaming desktop PC installation (like 99% of other M.2 SD heatsinks), so I will hold full judgement on how efficient the A92 heatsink is for PS5 heat dissipation for another article/video soon.

So that is the physical design of the Addlink A92 SSD. But what about the hardware components themselves? Does the Addlink A92 cut the mustard in terms of current generation hardware and protocols? Let’s find out.

Addlink A92 SSD Review – PS5 Benchmark

Upon installing the Addlink A92 SSD into the PS5, the system gave an impressive benchmark of 5620MB/s. It should be noted that the PS5 has a very unique benchmarking system internally for its own software needs and although Sony recommends that you only use SSDs with a reported 5,500MB/s+ performance (sequential Read) minimum, we have seen SSDs with a lower reported PC benchmark of this be rated at 5,500MB/s+ om the PS5 benchmark. So, there is definitely wiggle room there.

To put the Addlink A92 SSD PS5 Performance Benchmark into a little perspective, here is how it compares against the Sabrent Rocket Q4, as these SSDs that are both PS5 supported and VERY similar architecture:

Addlink A92 PS5 Benchmark – 5620MB/s Sabrent Rocket Q4 PS5 Benchmark – 5621MB/s

With very little difference between the top three others in this tier, it is a solid benchmark. Additionally, the Addlink A92 takes care of overprovisioning at the NAND/Controller level (with four 96L QLC NAND modules of 512GB), so that means that this 2TB SSD is genuinely available as 2TB on the Playstation 5 Storage manager (not 1,920GB as seen previously):

Full PS5 Testing of the Addlink A92 (along with the A90 and A95) are available HERE on the NASCompares YouTube channel. But for now, let’s carry on with looking at the hardware of the A92, how it conventionally benchmarks and how it compares with currently favourite QLC NAND SSD, the Sabrent Rocket Q4.

Addlink A92 SSD Review – Hardware Specifications

The first thing to look at is the architecture of this SSD. Later we will compare it against a very similar built SSD, the sabrnet Rockeet QLC, but for now, here is how the SSD SSD is built:

Addlink A92

1TB – $139/£115 – 2TB – $267/£249 4TB – $539 / £499

PCIe Generation PCIe Gen 4
NVMe Rev NVMe 1.3
NAND QLC KIOXIA 96L
Max Capacity 4TB – Double Sided
Controller Phison E16-PS5016
Warranty 5yr

I know a lot of the above will seem needlessly technical, so below we can bring the most important considerations into sharper focus.

Hardware Focus of the Addlink A92 SSD Series

The first big, BIG thing to remember here is the controller, that Phison E16. An SSD is much like a microcosm version of a whole computer. The Controller is equivalent to the CPU, and Phison are one of the bigger 3rd party SSD controller manufacturers in the world! I say 3rd party, because some long-running storage brands like Samsung and WD have most of their development and hardware engineering ‘in-house’ and use their own branded controllers. Whereas some brands source some/all components for their SSDs from 3rd parties – which is not necessarily a bad thing for both them and the industry (there are pros and cons on either side). Phison has been at the cutting edge of this subject for years now and the newer E18 was first revealed last year in 2020, but due to the pandemic making storage trends unpredictable and semi-conductor shortages, most SSDs that utilized the Phison E18 eventually arrived in 2021. Before that though was the Phison E16, the brands first PCIe 4.0 controller for NVMe SSD and it was widely featured by SSD brands at launch. This controller is one of the biggest reasons that the Addlink A92 can actually back up its promises about the 5,00MB/s+ Sequential Read (sequential data = big chunks of data). However, that is not the only reason.

The NAND on the Addlink A92 is where the data lives! SSDs (as you no doubt know) do not use moving parts as found in traditional hard drives and instead uses cells that are charged and data is read/written to them in this process. The quality of the NAND and the layers used will make a big difference to the durability and performance. The Addlink A92 and it’s Phison 16 arrive with 96 layer 3D QLC NAND onboard but it’s pairing with QLC NAND (not the more common but arguably more expensive TLC NAND) but does feature it at 96L, which is on par with more current-gen PCIe 4 M.2 SSDs in the market.

Much like the Controller on the Addlink A92 being the ‘CPU’, it also has an area of memory. The Addlink A92 SSD uses DDR4 memory on board and this in conjunction with the SSD provides a massive body of data handling resources for getting your data moving through the SSD and out of the m.2 NVMe PCIe 4 interface. The amount of memory scales in conjunction with the 1TB or 2TB SSD you use, with 2GB of DDR4 at the on the 2TB tier, 1GB DDR4 on the 1TB, etc.

Finally, there is the M.2 NVMe connection. Not all m.2 SSDs are created equal and although M.2 SATA and M.2 NVMe look similar, they provide massively different performance and connectivity. However, the Addlink A92 takes it one step further, by using a newer generation of PCIe Connectivity. In short, M.2 NVMe SSDs are connected to the host PC/Console system via PCIe protocol (think of those slots that you almost always use for your graphics cards, but a much, MUCH smaller connector). These allow much larger bandwidth (ie maximum speed) for the connected storage media, Much like regular PCIe slots, they have different versions (i.E PCIe Gen 1, 2, 3, 4, etc) and also a multiplying factor (x1, x2, x4, etc). Up until around 18 months ago, the best M.2 NVMes were M.2 PCIe Gen 3×4 (so a maximum 4,000MB/s possible). However, never generation SSD like the Addlink A92 use PCIe Gen 4×4 (a potential 8,000MB/s possible) and it is only now that SSD controllers and NAND production has reached a point where it can catch up and fully saturate (i.e fill) this connection.

Overall, you really cannot fault the hardware inside/onboard the Addlink A92 (apparent from querying that NAND), as it is still (at release) higher performing in sequential Read and Write than many other M.2 NVMe SSDs in the market at both QLC use AND those at PCIe Gen 3. Before we go into the full testing, however, it is worth taking a moment to look closely at the reported performance benchmarks of the Addlink A92, as although the performance seems stellar, there are areas such as IOPS and endurance when compared with its main rivals that are worth taking into consideration.

Addlink A92 SSD Review – Official Stats First

Before we conduct our own testing on this SSD, Let’s take a closer look at the reported specifications and benchmarks first. The Addlink A92 SSD arrives in multiple capacities (below), although rather odd that there is no 8TB version, given the space increases that QLC SSDs allow and some brands able to squeeze 8TB on a 2280 SSD at QLC level. The Prices currently are a little inconsistent (with each higher capacity tier actually having a higher price per GB – quite unusual) likely due to the hardware shortages, the Pandemic, Chia has affected SSD availability in the last 12 months and most recently the announcement that PS5 supports this SSD and it has increased the majority of PS5 supported SSDs price point in most regions. Below is a breakdown of how each Addlink A92 SSD compares against its closest competitor, the Sabrent Rocket Q4:

Brand/Series Addlink A92

1TB – $139/£115 – 2TB – $267/£249 4TB – $539 / £499

Sabrent Rocket Q4

1TB – $159/£140 – 2TB – $319/£285 4TB – $749/£605

PCIe Generation PCIe Gen 4 PCIe Gen 4
NVMe Rev NVMe 1.3 NVMe 1.3
NAND QLC KIOXIA 96L QLC Micron 96L
Max Capacity 2TB – Double Sided 4TB – Single Sided
Controller Phison E16-PS5016 Phison E16-PS5016
Warranty 5yr 1yr/5yr
500GB Model N/A N/A
Price in $ and $ N/A N/A
1TB Model AD1TBA92M2P SB-RKTQ4-1TB
Price in $ and $ $139 / £135 $159 / £140
2TB Model AD2TBA92M2P SB-RKTQ4-2TB
Price in $ and $ $267 / £249 $319 / £285
4TB Model AD4TBA92M2P SB-RKTQ4-4TB
Price in $ and $ $539 / £499 $749 / £605
500GB Model N/A N/A
Total Terabytes Written (TBW) N/A N/A
Mean Time Between Failures (MTBF, hours) N/A N/A
DWPD N/A N/A
1TB Model AD1TBA92M2P SB-RKTQ4-1TB
Total Terabytes Written (TBW) 200TB 200TB
Mean Time Between Failures (MTBF, hours) N/A 1,800,000
DWPD 0.1DWPD 0.1DWPD
2TB Model AD2TBA92M2P SB-RKTQ4-2TB
Total Terabytes Written (TBW) 400TB 400TB
Mean Time Between Failures (MTBF, hours) N/A 1,800,000
DWPD 0.1DWPD 0.1DWPD
4TB Model AD4TBA92M2P SB-RKTQ4-4TB
Total Terabytes Written (TBW) 800TB 800TB
Mean Time Between Failures (MTBF, hours) N/A 1,800,000
DWPD 0.1DWPD 0.1DWPD

There are clear throughput improvements as you rise through the capacity tiers (not unusual), as does the rated 4K IOPS. Though one area worth focusing on a little is that TBW (terabytes Written) and DWPD (Drive writes per day), as the expected massive drop in durability (chiefly focused on daily/annual write activity) is massive compared with other higher tier SSDs in the market, allow on par with the Sabrent Rocket Q4. s mentioned, although the durability of an SSD is incredibly important, the PS5 (and indeed PC gaming outside of streaming and recording/capture) is an INCREDIBLY heavy READ activity, so although durability is important still, the drop to 0.1 Drive Write per day (when compared against the 0.4 and 0.9 DWPD of the A95 and A90) is not as make-or-break as it might have been elsewhere.

As you might expect from the use of the Phison E16 controller and 96 layer NAND, the reported IOPS on each capacity is actually pretty similar to the 96L Sabrent Rocket Q4. This is still very impressive anyway (if compared against older-gen SSDs and not prosumer class drives). As aside from the NAND on the A92, the rest of the architecture of the drive is actually very similar indeed to the Firecuda 520, Sabrent Rocket PCIe 4.0 and Silcon Power US70 – with write performance vs those TLC NAND SSDs almost half in some places (getting considerably worse at the lower capacities). Below is the read and write of the Addlink A92 vs the Sabrent Rocket Q4, along with reported IOPS:

Brand/Series Addlink A92

1TB – $139/£115 – 2TB – $267/£249 4TB – $539 / £499

Sabrent Rocket Q4

1TB – $159/£140 – 2TB – $319/£285 4TB – $749/£605

500GB Model N/A N/A
Sequential Read (Max, MB/s), 128 KB N/A N/A
Sequential Write (Max, MB/s), 128 KB N/A N/A
1TB Model AD1TBA92M2P SB-RKTQ4-1TB
Sequential Read (Max, MB/s), 128 KB 4700MB 4700MB
Sequential Write (Max, MB/s), 128 KB 1850MB 1850MB
2TB Model AD2TBA92M2P SB-RKTQ4-2TB
Sequential Read (Max, MB/s), 128 KB 4850MB 4800MB
Sequential Write (Max, MB/s), 128 KB 3600MB 3600MB
4TB Model AD4TBA92M2P SB-RKTQ4-4TB
Sequential Read (Max, MB/s), 128 KB 4900MB 4900MB
Sequential Write (Max, MB/s), 128 KB 3600MB 3500MB
Brand/Series Addlink A92 Sabrent Rocket Q4
500GB Model N/A N/A
Random Read (Max, IOPS), 4 KB QD32 N/A N/A
Random Write (Max, IOPS), 4 KB QD32 N/A N/A
1TB Model AD1TBA92M2P SB-RKTQ4-1TB
Random Read (Max, IOPS), 4 KB QD32 180,000 180,000
Random Write (Max, IOPS), 4 KB QD32 450,000 450,000
2TB Model AD2TBA92M2P SB-RKTQ4-2TB
Random Read (Max, IOPS), 4 KB QD32 350000 350000
Random Write (Max, IOPS), 4 KB QD32 700,000 700000
4TB Model AD4TBA92M2P SB-RKTQ4-4TB
Random Read (Max, IOPS), 4 KB QD32 350000 350,000
Random Write (Max, IOPS), 4 KB QD32 700000 700,000

So incredibly similar! There are a few slithers of difference here, but given the 10% or so price decrease in the Addlink A92 (as well as the fact it includes a premium heatsink), it does make that drive look the better choice of the two. That said, both SSDs (on paper at this stage!) are fantastic examples of where consumer and prosumer SSDs are evolving towards. Let’s get the Addlink A92 on the test machine!

Testing the Addlink A92 m.2 PCIE4 NVMe SSD

The Addlink A92 was selected for this test and it was tested using multiple benchmark tools, from a cold boot, in the 2nd storage slot (i.e not the OS drive). Each test was conducted three times (full details of this are shown in the YouTube Review of the Addlink A92 over on NASCompares):

Test Machine:

  • Windows 10 Pro Desktop System
  • Intel i5 11400 Rocket Lake – 6-Core 2.6/4.4Ghz
  • 16GB DDR4 2666MHz Memory
  • Intel B560M mATX Motherboard
  • OS Storage, Seagate Firecuda 120 SSD
  • Test SSD connected to Secondary PCIe Gen 4 M.2 Slot

Using CrystalDisk, we got a good measure of the drive and verified that this PCIe Gen 4 x4 SSD was indeed using the 4×4 lane. Additionally, the temp averaged out around 41C between each test being conducted.

CRYSTAL DISK BENCHAMRK

The first tests were conducted using the ATTO disk benchmark software. The first was a 256MB test file size and below is a breakdown of the transfer rates and IOPS. The 2nd Test was a 1GB test file and finally, the last test was with a 4GB test file. The system was given 1-minute cool downtime between tests, no screen recording software was used (remove overhead) and a heatsink was used throughout (no reboots)

ATTO Disk Benchmark Test #1

256MB File PEAK Read Throughput  = 5.24GB/s

256MB File PEAK Write Throughput = 3.49GB/s

 


 

ATTO Disk Benchmark Test #2

1GB File PEAK Read Throughput  = 5.23GB/s

1GB File PEAK Write Throughput = 3.53GB/s

 


 

ATTO Disk Benchmark Test #3

4GB File PEAK Read Throughput  = 5.23GB/s

4GB File PEAK Write Throughput = 3.53GB/s

 


 

Next, although the ATTO tests were quite good, but not what I would have hoped from this SSD, so I moved on to the Crystal Disk Mark testing to see how well it would handle our lasts barrage of tests. The first test was the 1GB file testing, which measured both sequential and random, as well as the read and write IOPS. Test were conducted on a 1GB, 4GB and 16GB Test File. I also included a mixed 70/30 read and write task to give a little bit more of a realistic balanced workload. These tests were conducted with 1-minute cooling break in between

CRYSTALDISK MARK 1GB TEST


CRYSTALDISK MARK 4GB TEST


CRYSTALDISK MARK 16GB TEST

Next, I switched to AS SSD benchmark. A much more thorough test through, I used 1GB, 3GB and 5GB test files. Each test includes throughput benchmarks and IOPS that are respective to the larger file sizes (important, if you are reading this and trying to compare against the reported 4K IOPS from the manufacturer).

AS SSD Benchmark Test #1

 


AS SSD Benchmark Test #2

 


AS SSD Benchmark Test #3

 

Ordinarily, I would introduce tests like BlackMagic and AJA into the mix here, but even a short burst of testing on an NVMe like this would over saturate the cache memory on board. Nevertheless, in the short term we still could ascertain the reported performance on 1GB, 4GB and 16GB file testing was:

1GB AJA File Test Results (Peak) = 4231MB/s Read & 3958MB/s Write

4GB AJA File Test Results (Peak) = 4307MB/s Read & 3935MB/s Write

16GB AJA File Test Results (Peak) = 4350MB/s Read & 3938MB/s Write

Overall, the Addlink A92 was certainly able to provide some solid performance, as well as potentially exceed the test figures here on a more powerful machine. Given the reported Read and Write statistics that the brand has stated publically, I think there is enough evidence here to back up those claims. IOPs were a little lower than I expected, but again, we were testing very large file types, so this would have to be taken in context. Below is the full temperature reading throughout the entire tests, with the SSD and its unique heatsink maintaining a solid temperature of between 40-50 degrees throughout – very impressive for a QLC NAND SSD, though still higher than the A90 and A95 that were tested before it.

Addlink A92 SSD Review – Conclusion

Fairplay to Addlink – the A92 SSD DEFINITELY works on the PS5. From its confirmed benchmarks to like for like performance comparisons on PS5 (Full tests HERE), it cannot be said that this rather modest QLC M.2 NVMe SSD is not suitable for PS5. Arriving as easily one of the best value SSDs for the PS5 storage expansion upgrade, as well as being one of the highest performing QLC SSDs I have yet to feature on the channel in 2021, I have almost nothing but praise for it. My professional ‘hat’ will tell you that QLC NAND SSD is always to be avoided, as they lack the long term endurance and performance of their TLC alternatives in the market. However, it has to be acknowledged that their utility is much more closed gaming systems like the PS5, where the end-user cannot push these SSDs in particularly hard or any unconventional ways. Therefore there is an argument that QLC NAND SSDs might have finally found their ideal use for most day-to-day users. Of course, the performance of the Addlink A92 in the PS5 seems great now, but we have no idea how much devs are going to push the PS5 hardware in years to come and if the A92 has the staying power in your system to still be a reliable storage upgrade to run your games in 2023-2024. That said, at this price tag, with it’s the inclusive heatsink and arriving at almost half the price of some other brands at the 4TB level, those looking for a much more affordable PS5 SSD upgrade have little to complain about here.

PROs of the Addlink A92 CONs of the Addlink A92
Genuinely Impressive Performance on a Phison E16 SSD in PS5 & PC

First Time QLC NAND SSDs might have found a home

Inclusive Heatsink and STILL lower in price than the Sabrent Rocket Q4 by around 10%

PS5 Benchmark rated at 5,600MB/s+

Lowest Prices 4TB 2280 PCIe4 SSD in the Market

QLC NAND SSD’s are always a bit of an industry negative and durability is very low

Low Sustained Write Performance

 


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INEO / Graugear PS5 SSD M13 Heat Pipe Heatsink Review & Temperature Testing

10 décembre 2021 à 01:37

Reviewing the INEO PS5 Designed Heatsink for SSD Upgrades

Ever since Sony enabled the storage upgrade feature of the PS5, the sudden need for understanding the architecture of M.2 SSDs has increased dramatically. The super-fast PCIe Gen 4 M.2 NVMe SSDs that are required to increase your PS5 storage differ wildly in shape, size and installation that the old SATA hard drives previously and one big new factor that most PS5 gamers are having to get their heads around is the subject of cooling and heat dissipation. These new M.2 SSDs get hot, as electricity is passed through them (no moving parts) and the faster they get, the generally hotter they become. If that heat creeps into the 50-70 degrees celsius zone, it can lead to the drive dropping in performance (know as throttling or bottlenecking) as the SSD’s brain (known as the SSD controller) does not want the heat to harm to long term usability or endurance of the SSD as a whole. Therefore this heat needs to go somewhere – and HERE is where SSD heatsinks come in. These aluminium, copper and even steel modules are connected to the SSD (generally with an additional thermal heat pad, silicon or paste component too) and the heat is then drawn away from the SSD, into the heatsink, then dissipated into the surrounding air. A neat idea, but then most heatsinks for M.2 NVM SSDs released before Summer 2022 was designed with PCs or Laptops in mind – devices with a lot more active airflow and space considerations in mind. The PS5 on the other hand has a small, confined M.2 slot that holds the SSD in place and this is done to make sure that it does not impact the temperature and running of the rest of the PS5 System. Therefore, heatsinks are starting to arrive on the market that is SPECIFICALLY designed for use in the Playstation 5 console system. Easily the most advanced and effective example of this is the INEO Heat Pipe PS5 SSD Heatsink (also known online as the GrauGear PS5 heatsink in Germany and some other regions). A fantastically over the top and overkill heatsink that is also about 4x more expensive than the bulk of regular M.2 NVMe SSD heatsinks on the market. So today I want to take a close look at this PS5 heating, see how effective it is and ultimately help you decide if it deserves your gaming data!

INEO PS5 Designed SSD Heatsink Review – Quick Conclusion

You 100% will have a cooler and more efficiently climate-based SSD in your PS5 if you choose to install the INEO/Graugear PS5 Heatsink – I cannot stress enough that this is true! The copper pipe design massively decreases the temperature of the SSD when in use, as well as dissipates the generated heat away from the SSD faster than any other PS5 SSD Heatsink I have ever tested. HOWEVER, the real question here is whether you are really going to need THAT MUCH heat dissipation on your PS5. Unless you are going to use your PS5 system for more than 6-7 hours a day (active gaming, not just media watching), the difference in heat dispersion of the INEO/Graugear PS5 Heatsink vs the Sabrent or Elecgear PS5 heatsinks is very small indeed (and this is around 20-25% more expensive than those). Compared with traditional ‘bog standard’ m.2 heatsinks at $10-15 that were originally designed for PC use, the INEO/Graugear Heatsink is EXCEPTIONALLY  better at keeping an SSD cool in your PS5. Ultimately, the INEO/Graugear Heatsink is being marketed as a prosumer/premium priced heatsink for an SSD in your PS5 and it provides exactly that level of quality – it just comes down to whether you need that level of performance – no one did the weekly grocery shop in a Lamborgini!

EFFECTIVENESS - 10/10
HARDWARE - 10/10
PERFORMANCE - 10/10
PRICE - 6/10
VALUE - 8/10


8.8
PROS
👍🏻Two-stage SSD cooling in the PS5
👍🏻Supports single and double-sided SSDs comfortably
👍🏻Very high-quality build
👍🏻Easy Installation
👍🏻Additional M.2 Screws and washers included
👍🏻The copper Pipe is ventilated to reduce air friction
CONS
👎🏻Quite pricey for a heatsink
👎🏻Cannot replace the PS5 M.2 SSD Panel
👎🏻Questions surrounding the impact of this H/S in conjunction with the PS5 components are still unanswered and unknown in the grand scheme of things

INEO PS5 Designed SSD Heatsink Review – Retail Packaging

The box that the INEO/Graugear PS5 Heatsink arrives in is significantly bigger than any other boxed heatsink I have ever received (and by a factor of about 10x when compared to budget $10 alternatives like the Eluteng or Warship m.2 H/S). Lovely printed design and plenty of pictures of it in high res on all sides, installed in a PS5 system.

Opening up the box reveals the heatsink itself in a custom mould, cardboard holder. It takes up the bulk of the retail box, but there are other bits inside that are worth highlighting.

Underneath the INEO/Graugear PS5 Heatsink itself, we find a first-time setup manual, thermal pads, screwdriver, 2 screw kits and information on the 1-year warranty that it arrives with.

Laying it all out, there is the same sort of thing that most SSD heatsink’s arrive with – just more of each thing and of higher quality in some places.

For example, an M.2 SSD heatsink can often arrive with a screw mount to fix the SSD in place, however, the INEO/Graugear PS5 Heatsink arrives with two sets AND also these are PS5 specific in length for the system’s rather deep screw holes (as well as inclusive washers of course). Even the thermal pads that it arrives with (four in total) are a step above the norm, with 2x at 7mm and 2x 1.2mm thickness, depending on whether you want to install at the top, bottom, or on more heavily populated SSDs in the PS5 M.2 bay.

Looking at the INEO/Graugear PS5 Heatsink top-down, show that it is a rather sturdy and fixed-size piece of kit. It is designed to fit the PS5 M.2 bay (NOT using the m.2 plate cover) and the copper heat pipe (I will cover this more in a bit) runs out of the available bay, along the front of the PS5 fan/vents, and then is curved to the shape of the PS5 chassis internally. Let’s take a much closer look a the build quality and design of the INEO/Graugear PS5 Heatsink.

INEO PS5 Designed SSD Heatsink Review – Design

Flipping this PS5 SSD Heatsink over shows that it is designed to surround and encase your SSD inside an aluminium main panel. The closed INEO/Graugear PS5 Heatsink box is held by 4 screws and there is space for up to a 2 sided SSD and thermal pads on top and bottom.

A close look at the physical design of the Ice Cold branded, vented INEO/Graugear PS5 Heatsink aluminium box shows that it is designed to capture all the cool air that will be immediately passing through it from the PS5 fan and vents. It is angled too and in a similar raised shape to the PS5 internal chassis too. This is clearly not accidental.

The four screws that hold the aluminium panel in place are micro-sized and quite soft – so I can imagine those threads getting ruined very quickly indeed!

Inside the main aluminium case of the INEO/Graugear PS5 Heatsink, we can see that the copper pipe attachment of the main body of this design is soldered into place and runs diagonally across the M.2 SSD  that you install inside. This is likely to cover bases on a wide variety of SSDs that could be installed in this heatsink and the PS5.

The thermal pads that are included with the INEO/Graugear PS5 Heatsink fill the entire casing on top and bottom and will be more than enough to cover ANY 2280 length SSD installed inside.

That copper pipeline that runs through the top of the aluminium panel of the INEO/Graugear PS5 Heatsink is incredibly unit and (at least for the PS5 system) has ONLY been featured on one other PS5 heatsink, the Elecgear Playstation Designed SSD heatsink, which we reviewed HERE. Its main use is to act as an additional and high conductive heat rod to draw heat from both the SSD and the aluminium heatsink, acting as a two-step cooling system and further decreasing the temp of the SSD and its controller. Given that the PS5 will be hitting this SSD much, MUCH less than a PC might, it does seem like tremendous overkill, however, for those that game for 6, 8 or 12 hours a day (kids, teens, gaming professionals and those that create games-related content for example), this might actually be something that could fit their heavy, sustained usage patterns.

One additional heat is transferred to the copper heat pipe, it is then fed into the elongated line and this is going to be receiving airflow from the PS5 front vents, thanks to the system’s negative cooling system (pulling air through the front and pushing it out the back. The top of the INEO/Graugear PS5 Heatsink is also not quite as dense as you think, arriving heavily vented itself.

The INEO/Graugear PS5 Heatsink (once an SSD is installed) fits precisely into the PS5 shape internally, levering into the M.2 slot (connecting to the m.2 slot first) and then simply lowering down into the PS5 internal chassis designed grooves.

The heatsink is fixed in place with a screw fixed latch/arm that sits on top of the screw hole that the PS5 uses for securing the m.2 SSD cover plate (which cannot be used in conjunction with the INEO/Graugear PS5 Heatsink). The actual metal clip is a little loose (for ease of initial installation I guess) but is the only thing about the design of the INEO/Graugear PS5 Heatsink that I don’t really like.

The screw that the PS5 already features for the M.2 slot (the cross, square, circle, triangle embossed one) is what you need to install the INEO/Graugear PS5 Heatsink in place.

Once in place, the placement of the copper heat pipe to dissipate heat into the airflow/vent is pretty clear and you can see how this heatsink is going to be able to offload all of that SSD generate heat exceptionally quickly.

Indeed, looking at the chassis of the PS5 on its side, you can see just how much of the direct airflow of the PS5 front vent is going to immediately heat the INEO/Graugear PS5 Heatsink. On the one hand, it will DEFINITELY mean that the SSD will be SUPER COOL, but I am a tiny pinch concerned about that ever so slightly hotter air going into the PS5 internal system. The difference will be very, very small indeed, but it’s worth thinking about in mammoth length sessions.

Additionally, the PS5 M.2 SSD cover plate cannot be applied, as the height of the ICE COLD heatsink cage is taller than the slot (in order to capture the airflow along the way). During the later testing of this heatsink, I do take time to test the ambient airflow on the PS5 when it is in operation, not just the SSD/Controller.

The tip of the copper pipe on the INEO/Graugear PS5 Heatsink features very fine vents throughout and this allows the airflow to pass directly through the fanned out tip. It is angled correctly with the PS5 front vent holes too, so it will certainly not block airflow internally whilst the system is in operation.

A top-down look for the PS5 with the INEO/Graugear PS5 Heatsink and m.2 SSD installed shows just how well designed in shape with the PS5 that this device is. No additional fan wires etc and when it does stand between the PS5 plate vents and the internal fan, it does so in the least obtrusive way it can. Let’s move over to the temperature testing of the INEO/Graugear PS5 Heatsink and also see how it compares with a domestic/PC grade SSD heatsink for $10.

INEO PS5 Designed SSD Heatsink Review – Temperature Testings

Temperature testing for the INEO PS5 Designed SSD heatsink has been broken down into several areas. The main aims here are to work out the following things:

  1. Does the INEO / GRAUGEAR Heatsink Keep the Temperature low on the SSD in sustained use?
  2. Does the INEO / GRAUGEAR  Heatsink Interfere with the PS5 Internal System Temp negatively?
  3. Does the INEO / Graugear Heatsink provide a significant improvement over PC designed M.2 SSD heatsinks (eg the Eluteng M.2)

In order to do this, I have installed a temperature sensor on the M.2 SSD itself, UNDER the heatsink AND the thermal pad, directly on the controller chip of the SSD. The SSD used in the testing was the TeamGroup T-Force Cardea A440, a Phison E18, 96L 3D TLC NAND SSD at 1TB – a good mid-range price point SSD that is single-sided and provides 6551MB/s on the PS5 internal benchmark.

When the temp node is on the SSD Controller, I then place the thermal pad down, closed and screw down the heatsink, then attach the 2nd node just underneath the PS5 fan point, in the open air. This second temperature sensor will tell us the surrounding system temp that the internal fan will be used to cool the rest of the system.

The testing consisted of 6 different elements. 4 gameplay sessions of 25mins each, with 2 sessions focusing on the SSD temp and 2 focusing on the system temp (in that order, with 1-2 mins reboot between each, in order to see how the system temp is affected over the combined power-on time).

Then a sustained read and write activity of 350-380MB/s to/from the PS5 internal PS5 SSD and M.2 NVMe SSD (the Cardea A440) and how it impacted the SSD controller only. We are NOT looking at performance/framerate/MB/s etc, ONLY temperatures. Below were the results (video will be published shortly).

Note – BOTH PS5 Side plates were on during the tests 

Test Type Starting Temp (C) Finishing Temp (C) Change (C)
Red Dead Redemption 25min Play (Controller) 33.8℃ 35.2℃ 1.4℃
Red Dead Redemption 25min Play (System Temp) 27.3℃ 27.7℃ 0.4℃
GTA V 25min Play (Controller) 34.8℃ 34.4℃ -0.4℃
GTA V 25min Play (System Temp) 29.3℃ 30.6℃ 0.9℃
Heavy Read (350GB) 26.1℃ 39.6℃ 13.5℃
Heavy Write (350GB) 34.5℃ 36.4℃ 1.9℃

As you can see, in almost all tests, the INEO PS5 Designed SSD heatsink results in very, VERY small increases in temperature over time, much, MUCH lower than most of the other heatsinks that I have tested. To put that into perspective, here is how thIS copper pipe styled heatsink compared in those same tests versus the Eluteng M.2 at just $10 (at least $25 less than the INEO / GRAUGEAR H/S):

NOTE – There tests were performed on different days and ambient temp AND general environmental conditions can undermine these results. Watch the video published soon to see these results in much, MUCH greater detail)

Test Type Eluteng H/S Change INEO-GRAUGEAR H/S Change
Red Dead Redemption 25min Play (Controller) 5.9℃ 1.4℃
Red Dead Redemption 25min Play (System Temp) 1.5℃ 0.4℃
GTA V 25min Play (Controller) 0.5℃ -0.4℃
GTA V 25min Play (System Temp) 0.3℃ 0.9℃
Heavy Read (350GB) 6.2℃ 13.5℃
Heavy Write (350GB) 15.4℃ 1.9℃

So, as you can see, it certainly did a great job. These are still very small differences though and it is worth remembering that an NVMe SSD is designed to run perfectly well at between 30-50 degrees. Anything higher than that (headed towards 70 degrees) can result in throttling. Overall I still think the INEO definitely does exactly what it says it will and does it very well – it is a question of whether you play your PS5 for long enough /regular periods that you need that level of protection/cooling. Let’s conclude the review and give my verdict.

NOTE – The FULL video of the Temperature tests for the INEO PS5 Designed SSD Heatsink, as well as how it compares against the Eluteng M.2 Heatsink, the Sabrent PS5 heatsink and the INEO Heatsink Heatsink is available below in two videos. The full INEO PS5 SSD Copper Pipe Heatsink Review and testing are in the first video, then a full comparison between the INEO Heatsink and the Sabrent and ElecGear PS5 designed Heatsinks is the next one.

When I compared the INEO PS5 Hetasink against the Sabrent, Elecgear and Eluteng Heatsink, the main takeaway was that enterprise PS5 heatsink’s like these DEFINITELY keep the SSD/Controller much cooler, as well as have minimum impact on the system temperature too. But unless you are a particularly hardcore gamer, the 3-4x price point o these prosumer SSD heatsink’s are a little unnecessary.

INEO PS5 Designed SSD Heatsink Review – Conclusion & Verdict

You 100% will have a cooler and more efficiently climate-based SSD in your PS5 if you choose to install the INEO/Graugear PS5 Heatsink – I cannot stress enough that this is true! The copper pipe design massively decreases the temperature of the SSD when in use, as well as dissipates the generated heat away from the SSD faster than any other PS5 SSD Heatsink I have ever tested. HOWEVER, the real question here is whether you are really going to need THAT MUCH heat dissipation on your PS5. Unless you are going to use your PS5 system for more than 6-7 hours a day (active gaming, not just media watching), the difference in heat dispersion of the INEO/Graugear PS5 Heatsink vs the Sabrent or Elecgear PS5 heatsinks is very small indeed (and this is around 20-25% more expensive than those). Compared with traditional ‘bog standard’ m.2 heatsinks at $10-15 that were originally designed for PC use, the INEO/Graugear Heatsink is EXCEPTIONALLY  better at keeping an SSD cool in your PS5. Ultimately, the INEO/Graugear Heatsink is being marketed as a prosumer/premium priced heatsink for an SSD in your PS5 and it provides exactly that level of quality – it just comes down to whether you need that level of performance – no one did the weekly grocery shop in a Lamborgini!

PROS of the INEO / Graugear PS5 SSD Heatsink PROS of the INEO / Graugear PS5 SSD Heatsink
  • Two-stage SSD cooling in the PS5
  • Supports single and double-sided SSDs comfortably
  • Very high-quality build
  • Easy Installation
  • Additional M.2 Screws and washers included
  • The copper Pipe is ventilated to reduce air friction
  • Quite pricey for a heatsink
  • Cannot replace the PS5 M.2 SSD Panel
  • Questions surrounding the impact of this H/S in conjunction with the PS5 components are still unanswered and unknown in the grand scheme of things


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ElecGear PS5 SSD Heatsink Hardware Review – Game Changer or Overkill?

30 novembre 2021 à 15:00

Reviewing the Elecgear PS5 Designed Heatsink for SSD Upgrades

The Elecgear heatsink for PS5 is an unusual piece of kit, there is no denying it. Every since the option to upgrade the storage on your PS5 via the M.2 SSD expansion bay was activated, many Playstation 5 gamers have had to learn a few new things about the latest generation of solid-state drive (SSD) storage. Alongside concepts like NVMe, M.2 and PCIe generations, PS5 gamers have had to learn about how this latest generation of super-fast SSD storage can get hot! Not quite as hot as it might get in video editing studios and professional content creators, but still hit enough for them to make provision. Sony themselves at the enabling of the m.2 SSD slot of the PS5 were VERY keen to highlight that gamers should purchase an m.2 heatsink of a very specific size and dimension for inside their console (in the m.2 expansion bay) to allow the SSD inside to dissipate (transfer) the heat being generated on the SSD to the heatsink and allow it to pass it into the air – thereby allowing the SSD to remain cool and high performing. A useful bit of information, HOWEVER, most m.2 SSD heatsinks were designed for PC case use – big cases that feature multiple internal fans, open-air and plenty of space. The PS5 M.2 SSD upgrade slot however is small, barely fits even modest M.2 heatsinks and requires a cover (which seems like madness to a PC user). So, as the PS5 has allowed SSD upgrades and needs a heatsink, some brands got to work on producing specifically PS5 designed heatsinks and into this arena, we now find the ElecGear PS5 SSD heatsink (aka the EL-P5C). Arriving at a noticeably higher price point than most, the $35-50 PRICE POINT (depending on where you shop online and only in 3-4 regions) is 3-5x more expensive than a regular PC M.2 heatsink and even more expensive than the current Sabrent PS5 heatsink that is currently the ‘score to beat’ (review HERE). So, today I want to take a close look at the Elecgear PS5 heatsink, review its design and build quality, perform some temperature tests, compare it with cheaper alternatives and ultimately design if it is the right move for you and your PS5 gaming in future. Let’s begin.

Elecgear PS5 SSD Heatsink Review – Quick Conclusion

The Elecgear does EVERYTHING that it says it can and will do. From maintaining one of the lowerest SSD temperatures that I have witnessed on the PS5 NVMe SSD for the most part, to the clear effort that has gone into the design of the heatsink to existing both in and outside of the PS5 M.2 SSD expansion slot, you cannot question it’s ability to keep your SSD running at an optimal operational temperature! The price tag seems a little high (at $35-50 depending on where you shop at online) especially given the $10-15 dollar price tag of most other M.2 SSD heatsinks – something that I could accept IF it was the only S5 designed heatsink. But given that Sabrent released their own PS5 heatsink, currently priced at $20 (with SSD combo options) 3 months before, that pricetag is a little harder for some to swallow. Nevertheless, even in the general airflow and temperature of the PS5, the elecgear seems to make sure not to impede or negatively impact the core system temp, which is a big plus in its favour. Overall, I can definitely recommend this heatsink for those of you that play your PS5 every single day and for moderately extensive periods, but for light gamers and those that jump on at weekends – this might be a bit overkill.

EFFECTIVENESS - 10/10
HARDWARE - 10/10
PERFORMANCE - 9/10
PRICE - 6/10
VALUE - 8/10


8.6
PROS
👍🏻World’s First PS5 Copper Pipe Equipped Heatsink
👍🏻Blends in well with PS5 design
👍🏻clearly designed to keep SSD temp low, and it DOES
👍🏻Easy Installation
👍🏻Optional SSD height rasing kit included
👍🏻Clear considerations for single/double-sided SSDs
👍🏻Clearly designed to work alongside the PS5 airflow channels
CONS
👎🏻Quite pricey for a heatsink
👎🏻Poor availability across most of the world (mostly amazon only)
👎🏻Questions surrounding the impact of this H/S in conjunction with the PS5 components are still unanswered and unknown in the grand scheme of things

Elecgear PS5 SSD Heatsink Review – Retail Packaging

The retail box for this PS5 designed heatsink is…well…a little underwhelming. I know that $35+ is not a huge sum of money, but at the same time, there is a certain branding that ‘gamer’ focused accessories have a tendency to lean towards and that is a bit absent here. Even the $10-15 heatsinks that have popped up over the last few months have made a small attempt to factor this in, but the ElecGear EL-P5C definitely has the feeling of production line haste about it.

Likewise, the contents of the box, although pretty detailed in their scope, are kind of ‘thrown’ in there. I know there is little to no moving parts here to make considerations for, but it is another one of those areas where you feel that this kit is a little cheap feeling.

However, one could easily argue that the money has been spent on the kit itself. The contents of the Elecgear PS5 heatsink is actually quite extensive when compared against its more affordable competitors. The EL-P5C kit includes the PS5 designed heatsink itself, a paper multi-language manual, mid-quality micro-screwdriver, thermal pads and a rather unique SSD riser.

Now to put these accessories into perspective, the Sabrent PS5 heatsink includes all but the riser kit, the Eluteng PC M.2 heatsink has everything but the riser kit and the INEO Heatpipe PS5 heatsink is a different story altogether. The ElecGear PS5 SSD heatsink includes the means to increase the height of the M.2 SSD installed in the PS5 upgrade slot and ensure it is raised further from the PS5 main PCB underneath, as well as reduce the distance between the SSD and the heatsink.

Now, this is quite an unusual extra for a console system. Although this is moderately common with custom PC builds (because the wide variety of motherboards and CPU placements in that area are so diverse physically), but on a closed and uniform system like the PS5, I was surprised to see it. The argument is that thicker/double-sided NVMe SSDs need further ground clearance and room to allow further heat dissipation, as well as making sure than an installed SSD has a closer connection to the heatsink you pair it with. Indeed, ElecGear themselves say the following on their own product pages:

“It seems the leading maker Sony does not belong to M.2 SSD industry. We don’t think that the stock screws mount M.2 SSD appropriately in the memory compartment. ElecGear did it better with a re-designed fixing structure for your gaming SSD. The modified guide post, standard M.2 screw and even a copper washer to adjust the height of SSD are included in the box” – ElecGear, Product Pages, Amazon.com

For my temperature tests later, I used the single-sided TeamGroup T-Force Cardea A440 SSD, so I did not use these risers. But I think there IS a ring of truth in what Elecgear are saying here, but more on how heavily the heatsink connects with the SSD, as the M.2 slot in the PS5 is a little lower than I would like and therefore even a 0.5mm difference can greatly reduce the effectiveness of heat dissipation from the SSD to the Heatsink. Another way in which Elecgear have addressed this concern in their PS5 heatsink kit is in the thermal pads that are included. The x4 thermal pads that are included are in pairs of two different thicknesses of 0.8mm and 1.5mm. Once again, a nice touch and something that the rather understated nature of the package presentation would suggests would be absent. So you have two differing heat pads for your SSDs that allow better dissipation levels of 4.8W/m-k and 3.6W/m-k on the blue and pink panel respectively. There is also an instructional manual that details the installation and also covers the installation of the SSD riser panels and washer kit.

The manual seems fine at first glance, but there are certainly a few grammar errors present and again, it is little things like this in terms of presentation that result in the Elecgear PS5 heatsink getting undermined, despite its excellent contents. However, that is enough fo4 the packaging and presentation. Let’s get to grips with the Elecgear PS5 heatsink itself, the design and how it works.

Elecgear PS5 SSD Heatsink Review – Design

A good look at the Elecgear heatsink for PS5 shows us that this thing is pretty large! indeed, with the eluteng $10 heatsink of choice for budget buyers measuring at just 70x22x6mm, the Elecgear towers over it at 128x72x14mm. This is because it is designed to both fill AND sit outside of the PS5 M.2 SSD expansion bay, thereby both collecting the heat generated by the SSD, but also using the PS5 internal system fan to cool the heatsink at the same time – thereby allowing much faster and efficient heat dissipation fo the SSD in use over hours and hours of play.

Now, the big, big difference between a PS5 designed heatsink like the elecgear EL-P5C and a regular M.2 heatsink design that was made for PC use primarily, is to do with airflow. NVMe SSDs (such as those used by the PS5 for storage upgrades and PC gaming) get quite hot when in use. They have no moving parts, but the faster the SSD read/write speed, the hotter it can get over time. Heat is a big, BIG problem for SSDs, as it can result in the performance being throttled/bottlenecked by the system, as well as affecting the durability of the SSD long term. That is why Heatsinks are important and although the PS5 is a much less intensive read/write system than a bigger PC or editing machine, it still can affect the SSD.

The m.2 slot on the PS5 is quite small, as well as arrives with a cover that Sony insist should always cover your M.2 SSD. This is a little counterintuitive to most SSD heatsinks, as they are DESIGNED to live directly in the open airflow of a PC case or under/above a fan kit in a laptop – this allows the heat being collected by the heatsink from the SSD to be dispersed int other air. Closing a PC designed heatsink into that PS5 SSD slot seems the very opposite of that. That is where the elecgear PS5 heatsink comes in. It covers the SSD you have installed in the M.2 slot, but instead of replacing the PS5 M.2 metal plate cover, the elecgear fills the space and then spreads out over the side and is angled towards the large, single internal PS5 fan. This allows the heatsink to collect all that heat from the SSD, and then disperse it directly into the incoming fan. But we will touch on that element a bit later.

The vents of the elecgear heatsink are clearly designed for use in the PS5 system, in direct alignment with both the fan AND the air channelling internal curves of the PS5 that direct airflow into the fan. The lines are also ventilated to allow air to pass in and out of the heatsink too – a nice extra touch. However, the heat dissipation is taken an extra step further when you flip it over. The base of the Elecgear PS5 Heatsink (that connected with the SSD you installed in your console, along with a thermal pad) not only covers the entire length of a 2280 length drive, but also features an excellent copper pipe (5mm x 98mm)

Now, this copper pipe is a big deal when compared against exclusively aluminium only heatsinks. The copper pipe is considerably more effective at drawing heat from the SSD components (the controller, primarily) and this heat can be delivered to the aluminium plate (as well as the plate still collecting heat of its own accord from the SSD too). This massively increases the potential heat dissipation when in use and almost certainly dramatically decreases the typical temp of the SSD inside the PS5. This and the fact that the larger heat plate is in the immediate airflow path of the internal fan, makes this almost certainly the most effective heat-dissipating heatsink you can buy on PS5. However, it does this at a potential cost of ‘robbing’ airflow that was designed to keep the PS5 system CPU, GPU, memory and its own SSD cool.

Let’s get the Elecgear PS5 heatsink installed inside the PS5, see how it sits, how high it is against that fan and ultimate temperature test it to see how well it performs and whether it negatively/positively affects the PS5 system temp elsewhere.

Elecgear PS5 SSD Heatsink Review – Installation

Installation of the Elecgear heatsink is incredibly straightforward – but only if you are not planning on using the riser kit. The riser kit that is designed to improve the connection of the SSD and heatsink is optional and in order to properly test this heatsink with a typical SSD PS5 installation (versus a regular heatsink), I decided to install it without the riser kit. Your SSD goes inside the M.2 SSD expansion slot. Make sure you use a thermal pad from the accessory kit and lay it across the top of the SSD. You can place a thermal pad UNDER the SSD if it is double-sided, but your MAIN priority should be the side with the controller/brains of the NVMe SSD.

NOTE – Ignore the wire on the photo, this was just the thermometer cable I used in testing for this review

Then you simply slot the heatsink itself into the slit that the usual PS5 SSD cover plate would fit and close the heatsink into place. You will know that it is installed correctly as the screw hole at the top will align with the hole that the PS5 Screw (topped with the square, circle, triangle cross) is visible. When installed, the heatsink looks a perfectly natural fit and even looks like it would not have looked out of place as an official component at launch – something many have complained at Sony for in relation to SSD upgrades on this system.

Looking at this heatsink from a tighter/low angle, you can see that it rises from the base level of the PS5 internal plat by around 2-3mm. It still completely allows the external PS5 side plates to be reinstalled (with no contact between them and the heatsink), as well as the grooved channels of the Elecgear heatsink to line up with the PS5 external vent lines and deliver that air to the internal PS5 fan – it just also uses that are to cool the heatsink (and in turn assist the SSD temp) along the way. I am still a little thoughtful about if this increases the airflow by much on its way to the PS5 fan (which is pushing air over the internal components of the console), but we will get to that later.

The Elecger heatsink also takes advantage of the same screw hole and screw that the PS5 has already to cover the m.2 slot, as well as having a counter-sunk shape to make sure that the screw still goes in at the full depth of the hole, whilst not interfering with the integrity of the heatsink.

Overall, the heatsink is clearly very well designed in conjunction with the PS5 shape internally, as well as clear architecture choices being made here to ensure that airflow to the existing PS5 internal cooling measures are unimpeded as much as possible. Let’s see how the Elecgear heatsink for PS5 handles internal temperatures and those of the SSD controller.

Elecgear PS5 SSD Heatsink Review – Temperature Testings

Temperature testing for the Elecgear PS5 SSD heatsink has been broken down into several areas. The main aims here are to work out the following things:

  1. Does the Elecgear Heatsink Keep the Temperature low on the SSD in sustained use?
  2. Does the Elecgear Heatsink Interfere with the PS5 Internal System Temp negatively?
  3. Is the Elecgear Heatsink provide a significant improvement over PC designed M.2 SSD heatsinks (eg the Eluteng M.2)

In order to do this, I have installed a temperature sensor on the M.2 SSD itself, UNDER the heatsink AND the thermal pad, directly on the controller chip of the SSD. The SSD used in the testing was the TeamGroup T-Force Cardea A440, a Phison E18, 96L 3D TLC NAND SSD at 1TB – a good mid-range price point SSD that is single-sided and provides 6551MB/s on the PS5 internal benchmark.

When the temp node is on the SSD Controller, I then place the thermal pad down, closed and screw down the heatsink, then attach the 2nd node just underneath the PS5 fan point, in the open air. This second temperature sensor will tell us the surrounding system temp that the internal fan will be using to cool the rest of the system.

The testing consisted of 6 different elements. 4 gameplay sessions of 25mins each, with 2 sessions focusing on the SSD temp and 2 focusing on the system temp (in that order, with 1-2 mins reboot between each, in order to see how the system temp is affected over the combined power-on time).

Then a sustained read and write activity of 350-380MB/s to/from the PS5 internal PS5 SSD and M.2 NVMe SSD (the Cardea A440) and how it impacted the SSD controller only. We are NOT looking at performance/framerate/MB/s etc, ONLY temperatures. Below were the results (video will be published shortly).

Note – BOTH PS5 Side plates were on during the tests 

Test Type Starting Temp (C) Finishing Temp (C) Change (C)
Red Dead Redemption 25min Play (Controller) 30.8℃ 31.4℃ 1.4℃
Red Dead Redemption 25min Play (System Temp) 23.1℃ 23.2℃ 0.1℃
GTA V 25min Play (Controller) 26.7℃ 28.1℃ 1.4℃
GTA V 25min Play (System Temp) 21.8℃ 22.9℃ 1.1℃
Heavy Read (350GB) 29℃ 35.6℃ 5.6℃
Heavy Write (350GB) 24℃ 36.1℃ 12.1℃

As you can see, in almost all tests, the elecgear PS5 SSD heatsink results in very, VERY small increases in temperature over time, much, MUCH lower than most of the other heatsinks that I have tested. To put that into perspective, here is how the Elecgear EL-P5C PS5 heatsink compared in those same tests versus the Eluteng M.2 at just $10 (at least $25 less than the elecgear):

NOTE – There tests were performed on different days and ambient temp AND general environmental conditions can undermine these results. Watch the video published soon to see these results in much, MUCH greater detail)

Test Type Eluteng H/S Change ElecGear H/S Change
Red Dead Redemption 25min Play (Controller) 5.9℃ 1.4℃
Red Dead Redemption 25min Play (System Temp) 1.5℃ 0.1℃
GTA V 25min Play (Controller) 0.5℃ 1.4℃
GTA V 25min Play (System Temp) 0.3℃ 1.1℃
Heavy Read (350GB) 6.2℃ 5.6℃
Heavy Write (350GB) 15.4℃ 12.1℃

So, as you can see, it certainly did a great job. These are still very small differences though and it is worth remembering that an NVMe SSD is designed to run perfectly well at between 30-50 degrees. Anything higher than that (headed towards 70 degrees) can result in throttling. Overall I still think the Elecgear definitely does exactly what it says it will and does it very well – it is a question of whether you play your PS5 for long enough /regular periods that you need that level of protection/cooling. Let’s conclude the review and give my verdict.

NOTE – The FULL video of the Temperature tests for the ElecGear PS5 SSD Heatsink, as well as how it compares against the Eluteng M.2 Heatsink, the Sabrent PS5 heatsink and the INEO Heatsink Heatsink will be live soon and in a 3-Part series of video below.

VIDEOS OF THE TESTS – COMING SOON BELOW (Dec 1st 2021)

Elecgear PS5 SSD Heatsink Review – Conclusion & Verdict

The Elecgear does EVERYTHING that it says it can and will do. From maintaining one of the lowerest SSD temperatures that I have witnessed on the PS5 NVMe SSD for the most part, to the clear effort that has gone into the design of the heatsink to existing both in and outside of the PS5 M.2 SSD expansion slot, you cannot question it’s ability to keep your SSD running at an optimal operational temperature! The price tag seems a little high (at $35-50 depending on where you shop at online) especially given the $10-15 dollar price tag of most other M.2 SSD heatsinks – something that I could accept IF it was the only S5 designed heatsink. But given that Sabrent released their own PS5 heatsink, currently priced at $20 (with SSD combo options) 3 months before, that pricetag is a little harder for some to swallow. Nevertheless, even in the general airflow and temperature of the PS5, the elecgear seems to make sure not to impede or negatively impact the core system temp, which is a big plus in its favour. Overall, I can definitely recommend this heatsink for those of you that play your PS5 every single day and for moderately extensive periods, but for light gamers and those that jump on at weekends – this might be a bit overkill.

PROS of the ElecGear PS5 SSD Heatsink PROS of the ElecGear PS5 SSD Heatsink
  • World’s First PS5 Copper Pipe Equipped Heatsink
  • Blends in well with PS5 design
  • clearly designed to keep SSD temp low, and it DOES
  • Easy Installation
  • Optional SSD height rasing kit included
  • Clear considerations for single/double-sided SSDs
  • Clearly designed to work alongside the PS5 airflow channels
  • Quite pricey for a heatsink
  • Poor availability across most of the world (mostly amazon only)
  • Questions surrounding the impact of this H/S in conjunction with the PS5 components are still unanswered and unknown in the grand scheme of things


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PS5 SSD Upgrades – The MOST Frequently Asked Questions – SOLVED

22 novembre 2021 à 01:55

Choosing the Right SSD for Your PS5 – Your Questions Answered

Upgrading your PS5 with an m.2 SSD to improve your overall available storage is a lot more complex than a lot of people think! In the previous generations of Playstation consoles, the choice was easy (buy a SATA hard drive or SSD – of which there were literally thousands of different types in the market that were suitable) but in the case of the Playstation 5, you need to look at surprisingly specific SSDs, known as M.2 NVMe SSDs. these need to be of a certain architecture, length, speed and variation. Add to that the fact these SSDs can get rather hot and require the use of heatsinks in many cases – something that most non-PC savvy buyers have never even seen or thought about previously. This all leads to those looking at upgrading the storage in their PS5 with a new SSD having a lot of questions that may seen easy to some or fantastically technical to others. So today I wanted to list the 20 more frequently asked questions that people have about upgrading the SSD in their PS5. I have avoided obvious questions and the actual process of installing an SSD (as those are answered in ALOT of detail and with diagrams HERE on an article and HERE in a video on YouTube). These are questions that are a little technical and understandably more NVMe-SSD-novice based. No question is too silly or too obvious, so let’s get started.

Most Frequently Asked Questions on PS5 SSD Upgrades

Below is the first group of the 10 most frequently asked questions about upgrading your PS5 storage with an SSD. There is also a full video covering all 10 questions in more detail, with diagrams and a few on-screen examples. Under each question, I have placed a link that will open up the video at the exact point where I cover that question. That way you can either read or watch the answer, based on your own convenience. Let’s begin.

Do Double Sided SSDs need extra cooling underneath in the PS5?

Find the answer in the Video above at – 01:36

The short answer – No! Double-sided SSDs do not need any additional heat dissipation along their base, just along the top of the SSD when connected. The longer answer is that although a double-sided SSD has chips on both sides, the most important part that needed to be kept at a low/optimal temperature is the controller (the brain of the drive) which is located on the top. The actual data lives on chips called ‘NAND’ and the bigger the SSD, the likelihood that there are more of these and that some are located on the bottom of the SSD. NAND actually works better when it is a little warmed. Additionally, the PS5 is 95% READ activity and 5% WRITE activity typically, something that does not particularly raise the temperature of the NAND (though it DOES on the controller). Therefore you do not need to worry about any extra cooling or heat dissipation on the base of the SSD in the PS5.

Should You use the PS5 SSD expansion slot with or without the cover?

Find the answer in the Video above at – 04:22

Where possible, you should always use the PS5 M.2 SSD slot with the cover on it. Although this seems a little counter-intuitive (as it prevents airflow over the SSD from the big internal PS5 fan, that is why the heat dissipation qualities of an SSD heatsink are necessary. If you run your PS5 with the cover on the m.2 SSD slot REMOVED, then although this will allow airflow to cool the SSD heatsink on your m.2 drive, it may interrupt/compromise the airflow internally on the PS5 towards the much, MUCH more important CPU, GPU and memory inside that keep the system running. These need extra cooling too and that is why the PS5 uses the negative pressure 2 vent system internally to ensure air is circulated in, through and out of the system as fast as possible! There are exceptions, such as the Sabrent PS5 SSD designed Heatsink that I reviewed here, but otherwise, I would always recommend using the cover for the overall better health of your PS5.

Should you remove the stickers and labels on the SSD and will it invalidate my warranty?

Find the answer in the Video above at – 07:28

Definitely, definitely not! There is no need. In older SSDs, removing the branded label to ensure that the SSD heatsink you installed contacted the chips on the drive was much more important. Modern SSDs no longer have this problem and adequate/proficient heat dissipation through this label has long been possible. Additionally, some brands actually prevent you from doing this as it could damage the SSD and can void your warranty (with some having tell-tale stickers that show you removed it). So yeah, no need to remove the SSD label inside

How do you upgrade the firmware on an SSD in my PS5?

Find the answer in the Video above at – 08:53

The sad truth is that you cannot do this easily. It is NOT possible to upgrade the firmware on an SSD from within the PS5 Software/ecosystem. Also, you cannot just put the SSD in a USB enclosure or docking station and update, as the SSD can ONLY be updated with a direct connection to a PC/Laptop motherboard, as the delivery system and direct interface with the SSD controller are too deep in the drive’s architecture. It is recommended that you install the SSD in a PC/Laptop slot and update it that way, but do bear in mind that it will likely format the drive when doing this, so make sure your game data is available to download again or moved over to your internal PS5 system SSD first.

Should you always buy the SSD and Heatsink from the same brand?

Find the answer in the Video above at – 10:32

Almost always yes! SSDs that arrive with a heatsink included generally mean that the heatsink has been applied onto the NVMe SSD at the factory level, which will have industrial-grade dust and environmental control. This will limit any dust during the application process and ensure a cleaner connection. Additionally, unlike a 3rd party generic heatsink that is ‘made for all’, a heatsink that is made and applied by the same brand as the SSD will mean that it can be crafted and applied in a much more precise way to the chips on the SSD PCB that need heat dissipation the most – that means that the thermal padding and shape of the heatsink will be designed around the SPECIFIC shape of the SSD and chips. The only time this is NOT the case is when you have SSDs that include a heatsink that you ‘apply yourself’, such as the Viper Patriot VP4300 or TeamGroup T-Force Cardea A440 – Both VERY, VERY good SSDs which include 2 different heatsinks each, but neither is pre-applied.

Why are PS5 SSDs out of stock or low stock and still very expensive?

Find the answer in the Video above at – 13:20

There are ALOT of things that have affected the SSD market in the last 2-2.5 years that have all resulted in buying an SSD for your PS5, PC, NAS Laptop or whatever is considerably more difficult. Aside from obvious factors, such as the demand for new PCIe 4 SSDs in PS5 since the feature was enabled in Aumtun 2021 AND the impact of working practices and demand during the COVID19 pandemic, there have also been three big other factors that hurt SSD availability and increased pricing. They were/are:

  • A cryptocurrency known as CHIA that, rather than using graphics cards and GPU power (like most other crypto including Bitcoin), relied on storage media and this resulted in large storage HDDs and faster SSDs being bought rapidly worldwide
  • The US-China trade war that formally started in 2019 resulted in the motion of stock and resources used in the production of SSDs being slowed/stopped worldwide
  • Semi-conductor shortages in the east (a hugely important component used in all technology, not just SSDs) that was also harmed by massive droughts in Taiwan (where most of the world’s semiconductors are produced)

SSDs are slowly becoming more available and the pricing less crazy, but they are still not back to their same level compared to where they were in 2018/2019. You can find out a lot more information on this by watching the video below from my YouTube channel:

Do games load from the PS5 SSD expansion slot faster than the internal PS5 SSD?

Find the answer in the Video above at – 17:50

Not ALL games run faster on the M.2 SSD expansion slot of the PS5, but some certainly do. The internal PS5 SSD (based on testing and approximations, not directly from Sony themselves sadly) has a maximum sequential (big data) read of 5,500MB/s or so and a 4K random read IOPS (smallest data in massive quantities) of around 600-750,000. That means that if you install an SSD that is significantly greater than these values (good examples are the Seagate Firecuda 530, WD Black SN850, Samsung 980 Pro and T-Force Cardea A440 Pro Special SSD – which can hit 7,300MB/s Red and 1,000,000 IOPS), then you can run a lot of games faster. The KIND of games makes a lot of difference. Big, sandbox/open-world games will have ALOT of IOPS performance to factor in and therefore big games like GTA, RDR2, No Man Sky and Cyberpunk will likely load faster on a faster m.2 SSD than the internal PS5 SSD. But smaller, level/compact world games will likely seem no different on either.

Does SSD write speed matter on the PS5 expansion bay?

Find the answer in the Video above at – 20:00

At the moment (at the end of 2021) the answer is largely ‘NO’. An SSD installed inside your PS5 will likely be used for READ activity (i.e loading a game) more than 95% of its time in operation and only write activity happening when you are downloading/moving games to the SSD. Likewise, Sony has only allowed the PS5 system to internally store a handful of different storage activities on the system to access the M.2 SSD bay. However, as time goes on and developers are able to make the most of the SSD slot on this system and the massively faster SSDs inside (as well as streamers and video editors that want to store 4K high-quality PS5 gameplay in the hours-at-time), then write speed might well matter more and more. So, in the short term, it doesn’t matter. In the long term, it’s hard to say.

Can I use M.2 NVMe PCIe Gen 3 SSDs in the PS5 and if not, why not?

Find the answer in the Video above at – 21:43

No, you definitely cannot use PCIe Gen 3×4 SSDs (such as those older than Firecuda 510, Samsung 970 Plus, WD Black SN750) in the PS5 M.2 expansion slot. This is largely down to the PS5 internal SSD being faster than the maximum performance possible than even the fastest PCIe Gen 3 SSD. Therefore Sony has restricted SSDs in the PS5 m.2 expansion bay to PCIe Gen 4 only, as these are the only SSDs that can match/exceed the PS5 internal SSD. Thi ensures that all games will run well on the M.2 SSD as, or even better than, the internal PS5 SSD. This is especially important for online/multiplayer games, but also a general good thing for players.

Why did you get the PS2 designed plates for PS5?

Find the answer in the Video above at – 22:52

For those that are interested in the build of the Playstation 5 system that I use in my videos on NASCompares, below is a link to an article where I have broken down a guide on how to create the PS2 plate design of the PS5, as well as where to buy/find/make the components that make up this system.

Click the Image below for the PS2 Designed PS5 Design Guide – Or Click HERE

Here is the Video that answers all of the first 10 Most common questions about upgrading your PS5 SSD:

 

Below is a further 10 more most commonly asked questions about upgrading the storage in your PS5 console with an m.2 SSD. Once again, each question is answered in written form, as well as including a link to the video (at the correct time on the vid) where I go into more detail on this question, with examples, diagrams and/or demonstrations. You can read or watch the answer at your convenience.

Do the Speed of PS5 SSD Upgrades get better if you go for a larger capacity and why?

Find the answer in the Video above at – 00:50

In almost all cases, the larger the capacity (i.e in GB or TB) that an NVMe SSD is, the higher the performance. The reason for this is that the part of the SSD physically that contains your data is modules known as NAND. The larger the capacity, the more NAND will be present on the SSD hardware. So, when the drive is being accessed (especially in writing activity) it means taht the drive is normally writing to several NAND modules at once – thereby multiplying the amount of activity and therefore increasing the total amount being done per second. This is not always true however and can depend on how the SSD manufacturer has arranged the NAND storage evenly. So, a 1TB SSD can physically have 2x 512GB NAND modules onboard or 4x 256GB. It is the same amount of storage on both SSDs, but the one with 4 NAND modules will almost always run higher in key performance areas like throughput and IOPS.

Does Changing the heatsink on the PS5 SSD I have installed damage the SSD or result in anything else bad?

Find the answer in the Video above at – 04:02

In most cases, changing the SSD heatsink will not cause any damage, as heatsinks will either be attached with a light adhesive to the heatsink OR are not attached at all and are just pressed strongly against a thermal heating pad, which is attached to the heatsink. The only time that changed a heatsink can potentially the heatsink can be harmful is when an SSD includes the use of silicon/silica paste (as found in the Add Link A95, 192 and A90 for example) as these SSDs are INCREDIBLY well attached and removing the heatsink can leave a tonne of residue or even crack the SSD physical PCB board if done poorly. Likely some SSDs arrive in highly sealed surrounding heatsink cases (sh as the WD Black SN850+Heatsink) and removing those will break the heatsink for the most part entirely.

Do PS4 Games run better on the SSD I install in my PS5 expansion bay?

Find the answer in the Video above at – 07:29

Most of the PS4 generation games that are played on the PS5, but stored on the m.2 SSD expansion bay WILL run better than if they were stored on the internal SSD bay. However the difference will be very small, as these kinds of games have not been designed with NVMe SSD storage in mind, so have a set loading pattern and protocol that can only operate ‘so fast’ as it goes through its routine. Bigger games that are open world or sandbox will load faster, but fairly linear loading games will see little or no different than they would have loaded from an external HDD/SSD or a PS4 Pro with a 2.5″ SSD inside.

What is the Slowest M.2 NVMe SSD that you can use on the PS5?

Find the answer in the Video above at – 09:14

If you have been looking at particularly low cost (and therefore inevitably slower) NVMe SSDs to upgrade your PS5 and M.2 SSD Storage expansion bay, jsut to store media and PS4 games that won’t see the full benefit of top tier SSDs, then you might be wondering what is the lowest and slowest drive you can upgrade with. Currently, it is largely agreed that the Adata XPG GAMMIX S50 Lite is the lowest tier drive you can use. It has a reported performance of 3,900MB/s Sequential (big data) Read and 3,200MB/s Sequential Write. Also, with a 4K Random IOPS (so smaller, high quantity accessed data) of 490,000 Read – these performance benchmarks are from ADATA themselves and are almost half the performance of the likes of the WD Black SN850, Seagate Firecuda 530 and XPG GAMMIX S70. If you only want a drive for storage size vs price and are not too fussed about performance, this is the lowest you can go in 2021/2022

What is the Write Speed of the Internal PS5 SSD?

Find the answer in the Video above at – 12:05

The honest answer is that no one really knows the internal PS5 SSD sequential Write speed. The Read speed seems to be at around 5,000-5,500MB/s, but as the system is quite closed in it’s processes (for reasons of simplicity and stability with causal users), there is almost no way to accurately measure the write speed. Even when transferring games from an m.2 SSD or USB drive to the internal PS5 SSD is no use, as there is an element of encryption, compression and/or checking happening internally when moving data that results in the speed of transferring data completely inaccurate when compared to conventional write activity on a PC. Most estimates online have erred towards between 1,800-2,800MB/s sequential write speed. But even then, this is by no means precise or reliable.

Can You fill an M.2 NVMe SSD in your PS5, then Remove the SSD from your PS5 and install it in another PS5 to play the games?

Find the answer in the Video above at – 15:16

Unfortunately, no. Due to the PS5 encrypting/locking the games as they are downloaded to/moved in the system to that SPECIFIC PS5, the result is that if you powered down the PS5, took the M.2 SSD out, installed it in ANOTHER PS5 that even has the same PSN account registered, the rebooted – you would still be greeted a the start-up screen with a message saying that this SSD needs to be formatted for use. Doing so will result in the drive being completely deleted from existing data in order to format it and link it with the new PS5. It is even near impossible to clone an NVMe SSD onto another one (even using an external forensic level m.2 docking station) in case you wanted to ensure you kept a copy of games that get removed from the PSN storage later (see Kojima’s P.T demo for example) as the data on the SSD and formatting process are linked to THAT SSD and its serial number.

Which PS5 SSDs Deals Should You Look for on Black Friday?

Find the answer in the Video above at – 16:51

Since Sony enabled the M.2 SSD storage bay of the PS5, there have been dozens of new SSDs released on the market that are supported by the system. Now that a lot more PS5 compatible SSDs are available, this has resulted in a lot more affordable and competitively priced options appearing on the market. At the bottom of this article, you will find the FULL LIST of PS5 Compatible SSDs (with their performance and where to buy them). However, right now, in terms of Price, Performance and Value. The best options for most people are the Seagate Firecuda 530, the WD Black SN850 and the Samsung 980 Pro. They are by no means the only SSDs out there and you may well see some great deals on lesser-known SSDs, such as the Addlink A95, the XPG GAMMIX S70 Blade, the Viper Patriot VP4300 and the always popular Sabrent Rocket 4 Plus series. Alternatively, you can visit the PS5 SSD Black Friday Deals Page here.

Seagate Firecuda 530

Samsung 980 Pro

WD Black SN850

500GB – $149.99

1TB – $239.99

2TB – $489.99

4TB – $949.99.

250GB – $69.99

500GB – $119.99

1TB – $199.99

2TB – $429.99

500GB – $169.99

1TB – $249.99

2TB – $549.99

 

Should You Buy a PS5 SSD that features an Innogrit Rainer IG5236 or Phison E18 Controller?

Find the answer in the Video above at – 19:06

Although there are ALOT of M.2 SSDs that can be used on the PS5 (see MASSIVE compatibility list below), in terms of their onboard hardware and specifications they can be broken down into three different types:

  • Ones that use in-house development teams – Such as Samsung, Crucial and WD
  • Ones that use the Phison Controller Series (E16 and E18) – Such as Seagate, Gigabyte, MSI and Sabrent
  • Ones that use the Innogrit Rainer (IG5236) Controller – Such as Adata XPG and the Patriot Viper VP4300

Now the first category (in-house development) is always going to provide the best value and availability, as the brand controls every part of the development and sourcing of components. However, they release much fewer completed products/refreshes of a component than 3rd parties like Phison and Innogrit that create numerous components that are then utilized by hundreds of SSD brands – because they are dependant on the market constantly demanding their product. That is why there are ALOT of Phison E16 and E18 SSDs in the market right now, as they were one of the first to not only come up with a PCIe 4 controller, but also to develop multiple controller variations within it. Because they have such a large % of the market in SSD controller usage, they can be spread a little thin, resulting in a little less availability and potentially a higher price for SSDs with their newest gen controllers. The Innogrit controller on the other hand is a great newer and their PCIe 4 SSD Controller (the Innogrit Rainer IG5236) does not command the same level of notoriety on SSDs and instead provides a near-identical  (and in some cases higher) performance and durability, whilst still being more affordable than the Phison E18 SSDs. Add to this that practically ALL Innogrit IG5236 Controller SSDs (for example the XPG Gammix S70, S70 Blade and Viper Patriot VP4300) ALL include a premium grade heatsink (or an additional heatshield in some cases) whilst STILL being lower in price than a Phison E18 of the same level/capacity. That said, the PS5 tends to give a slightly higher benchmark on a Phison E18 controller. Ultimately, for overall PS5 performance, go for a Phison E18 Controller SSD. For the best value, whilst still having high performance and a heatsink, go for the Innogrit SSD controller drives.

Here is the video that answers all of the next 10 most common questions about upgrading your PS5 SSD:

 


 

All PS5 Compatible SSDs in 2021/2022 – UPDATED

Although Sony enabled the Playstation 5 SSD expansion slot in Summer 2021, they have yet to issue a FULL compatibility list of ALL drives that can be used. I have been testing a huge number of M.2 NVMe SSDs with PS5 in the last 3 months in order to create a master list of all the drives that work (here on the blog, as well as over on YouTube in my PS5 SSD Test Series HERE). Below is a breakdown of all the currently available and supported SSDs that are compatible with PS5 (with help on Reddit, Twitter and others).

BLUE = COMPATIBLE

GREY = UNCONFIRMED

BRAND MODEL ID SIZES CONTROLLER NAND R/W SPEED CHECK AMAZON
Acer Predator GM7000 512, 1TB, 2TB Innogrit 1G5236 Micron3D TLC 7,400 / 6,700 MB/s
ADATA XPG Gammix S70 Blade 1TB, 2TB Innogrit IG5236 3D Nand 7.4K / 6.4K MB/s
ADATA XPG Gammix S70 1TB, 2TB Innogrit Rainer IG5236 Micron 3D TLC 7.4K / 6.4K MB/s
ADATA XPG Gammix S50 Lite 1TB, 2TB Silicon MotionSM22 67 Micron 3D TLC 3.9K / 3.2K MB/s
ADATA XPG Gammix S50 1TB, 2TB Phison PS5016-E16 Toshiba 3D TLC 5.0K / 4.4K MB/s
Addlink A95 1TB, 2TB Phison PS5018-E18 Micron3D TLC 7.1K /6.8K MB/s
Addlink A92 1TB, 2TB, 4TB Phison PS5016-E16 Micron QLC 4.9K / 3.6K MB/s
Addlink A90 1TB, 2TB N/A 3D TLC 5.0K / 4.4K MB/s
Addlink H90 with heatsink 1TB, 2TB N/A  3D TLC 5.0K / 4,4K MB/s
Addlink S90 no heatsink 1TB, 2TB N/A 3D TLC 5.0K / 4,4K MB/s
Apacer AS2280Q4 500, 1TB, 2TB Phison PS5016-E16 3D TLC 5.0K / 4.4K MB/s
Asgard AN4 512, 1TB, 2TB Innogrit IG5236 YNTC 3D TLC 7.5K / 5.5K MB/s
Corsair MP600 Pro XT Hydro X 2TB, 4TB Phison PS5018-E18 Micron3D TLC 7.1K / 6.8K MB/s
Corsair MP600 Pro XT 1TB, 2TB, 4TB Phison PS5018-E18 Micron3D TLC 7.1K / 6.8K MB/s
Corsair MP600 Pro Hydro X 2TB Phison PS5018-E18-41 3D TLC 7.0K / 6.55K MB/s
Corsair MP600 Pro Standard 1TB, 2TB, 4TB Phison PS5018-E18-41 Micron3D TLC 7.0K / 6.55K MB/s
Corsair MP600 Core 1TB, 2TB, 4TB Phison PS5016-E16 3D QLC 4.95K / 3.95K MB/s
Corsair MP600 1TB, 2TB Phison PS5016-E16 Toshiba 3D TLC 4.95K / 4.25K MB/s
Crucial P5 Plus 500, 1TB, 2TB Crucial NVMe Micron TLC 6.6K / 5.0K MB/s
Galax HOF Pro 1TB, 2TB Phison PS5016-E16 Toshiba 3D TLC 5.0K / 4.4K MB/s
Gigabyte Aorus 7000S 1TB, 2TB Phison E18 Micron TLC 7.0K / 6.85K MB/s
Gigabyte Aorus 1TB, 2TB Phison PS5016-E16 Toshiba 3D TLC 5.0K / 4.0K MB/S
Goodram IRDM Ultimate X 500, 1TB, 2TB Phison PS5016-E16 Toshiba 3D TLC 5.0 / 4.5K MB/s
Inland Performance Plus 1TB, 2TB Phison PS5018-E18 Micron3D TLC 7.0 / 6.85 GB/s
Integral Ultima Pro X3 500, 1TB, 2TB N/A  3D TLC 5.0 / 4,4K MB/s
Intel DC P5800X 400, 800, 1.6TB Intel InteL Optane 2nd Gen 7.4 GB/s / 7.4
Kingmax PX4480 500, 1TB, 2TB Phison PS5016-E16 3D Nand 5.0 / 4.4K MB/s
Klevv CRAS C920 1TB, 2TB Phison PS5018-E18 3D TLC 7.0K / 7.0K MB/s
Lexar NM800 500, 1,000 GB InnoGrit IG5236 3D TLC 5.8K / 7.4K MB/s
Micron 3400 512, 1TB, 2TB Micron Based Micron 3D TLC N/A 
Micron 2450 256, 512, 1TB N/A Micron 3D TLC N/A 
MSI Spatium M480 500, 1TB, 2TB PhisonPS5018-E18 Micron 3D TLC 7.0K /6.85K MB/s
MSI Spatium M470 1TB, 2TB Phison PS5016-E16 Kioxia 3D TLC 5.0K / 4.4K MB/s
Mushkin Gamma 1TB, 2TB Phison PS5018 E18 Micron 3D TLC 7.1 / 6.8 MB/s
Mushkin Delta 1TB, 2TB, 4TB Phison PS5016-E16 Micron 3D TLC 4.9 / 3.9 MB/s
Patriot Viper VP4300 1TB, 2TB Innogrit Rainier IG5236 Micron 3D TLC 7.4K / 6.8K MB/s
Patriot Viper VP4100 1TB, 2TB Phison PS5016-E16 Toshiba 3D TLC 5.0K / 4.4K MB/s
Plextor M10P Series 512, 1TB, 2TB Innogrit Rainier IG5236 Kioxia TLC 7.0K / 5.0K MB/s
PNY XLR8 CS3140 1TB, 2TB Phison PS5016-E18-41 Micron 3D TLC 7.5K / 6.85K MB/s
PNY XLR8 CS3040 500GB, 1TB, 2TB Phison PS5016-E16-32 Toshiba 3D TLC 5.6K / 4.3K MB/s
Sabrent Rocket 4 Plus 500, 1TB, 2TB, 4TB Phison PS5018-E18 Micron 3D TLC 7.2K / 6.9K MB/s
Sabrent Rocket Q4 1TB, 2TB, 4TB Phison PS5016-E16 Micron 96L QLC 4.9K / 6.85K MB/s
Sabrent Rocket NVMe 4.0 1TB, 2TB Phison PS5016-E16 Toshiba 3D TLC 5.0K / 4.4K MB/s
Samsung PA9A1 (OEM) 250, 500, 1TB, 2TB Samsung Elpis Samsung 3D TLC 7.0K / 5.2K MB/s
Samsung 980 Pro 250, 500, 1TB, 2TB Samsung Elpis Samsung 3D TLC 7.0K / 5.0K MB/s
Seagate FireCuda 530 500, 1TB, 2TB, 4TB Phison PS5018-E18 Micron 3D TLC 7.0K / 6.9K MB/s
Seagate FireCuda 520
1TB Phison PS5016-E16 Toshiba 3D TLC 5.0K / 4.4K MB/s
Seagate FireCuda 520 500, 1TB, 2TB Phison PS5016-E16 Toshiba 3D TLC 5.0K / 4.4K MB/s
Silicon Power US70 1TB, 2TB Phison PS5016-E16 3D Nand 5.0K / 4.4K MB/s
Smartbuy Stream E19T 500, 1TB Phison PS5016-E19-35 Toshiba 3D TLC 3.3K / 3.0K MB/s
Smartbuy Impact E16 500, 1TB, 2TB Phison PS5016-E16 3D TLC 5.0K / 4.4K MB/s
Team Force Cardea Z44Q 2TB, 4TB Phison PS5012-E161 Micron 3D QLC 5.0K /4.0K MB/s
Team Force T Create Classic 1TB, 2TB Phison PS5016-E16 Kioxia 3D TLC 5.0K / 4.4K MB/s
Team Force Cardea Ceramic A440 1TB, 2TB Phison PS5086-E18 Micron TLC 7.0K / 6.9K MB/s
Team Force Cardea Ceramic C440 1TB, 2TB Phison PS5016-E16 Toshiba 3D TLC 5.0K / 4.4K MB/s
Team Force Cardea Zero Z440 256, 512, 1TB PhisonPS5016-E16 Toshiba 3D TLC 5.0K / 4.4K MB/s
Transcend MTE240S 512, 1TB N/A 3D TLC 3.8K / 3.2K MB/s
Western Digital Black SN850 500, 1TB, 2TB SanDisk 8-Channel 96L Bics4 7.0K / 5.1K MB/s

 


 

What is the Best PS5 SSD Heatsink – The Do’s and Don’ts

Most M.2 NVMe SSD that you might look at for your PS5 will NOT arrive with a heatsink. Some brands do include optional heatsinks for $20-40, but there will likely be PC-Grade gamer heatsinks and much, much too tall for the allocated PS5 Expansion storage slot for upgrades. Sony provided a handy upgrade guide for how big the NVMe SSD needs to be, alongside details of the type that is recommended.

Now, there are ALOT of M.2 NVMe SSD Heatsinks on the market – THOUSANDS! So it is important to know which ones are compatible and which ones you should completely avoid. Heatsink AND SSD together should NOT exceed in millimeters 110mm (L) x 25mm (W) x 11.25mm (H) and in inches 4.33in (L) x 0.984 in (W) x 0.442in (H). Another big thing to remember is that some SSD heatsinks use rubber bands to hold the M.2 NVMe SSD and the HEATSINK together. I would strongly recommend avoiding these kinds of heatsinks as they have a tendency not to last vast amounts of time and the silicon rubber bands (if produced poorly) can wear away. I strongly recommend a met surrounding heatsink case/enclosure like the one below, as it has 2 layers of internal thermal padding, the metal surrounding the whole SSD (assisting heat dissipation) and is screwed in place. Last point. The majority of NVMe M.2 PCIe Gen 4×4 SSDs right now are going to be 2280 (that is the length of the SSD), as this tier of SSD have only JUST been released in the last 6-9 months. However, they WILL get longer (to accommodate more storage cells and bigger capacity) so the fact the PS5 supports up to 22110 lengths SSDs is quite handy. If you are reading this guide much later in 2021/2022, then DO CHECK that the SSD  you are installing in your PS5 is 2280 or 22110, as the heatsink will also need to be this length too (as the screw holds an SSD Board mount need to match). This is much, MUCH less of a concern in 2021 however, so you can ignore this right now. So,  there you have it, those are the do’s and don’ts for buying a heatsink for your PS5 SSD upgrade. Below are 5 great examples of M.2 NVMe SSD Heatsinks that will fit in your PS5 Expansion slot. They vary in price, design, height, colour and density. Take a look:

 

 

UPDATED – The Recommended Ones Below Keep Selling out, so I have added more!

Sabrent PS5 SSD Designed Heatsink – $19.99

  • DESIGNED FOR PS5: Engineered to fit perfectly and easily into the PS5 SSD expansion slot. The installation has never been easier on the PS5
  • REVOLUTIONARY COOLING: Made from High-Quality CNC’d aluminium, the Sabrent PS5 Heatsink was specifically designed to maximize cooling performance and simplify the installation
  • UPGRADE YOUR PS5! Rather than creating a heatsink that would only trap the heat in the metal cover, we designed a heatsink that replaces the native PS5 cover. This allows for better cooling using the native fan as well as being a larger heatsink
  • INDUSTRIAL QUALITY: This SSD heatsink method also uses Sabrent’s “Sandwich Design” which ensures even pressure throughout the SSD for efficient and consistent heat transfer unlike methods used by other brands
  • CONVENIENCE: Comes with an installation guide as well as screws and thermal tape for easy convenient installation

ElecGear PS5 SSD Designed Heatsink – $34.99

  • [PS5 NVMe Heatsink] – The patent-pending cooler is exclusively designed for PlayStation 5 internal NVMe SSD. It features a heat pipe and a huge solid aluminum heatsink. The high performance comes from the numerous cooling fins and the delicate utilization of air circulation sucked by PS5 main cooling fan. The streamlined profile is a snag fit with the middle frame of PS5 chassis. The heatsink is the ultimate cooling solution to the heat management of extreme Gen4 gaming SSD
  • [Heat Pipe and Thermal Pads] – A 5mm heatpipe seamlessly embedded in the lower aluminum deck. The passive design with no cooling fan is aiming for being totally silent. The heat produced by SSD will be absorbed by the heat pipe and effectively conducted to the extensive aluminum fins. Two pieces pre-divided thermal pads are included for excellent heat connection. 0.8mm and 1.5mm thickness option adapts to any PCIe NVMe M.2 SSD
  • [Improved Mounting Post] – It seems the leading maker Sony does not belong to M.2 SSD industry. We don’t think that the stock screws mount M.2 SSD appropriately in the memory compartment. ElecGear did it better with a re-designed fixing structure for your gaming SSD. The modified guide post, standard M.2 screw and even a copper washer to adjust the height of SSD are included in the box
  • [Compatibility Note] – The cooler fits both PS5 Ultra HD and Digital editions. In terms of hardware, it’s compatible with any standard NVMe M.2 solid state drive. Fully tested with WD Black SN850, Samsung 980 Pro and Sabrent Rocket NVMe 4.0. It supports 2230, 2242, 2260, 2280 form factor and also works with 22110 in the future. Please be noticed: The SSD maker’s thin heatsink should be removed before installing, for example, Corsair-Force MP600 and ADATA XPG

 

PNY XLR8 Gaming PS5 SSD Designed Heatsink – $24.99

PNY XLR8 PS5 SSD Heatsink is designed for PS5, integrating the original PS5 SSD cover, PNY offers a brilliant design, combined the cover with heatsink which provides extreme cooling performance, taking your extra upgraded PS5 NVMe SSD to the extreme. Not only can you destroy the competition, and play more games, but your system can look good while doing so.

  • Part No : M22110PSVHS-XR-RB
  • Design to integrate PS5 SSD cover & heatsink
  • Greatly improves cooling efficiency
  • Included spare screws x1 + Thermal pads
  • Compare to no heatsink, cools downs the SSD over 40%*
  • Recommended SSD: XLR8 CS3140 Gen 4×4

INEO / GRAUGEAR PS5 SSD Designed Heatsink G-PS5HS01 – $34.99

The new GRAUGEAR/INEO heat pipe cooler G-PS5HS01 reduces the temperature of your M.2 NVMe SSDs in the PlayStation®5 by up to 50% and thus contributes to a longer lifetime of your SSDs. The performance of your M.2 NVMe SSDs is also positively influenced by the GRAUGEAR/INEO heat pipe cooler G-PS5HS01. The Ø7mm copper heat pipe and the copper fins and aluminium heat sink ensure maximum performance.

  • Heat Pipe from Copper maximum performance
  • The reduced temperature of M.2 NVMe SSD up to 50%
  • Designed for PlayStation®5
  • Compatible with Single/Double-sided M.2 2280 SSDs
  • 1 x G-PS5HS01, 4 x Thermal Pads
  • 1 x Screwdriver1 x SSD mounting screw
  • 1x Screws, 1 x Manual, 1 x Warranty card

 

QIVYNSRY M.2 heatsink 2280 SSD Double-Sided Heat Sink

  • Designed for desktop computers, but works with PS5
  • Aluminum body, Anodic Oxidation Surface Treatment;
  • with 10°C – 30°C cooling effect;
  • Compatible with Singel/Double sided M.2 NVME NGFF SSD;
  • Easy to install, and not damage the hard disk.

Includes:

  • 1* EZ NVMe Heatsink-Silver
  • 2* Thermal pads
  • 5* Screws.
  • 1* Installation guide.

 

 

SUPER BUDGET OPTION – Akuoly M.2 SSD Heatsink 4 Pack Aluminum Heatsink Cooler Cooling

 

  • To Save Your Device from Fail Prematurely–Reduce the risk of hardware failure due to overheating. The gap of these Akuoly heatsinks between the larger fins increases the area of the board and thus provides for greater heat transfer
  • Made of High Quality Aluminum–Made of high quality aluminum, great thermal conductivity. An aluminum heatsink is a passive heat exchanger that efficiently transfers heat through electronic signal or mechanical signal with device, thus keeping a regulation of the temperature of the device at an optimal level
  • Suitable for Various Devices–Suitable for heating elements on Wi-Fi routers, M.2 SSD, AC adapters, chargers, high power amplifier transistor semiconductor devices and so on
  • Cheerful 4 Pack Heatsink & Thermal Pads– 4 pieces x aluminum heatsink Cooling Fin (each 70mm x 22mm x 6mm), large surface area and great fins; with 4 pieces of double-sided thermal tape whose thermal conductivity: about 1.3 W / (m·K).
  • Material: Aluminum
  • Size: 70mm (L) x 22mm (W) x 6mm (H)
  • Package: 4 Pack x Aluminum Heatsink Cooling Fins
  • 4 Pieces Double-sides Thermal Tape whose thermal conductivity: about 1.3 W / (m·K).

 

SGTKJSJS M.2 Heatsink SSD Cooler for PCIE NVME

Excellent little kit. Comes with: A screwdriver, a cleaning and drying towelette(not needed if the m.2 is new and/or not dusty) and it has two dark blue(.5mm) for the bottom(U bracket) and two light blue(1mm) for the top(heatsink) for 2 m.2 drives. There is a protective film on BOTH sides of each of the thermal tape piece. Remove BOTH pieces of film of EACH of the thermal tape pieces and apply them. Once the thermal tape is on both sides(1 blue-bottom, 1 light blue-heatsink) place the bottom of your m.2 drive into the U bracket/bottom of the thermal unit. Next make sure that the top piece(heatsink) has the open spot for the screw for your motherboard facing the back to leave space to attach. Next, line up the holes and gently drop the top heatsink into the U bracket/bottom.

Package list

  • M.2 SSD heatSink  X2
  • Silicone thermal pad   X4

  • Fixing screw  X8

  • screwdriver  X1

 

EZDIY-FAB M.2 2280 SSD heatsink

Double-Sided Heat Sink, High-Performance SSD Cooler for PCIE NVME M.2 SSD or SATA M.2 SSD- Red or Black – $15

  • Designed for desktop computers, but works inside PS5
  • Aluminum material for best heat dissipation and maximum performance.
  • Compatible with Singel/Double sided M.2 2280 SSDs.
  • Easy to install.
  • Beautiful metal surface treatment, installed in the chassis to form a beautiful landscape.

Includes:

  • 1* EZ NVMe Heatsink-Silver
  • 2* Thermal pads
  • 5* Screws.
  • 1* Installation guide.

 

 


MHQJRH M.2 2280 SSD heatsink – SINGLE SIDE SSD USE ONLY – VERY TIGHT FIT!!

Double-Sided Heat Sink, Matching Thermal Silicone pad for PCIE NVME M.2 SSD or SATA M.2 SSD – $9.99

  • Designed for Compact M.2 NVMe SSD Installation
  • Aluminum body, Anodic Oxidation Surface Treatment.
  • Aluminum alloy-Groove design, greatly increase the heat dissipation area, with 10°C – 30°C cooling effect.
  • Compatible with Singel/Double-sided M.2 2280 SSDs.
  • Easy to install, and not damage the SSD
  • Advancing Gene thermal pad is made from Nano Silicon Grease Material, with good thermal conductivity ability. Soft enough and good ductility, compatible with uneven surfaces of the M.2 SSD. Low viscosity, with no damage to the SSD label.

Includes:

  • M.2 SSD heatSink X1
  • Silicone thermal pad X3
  • Fixing screw X6
  • Screwdriver X1

 

 


 

Ice Cold Ineo M.2 heatsink 2280 SSD

Thermal Silicone pad for M.2 PCIE NVMe SSD – $10.99

  • The NVMe heatsink are able to support the NVMe SSD type 70x20mm
  • Please place the silicone cooling pad between the heatsink and the SSD to prevent damage to the SSD and protect the particles of the SSD, which can effectively extend the life of your SSD.
  • Package including: 1 NVMe Aluminum heatsink, 2 silicone thermal pad, 1 user manual, 1 screw driver , 1 guarantee card, 1 screw
  • Each product has strict tested before We sent it to you and offer 1 Year Limited Warranty, Life-time free technical support by ineo.

Includes:

  • 1 NVMe Aluminum heatsink
  • 2 silicone thermal pad
  • 1 user manual
  • 1 screw driver
  • 1 1 screw

 


 

WARSHIP Pro M.2 2280 SSD Heatsink

PCIE NVME or SATA m2 2280 SSD Double-Sided Heat Sink – Black – $8.99

  • Suports PCIE NVME M.2 2280 size SSD or SATA M2 2280 size SSD
  • Aluminium alloy, silver plating , anodic oxidation surface treatment
  • Easy to install, NO damage to the SSD.
  • Aluminum alloy-Groove design with 10°C – 30°C cooling effect

Includes:

  • HeatSink X2
  • Big Silicone thermal pad X 2
  • Small Silicone thermal pad X 10
  • Screws X 6
  • Screwdriver X1

 

 


 

Best Budget Choice – Nankui SSD Heatsink Surround – SINGLE SIDE SSD USE ONLY – VERY TIGHT FIT!!

NVMe Heatsink for m.2 2280 SSD,Double-Sided Cooling – $5.99

  • Originally designed for desktop computers, This M.2 SSD heatsink compatible with all single sided Type.
  • Simple Lock design, easy to install
  • Double Aluminum alloy-Groove design, greatly increase the heat dissipation area, with 7°C – 30°C cooling effect (Varies depending on the environments), Ensure the high-speed and long-lasting performance of SSD, continuous high-speed reading and writing and long-term game performance are still strong
  • Main body material: Aluminum alloy, anodic oxidation surface treatment. Dimensions: 76.5*24.*12mm , Nano Silicon Grease Material Dimensions:70*20*T.4 ,Thermal conductivity:3W/m-k

Includes:

  • M.2 SSD heatSink X1
  • Silicone thermal pad X3
  • No Screws – Clicks Shut

 

 


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