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Hier — 6 décembre 2021Flux principal

Signature électronique de mail : un dispositif central pour les entreprises

6 décembre 2021 à 11:31
Par : UnderNews

Signer ses e-mails permet d’ attester de son identité au moment d’envoyer un message électronique. Mais la réalité est toute autre : les e-mails peuvent être la cible de cybercriminels, qui compromettront le contenu des envois ou se glisseront dans une boîte mail pour usurper l’identité du soit disant expéditeur. Sécuriser ses e-mails grâce à la signature électronique est donc une pratique désormais indispensable pour échanger dans une sphère de confiance.

The post Signature électronique de mail : un dispositif central pour les entreprises first appeared on UnderNews.

ElecGear PS5 SSD Heatsink Hardware Review – Game Changer or Overkill?

30 novembre 2021 à 15:00

Reviewing the Elecgear PS5 Designed Heatsink for SSD Upgrades

The Elecgear heatsink for PS5 is an unusual piece of kit, there is no denying it. Every since the option to upgrade the storage on your PS5 via the M.2 SSD expansion bay was activated, many Playstation 5 gamers have had to learn a few new things about the latest generation of solid-state drive (SSD) storage. Alongside concepts like NVMe, M.2 and PCIe generations, PS5 gamers have had to learn about how this latest generation of super-fast SSD storage can get hot! Not quite as hot as it might get in video editing studios and professional content creators, but still hit enough for them to make provision. Sony themselves at the enabling of the m.2 SSD slot of the PS5 were VERY keen to highlight that gamers should purchase an m.2 heatsink of a very specific size and dimension for inside their console (in the m.2 expansion bay) to allow the SSD inside to dissipate (transfer) the heat being generated on the SSD to the heatsink and allow it to pass it into the air – thereby allowing the SSD to remain cool and high performing. A useful bit of information, HOWEVER, most m.2 SSD heatsinks were designed for PC case use – big cases that feature multiple internal fans, open-air and plenty of space. The PS5 M.2 SSD upgrade slot however is small, barely fits even modest M.2 heatsinks and requires a cover (which seems like madness to a PC user). So, as the PS5 has allowed SSD upgrades and needs a heatsink, some brands got to work on producing specifically PS5 designed heatsinks and into this arena, we now find the ElecGear PS5 SSD heatsink (aka the EL-P5C). Arriving at a noticeably higher price point than most, the $35-50 PRICE POINT (depending on where you shop online and only in 3-4 regions) is 3-5x more expensive than a regular PC M.2 heatsink and even more expensive than the current Sabrent PS5 heatsink that is currently the ‘score to beat’ (review HERE). So, today I want to take a close look at the Elecgear PS5 heatsink, review its design and build quality, perform some temperature tests, compare it with cheaper alternatives and ultimately design if it is the right move for you and your PS5 gaming in future. Let’s begin.

Elecgear PS5 SSD Heatsink Review – Quick Conclusion

The Elecgear does EVERYTHING that it says it can and will do. From maintaining one of the lowerest SSD temperatures that I have witnessed on the PS5 NVMe SSD for the most part, to the clear effort that has gone into the design of the heatsink to existing both in and outside of the PS5 M.2 SSD expansion slot, you cannot question it’s ability to keep your SSD running at an optimal operational temperature! The price tag seems a little high (at $35-50 depending on where you shop at online) especially given the $10-15 dollar price tag of most other M.2 SSD heatsinks – something that I could accept IF it was the only S5 designed heatsink. But given that Sabrent released their own PS5 heatsink, currently priced at $20 (with SSD combo options) 3 months before, that pricetag is a little harder for some to swallow. Nevertheless, even in the general airflow and temperature of the PS5, the elecgear seems to make sure not to impede or negatively impact the core system temp, which is a big plus in its favour. Overall, I can definitely recommend this heatsink for those of you that play your PS5 every single day and for moderately extensive periods, but for light gamers and those that jump on at weekends – this might be a bit overkill.

EFFECTIVENESS - 10/10
HARDWARE - 10/10
PERFORMANCE - 9/10
PRICE - 6/10
VALUE - 8/10


8.6
PROS
👍🏻World’s First PS5 Copper Pipe Equipped Heatsink
👍🏻Blends in well with PS5 design
👍🏻clearly designed to keep SSD temp low, and it DOES
👍🏻Easy Installation
👍🏻Optional SSD height rasing kit included
👍🏻Clear considerations for single/double-sided SSDs
👍🏻Clearly designed to work alongside the PS5 airflow channels
CONS
👎🏻Quite pricey for a heatsink
👎🏻Poor availability across most of the world (mostly amazon only)
👎🏻Questions surrounding the impact of this H/S in conjunction with the PS5 components are still unanswered and unknown in the grand scheme of things

Elecgear PS5 SSD Heatsink Review – Retail Packaging

The retail box for this PS5 designed heatsink is…well…a little underwhelming. I know that $35+ is not a huge sum of money, but at the same time, there is a certain branding that ‘gamer’ focused accessories have a tendency to lean towards and that is a bit absent here. Even the $10-15 heatsinks that have popped up over the last few months have made a small attempt to factor this in, but the ElecGear EL-P5C definitely has the feeling of production line haste about it.

Likewise, the contents of the box, although pretty detailed in their scope, are kind of ‘thrown’ in there. I know there is little to no moving parts here to make considerations for, but it is another one of those areas where you feel that this kit is a little cheap feeling.

However, one could easily argue that the money has been spent on the kit itself. The contents of the Elecgear PS5 heatsink is actually quite extensive when compared against its more affordable competitors. The EL-P5C kit includes the PS5 designed heatsink itself, a paper multi-language manual, mid-quality micro-screwdriver, thermal pads and a rather unique SSD riser.

Now to put these accessories into perspective, the Sabrent PS5 heatsink includes all but the riser kit, the Eluteng PC M.2 heatsink has everything but the riser kit and the INEO Heatpipe PS5 heatsink is a different story altogether. The ElecGear PS5 SSD heatsink includes the means to increase the height of the M.2 SSD installed in the PS5 upgrade slot and ensure it is raised further from the PS5 main PCB underneath, as well as reduce the distance between the SSD and the heatsink.

Now, this is quite an unusual extra for a console system. Although this is moderately common with custom PC builds (because the wide variety of motherboards and CPU placements in that area are so diverse physically), but on a closed and uniform system like the PS5, I was surprised to see it. The argument is that thicker/double-sided NVMe SSDs need further ground clearance and room to allow further heat dissipation, as well as making sure than an installed SSD has a closer connection to the heatsink you pair it with. Indeed, ElecGear themselves say the following on their own product pages:

“It seems the leading maker Sony does not belong to M.2 SSD industry. We don’t think that the stock screws mount M.2 SSD appropriately in the memory compartment. ElecGear did it better with a re-designed fixing structure for your gaming SSD. The modified guide post, standard M.2 screw and even a copper washer to adjust the height of SSD are included in the box” – ElecGear, Product Pages, Amazon.com

For my temperature tests later, I used the single-sided TeamGroup T-Force Cardea A440 SSD, so I did not use these risers. But I think there IS a ring of truth in what Elecgear are saying here, but more on how heavily the heatsink connects with the SSD, as the M.2 slot in the PS5 is a little lower than I would like and therefore even a 0.5mm difference can greatly reduce the effectiveness of heat dissipation from the SSD to the Heatsink. Another way in which Elecgear have addressed this concern in their PS5 heatsink kit is in the thermal pads that are included. The x4 thermal pads that are included are in pairs of two different thicknesses of 0.8mm and 1.5mm. Once again, a nice touch and something that the rather understated nature of the package presentation would suggests would be absent. So you have two differing heat pads for your SSDs that allow better dissipation levels of 4.8W/m-k and 3.6W/m-k on the blue and pink panel respectively. There is also an instructional manual that details the installation and also covers the installation of the SSD riser panels and washer kit.

The manual seems fine at first glance, but there are certainly a few grammar errors present and again, it is little things like this in terms of presentation that result in the Elecgear PS5 heatsink getting undermined, despite its excellent contents. However, that is enough fo4 the packaging and presentation. Let’s get to grips with the Elecgear PS5 heatsink itself, the design and how it works.

Elecgear PS5 SSD Heatsink Review – Design

A good look at the Elecgear heatsink for PS5 shows us that this thing is pretty large! indeed, with the eluteng $10 heatsink of choice for budget buyers measuring at just 70x22x6mm, the Elecgear towers over it at 128x72x14mm. This is because it is designed to both fill AND sit outside of the PS5 M.2 SSD expansion bay, thereby both collecting the heat generated by the SSD, but also using the PS5 internal system fan to cool the heatsink at the same time – thereby allowing much faster and efficient heat dissipation fo the SSD in use over hours and hours of play.

Now, the big, big difference between a PS5 designed heatsink like the elecgear EL-P5C and a regular M.2 heatsink design that was made for PC use primarily, is to do with airflow. NVMe SSDs (such as those used by the PS5 for storage upgrades and PC gaming) get quite hot when in use. They have no moving parts, but the faster the SSD read/write speed, the hotter it can get over time. Heat is a big, BIG problem for SSDs, as it can result in the performance being throttled/bottlenecked by the system, as well as affecting the durability of the SSD long term. That is why Heatsinks are important and although the PS5 is a much less intensive read/write system than a bigger PC or editing machine, it still can affect the SSD.

The m.2 slot on the PS5 is quite small, as well as arrives with a cover that Sony insist should always cover your M.2 SSD. This is a little counterintuitive to most SSD heatsinks, as they are DESIGNED to live directly in the open airflow of a PC case or under/above a fan kit in a laptop – this allows the heat being collected by the heatsink from the SSD to be dispersed int other air. Closing a PC designed heatsink into that PS5 SSD slot seems the very opposite of that. That is where the elecgear PS5 heatsink comes in. It covers the SSD you have installed in the M.2 slot, but instead of replacing the PS5 M.2 metal plate cover, the elecgear fills the space and then spreads out over the side and is angled towards the large, single internal PS5 fan. This allows the heatsink to collect all that heat from the SSD, and then disperse it directly into the incoming fan. But we will touch on that element a bit later.

The vents of the elecgear heatsink are clearly designed for use in the PS5 system, in direct alignment with both the fan AND the air channelling internal curves of the PS5 that direct airflow into the fan. The lines are also ventilated to allow air to pass in and out of the heatsink too – a nice extra touch. However, the heat dissipation is taken an extra step further when you flip it over. The base of the Elecgear PS5 Heatsink (that connected with the SSD you installed in your console, along with a thermal pad) not only covers the entire length of a 2280 length drive, but also features an excellent copper pipe (5mm x 98mm)

Now, this copper pipe is a big deal when compared against exclusively aluminium only heatsinks. The copper pipe is considerably more effective at drawing heat from the SSD components (the controller, primarily) and this heat can be delivered to the aluminium plate (as well as the plate still collecting heat of its own accord from the SSD too). This massively increases the potential heat dissipation when in use and almost certainly dramatically decreases the typical temp of the SSD inside the PS5. This and the fact that the larger heat plate is in the immediate airflow path of the internal fan, makes this almost certainly the most effective heat-dissipating heatsink you can buy on PS5. However, it does this at a potential cost of ‘robbing’ airflow that was designed to keep the PS5 system CPU, GPU, memory and its own SSD cool.

Let’s get the Elecgear PS5 heatsink installed inside the PS5, see how it sits, how high it is against that fan and ultimate temperature test it to see how well it performs and whether it negatively/positively affects the PS5 system temp elsewhere.

Elecgear PS5 SSD Heatsink Review – Installation

Installation of the Elecgear heatsink is incredibly straightforward – but only if you are not planning on using the riser kit. The riser kit that is designed to improve the connection of the SSD and heatsink is optional and in order to properly test this heatsink with a typical SSD PS5 installation (versus a regular heatsink), I decided to install it without the riser kit. Your SSD goes inside the M.2 SSD expansion slot. Make sure you use a thermal pad from the accessory kit and lay it across the top of the SSD. You can place a thermal pad UNDER the SSD if it is double-sided, but your MAIN priority should be the side with the controller/brains of the NVMe SSD.

NOTE – Ignore the wire on the photo, this was just the thermometer cable I used in testing for this review

Then you simply slot the heatsink itself into the slit that the usual PS5 SSD cover plate would fit and close the heatsink into place. You will know that it is installed correctly as the screw hole at the top will align with the hole that the PS5 Screw (topped with the square, circle, triangle cross) is visible. When installed, the heatsink looks a perfectly natural fit and even looks like it would not have looked out of place as an official component at launch – something many have complained at Sony for in relation to SSD upgrades on this system.

Looking at this heatsink from a tighter/low angle, you can see that it rises from the base level of the PS5 internal plat by around 2-3mm. It still completely allows the external PS5 side plates to be reinstalled (with no contact between them and the heatsink), as well as the grooved channels of the Elecgear heatsink to line up with the PS5 external vent lines and deliver that air to the internal PS5 fan – it just also uses that are to cool the heatsink (and in turn assist the SSD temp) along the way. I am still a little thoughtful about if this increases the airflow by much on its way to the PS5 fan (which is pushing air over the internal components of the console), but we will get to that later.

The Elecger heatsink also takes advantage of the same screw hole and screw that the PS5 has already to cover the m.2 slot, as well as having a counter-sunk shape to make sure that the screw still goes in at the full depth of the hole, whilst not interfering with the integrity of the heatsink.

Overall, the heatsink is clearly very well designed in conjunction with the PS5 shape internally, as well as clear architecture choices being made here to ensure that airflow to the existing PS5 internal cooling measures are unimpeded as much as possible. Let’s see how the Elecgear heatsink for PS5 handles internal temperatures and those of the SSD controller.

Elecgear PS5 SSD Heatsink Review – Temperature Testings

Temperature testing for the Elecgear PS5 SSD heatsink has been broken down into several areas. The main aims here are to work out the following things:

  1. Does the Elecgear Heatsink Keep the Temperature low on the SSD in sustained use?
  2. Does the Elecgear Heatsink Interfere with the PS5 Internal System Temp negatively?
  3. Is the Elecgear Heatsink provide a significant improvement over PC designed M.2 SSD heatsinks (eg the Eluteng M.2)

In order to do this, I have installed a temperature sensor on the M.2 SSD itself, UNDER the heatsink AND the thermal pad, directly on the controller chip of the SSD. The SSD used in the testing was the TeamGroup T-Force Cardea A440, a Phison E18, 96L 3D TLC NAND SSD at 1TB – a good mid-range price point SSD that is single-sided and provides 6551MB/s on the PS5 internal benchmark.

When the temp node is on the SSD Controller, I then place the thermal pad down, closed and screw down the heatsink, then attach the 2nd node just underneath the PS5 fan point, in the open air. This second temperature sensor will tell us the surrounding system temp that the internal fan will be using to cool the rest of the system.

The testing consisted of 6 different elements. 4 gameplay sessions of 25mins each, with 2 sessions focusing on the SSD temp and 2 focusing on the system temp (in that order, with 1-2 mins reboot between each, in order to see how the system temp is affected over the combined power-on time).

Then a sustained read and write activity of 350-380MB/s to/from the PS5 internal PS5 SSD and M.2 NVMe SSD (the Cardea A440) and how it impacted the SSD controller only. We are NOT looking at performance/framerate/MB/s etc, ONLY temperatures. Below were the results (video will be published shortly).

Note – BOTH PS5 Side plates were on during the tests 

Test Type Starting Temp (C) Finishing Temp (C) Change (C)
Red Dead Redemption 25min Play (Controller) 30.8℃ 31.4℃ 1.4℃
Red Dead Redemption 25min Play (System Temp) 23.1℃ 23.2℃ 0.1℃
GTA V 25min Play (Controller) 26.7℃ 28.1℃ 1.4℃
GTA V 25min Play (System Temp) 21.8℃ 22.9℃ 1.1℃
Heavy Read (350GB) 29℃ 35.6℃ 5.6℃
Heavy Write (350GB) 24℃ 36.1℃ 12.1℃

As you can see, in almost all tests, the elecgear PS5 SSD heatsink results in very, VERY small increases in temperature over time, much, MUCH lower than most of the other heatsinks that I have tested. To put that into perspective, here is how the Elecgear EL-P5C PS5 heatsink compared in those same tests versus the Eluteng M.2 at just $10 (at least $25 less than the elecgear):

NOTE – There tests were performed on different days and ambient temp AND general environmental conditions can undermine these results. Watch the video published soon to see these results in much, MUCH greater detail)

Test Type Eluteng H/S Change ElecGear H/S Change
Red Dead Redemption 25min Play (Controller) 5.9℃ 1.4℃
Red Dead Redemption 25min Play (System Temp) 1.5℃ 0.1℃
GTA V 25min Play (Controller) 0.5℃ 1.4℃
GTA V 25min Play (System Temp) 0.3℃ 1.1℃
Heavy Read (350GB) 6.2℃ 5.6℃
Heavy Write (350GB) 15.4℃ 12.1℃

So, as you can see, it certainly did a great job. These are still very small differences though and it is worth remembering that an NVMe SSD is designed to run perfectly well at between 30-50 degrees. Anything higher than that (headed towards 70 degrees) can result in throttling. Overall I still think the Elecgear definitely does exactly what it says it will and does it very well – it is a question of whether you play your PS5 for long enough /regular periods that you need that level of protection/cooling. Let’s conclude the review and give my verdict.

NOTE – The FULL video of the Temperature tests for the ElecGear PS5 SSD Heatsink, as well as how it compares against the Eluteng M.2 Heatsink, the Sabrent PS5 heatsink and the INEO Heatsink Heatsink will be live soon and in a 3-Part series of video below.

VIDEOS OF THE TESTS – COMING SOON BELOW (Dec 1st 2021)

Elecgear PS5 SSD Heatsink Review – Conclusion & Verdict

The Elecgear does EVERYTHING that it says it can and will do. From maintaining one of the lowerest SSD temperatures that I have witnessed on the PS5 NVMe SSD for the most part, to the clear effort that has gone into the design of the heatsink to existing both in and outside of the PS5 M.2 SSD expansion slot, you cannot question it’s ability to keep your SSD running at an optimal operational temperature! The price tag seems a little high (at $35-50 depending on where you shop at online) especially given the $10-15 dollar price tag of most other M.2 SSD heatsinks – something that I could accept IF it was the only S5 designed heatsink. But given that Sabrent released their own PS5 heatsink, currently priced at $20 (with SSD combo options) 3 months before, that pricetag is a little harder for some to swallow. Nevertheless, even in the general airflow and temperature of the PS5, the elecgear seems to make sure not to impede or negatively impact the core system temp, which is a big plus in its favour. Overall, I can definitely recommend this heatsink for those of you that play your PS5 every single day and for moderately extensive periods, but for light gamers and those that jump on at weekends – this might be a bit overkill.

PROS of the ElecGear PS5 SSD Heatsink PROS of the ElecGear PS5 SSD Heatsink
  • World’s First PS5 Copper Pipe Equipped Heatsink
  • Blends in well with PS5 design
  • clearly designed to keep SSD temp low, and it DOES
  • Easy Installation
  • Optional SSD height rasing kit included
  • Clear considerations for single/double-sided SSDs
  • Clearly designed to work alongside the PS5 airflow channels
  • Quite pricey for a heatsink
  • Poor availability across most of the world (mostly amazon only)
  • Questions surrounding the impact of this H/S in conjunction with the PS5 components are still unanswered and unknown in the grand scheme of things


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Addlink A90 SSD Review – The Mid Range PS5 SSD

12 novembre 2021 à 01:41

Review of the Addlink A90 PCIe Gen 4 NVMe SSD

The Addlink A90 is an unusual SSD, to say the least, with its promise of PCIe performance at a price tag approaching that of PCIe3. In the short period of time that Sony has enabled the PS5 m.2 NVMe SSD Expansion bay, around 30-35 mainline SSDs have fallen into the realm of compatibility with this storage upgrade. Sony has not exactly been forthcoming about which SSDs are supported and which are not, with many communities online working together to put together tested and proven PS5 compatibility lists. For parents looking to buy an SSD for their children’s new next-gen console, to long time gamers who are having to quickly learn the eccentricities of M.2 SSD storage – the days of memory cards and official upgrades are a thing of the past. Therefore, when Addlink launched their A-Series of SSDs, all with confirmed PS5 compatibility and logos, in efforts to provide a range of drives that allow PS5 buyers a choice between Performance – Price – Capacity – or all three. We already reviewed the Addlink A95 Prosumer SSD and now it is time to review the Addlink A90 SSD – Arriving at a lower price point, but also a lower performance threshold of around 1500-2000MB/s less. Although its traditional PC benchmarks rate it as below the recommended 5,500MB/s sequential read of PS5, the PS5’s own benchmark tell a different story (covered later in the testing) and confirm the compatibility of the Addlink A90 with PS5. So, should you consider the mid-range Addlink A90 NVMe SSD for your PS5 upgrade? Maybe as your PC gamer storage solution? Let’s find out.

Interested in the Addlink A95 SSD? Here is the Addlink A95 Prosumer PS5 SSD Review herehttps://nascompares.com/2021/10/15/addlink-a95-ps5-ssd-review-bringing-its-a-game

Addlink A90 SSD Review – Quick Conclusion

Although a step down from the arguably more impressive A95, it also is a lower price point whilst still maintaining a number of the more expensive drives highest qualities, which means you still feel like you are getting a good ‘2nd place’ drive, without fear of too much compromise. Few SSDs that I have featured here on NASCompares have left me with the consistently please tone that the Addlink A Game range has. Whether you are looking at this as an SSD upgrade for your PS5 or your Gaming PC, there is very little to be unhappy about here as a gamer. The Build quality of both the SSD itself, as well as the heatsink and choices made at the hardware architecture level are all high-end choices that do not leave you with a feeling unsatisfied. When choosing to upgrade your SSD, it can be easy to always opt for the much bigger know brands like WD or Seagate, thinking that there is a clear reason for their higher price. As true as that can be sometimes, in the case of the Addlink A90 you have an SSD that takes advantage of the same hardware choices that those bigger brands offer in the likes of the Firecuda 520 from Seagate or the Sabrent Rocket PCIe 4.0, includes a high-quality heatsink, arrives preattached in a very sturdy build and at no point in the testing did we feel that a power or memory bottleneck appears. It might lack some of the enterprise bells and whistles of more enterprise-level SSDs, but the A90 is not targeting flash, fabric or caching – it is designed for gamers and at this, it is an unquestionable success. Keep an eye on this one!

SPEED - 8/10
HARDWARE - 8/10
DURABILITY - 9/10
PRICE - 8/10
VALUE - 8/10


8.2
PROS
👍🏻Genuinely Impressive Performance on a Phison E16 SSD
👍🏻Very nice heatsink and thermal application internally
👍🏻
👍🏻Low-Temperature Reading even in high use
👍🏻
👍🏻One of the highest Read/Write Performers available
👍🏻
👍🏻Use of Micron 176L TLC NAND is promised in 2022 (TBC)
👍🏻
👍🏻Fully PS5 Compatible with In-System Benchmark exceeding minimum
👍🏻
👍🏻Higher Durability than WD Black SN850, Samsung 980 Pro & Sabrent Rocke
CONS
👎🏻More Expensive than WD Black SN850 & Samsung 980 Pro
👎🏻Not Quite as Durable as Seagate Firecuda 520
👎🏻
👎🏻Little overshadowed by the Addlink A95

Addlink A90 SSD Review – Packaging

Shiny. Very, VERY Shiny! That is how I would begin in describing the packaging here. Arriving in somewhat holographic packaging, the retail box of the Addlink S95 pulls no punches here when it comes to aiming at the gamers, with most of the focus going to performance stats and highlighting their A Game gamer series (the A90, A90 and A92).

The rear of the box makes a point of not only highlighting that this SSD is PS5 compatible, but also it’s one of the first SSDs I have had in for review that actually features the official PS5 logo. Along with that, there is a little nod to the heatsink and rather unique (at least as far as other M.2 SSDs on the market) application of the heatsink, using a much more malleable substance (we will go into more detail later) they are keen to highlight that this does an improved job of maintaining the SSD temperature. This will be covered at the last 3rd of this review in the testing and benchmarking.

The contents of the box are a little small, but not in a bad way. A first-time setup guide and warranty information is included in a booklet (as well as the usual web/3D-Barcode links), as well as the SSD itself (with heating pre-applied).

The Heatsink on the Addlink A90 is an interesting mix of elements that include aesthetical design, air efficiency and professional application. Addlink have an impressive range of m.2 NVMe solutions in their catalogue, many using modified versions of this heatsink (depending on the product series), so the need to add the Add AGame logo and PCIe4.0 architecture makes sense.

Looking at the A90 heatsink directly, it is a sweet looking design. Comprised of 3 main elements, a pre-cute metal plate with air channel grooves, a secondary metal clip that surrounds it and finally the thermal silica gel pad that connected the Heatsink to the SSD.

Looking at the Addlink A90 at an angle shows that, despite the aggressive nature of the heatsink, it is actually not very tall. In fact, the Low-Profile designed heatsink is only has a 9.1 mm height, with the total Heatsink+silica+SSD coming to just under 11.25mm. With space being at a premium in the PS5 M.2 SSD slot (and users wanting a little space around/above their SSD+HS to promote any airflow, this is particularly impressive.

Likewise, the heatsink is fractionally raised from the SSD a degree higher than most SSD+HS combos on the Adddlink A90, as the silica gel between them is particularly thick and envelopes the chips underneath a tad (on purpose). This means that is a surrounding around that can capture passing airflow around the SSD, that is not obstructed by a surrounding casing.

Removing the Addlink A90 Heatsink was NOT easy. I cannot stress enough how well attached this heatsink was! I nearly snapped the SSD in two trying to remove it. The SSD uses an adhesive coated silica gel that covered the entirety of the M.2 NVMe SSD, but also slightly envelopes each chip on the drive. It doesn’t smother them (so no touching the PCB) but it does surround the edges of each component to cover a greater physical density, whilst still remaining tidy.

A closer look a the heatsink base shows you just how well it surrounds each chip (with clear indications of where each was placed from imprints). Additionally, you can see that the consistency of the silica gel pad is not the same as the reusable pads in other heatsinks, with this substance having more in common with thermal paste found on CPUs. The slightly porous nature of it definitely seemed to ensure that the components were adequately covered and it does leave you with a distinct feeling of quality and professional application.

Taking the time to clean a little of the silica gel away, you can see that the A90’s controller is much lower on the board than many other SSDs (where it will more often be located directly beneath the m.2 key connector.

As mentioned, the Addlink A90 NVMe SSD fits very neatly into the PS5 SSD upgrade slot, with a clear few millimetres between the heatsink and the m.2 slot cover. Although it is worth highlighting that this heatsink was originally designed for a gaming desktop PC installation (like 99% of other M.2 SD heatsinks), so I will hold full judgement on how efficient the A90 heatsink is for PS5 heat dissipation for another article/video soon.

So that is the physical design of the Addlink A90 SSD. But what about the hardware components themselves? Does the Addlink A90 cut the mustard in terms of current generation hardware and protocols? Let’s find out.

Addlink A90 SSD Review – PS5 Benchmark

Upon installing the Addlink A90 SSD into the PS5, the system gave an impressive benchmark of 5636MB/s. It should be noted that the PS5 has a very unique benchmarking system internally for its own software needs and although Sony recommends that you only use SSDs with a reported 5,500MB/s+ performance (sequential Read) minimum, we have seen SSDs with a lower reported PC benchmark of this be rated at 5,500MB/s+ om the PS5 benchmark. So, there is definitely wiggle room there.

To put the Addlink A90 SSD PS5 Performance Benchmark into a little perspective, here is how it compares against the Seagate Firecuda 520, Silicon Power US70 and Sabrent Rocket PCIe 4.0 – three SSDs that are all PS5 supported and VERY similar architecture:

Addlink A90 PS5 Benchmark – 5636MB/s Seagate Firecuda 520 PS5 Benchmark – 5621MB/s
Sabrent Rocket PCIe 4.0 PS5 Benchmark – 5622MB/s Silicon Power US70 PS5 Benchmark – 56227MB/s

With very little difference between the top three others in this tier, it is a solid benchmark. Additionally, the Addlink A90 takes care of overprovisioning at the NAND/Controller level (with four 96L 3D TLC NAND modules of 512GB), so that means that this 2TB SSD is genuinely available as 2TB on the Playstation 5 Storage manager (not 1,920GB as seen previously):

Full PS5 Testing of the Addlink A90 (along with the A95 and A92) is all available as a playlist over on the NASCompares YouTube channel. But for now, let’s carry on with looking at the hardware of the A90, how it conventionally benchmarks and how it compares with currently favourite PS5 SSDs like the Sabrent Rocket PCIe 4.0 and Seagate Firecuda 520,

Addlink A90 SSD Review – Hardware Specifications

As you might expect from an M.2 NVMe SSD that boldly promises performance of over 5,000MB/s sequential read (ie BIG data), the hardware specifications and architecture of the Addlink A90 are quite modern. Indeed, for all the big talk of the Seagate Firecuda 520 hardware (or Firecuda 530 – still currently the ‘score to beat’ PCIe Gen4 m.2 NVMe right now) being top tier, the Addlink A90 is much more comparable to the Seagate Firecuda 520 and is pretty darn similar on the spec sheet! Below is how it looks:

Addlink A90

1TB – $179/£155 – 2TB – $344/£300

PCIe Generation PCIe Gen 4
NVMe Rev NVMe 1.3
NAND 3D TLC KIOXIA 96L
Max Capacity 2TB – Double Sided
Controller Phison E16-PS5016
Warranty 5yr

I know a lot of the above will seem needlessly technical, so below we can bring the most important considerations into sharper focus.

Hardware Focus of the Addlink A90 SSD Series

The first big, BIG thing to remember here is the controller, that Phison E16. An SSD is much like a microcosm version of a whole computer. The Controller is equivalent to the CPU, and Phison are one of the bigger 3rd party SSD controller manufacturers in the world! I say 3rd party, because some long-running storage brands like Samsung and WD have most of their development and hardware engineering ‘in-house’ and use their own branded controllers. Whereas some brands source some/all components for their SSDs from 3rd parties – which is not necessarily a bad thing for both them and the industry (there are pros and cons on either side). Phison has been at the cutting edge of this subject for years now and the newer E18 was first revealed last year in 2020, but due to the pandemic making storage trends unpredictable and semi-conductor shortages, most SSDs that utilized the Phison E18 eventually arrived in 2021. Before that though was the Phison E16, the brands first PCIe 4.0 controller for NVMe SSD and it was widely featured by SSD brands at launch. This controller is one of the biggest reasons that the Addlink A90 can actually back up its promises about the 5,00MB/s+ Sequential Read (sequential data = big chunks of data). However, that is not the only reason.

The NAND on the Addlink A90 is where the data lives! SSDs (as you no doubt know) do not use moving parts as found in traditional hard drives and instead uses cells that are charged and data is read/written to them in this process. The quality of the NAND and the layers used will make a big difference to the durability and performance. Indeed, the Addlink A90 matches the current Phison 16 favourite PCIe4 SSD (the Seagate Firecuda 530) with 96 layer 3D TLC NAND onboard. This is a noticeably large jump over many others that are using 64L 3D TLC NAND before it and is a big part of the drive’s performance gains. Although the majority of modern PCIe M.2 SSD use 3D TLC NAND (with the Addlink A92 arriving with QLC NAND), most are still at 96L now layers, so this still puts the Addlink A90 on a level footing with most of the SSDs out there.

Much like the Controller on the Addlink A90 being the ‘CPU’, it also has an area of memory. The Addlink A90 SSD uses DDR4 memory on board and this in conjunction with the SSD provides a massive body of data handling resources for getting your data moving through the SSD and out of the m.2 NVMe PCIe 4 interface. The amount of memory scales in conjunction with the 1TB or 2TB SSD you use, with 2GB of DDR4 at the on the 2TB tier, 1GB DDR4 on the 1TB, etc.

Finally, there is the M.2 NVMe connection. Not all m.2 SSDs are created equal and although M.2 SATA and M.2 NVMe look similar, they provide massively different performance and connectivity. However, the Addlink A90 takes it one step further, by using a newer generation of PCIe Connectivity. In short, M.2 NVMe SSDs are connected to the host PC/Console system via PCIe protocol (think of those slots that you almost always use for your graphics cards, but a much, MUCH smaller connector). These allow much larger bandwidth (ie maximum speed) for the connected storage media, Much like regular PCIe slots, they have different versions (i.E PCIe Gen 1, 2, 3, 4, etc) and also a multiplying factor (x1, x2, x4, etc). Up until around 18 months ago, the best M.2 NVMes were M.2 PCIe Gen 3×4 (so a maximum 4,000MB/s possible). However, never generation SSD like the Addlink A90 use PCIe Gen 4×4 (a potential 8,000MB/s possible) and it is only now that SSD controllers and NAND production has reached a point where it can catch up and fully saturate (i.e fill) this connection.

Overall, you really cannot fault the hardware inside/onboard the Addlink A90, as it is still (at release) higher performing in sequential Read and Write than many other M.2 NVMe PCIe 4 SSDs released of the same architecture (especially at Sequential Write – to be discussed). Before we go into the full testing, however, it is worth taking a moment to look closely at the reported performance benchmarks of the Addlink A90, as although the performance seems stellar, there are areas such as IOPS and endurance when compared with its main rivals that are worth taking into consideration.

Addlink A90 SSD Review – Official Stats First

Before we conduct our own testing on this SSD, Let’s take a closer look at the reported specifications and benchmarks first. The Addlink A90 SSD arrives in multiple capacities (below). The Prices currently are a little inconsistent (with each higher capacity tier actually having a higher price per GB – quite unusual) likely due to the hardware shortages, the Pandemic, Chia has affected SSD availability in the last 12 months and most recently the announcement that PS5 supports this SSD and it has increased the majority of PS5 supported SSDs price point in most regions. Below is a breakdown of how each Addlink A90 SSD compares against the same capacity i nthe Sabrent Rocket PCIe 4.0 and Seagate Firecuda 520 SSD:

Brand/Series Addlink A90

1TB – $179/£155 – 2TB – $344/£300

Sabrent Rocket PCIe4

500GB – $89 / £79 1TB – $159 / £140– 2TB – $299 / £359

Seagate FireCuda 520

500GB – $104 / £89 1TB – $179 / £135 – 2TB – $369 / £309

PCIe Generation PCIe Gen 4 PCIe Gen 4 PCIe Gen 4
NVMe Rev NVMe 1.3 NVMe 1.3 NVMe 1.3
NAND 3D TLC KIOXIA 96L 3D TLC KIOXIA 96L 3D TLC KIOXIA 96L
Max Capacity 2TB – Double Sided 2TB – Double Sided 2TB – Double Sided
Controller Phison E16-PS5016 Phison E16-PS5016 Phison E16-PS5016
Warranty 5yr 1yr/5yr 5yr+3yr Rescue
500GB Model N/A SB-ROCKET-NVMe4-500 ZP500GM3A002
Price in $ and $ N/A $89 / £79 $89 / £79
1TB Model AD1TBA90M2P SB-ROCKET-NVMe4-1TB ZP1000GM3A002
Price in $ and $ $179 / £155 $159 / £140 $159 / £140
2TB Model AD2TBA90M2P SB-ROCKET-NVMe4-2TB ZP2000GM3A002
Price in $ and $ $344 / 300 $399 / £359 $399 / £359
4TB Model N/A N/A N/A
Price in $ and $ N/A N/A N/A
500GB Model N/A SB-ROCKET-NVMe4-500 ZP500GM3A002
Total Terabytes Written (TBW) N/A 850TB 850TB
Mean Time Between Failures (MTBF, hours) N/A 1,700,000 1,800,000
DWPD N/A 0.9DWPD 0.9DWPD
1TB Model AD1TBA90M2P SB-ROCKET-NVMe4-1TB ZP1000GM3A002
Total Terabytes Written (TBW) 1800TB 1800TB 1800TB
Mean Time Between Failures (MTBF, hours) 1,700,000 1,700,000 1,800,000
DWPD 0.9DWPD 0.9DWPD 0.9DWPD
2TB Model AD2TBA90M2P SB-ROCKET-NVMe4-2TB ZP2000GM3A002
Total Terabytes Written (TBW) 3600TB 3600TB 3600TB
Mean Time Between Failures (MTBF, hours) 1,700,000 1,700,000 1,800,000
DWPD 0.9DWPD 0.9DWPD 0.9DWPD
4TB Model N/A N/A N/A
Total Terabytes Written (TBW) N/A N/A N/A
Mean Time Between Failures (MTBF, hours) N/A N/A N/A
DWPD N/A N/A N/A

There are clear throughput improvements as you rise through the capacity tiers (not unusual), as does the rated 4K IOPS. Though one area worth focusing on a little is that TBW (terabytes Written) and DWPD (Drive writes per day), as this drive is NOTICEABLY higher than the Samsung 980 Pro and WD Black SN850 in terms of NAND lifespan on daily writes, likely down to that Micron 96 Layer 3D TLC NAND used by it lower performance than those other drives over time. That said, the PS5 is a highly READ focused system and DWPD and TBW are less of a concerning factor in that architecture. This is an important point because the brand has significantly less pedigree in-home/business SSD media than the likes of Samsung, WD and Seagate and people will want to know they are going to get a product that lasts!

As you might expect from the use of the Phison E16 controller and 96 layer NAND, the reported IOPS on each capacity is actually pretty similar to the 96L Sabrent Rocket PCIe 4.0 and near enough identical to the Seagate Firecuda 520. This is still very impressive anyway, but it does make me wonder where the disparity stems from. Indeed, when you look at the bulk of PCIe 4×4 M.2 NVMe 1.4 SSD, that feature the E16 controller and 96L (or higher) on board, it really only leaves about 4 other SSDs in the market today that this can be compared against. Of those, the only one that seemingly ‘out specs’ the Addlink A90 is the Seagate Firecuda 520 marginally. However, the Addlink A90 SSD has been available in the market for just a week or so and has certainly embedded itself in the market with PS5 users. Additionally, Addlink state that they are hoping to upgrade the NAND on the A90 series to 176L in the near future – but I did not factor that into this review at the time of writing. Below is how these three drives compare:

Brand/Series Addlink A90

1TB – $179/£155 – 2TB – $344/£300

Sabrent Rocket PCIe4

500GB – $89 / £79 1TB – $159 / £140– 2TB – $299 / £359

Seagate FireCuda 520

500GB – $104 / £89 1TB – $179 / £135 – 2TB – $369 / £309

500GB Model N/A SB-ROCKET-NVMe4-500 ZP500GM3A002
Sequential Read (Max, MB/s), 128 KB N/A 5000MB 5000MB
Sequential Write (Max, MB/s), 128 KB N/A 2500MB 2500MB
1TB Model AD1TBA90M2P SB-ROCKET-NVMe4-1TB ZP1000GM3A002
Sequential Read (Max, MB/s), 128 KB 5000MB 5000MB 5000MB
Sequential Write (Max, MB/s), 128 KB 4400MB 4400MB 4400MB
2TB Model AD2TBA90M2P SB-ROCKET-NVMe4-2TB ZP2000GM3A002
Sequential Read (Max, MB/s), 128 KB 5000MB 5000MB 5000MB
Sequential Write (Max, MB/s), 128 KB 4400MB 4400MB 4400MB
4TB Model N/A N/A N/A
Sequential Read (Max, MB/s), 128 KB N/A N/A N/A
Sequential Write (Max, MB/s), 128 KB N/A N/A N/A
Brand/Series Addlink A90 Sabrent Rocket PCIe4 Seagate FireCuda 520
500GB Model N/A SB-ROCKET-NVMe4-500 ZP500GM3A002
Random Read (Max, IOPS), 4 KB QD32 N/A 400000 430,000
Random Write (Max, IOPS), 4 KB QD32 N/A 550000 630,000
1TB Model AD1TBA90M2P SB-ROCKET-NVMe4-1TB ZP1000GM3A002
Random Read (Max, IOPS), 4 KB QD32 750,000 750,000 760,000
Random Write (Max, IOPS), 4 KB QD32 700,000 750,000 700,000
2TB Model AD2TBA90M2P SB-ROCKET-NVMe4-2TB ZP2000GM3A002
Random Read (Max, IOPS), 4 KB QD32 750,000 750,000 750,000
Random Write (Max, IOPS), 4 KB QD32 700,000 850TB 700,000
4TB Model N/A N/A N/A
Random Read (Max, IOPS), 4 KB QD32 N/A N/A N/A
Random Write (Max, IOPS), 4 KB QD32 N/A N/A N/A

Yes, that is a LONG table, but you can immediately see that the Seagate Firecuda 520 raises the stakes on all of the key specifications. Although there are a number of micro reasons for this and they both feature 96L NAND, the Seagate entry has the inclusive data recovery services and a much more established reputation. Yes, that is why the Firecuda 520 commands the higher price tag. Additionally, the Sabrent Rocket originally arrived at a better price point at the lower tiers (constantly in sales as it has been in the market for almost a year longer) in most tiers and the fact it does this whilst still hitting that 5,000MB/s certainly gives pause for thought. However, for many, the additional cost for higher durability they may never need in the Firecuda 520, peak performance their core system will not reach and IOPS rating that their larger file handling will never utilize will mean that choosing the Firecuda or Sabrent Rocket PCIe 4.0 is not in their interest. Both SSDs (on paper at this stage!) are fantastic examples of where consumer and prosumer SSDs are evolving towards. Lastly, it is worth remembering that the Addlink A90 arrives at a lower price point than the others, yet STILL features an included premium low-profile heatsink in the price, Let’s get the Addlink A90 on the test machine!

Testing the Addlink A90 m.2 PCIE4 NVMe SSD

The Addlink A90 was selected for this test and it was tested using multiple benchmark tools, from a cold boot, in the 2nd storage slot (i.e not the OS drive). Each test was conducted three times (full details of this are shown in the YouTube Review of the Addlink A90 over on NASCompares):

Test Machine:

  • Windows 10 Pro Desktop System
  • Intel i5 11400 Rocket Lake – 6-Core 2.6/4.4Ghz
  • 16GB DDR4 2666MHz Memory
  • Intel B560M mATX Motherboard
  • OS Storage, Seagate Firecuda 120 SSD
  • Test SSD connected to Secondary PCIe Gen 4 M.2 Slot

Using CrystalDisk, we got a good measure of the drive and verified that this PCIe Gen 4 x4 SSD was indeed using the 4×4 lane. Additionally, the temp averaged out around 41C between each test being conducted.

The first tests were conducted using the ATTO disk benchmark software. The first was a 256MB test file size and below is a breakdown of the transfer rates and IOPS. The 2nd Test was a 1GB test file and finally, the last test was with a 4GB test file. The system was given 1-minute cool downtime between tests, no screen recording software was used (remove overhead) and a heatsink was used throughout (no reboots)

ATTO Disk Benchmark Test #1

256MB File PEAK Read Throughput  = 5.24GB/s

256MB File PEAK Write Throughput = 3.94GB/s

 


 

ATTO Disk Benchmark Test #2

1GB File PEAK Read Throughput  = 5.24GB/s

1GB File PEAK Write Throughput = 4.06GB/s

 


 

ATTO Disk Benchmark Test #3

4GB File PEAK Read Throughput  = 5.22GB/s

4GB File PEAK Write Throughput = 4.06GB/s

 


 

Next, although the ATTO tests were quite good, but not what I would have hoped from this SSD, so I moved on to the Crystal Disk Mark testing to see how well it would handle our lasts barrage of tests. The first test was the 1GB file testing, which measured both sequential and random, as well as the read and write IOPS. Test were conducted on a 1GB, 4GB and 16GB Test File. I also included a mixed 70/30 read and write task to give a little bit more of a realistic balanced workload. These tests were conducted with 1-minute cooling break in between

CRYSTALDISK MARK 1GB TEST


CRYSTALDISK MARK 4GB TEST


CRYSTALDISK MARK 16GB TEST

 

Next, I switched to AS SSD benchmark. A much more thorough test through, I used 1GB, 3GB and 5GB test files. Each test includes throughput benchmarks and IOPS that are respective to the larger file sizes (important, if you are reading this and trying to compare against the reported 4K IOPS from the manufacturer).

AS SSD Benchmark Test #1

 


AS SSD Benchmark Test #2

 


AS SSD Benchmark Test #3

 

Ordinarily, I would introduce tests like BlackMagic and AJA into the mix here, but even a short burst of testing on an NVMe like this would over saturate the cache memory on board. Nevertheless, in the short term we still could ascertain the reported performance on 1GB, 4GB and 16GB file testing was:

1GB AJA File Test Results (Peak) = 4483MB/s Read & 4155MB/s Write

4GB AJA File Test Results (Peak) = 4475MB/s Read & 41324MB/s Write

16GB AJA File Test Results (Peak) = 4487MB/s Read & 4148MB/s Write

Overall, the Addlink A90 was certainly able to provide some solid performance, as well as potentially exceed the test figures here on a more powerful machine. Given the reported Read and Write statistics that the brand has stated publically, I think there is enough evidence here to back up those claims. IOPs were a little lower than I expected, but again, we were testing very large file types, so this would have to be taken in context. Below is the full temperature reading throughout the entire tests, with the SSD and it’s unique heatsink maintaining a solid temperature of between 30-40 degrees throughout – very impressive.

Addlink A90 SSD Review – Conclusion

Although a step down from the arguably more impressive A95, it also is a lower price point whilst still maintaining a number of the more expensive drives highest qualities, which means you still feel like you are getting a good ‘2nd place’ drive, without fear of too much compromise. Few SSDs that I have featured here on NASCompares have left me with the consistently please tone that the Addlink A Game range has. Whether you are looking at this as an SSD upgrade for your PS5 or your Gaming PC, there is very little to be unhappy about here as a gamer. The Build quality of both the SSD itself, as well as the heatsink and choices made at the hardware architecture level are all high-end choices that do not leave you with a feeling unsatisfied. When choosing to upgrade your SSD, it can be easy to always opt for the much bigger know brands like WD or Seagate, thinking that there is a clear reason for their higher price. As true as that can be sometimes, in the case of the Addlink A90 you have an SSD that takes advantage of the same hardware choices that those bigger brands offer in the likes of the Firecuda 520 from Seagate or the Sabrent Rocket PCIe 4.0, includes a high-quality heatsink, arrives preattached in a very sturdy build and at no point in the testing did we feel that a power or memory bottleneck appears. It might lack some of the enterprise bells and whistles of more enterprise-level SSDs, but the A90 is not targeting flash, fabric or caching – it is designed for gamers and at this, it is an unquestionable success. Keep an eye on this one!

PROs of the Addlink A90 CONs of the Addlink A90
Genuinely Impressive Performance on a Phison E16 SSD

Very nice heatsink and thermal application internally

Low-Temperature Reading even in high use

One of the highest Read/Write Performers available

Use of Micron 176L TLC NAND is promised in 2022 (TBC)

Fully PS5 Compatible with In-System Benchmark exceeding minimum

Higher Durability than WD Black SN850, Samsung 980 Pro & Sabrent Rocket

More Expensive than WD Black SN850 & Samsung 980 Pro

Not Quite as Durable as Seagate Firecuda 520

Little overshadowed by the Addlink A95


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À partir d’avant-hierFlux principal

Sharik – Partage de fichiers via Wifi ou hotspot mobile

5 décembre 2021 à 09:00
Par : Korben

Vous voulez partager des fichiers entre 2 appareils que ce soit un smartphone ou un PC Linux / Windows, mais vous n’avez pas grand-chose sous la main.

Alors bien sûr il y a ShareDrop que vous avez découvert ici, mais ShareDrop nécessite d’avoir Internet. Car oui, la solution que je vous propose vous permet de partager des fichiers entre appareils connectés sur le même réseau Wifi, mais même si vous n’avez pas de Wifi et pas Internet, vous pourrez quand même y arriver avec le partage de connexion (hotspot) de votre smartphone.

Il vous suffit d’installer Sharik sur l’ordinateur ou le smartphone qui doit expédier le fichier puis de le recevoir sur l’autre appareil, soit avec une autre application Sharik, soit directement en entrant l’URL communiquée par l’outil dans un navigateur. Ainsi, vous pouvez partager des images, des fichiers, des applications installées ou simplement du texte.

Et voilà. C’est hyper simple, l’outil est dispo dans toutes les langues, sur tous les OS (sauf macOS, qui n’est pas dispo encore, mais osef puisqu’on peut quand même recevoir des trucs si on le souhaite).

Sharik est entièrement gratuit, open source et vous pourrez y contribuer en vous rendant sur sa page Github.

Vous pouvez télécharger Sharik pour :

Noël 2021 : suivez ce guide pour offrir des livres de SF et de fantasy - Numerama

4 décembre 2021 à 14:33

Un peu de robots, de magie noire et de fin du monde au pied du sapin, n'est-ce pas là délicieux ? Voici notre sélection pour offrir des livres de SF et Fantasy à Noël 2021. [Lire la suite]

Voitures, vélos, scooters... : la mobilité de demain se lit sur Vroom ! https://www.numerama.com/vroom/vroom//

L'article Noël 2021 : notre guide pour offrir des livres de SF et de fantasy est apparu en premier sur Numerama.

Configuring data loss prevention for email from the Compliance Center in Microsoft 365

3 décembre 2021 à 17:10

Data loss prevention (DLP) in Microsoft 365 can help you achieve your compliance goals. In this article, you will learn how to effectively use DLP to safeguard your data in Exchange Online (email). You will be introduced to the basics of creating DLP policies and best practices.

The post Configuring data loss prevention for email from the Compliance Center in Microsoft 365 first appeared on 4sysops.

Facebook commence à obliger certains comptes en France à avoir l'authentification forte - Numerama

3 décembre 2021 à 15:24

Facebook 2FA

Des internautes en France commencent à recevoir des messages de Facebook leur demandant d'activer obligatoirement l'authentification à deux facteurs, sous peine de perdre l'accès à leur compte. La mesure s'inscrit en amont de l'élection présidentielle de 2022 et concerne uniquement des profils ayant une certaine notoriété. [Lire la suite]

Voitures, vélos, scooters... : la mobilité de demain se lit sur Vroom ! https://www.numerama.com/vroom/vroom//

L'article Facebook commence à obliger certains comptes en France à avoir l’authentification forte est apparu en premier sur Numerama.

SMS, apps, empreintes : quelles méthodes de double authentification choisir ? - Numerama

3 décembre 2021 à 07:00

Vous avez entendu parler de la double authentification, mais vous n’êtes pas certains de ce dont il s'agit ou de comment la mettre en place ? Pas de panique, ce petit outil de sécurité est facile à adopter et peut venir sous différentes formes. [Lire la suite]

Abonnez-vous à notre chaîne YouTube pour ne manquer aucune vidéo !

L'article SMS, apps, empreintes : quelles méthodes de double authentification choisir ? est apparu en premier sur Numerama.

La nouvelle bande-annonce de Matrix 4 révèle ses liens avec les autres films - Numerama

1 décembre 2021 à 18:26

Un deuxième trailer, intitulé « déjà vu », a été publié pour Matrix 4 : Resurrections. Il est cryptique. [Lire la suite]

Voitures, vélos, scooters... : la mobilité de demain se lit sur Vroom ! https://www.numerama.com/vroom/vroom//

L'article La nouvelle bande-annonce de Matrix 4 révèle ses liens avec les autres films est apparu en premier sur Numerama.

Matrix 4 : trailer, histoire, casting… tout ce qu’on sait de « Matrix Resurrections » - Numerama

1 décembre 2021 à 11:31

Matrix 4 s'intitule The Matrix Resurrections et il sera dirigé par Lana Wachowski, avec à nouveau Keanvu Reeves et Carrie-Anne Moss. La date de sortie est programmée au 22 décembre 2021. Entre la bande-annonce et les détails sur cette suite, voici ce que l'on sait. [Lire la suite]

Abonnez-vous à notre chaîne YouTube pour ne manquer aucune vidéo !

L'article Matrix 4 : trailer, histoire, casting… tout ce qu’on sait de « Matrix Resurrections » est apparu en premier sur Numerama.

Matrix 4 Resurrections : il faudra « traverser le miroir » pour comprendre le film - Numerama

1 décembre 2021 à 10:30

Il faudra passer « derrière le miroir » pour comprendre le futur film Matrix dans lequel jouent, de nouveau, Keanu Reeves et Carrie-Ann Moss. Dans une interview pour un média américain, Lana Wachowski s'est confiée. [Lire la suite]

Voitures, vélos, scooters... : la mobilité de demain se lit sur Vroom ! https://www.numerama.com/vroom/vroom//

L'article Matrix 4 Resurrections : il faudra « traverser le miroir » pour comprendre le film est apparu en premier sur Numerama.

Cybersécurité – La Gestion et Gouvernance des Identités (IGA)

1 décembre 2021 à 09:15
Par : UnderNews

La Gestion et Gouvernance des Identités (IGA) permet de donner les bons accès aux bonnes personnes, aux bonnes applications, au bon moment, pour les bonnes raisons. Nous allons voir ensemble les 10 règles pour réussir la mise en œuvre d’une solution d’IGA.

The post Cybersécurité – La Gestion et Gouvernance des Identités (IGA) first appeared on UnderNews.

La FIFA lance son test pour détecter le hors-jeu au football avec l'IA - Numerama

30 novembre 2021 à 12:35

hors-jeu football

La Coupe arabe de football sera le théâtre d'un test à grande échelle pour déterminer l'apport que peut avoir l'intelligence artificielle dans la détection du hors-jeu. [Lire la suite]

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L'article La FIFA lance son test pour détecter le hors-jeu au football avec l’IA est apparu en premier sur Numerama.

Il y aura une autre nouvelle trilogie Spider-Man après No Way Home (et avec Tom Holland) - Numerama

29 novembre 2021 à 16:26

Tom Holland devrait endosser à nouveau le costume de Spider-Man, au moins dans un quatrième film, d'après la productrice Amy Pascal. [Lire la suite]

Abonnez-vous à notre chaîne YouTube pour ne manquer aucune vidéo !

L'article Il y aura une autre nouvelle trilogie Spider-Man après No Way Home (et avec Tom Holland) est apparu en premier sur Numerama.

Les grands principes de la reconnaissance faciale : fonctionnement et sécurité

29 novembre 2021 à 10:46
Par : UnderNews

La reconnaissance faciale consiste à identifier une personne au moyen d’une image ou d’une vidéo de son visage. La technologie recueille un ensemble de données biométriques uniques pour identifier, vérifier ou authentifier une personne. Contrairement à d’autres solutions d’identification telles que les mots de passe, la vérification e-mail ou l’identification des empreintes digitales, la reconnaissance faciale biométrique utilise des modèles mathématiques et dynamiques qui positionnent ce système comme l’un des plus sûrs.

The post Les grands principes de la reconnaissance faciale : fonctionnement et sécurité first appeared on UnderNews.

Récursion de Blake Crouch : un polar SF qui retourne le cerveau, mais avec du cœur

28 novembre 2021 à 19:38

Après l'excellent Dark Matter, Blake Crouch réussit à nouveau, avec Récursion, un tour de passe-passe littéraire : nous triturer les méninges avec tendresse. Entre science-fiction et polar, voilà un roman qui vous fera passer un très bon moment de lecture. [Lire la suite]

Voitures, vélos, scooters... : la mobilité de demain se lit sur Vroom ! https://www.numerama.com/vroom/vroom//

L'article Récursion de Blake Crouch : un polar SF qui retourne le cerveau, mais avec du cœur est apparu en premier sur Numerama.

Sauriez-vous dire lequel de ces 2 visages a été généré par une IA ?

28 novembre 2021 à 15:09

Le site Which Face Is Real propose de jouer à un jeu particulier : réussir à différencier les visages humains de visages inventés par une intelligence artificielle. Et c'est plus difficile que cela en a l'air. [Lire la suite]

Voitures, vélos, scooters... : la mobilité de demain se lit sur Vroom ! https://www.numerama.com/vroom/vroom//

L'article Sauriez-vous dire lequel de ces 2 visages a été généré par une IA ? est apparu en premier sur Numerama.

Football : après la VAR, de l’IA pour détecter les hors-jeu ?

26 novembre 2021 à 18:03

football

La Coupe du monde de football au Qatar en 2022 pourrait être le théâtre d'un petit bouleversement, avec l'arrivée d'algorithmes et de caméras pour repérer les situations de hors-jeu. [Lire la suite]

Voitures, vélos, scooters... : la mobilité de demain se lit sur Vroom ! https://www.numerama.com/vroom/vroom//

L'article Football : après la VAR, de l’IA pour détecter les hors-jeu ? est apparu en premier sur Numerama.

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